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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 195)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 100)
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Intervención     Open Access  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Sustainability     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1856-0315
Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [261 journals]
  • Effects of Thinning Regimes on Growth and Yield of Tectona grandis at
           Longuza Forest Plantation, Muheza District, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: O.S. Mgoo, J.N. Mwambusi, S.A.O. Chamshama
      Pages: 1 - 26
      Abstract: Thinning regime implies stands thinned at successive intervals, type, and intensity influencing growth and yield. Teak Forests in Tanzania are the main source of hardwood raw materials however thinning operations are not properly implemented. The purpose of this study was to determine whether thinned stands could impair the eventual projected growth and yield. Growth and yield data were collected from 168 purposively selected circular plots of radius 9.78 m distributed systematically in 9 thinned compartments in three thinning regimes. Thinning history, tree diameter, and total height of three fattest trees were recorded. Simple t-test was used to compare whether thinned stands were significantly different from Teak yield table values in Dbh, volume, and stocking. Results show that 88.9% and 11.1% of thinned compartments were understocked and well stocked respectively based on the Teak yield table. Also, 100% and 75% of first and second thinnings respectively were well timed whereas 25% of second thinning was delayed. Among surveyed compartments, 66.7% and 33.3% belong to site classes I and II respectively. Effects of adequate and timely thinning on Dbh and volume were 2-42% and 9-53% respectively. Thinning and timing promoted positively Dbh and Volume growth. Adequate and timely thinning treatments are recommended
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Foraging in a 3-D world: The Influence of Body Size and Sex on Vertical
           and horizontal foraging Behaviour of Yellow Baboons

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: A.S. Kitegile, S.N. Hassan
      Pages: 27 - 42
      Abstract: Foraging is among complex animal behaviours, which involve making decisions on what and where to forage, so as to maximize nutritional gain and reduce predation risk. In ungulates, it is known to also be influenced by sexual size dimorphism, however, this is not clear in sexually size dimorphic yellow baboon. Using focal animal sampling techniques, we collected data from habituated troops of yellow baboons to test whether body size and/or sex has influence on their use of vertical and horizontal strata when foraging. Results showed that, yellow baboons foraged more frequently on the ground up to 1 m than beyond this height. However, adult females foraged on the ground significantly more frequently than adult and subadult males. While, adult and subadult males used higher canopy beyond 2 m, more frequently than adult females. Moreover, adult females and subadult males foraged more frequently at the troop centre than adult males. This study concludes that sex and to some extent body size significantly influence foraging decisions of yellow baboon in the use of vertical and horizontal strata. Detailed understanding of spacing behaviour of baboons is recommended as it is important towards better understanding of their complex social life.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Morphological Variation and Interrelationship among Traits of African
           Walnut (Plukenetia Conophora Mull Arg.) Accessions from Nigeria

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: J.O. Amadi, V.I. Alaje, F.F. Adegoke, O.F. Oyedeji, G.A. Adebusuyi
      Pages: 43 - 53
      Abstract: Plukenetia conophora is a woody climber with high demand for food, raw material, medicine and income generation but has not been improved upon. Therefore, this study was conducted with the aim of evaluating its variability and character association. Seven accessions sown directly into polythene bags filled with top soil were laid out in a completely randomized design in five replications. Data on height, collar diameter, number of leaves, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight, root dry weight, biomass and leaf area were subjected to Analysis of Variance and Principal component analysis. For most of the traits, there were significant differences among the accessions indicating variations among the accessions. The first three axes accounted for 79.5% of the overall variations. Clustering analysis grouped the seven accessions into three clusters. Members of cluster one which had the highest biomass and leaf area could serve as genes for parental lines that might be used in hybridization programs to improve this species. A positive significant correlation existed between leaf area and biomass as well as leaf dry weight. This therefore will facilitate the selection of promising phenotypes. This result will constitute a database for the improvement of Walnut.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Essence of Wildlife Crimes and Associated Effects on Wild Animals’
           Protection in Tanzania – Legal Perspective

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: M. Boniphace
      Pages: 54 - 65
      Abstract: Conservation challenges have surfaced in Tanzania for decades. Several researches have revealed the causes, each research taking own perspective. This article discusses conservation challenges in legal perspective. The article reveals the manner crimes against wildlife initiate human induced wildlife conflicts, but humans have legal ambits to justify their actions. The article uncovers several acts the law permits whilst the same are triggering misery over wildlife.  The article discovers environmental crimes posed by humans’ development demands. Yet, humans refuse to acknowledge the situation and camouflage in attributing their ill actions to wildlife by twisting the situation as “human-wildlife conflicts”. The article recommends that, it is technically improper to capacitating wildlife to commit crimes.  Particularly, wildlife are the victims of unjust and pre-meditated human actions. In this review, content and thematic analysis used to interpret an in-depth aspects of wildlife law(s). It is concluded that, whilst the law recognizes wildlife in two facets; wild animals and their habitats, and requires the protection of both, there are human-wildlife common interests which the law has not been able to safeguard inter se and thus trigger crimes against wildlife. There is need for suitable laws in the wildlife sector to safeguard wildlife.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Vegetation Cover Changes due to Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in
           Bukombe-Mbogwe Forest Reserve in Geita Region, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: P. Pancrace, R.J. Salanga, M.C.S. Lalika
      Pages: 66 - 82
      Abstract: Bukombe-Mbogwe Forest Reserve (BMFR) has substantially lost its vegetation cover following Artisanal and Small-scale Gold Mining (ASGM). The study aimed at examining vegetation cover changes in BMFR and surrounding villages due to ASGM in Mbogwe District. Purposive and random sampling were employed obtaining 138 respondents. Data was collected through remote sensing, participant observation, questionnaire survey, key informant interviews and focus group discussions. Landsat images of three window periods (1984, 2002 and 2020) were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and supervised classification of Maximum Likelihood (ML) algorithm techniques respectively. Descriptive and content analysis were conducted for quantitative and qualitative socio-economic data respectively.  By using NDVI technique, median values decreased in BMFR from 0.57 (dense vegetation) to 0.34 (shrubs and grasslands). Land use/cover changes (LULCC) for 1984 to 2020 proved that there was decrease in dense vegetation from 46.4% to 25.62%, bare-land from 43.23% to 20.06% and increase in sparse vegetation from 9.4% to 46.86% and built-up land from 0.97% to 7.46%. Logs for pit construction were extracted from BMFR by 67.5%. Therefore; ASGM has negatively changed vegetation cover in BMFR and surrounding villages. The paper recommends increasing protection in BMFR by employing Joint Forest Management (JFM).
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Resource Use Efficiency in Beekeeping Using Modern Beehives: A Case of
           Sikonge District, Tabora - Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: M.M. Wawa, L.P. Lusambo, G.E. Mbeyale
      Pages: 83 - 93
      Abstract: This study revealed detailed information concerning resource use efficiencies using modern beehives essential in planning to improve yield and profit of beekeeping in Sikonge District. Choices made by a beekeeper to use what and how much resources in beekeeping vary among beekeepers basing on availability of the resource itself. This study analysed the resource use efficiency in beekeeping activities in Sikonge District. The specific objective for this study was to evaluate resource use efficiency of beekeeping using modern beehives. Data was collected by semi-structured questionnaire, key informants’ interview, focus group discussion and direct field observation. This study was done in four wards; Chabutwa, Tutuo, Kipanga and Kiloleli. The wards were randomly selected out of the 15 wards of Sikonge District. Descriptive statistics were obtained using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) computer programme as analytical tool. Results revealed that the number of beehives and number of man-days for hired labour were underutilised with resource use efficiency coefficient (r) values of 1.5 and 121 respectively while family labour man-days were over utilised (r = -91.82). It is recommended that beekeepers in Sikonge utilize the available resources optimally to maximize yield and profit of their beekeeping activities.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Soil Organic Carbon and Emission Factors for Different Land Cover Classes
           in Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: E.W. Mauya, B.H. Massawe, S. Madundo, D. Shirima, E. Zahabu
      Pages: 94 - 105
      Abstract: Quantification of carbon stock and development of country-specific emission factors in relation to the Agriculture, Forestry, and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sector has the potential to improve national greenhouse gas inventory systems. This study was therefore, conducted to quantify soil organic carbon (SOC) and develop emission factors using the national forest inventory data of Tanzania. The results, showed that, the mean SOC for the different land cover subclasses ranged from 31.23 Mg C /ha to 99.8 Mg C /ha. The lowest value being recorded in the bushland thicket and highest value in the forest humid mountains. Spatial interpolation map indicated that, large areas in the central part had low values of SOC, ranging from 0-53Mg C/ha. The SOC for the primary land cover classes were 37.32 Mg C/ha, 43.44 Mg C/ha, 39.68 Mg C/ha for forest, non-non forest and wetlands respectively. Their correspondingly annual emission factors were, 3.56 Mg CO2/ha/yr, 4.14 Mg CO2/ha/yr, and 3.78 Mg CO2/ha/yr, respectively. The values presented in this paper correspond to IPCC tier 2 and can be used for estimation of carbon emission at the national scale for the respective major primary land cover classes.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Wildlife Poaching practices in Tanzania’s Ruaha Landscape
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: H.T. Mrosso, R.P. Kicheleri, J.J. Kashaigili, P.K.T. Munishi, R.M. Kadigi, C.P. Mgeni, M.H. Kimaro
      Pages: 106 - 119
      Abstract: Throughout the world, millions of wild species and products are illegally collected, used, traded and exported. Tanzania's Ruaha landscape is considered a critical area for biodiversity, as well as an area where poaching exists. Despite the area being rich in abundance and diversity of wildlife, in-depth analysis of wildlife species hunted most and the methods used by poachers is lacking. This study assessed the most hunted wildlife species, extracted products and uses, and associations between wildlife products, hunting methods, and ethnic groups. Data was collected by utilizing the snowball technique after 123 poachers were given a semi-structured questionnaire in villages near the Ruaha National Park. Among the most hunted species are did-dik, impala, kudu, lion, buffalo, and elephants. Bushmeat, skin, claws, ivory, and fat were the most harvested wildlife products. 60 % of wildlife products used for food and source of income, and the methods used for illegal hunting were domestic dogs, spears, snares, and torches. The findings are critical for understanding the link between the most poached species, products, and methods used in relation to ethnic groups in the Ruaha landscape. Increased anti-poaching patrols and wildlife conservation awareness could help reduce the dependence of local communities on wildlife products.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Assessment of Forest Cover Change under Different Forest Tenure Regimes in
           Ngitili Management Systems in Meatu District, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: B.J. Manyanda, J.J. Kashaigili
      Pages: 120 - 131
      Abstract: Deforestation and forest degradation are tied to a complex array of socioeconomic and political factors. Quantifying the amount of forest is key to ensure that appropriate management practices and policies are in place to combat deforestation and forest degradation. Despite the fact that forestland tenure changes from private and communal to state ownership occurred in Ngitili management systems in Meatu district Tanzania, little has been done to evaluate its impacts on forest cover. The objective of this study was to assess the forest cover changes under different tenure regimes in Ngitili management system.  Landsat imagery of 1986 and 2000 were used in this study and data were analyzed using QGIS software. Results show that open land, grassland, bushland and open forest were the dominant forest classes under private and communal tenure regime while semi closed forest dominated most of the Ngitili area under the state tenure regime. The study concludes by supporting the alternative hypothesis that, forest land tenure changes have significant impacts on forest cover. The study recommends that, a study is needed to assess the impact of devolution which occurred in 2002 on forest cover change.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The Roles of Socioeconomic, Social Capital, Households and Community
           Benefits on Participation in Conservation-Related Activities: A Case Study
           of Old Oyo National Park, Nigeria

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: K.O. Ogunjinmi, A.A. Ogunjinmi, O.O. Odefadehan, O.O. Odentun, M.O. Omunna
      Pages: 132 - 150
      Abstract: Stakeholders’ participation in wildlife protection is viewed as one of the antidotes to successful nature conservation. The study assessed the influence of socioeconomic, social capital, households and communities’ benefits on participation in conservation related activities in Old Oyo National Park, Nigeria.  A multistage and random sampling technique was adopted for the selection of communities and households. The sample size was 302 household heads or their representatives drawn at random from 29 selected support zone communities of the Park. Data were obtained with the use of questionnaire. Data obtained were presented and analysed using descriptive statistics while hypotheses were tested using Chi-square, Pearson Correlation, and Logistic regression analyses. Results revealed that length of residency (p < 0.01) had the greatest impact on households' conservation engagement among the socioeconomic variables. Involvement in a work project with neighbours and others in the community (p < 0.01) had the greatest impact on participation. Provision of animal husbandry training and boreholes were the benefits that impacted most on household and community participation in conservation (p < 0.01), respectively. Government and conservation agencies should utilise community characteristics, social capital, and provision of more households and community benefits to enhance participation in conservation activities in the park.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A New Diet on the Menu: Yellow Baboon Foraging on Cassod Tree (Senna
           siamea), A Trypsin Inhibitor Legume

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: A.S. Kitegile
      Pages: 151 - 162
      Abstract: Cassod (Senna Siamea) which belongs to the family Fabaceae is the fast-growing leguminous tree with prolific seed production. The tree contains trypsin inhibitor proteins which are potentially deleterious to monogastric animals.  Feeding behaviour of yellow baboons has been extensively studied in the savannah environment of East Africa. However, none of the study has reported on yellow baboon foraging on Senna siamea, this is the first study reporting on its consumption by yellow baboons in East Africa. We used focal animal sampling to collect data on yellow baboons’ consumption of Senna siamea. Finding from the study indicated that, seeds were the only food parts consumed by yellow baboons from Senna siamea; and they were consumed more in the late dry season and never in the wet season. Seeds were consumed either unprocessed or processed by removing the seed coat. Consumption of proceed seeds were done more by adult females and sub adult males (small bodied individuals) than adult males. It is considered that the climatic changes witnessed around the globe might have provided baboons with wider food choices options and adaptation. Therefore, more studies on baboons’ dietary choices are important for the understanding of their complex ecological adaptations.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Vegetation Characteristics and Deforestation at Two Mangrove Ecosystems
           Subjected to Varying Anthropogenic Influences: Case of Mtoni and Dege, Dar
           es Salaam, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: F.Y. Mahenge
      Pages: 163 - 177
      Abstract: Mangrove ecosystems are subject to over-exploitation, pollution, and conversion to other land uses from anthropogenic pressures. To understand the way different mangrove species, respond to the anthropogenic impacts, Mtoni and Dege mangrove ecosystems, with varying degradation levels were compared on vegetation characteristics, deforestation, and abiotic variables. The study adopted the line transect permanent plots method. In each sampling plot, mangrove vegetation characteristics and selected abiotic variables were assessed. Mangrove vegetation characteristics were tested using an independent t-test and a special t-test. Mangrove species diversity was calculated using Shannon-Wiener Index. Relationships of variables were tested using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients. Findings showed that Mtoni had higher mangrove species diversity, richness, and evenness than Dege. Dege showed significantly higher mangrove density, basal area, and regeneration than Mtoni. Stump density was significantly higher at Mtoni than at Dege. In Mtoni, the basal area was significantly negative correlated with both salinity and organic matter. In Dege, basal area and salinity were significantly positive correlated. There was high mangrove degradation at Mtoni compared to Dege. It is recommended that participatory conservation and management interventions be undertaken. Mere protection from further exploitation is sufficient for Dege, while active restoration is recommended for Mtoni.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Diet Composition and Niche Overlap of Four Sympatric Rodent Species
           Inhabiting Mount Rungwe Forest Nature Reserve, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: U. Richard, R.M. Byamungu, F. Magige
      Pages: 178 - 192
      Abstract: Understanding animal feeding behaviour is key in determining coexistence mechanisms which are vital for conservation and management. The coexistence mechanisms of sympatric species in mount Rungwe are unknown. From 2020 to 2021 a study on the dietary contribution, overlap and niche breadth of four rodents in Mount Rungwe Forest Nature Reserve was conducted. Random sampling was employed with the removal method, whereby captured rodents’ stomachs were removed and their contents analyzed. Dietary contribution, overlap and niche breadth were calculated. All species consume diverse food resources and categories where Beamys hindei had a significantly high number of seeds/grains while Grammomys dolichurus and Lophuromys machangui contained a significantly higher number of invertebrates. Narrow niche breadth was observed for G. dolichurus while Praomys delectorum, L. machangui, and B. hindei had a moderate niche breadth but the dietary overlap was high in all four species.  Our results conclude that L. machangui, P. delectorum, and B. hindei can coexist without competition as they have >0.5 niche breadth and high overlap, while G. dolichurus might experience competition because of low niche breadth and food diversity. Further investigation regarding seasonal diet partitioning and micro identification of food items is recommended
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Napier (Penisetum purpureum) Agronomic Response Under Desmodium (Desmodium
           intortum) Influence at Ubiri village Lushoto District, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: C.S. Lissu, L.L. Lulandala, B.J. Manyanda, T.B. Tsere, I.H. Babili
      Pages: 193 - 201
      Abstract: The scarcity of high-quality forage to animals is one of the major limiting factors to dairy productivity improvement in Lushoto District. This is attributed to soil fertility losses due to soil erosion, deforestation and the decrease or abandonment of the use of mineral fertilizer. The objective of the present study was to assess the Napier Agronomic response under Desmodium influence for dairy producers in Ubiri Village, Lushoto District. Two treatments were used; Desmodium and number of harvests established using Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications. Data collected included counting the number of tillers per bunch, measuring the height of tillers (m), leaf area indices and biomass yield (tha-1) in each treatment in their respective replications. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance in R software. The results show that, during the third harvest (28 weeks) Desmodium significantly (P<0.05) increased the tiller number, leaf area index (LAI) and the biomass yield (tha-1) of the grasses by 41%, 76%, and 73% respectively. It was concluded that, Desmodium had positive influence on the agronomic performance of hybrid Napier grass. For sustainable provision of benefits to livestock keepers, we recommend that, integration of forage crops and Desmodium should be promoted.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Effects of Thinning on Growth, Yield and Stem Quality of Pinus patula at
           Sao Hill Forest Plantation, Mufindi District, Tanzania

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: P.C. Nguyeje, S.A.O. Chamshama, W.A. Mugasha
      Pages: 202 - 213
      Abstract: Pinus patula is one of the most important plantation species grown in Eastern and Southern Africa. Its growth rate and yield vary considerably depending on site conditions, management techniques and genetic quality of the trees. It has been suspected that thinning of softwood plantations in Tanzania has been neglected resulting in lower standing volume being distributed into many small trees of poor form. This study assessed the effects of thinning on growth, yield and stem quality of Pinus patula at Sao Hill Forest Plantation located in Southern Highland part of Tanzania. In a systematically established plots; diameter of all trees, a total height of three trees and stem quality of four classes were recorded. An independent t-test was used to test for significant difference in stand parameters and Mann-Whitney U test was used to test stem quality between thinned and unthinned stand. Results showed that thinning significantly increased growth and yield of Pinus patula. Thinning improves stem quality by 9% resulting in trees having straight and good stem form. Thinned stands yielded higher volume than unthinned stands. Therefore, this study recommends that pine plantations should be timely thinned as per used thinning schedule to ensure that more volume is attained.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Assessment of Factors Moderating Community Attitudes Towards Wildlife
           Tourism and Conservation: A Case of Ikona and Makao Wildlife Management
           Areas

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: J.T. Mgonja, D.N. Uswege
      Pages: 214 - 233
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess community attitudes towards the impacts of wildlife tourism and conservation interventions in Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) to community livelihoods. The study used Ikona and Makao Wildlife Management Areas as a case study. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October to November 2018 using a semi-structured questionnaire. A total of 559 randomly sampled respondents were interviewed. Data were analysed using SPSS General Linear Model-Univariate. The findings revealed that Social Economic Status (SES) of the respondents significantly influenced respondents’ attitudes while gender and origin of the respondents marginally influenced their attitudes. Majority of the respondents accept WMA in their villages though are not satisfied with the benefits accrued from WMA. Most of the respondents mentioned crops damage and livestock depredation as major factors undermining their attitudes towards WMAs. The study provides empirical evidence that without local communities realizing direct and tangible benefits, it will be difficult to associate conservation and livelihood improvement, a condition that undermines wildlife conservation. The study recommends WMAs authorities to find sustainable solutions to crops damage and livestock depredation problem. The study also recommends introduction of wildlife conservation to schools to create and increase awareness among youths from childhood stage.
      PubDate: 2022-10-03
      DOI: 10.4314/tjfnc.v91i2.
      Issue No: Vol. 91, No. 2 (2022)
       
 
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