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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
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Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.874
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1035-3712 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5494
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Wildlife Research turns 50

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      Authors: Andrea C. Taylor, Aaron J. Wirsing
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Andrea C. Taylor, Aaron J. Wirsing - Volume 50(1)
      Environmental context. High-quality ecotoxicology data are required to derive reliable water quality guideline values that ensure long-term protection of marine biota from arsenate. Tropical and temperate marine biota have sensitivity to arsenate covering three to four orders of magnitude due to the range of arsenate detoxification mechanisms used to reduce toxicity. The water quality guideline values derived in this study will contribute to robust risk assessments of arsenate in marine environments.

      Citation: Wildlife Research - Volume 50(1)
      PubDate: 2023-01-19
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22191
      Issue No: Vol. 50, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Remote sensing shows south-east Queensland koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)
           prefer areas of higher tree canopy height within their home ranges

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      Authors: Dave L. Mitchell, Mariela Soto-Berelov, Simon D. Jones
      Abstract: Dave L. Mitchell, Mariela Soto-Berelov, Simon D. Jones

      Home range studies have the potential to provide valuable information about faunal habitat use. Previous research has shown that koalas prefer taller individual trees at the plot scale, so we investigated whether this preference extends across areas of higher forest canopy within home ranges. We approached this task by comparing resource availability within core and non-core home range components, and found that core home ranges have a significantly higher proportion of the highest canopy class than non-core areas. Canopy height classes can be displayed on a map to provide useful information to aid habitat management. Photograph by Rafael Ben-Ari.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22093
       
  • Stable dingo population structure and purity over 11 years of lethal
           management

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      Authors: Danielle Stephens, Malcolm S. Kennedy, Tracey L. Kreplins
      Abstract: Danielle Stephens, Malcolm S. Kennedy, Tracey L. Kreplins

      Our understanding of anthropogenic impacts on vertebrates can be improved by longitudinal research. Here we have examined population genetics of Australian dingoes over 11 years and across a large mixed-use study area. We found no evidence that the dingo population demographics or introgression had changed over the study period, but we did find genetic heterogeneity within the study area, particularly associated with areas of land-use changes and barrier fencing. Photograph by DPIRD WA.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22110
       
  • Factors influencing the activity ranges of feral pigs (Sus scrofa) across
           four sites in eastern Australia

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      Authors: Cameron Wilson, Matthew Gentle, Darren Marshall
      Abstract: Cameron Wilson, Matthew Gentle, Darren Marshall

      Understanding how feral pigs utilise their environments is an important aspect of both exotic disease modelling and pest management programs. This study aimed to investigate the influence of various ecological factors on range size and test selection of habitat. We found that range size was significantly influenced by sex, site and body mass and that feral pigs demonstrated a preference for habitat between 20% and 40% canopy cover. These findings could generate efficiencies in pest management and refinement in feral pig distribution modelling. Photograph by Nicky Webb..

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22095
       
  • Effects of helicopter net gunning on the survival and movement behaviour
           of nilgai antelope

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      Authors: Jeremy A. Baumgardt, Aaron M. Foley, Kathryn M. Sliwa, Randy W. DeYoung, J. Alfonso Ortega-S., David G. Hewitt, Tyler A. Campbell, John A. Goolsby, Kim H. Lohmeyer
      Abstract: Jeremy A. Baumgardt, Aaron M. Foley, Kathryn M. Sliwa, Randy W. DeYoung, J. Alfonso Ortega-S., David G. Hewitt, Tyler A. Campbell, John A. Goolsby, Kim H. Lohmeyer

      Net-gunning from a helicopter is a common method of capture for many ungulates&#x003B; however, impacts of this method on survival and movement patterns have not been assessed for nilgai antelope. This study estimated survival following capture by using data from three projects and compared movement patterns 1 month before capture with those 1 month after capture for a subset of collared nilgai. We recommend capturing nilgai with this method and make recommendations on censoring post-capture movement data according to the type of analysis. Photograph by Kathryn M. Sliwa.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-12
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22049
       
  • Controlling feral ruminants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions: a case
           study of buffalo in northern Australia

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      Authors: Hugh F. Davies, Brett P. Murphy, Clément Duvert, Georgina Neave
      Abstract: Hugh F. Davies, Brett P. Murphy, Clément Duvert, Georgina Neave

      The bourgeoning carbon economy is creating novel ways to incentivise conservation management activities that have the co-benefits of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and social inequality. We investigated the monetary value of carbon credits that landowners could generate by reducing ecologically destructive feral populations of the Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in northern Australia. We demonstrate that the management of feral ruminants could be incentivised by the generation of carbon credits, with the potential to simultaneously avoid GHG emissions, generate income for landowners and offer significant ecological benefits. Photograph by Jaime Heiniger.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-05
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22134
       
  • Do we need to mine social media data to detect exotic vertebrate-pest
           introductions'

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      Authors: Peter Caley, Phillip Cassey
      Abstract: Peter Caley, Phillip Cassey

      We explored whether data mining of social media via image recognition and/or natural language processing could improve on the surveillance provided by citizens for the detection of invasive alien species. We found that for most alien vertebrate groups, the existing voluntary reporting mechanism appears to be already reasonably effective. We argue that mining citizens social media data for evidence of invasive alien species needs to demonstrate not only that it will be an improvement on the business as usual case, but also that gains achieved cannot be achieved by alternative approaches. Photograph by Peter Caley.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22116
       
  • Bird community structure and habitat association in Owabi Wildlife
           Sanctuary, Ashanti Region (Ghana)

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      Authors: Collins Ayine Nsor, Nana Afua Ankomah Dei, John Mensah Nkrumah, Rockson Acolatse, Emmanuel Danquah
      Abstract: Collins Ayine Nsor, Nana Afua Ankomah Dei, John Mensah Nkrumah, Rockson Acolatse, Emmanuel Danquah

      Global bird population decline has led to renewed interest in bird–habitat selection studies. This study, which aimed at assessing bird habitat preference, found the farmlands and built-up as the most preferred habitats, whereas the open water was the least preferred. The forest reserve was the most diverse, owing to food availability and less disturbance. The findings highlighted the need to incorporate habitat demographic information into conservation planning and management. Photograph by Rockson Acolatse.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21148
       
  • ‘It’s a people problem, not a goat problem.’
           Mitigating human–mountain goat interactions in a Canadian
           Provincial Park

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      Authors: Josie V. Vayro, Emalee A. Vandermale, Courtney W. Mason
      Abstract: Josie V. Vayro, Emalee A. Vandermale, Courtney W. Mason

      As visitation to parks and protected areas increases, the risk of negative interactions between humans and wildlife grows. In this study, we use 2 years of survey and interview data to examine human–mountain goat interactions and current mitigation and management strategies in a British Columbian Provincial Park, Canada. This study adds to existing data relating to mitigating human–wildlife interactions and informs management decisions aimed at addressing potential and existing problems associated with these interactions. Photograph by Claudie Pageau.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-03
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22005
       
  • Avian assemblages are maintained after aerial applications of ULV
           fenitrothion for control of the Australian plague locust (Chortoicetes
           terminifera (Walker)) in arid and semiarid agroecosystems

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      Authors: Paul Story, Kris French
      Abstract: Paul Story, Kris French

      Avian assemblages were surveyed using a transect-point method before and after aerial applications of an organophosphorous insecticide, fenitrothion, for locust control. No pesticide-related differences in assemblages were detected between sprayed and unsprayed sites using multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) analysis techniques. Although sublethal impacts on individuals have been identified in previous research, landscape-level changes in Australian avian assemblages resulting from single fenitrothion applications appear unlikely, provided spraying protocols remain unchanged. Photograph by Wim C. Mullié.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-03
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22065
       
  • Implications of habitat overlap between giant panda and sambar for
           sympatric multi-species conservation

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      Authors: Wenke Bai, Jindong Zhang, Ke He, Shanshan Zhao, Xiaodong Gu, Jie Hu, Melissa Songer, Caiquan Zhou, Xin Dong, Qiongyu Huang
      Abstract: Wenke Bai, Jindong Zhang, Ke He, Shanshan Zhao, Xiaodong Gu, Jie Hu, Melissa Songer, Caiquan Zhou, Xin Dong, Qiongyu Huang

      We analysed overlap in the habitat area and habitat suitability between giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and sambar (Rusa unicolor) to examine potential sympatric species competition. The results indicate that the similarity of habitat requirements between the two species is high. In addition, the competition for space use among populations of the two species could intensify as the sambar population increases. Niche overlap and interspecific competition between sympatric species should be a stronger focus in endangered species conservation. We suggest strengthening the habitat restoration and establishment of corridors for all key species to alleviate the increased competition associated with niche overlap among sympatric species. Photograph by camera trap.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-23
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22018
       
  • Understanding the zoonotic pathogen, Coxiella burnetii in Australian fur
           seal breeding colonies through environmental DNA and genotyping

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      Authors: Brett R. Gardner, John P. Y. Arnould, Jasmin Hufschmid, Rebecca R. McIntosh, Aymeric Fromant, Mythili Tadepalli, John Stenos
      Abstract: Brett R. Gardner, John P. Y. Arnould, Jasmin Hufschmid, Rebecca R. McIntosh, Aymeric Fromant, Mythili Tadepalli, John Stenos

      Infectious diseases such as Q-fever (Coxiella) often contribute to reproductive failure in terrestrial mammals. We investigated whether this pathogen could be detected in the environment and in Australian fur seal placentas by using molecular techniques. Our results indicated that Coxiella burnetii is present in two of the largest breeding colonies and that environmental DNA can be used to survey for infected colonies. Photograph by Hanna Geeson.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-20
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22136
       
  • Eye in the sky: observing wild dingo hunting behaviour using drones

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      Authors: Tahlia I. Pollock, Daniel O. Hunter, David P. Hocking, Alistair R. Evans
      Abstract: Tahlia I. Pollock, Daniel O. Hunter, David P. Hocking, Alistair R. Evans

      The behaviours that dingoes use to capture and kill their prey are highly dynamic and can be challenging to observe directly without disturbance. This study reports a series of direct observations of wild hunting behaviour filmed using cameras attached to either a helicopter or drone. This project contributes to our knowledge of dingo ecology and also acts as a case study highlighting the utility of drones for directly observing dynamic behaviours in the wild. Images by Daniel Hunter and Edward Saltau.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22033
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of volunteer and contract ground-based shooting of
           sambar deer in Australia

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      Authors: Sebastien Comte, Elaine Thomas, Andrew J. Bengsen, Ami Bennett, Naomi E. Davis, Daniel Brown, David M. Forsyth
      Abstract: Sebastien Comte, Elaine Thomas, Andrew J. Bengsen, Ami Bennett, Naomi E. Davis, Daniel Brown, David M. Forsyth

      Ground-based shooting is widely used to reduce the undesirable impacts of deer, but the effectiveness and costs of this technique have seldom been quantified in Australasia. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of volunteer and contract ground-based shooters for controlling sambar deer in a 5-year management program in eastern Australia. Our study showed that the catch per unit effort of contract shooters was four times greater than that of volunteers, but that cost per unit killed was 10.1% greater for contract shooters. Photograph by Parks Victoria.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-12
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22030
       
  • Characterising a unique recreational hunting method: hound hunting of
           sambar deer (Cervus unicolor) in Victoria, Australia

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      Authors: Jordan O. Hampton, Andrew J. Bengsen, Sebastien Comte, Jason S. Flesch, Simon D. Toop, Christopher Davies, David M. Forsyth
      Abstract: Jordan O. Hampton, Andrew J. Bengsen, Sebastien Comte, Jason S. Flesch, Simon D. Toop, Christopher Davies, David M. Forsyth

      We quantified metrics including pursuit distance and duration for 136 sambar deer hunted with hounds in Victoria, Australia, during 2020–2021. Hunts were successful in harvesting a deer in 88% of cases but chase times and distances were long relative to other deer hunting methods. Successful hound hunting requires a network of roads, potentially limiting its usefulness for controlling sambar deer in remote areas. Photograph by Chris Eaton.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22117
       
  • Lion (Panthera leo) diet and cattle depredation on the Kuku Group Ranch
           Pastoralist area in southern Maasailand, Kenya

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      Authors: Iain R. Olivier, Craig J. Tambling, Lana Müller, Frans G. T. Radloff
      Abstract: Iain R. Olivier, Craig J. Tambling, Lana Müller, Frans G. T. Radloff

      Retaliatory killing of lions is a threat to African lion (Panthera leo) populations. Our study took place in the Tsavo–Amboseli ecosystem, Kenya, assessing lion diet and cattle depredation. The most common species consumed by lions were cattle, whereas lag rainfall was an important predictor of cattle depredation. The findings provide opportunities to develop proactive husbandry interventions to reduce cattle depredations. Photograph by Iain Olivier.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-06
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22019
       
  • Livestock depredation by wild carnivores in the highlands of Wolaita zone,
           southern Ethiopia

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      Authors: Yigrem Deneke, Aberham Megaze, Wondimagegnheu Tekalign, Taye Dobamo, Herwig Leirs
      Abstract: Yigrem Deneke, Aberham Megaze, Wondimagegnheu Tekalign, Taye Dobamo, Herwig Leirs

      Livestock depredation by carnivores is a major conservation challenge around the world, causing substantial economic losses of people living around protected areas. This study aimed to assess livestock depredation by carnivore in the highlands of Wolaita, southern Ethiopia, and results showed that most losses occurred mainly during the night-time and dry season. We make recommendations for how to minimise human–carnivore conflicts by adjusting livestock guarding time and seasonality. Photograph by Yigrem Deneke.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-29
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21166
       
  • Irruptive dynamics of the brush-tailed bettong (Bettongia penicillata)
           when reintroduced to a fenced sanctuary with feral cats present

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      Authors: Jeff Short
      Abstract: Jeff Short

      The brush-tailed bettong or woylie is considered ‘Critically Endangered’, despite 50 years of conservation effort. This study follows the establishment, growth and subsequent decline of a translocated population to a fenced sanctuary, but with feral cats being present. Woylies successfully established, overshot their food resources and declined, with predation playing a minor role in limiting growth. Population declines resulting from food shortage induced by irruption and drought are likely to be a common medium-term outcome of unmanaged translocations to predator-free sites. Photograph by Jeff Short.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22063
       
  • Demographics, attitudes and emotions as predictors of support for bear
           management

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      Authors: Jerry J. Vaske, Craig A. Miller, Brent D. Williams, Samantha G. Pallazza, Xiohan Zang
      Abstract: Jerry J. Vaske, Craig A. Miller, Brent D. Williams, Samantha G. Pallazza, Xiohan Zang

      The Illinois Department of Natural Resources was mandated by legislation to develop management plans for American Black Bears. This article examined how Illinois residents’ demographics, emotions, and attitudes were related to support for black bear management strategies (e.g. active reintroduction, natural recolonisation). Both demographic and psychological characteristics were correlated with support for bear management, but these relationships are complex. Photograph by Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21179
       
  • Winter denning behaviour of striped skunks and interspecific den activity
           at their dens: implications for pathogen transmission

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      Authors: Katelyn M. Amspacher, F. Agustín Jiménez, Clayton K. Nielsen
      Abstract: Katelyn M. Amspacher, F. Agustín Jiménez, Clayton K. Nielsen

      Winter denning behaviour of striped skunks is highly variable but may influence interspecific interactions at den sites. Our study assessed winter denning behaviour of striped skunks and interspecific den activity in southern Illinois, USA, and found that dens were visited by numerous mammal species and striped skunk denning was influenced by weather and landscape variables. We highlight how this could influence pathogen transmission, especially across an urban–rural gradient. Photograph by Katelyn Amspacher.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22002
       
  • Evaluation of oral baits and distribution methods for Tasmanian devils
           (Sarcophilus harrisii) †

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      Authors: Sean Dempsey, Ruth J. Pye, Amy T. Gilbert, Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Jennifer M. Moffat, Sarah Benson-Amram, Timothy J. Smyser, Andrew S. Flies
      Abstract: Sean Dempsey, Ruth J. Pye, Amy T. Gilbert, Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Jennifer M. Moffat, Sarah Benson-Amram, Timothy J. Smyser, Andrew S. Flies

      This study aimed to test oral baits as potential vaccine-delivery vehicles for Tasmanian devils. Captive and wild devils consumed placebo versions of commercial baits used on mainland Australia. Abundant non-target species, such as brushtail possums, Tasmanian pademelons, and eastern quolls consumed most baits in the wild. Implementation of automated bait dispensers increased bait uptake by devils to over 50% at the same regional field sites. Photograph by Jennifer M. Moffat.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22070
       
  • Spatial constraints and seasonal conditions but not poaching pressure are
           linked with elevated faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations in
           white rhino

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      Authors: Zoliswa N. Nhleko, Andre Ganswindt, Sam M. Ferreira, Robert A. McCleery
      Abstract: Zoliswa N. Nhleko, Andre Ganswindt, Sam M. Ferreira, Robert A. McCleery

      The conservation of large African mammals in small protected areas might come at a physiological cost. This study investigated the effects of poaching pressure, protected area size (<500 km2), season and rainfall on white rhinos’ physiological condition. We found that elevated adrenocortical activity was associated with smaller protected areas and the dry season. We recommend careful consideration of density of white rhinos and other large mammals in small protected areas. Photograph by Zoliswa N. Nhleko.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22020
       
  • Recounting bias can affect abundance estimates from intensive helicopter
           surveys of feral goats

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      Authors: John P. Tracey, Peter J. S. Fleming
      Abstract: John P. Tracey, Peter J. S. Fleming

      The possibility of recounting animals during helicopter surveys of wildlife is rarely investigated. Using simultaneous ground observers, we investigated the movements of feral goats in response to intensive helicopter surveys. Goats moved away from already flown transects more frequently than towards those transects, which is likely to have resulted in recounting and consequent overestimation of population size. We make design recommendations to overcome this issue. Photograph by Peter Fleming.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22097
       
  • The effect of scent lures on detection is not equitable among sympatric
           species

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      Authors: Marlin M. Dart, Lora B. Perkins, Jonathan A. Jenks, Gary Hatfield, Robert C. Lonsinger
      Abstract: Marlin M. Dart, Lora B. Perkins, Jonathan A. Jenks, Gary Hatfield, Robert C. Lonsinger

      Camera trapping is a popular method for studying wildlife communities and scent lures are often used to improve detection of carnivores without considering the influence on other species. This study evaluated how a scent lure influenced detection of four species across foraging guilds and demonstrated disparate effects on species. We recommend that researchers avoid using scent lures or account for potential variation in their influence on detection for each species when assessing wildlife communities with cameras. Photograph by Marlin M. Dart.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22094
       
  • Translocating captive female white-tailed deer

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      Authors: Jace R. Elliott, Chad H. Newbolt, William D. Gulsby, Stephen S. Ditchkoff
      Abstract: Jace R. Elliott, Chad H. Newbolt, William D. Gulsby, Stephen S. Ditchkoff

      Throughout much of North America, female white-tailed deer are purchased from captive-breeding facilities and released into private shooting preserves&#x003B; yet, little is known about the survival or reproductive success of these animals. We found that translocating captive female white-tailed deer is likely to suppress survival and reproductive success, although survival of resulting offspring was comparable to wild deer. Our findings suggest that this practice resulting in increased average antler size within a recipient population is not feasible because of the survival and reproductive success observed in this study. Photograph by Auburn University Deer Lab.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22036
       
 
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