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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
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Tropical Conservation Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.692
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1940-0829 - ISSN (Online) 1940-0829
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Thanks to Reviewers

    • Abstract: Tropical Conservation Science, Volume 17, Issue , January-December 2024.

      Citation: Tropical Conservation Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T07:25:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19400829241233913
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2024)
       
  • The Role of Public Relations in Wildlife Conservation: Examples From
           Uganda

    • Authors: Simplicious J. Gessa, William Tayeebwa, Charles Tumwesigye, Jessica M. Rothman
      Abstract: Tropical Conservation Science, Volume 17, Issue , January-December 2024.
      Within developing countries, awareness efforts that promote wildlife conservation are not only important to engage communities neighboring wildlife habitats, but they are also critical nationally because urban dwellers are not usually exposed to wildlife. Here, we suggest that media and public relations professionals can promote domestic tourism activities, and engage communities in ways that will encourage the public to protect wildlife. We outline examples of successful ongoing initiatives we have used that stem from the principles of strategic communication to promote wildlife conservation in Uganda. First, tours with journalists, celebrities, and politicians have been launched to support awareness of wildlife and their economic value to the country. These initiatives highlight protected areas to the mainstream media and encourage domestic tourism. Second, parades around the country, intramural sports teams, as well as public lectures, community and school events are held to mobilize additional conservation awareness. Lastly, we discuss the role of strategic communication through media frames by the national newspapers in promoting the importance of wildlife conservation. These initiatives have likely led to the demonstrated increase in domestic tourism to national parks over the past decade and increase in support for wildlife by the Ugandan public.
      Citation: Tropical Conservation Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T08:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19400829241233471
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2024)
       
  • Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Bees in Traditional Agroecosystems
           and Tropical Forest Patches on the Yucatan Peninsula

    • Authors: Laura P. Serralta-Batun, Juan J. Jiménez-Osornio, Virginia Meléndez-Ramírez, Miguel A. Munguía-Rosas
      Abstract: Tropical Conservation Science, Volume 17, Issue , January-December 2024.
      Background and Research Objectives: Habitat matrices of intensive agricultural use are generally inhospitable to native bees in fragmented forests. However, in some tropical regions of the world, agricultural landscapes are dominated by traditional agroecosystems, which harbor high plant diversity and are subject to low-intensity management. These agroecosystems can therefore provide suitable habitats and important floral resources for the bee community. The objective of this study was to compare the taxonomic and functional diversity of bees in traditional agroecosystems and forest patches within an agricultural landscape of the Yucatan Peninsula. Methods: Sampling was conducted in two traditional agroecosystems (homegardens and a rainfed polyculture known as milpa) and forest patches as a control (N= 24 sites in total. Hereafter: habitats), using two complementary sampling techniques: pan traps and a sweep net. Taxonomic and functional diversity metrics were calculated and compared among habitats. Results: The three habitats were generally similar in terms of taxonomic and functional diversity. Differences were only detected among habitats in the inverse of Simpson’s diversity index and number of functional groups (functional entities), with higher values in the agroecosystems than in the forest. Conclusion: Taxonomic and functional diversity was similar in the traditional agroecosystems and forest patches, suggesting that these agroecosystems can provide temporal adequate resources for most bee functional groups and that movement of bees is possible among these habitats. Conservation Implications: Maintenance of low-intensity management practices and high (agro)biodiversity found in traditional agroecosystems is crucial for the conservation of native bees. It is therefore important to incorporate these systems into management strategies at the landscape level. Since traditional agroecosystems and forests have different land tenure systems (government, private, and communal), conservation strategies at this level require the involvement of different sectors of society.
      Citation: Tropical Conservation Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T09:08:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19400829231225428
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2024)
       
  • Our Hungry Neighbor: Self-Reported Data from Farmers’ Perspective on
           Tapanuli Orangutans in the Batang Toru Forest, Indonesia

    • Authors: Hamid Arrum Harahap, Yonariza, Simone Maynard, Endrizal Ridwan, Yuerlita
      Abstract: Tropical Conservation Science, Volume 17, Issue , January-December 2024.
      Background and Research AimsHuman-orangutan conflicts are a growing problem in the tropical rainforests of Sumatra. Habitat degradation and fragmentation can drive orangutans to move on to agroforestry plantations and into conflict with farmers. This research examines farmers’ awareness of the roles that Tapanuli orangutans play, their attitudes towards orangutans when they come on their land and the broader political-economic factors which influence interactions between smallholders and orangutans.MethodsWe used a mixed methods approach of quantitative surveys with 275 farmers and qualitative in-depth interviews with 22 key informants from 11 villages on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia.ResultsWe found that while many farmers had negative encounters with orangutans eating their crops, their responses differed. Some tolerated the orangutans; others chased them away. The difference stemmed from cultural beliefs about orangutans and their relationship to humans. Some communities hold them as neighbours, others fear them, but in both cases would not harm them. Most farmers do not perceive them as significant threats but as hunger-driven neighbours. Rather than blaming the orang-utans per se, they argue that habitat loss caused by expanding extractive activities is the driving factor of this conflict. They want to see limits on the expansion of extractive industry, alternative income sources and compensation for their orangutan losses.ConclusionThe study concludes by highlighting five aspects that need consideration for reducing human-orangutan conflicts and with a broader discussion on the need to include the socio-cultural context of the human populations in conservation initiatives.Implications for ConservationThe study underscores the imperative of integrating local farmers’ perspectives in conserving critically endangered Tapanuli orangutans. It advocates coexistence through crop loss mitigation, deforestation prevention, and compensation strategies, emphasizing the need for holistic, sustainable conservation measures encompassing ecological, social, and economic facets within the region.
      Citation: Tropical Conservation Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T07:37:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19400829241226932
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2024)
       
  • Soil Quality Indicators in Peasant Agroecosystems in Paraíba State,
           Brazil

    • Authors: David Marx Antunes de Melo, Aldrin Martin Pérez-Marin, Alexandre Eduardo de Araújo, Manoel Rivelino Gomes de Oliveira, Rodrigo Santana Macedo, Silvania Maria Souza Gomes do Nascimento
      Abstract: Tropical Conservation Science, Volume 17, Issue , January-December 2024.
      Background and Research Aims: Soil quality (SQ) is the basis for the Sustainability of Peasant Farming Systems (PFS). We hypothesized that different land uses modify soil quality through changes that can be analyzed by determining the Soil Quality Index (SQI).Methods: Soil samples were collected from the 0-20 cm layer in five subsystems of peasant agroecosystems located in the municipalities of Solânea (A), Casserengue (B), and Serraria (C). SQI was calculated using non-linear scoring, while a principal component analysis was performed using all data (bulk and particle density, total porosity, particle size, pH, macronutrients, and soil organic carbon) to determine a Minimum Data Set (MDS).Results: The MDS composed of P available, Ca+2, Al+3, sand, silt, H+Al, base saturation (BS%), and the aluminum saturation (AS%) indicate that these parameters can serve as indicators for soil quality assessment in peasant agroecosystems. Sand and silt are related to pedogenic processes and parent material, while the remaining indicators reflect management practices. Land conversion from forest to cropland decreased nutrient availability and soil organic matter in agroecosystems A (Arenosol) and B (Luvisol) and increased the cation exchange capacity in agroecosystem C (Lixisol).Conclusions: All agroecosystems showed low SQI values, highlighting the need to expand conservation practices in the studied agricultural subsystems, especially regarding the increase of soil organic matter. Our results contribute to improving the use and management of soils and the vulnerability assessment in peasant farming, an essential requirement for the sustainability of agroecosystems.Implications for Conservation: Our results also demonstrated that agroforestry practices can significantly increase soil quality and soil carbon sequestration, a viable alternative for maintaining organic matter in areas susceptible to degradation.
      Citation: Tropical Conservation Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T01:28:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/19400829231215492
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
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