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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 142 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American Museum Novitates     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 244)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 380)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chelonian Conservation and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access  
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access  
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eco-Entrepreneur     Open Access  
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 99)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Environment and Natural Resources Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal  
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intervención     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Media Konservasi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Natureza & Conservação : Brazilian Journal of Nature Conservation     Open Access  
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Northeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Northwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Acidification     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recycling     Open Access  
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Sustentabilidade em Debate     Open Access  
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The American Midland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
The Southwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.874
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1035-3712 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5494
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [26 journals]
  • Sign surveys can be more efficient and cost effective than driven
           transects and camera trapping: a comparison of detection methods for a
           small elusive mammal, the numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)
    • Authors: Anke Seidlitz, Kate A. Bryant, Nicola J. Armstrong, Michael C. Calver, Adrian F. Wayne
      Abstract: Anke Seidlitz, Kate A. Bryant, Nicola J. Armstrong, Michael C. Calver, Adrian F. Wayne

      Determining the most efficient detection method for a target species is key for successful wildlife monitoring and management. This study compared driven transects, sign surveys and camera trapping for detecting numbats (Myrmecobius fasciatus) in the Upper Warren region, Western Australia. Sign surveys were more successful and had the lowest cost per detection. We recommend sign surveys with occupancy modelling for long-term monitoring of numbats in the Upper Warren. Photograph by Anke Seidlitz.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-10
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20020
       
  • Adult capture on the nest does not affect hatching success of masked
           lapwing (Vanellus miles) eggs on a fox-free island
    • Authors: Daniel Lees, Adam P. A. Cardilini, Craig D. H. Sherman, Peter Dann, Michael A. Weston
      Abstract: Daniel Lees, Adam P. A. Cardilini, Craig D. H. Sherman, Peter Dann, Michael A. Weston

      Capture of shorebirds on their nests is standard practice used by research and conservation organisations across the world. We aimed to assess if the capture of adult masked lapwings on the nest and associated techniques (ringing, flagging and blood sampling) adversely affects hatching success. Trapping incubating lapwings using our current protocols does not compromise the hatching success of eggs, at least where foxes are absent. We urge that studies involving the capture of adult shorebirds on the nest to frequently analyse any potential adverse effects of their methods, especially where foxes are present. Photograph by Daniel Lees.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20129
       
  • Short-term responses of tree squirrels to different-sized forest patches
           on new clearcuts in a fragmented forest landscape
    • Authors: Thomas P. Sullivan, Druscilla S. Sullivan
      Abstract: Thomas P. Sullivan, Druscilla S. Sullivan

      The American red squirrel and northern flying squirrel disappear when clearcut harvesting leaves essentially no forested habitat. We tested the hypothesis that abundance, reproduction and body mass of these tree squirrel populations would be greater in large than small patches of retention forest on new clearcuts. Our results were short-term but habitat quality, although variable, was apparently sufficient to maintain the occurrence of both species across patch sizes ranging from 0.3 to 20.0 ha. Photograph by Druscilla Sullivan.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20002
       
  • Rapid colonisation, breeding and successful recruitment of eastern barn
           owls (Tyto alba delicatula) using a customised wooden nest box in remnant
           mallee cropping areas of southern Yorke Peninsula, South Australia
    • Authors: Kelly M. Meaney, David E. Peacock, David Taggart, James Smith
      Abstract: Kelly M. Meaney, David E. Peacock, David Taggart, James Smith

      Avian predators play a key role in rodent pest ecology but are limited by the availability of nesting resources. This study aimed to design a suitable pole-mounted nesting box for eastern barn owls on remote, house mouse-affected crops in southern Australia, and found that the prototype was successful for barn owl reproduction and observation. This design promotes barn owl welfare and breeding while maximising minimally invasive monitoring techniques for future research. Photograph by Kelly Meaney (Scoutguard Trail Camera).

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20021
       
  • Domestic dogs and water-availability effects on non-volant mammals in a
           protected area, south-eastern Brazil
    • Authors: Priscila Stéfani Monteiro-Alves, Atilla Colombo Ferreguetti, Marina Mello Allemand, Juliane Pereira-Ribeiro, Maja Kajin, Carlos Frederico Duarte Rocha, Helena Godoy Bergallo
      Abstract: Priscila Stéfani Monteiro-Alves, Atilla Colombo Ferreguetti, Marina Mello Allemand, Juliane Pereira-Ribeiro, Maja Kajin, Carlos Frederico Duarte Rocha, Helena Godoy Bergallo

      Our results indicate that the negative impact of domestic dog generates changes in the composition and local distribution of the species. Management action in this protected area must initiate control of domestic dogs to minimise their impact. Photograph by Atilla Ferreguetti.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20075
       
  • Lowland tapir exposure to pesticides and metals in the Brazilian Cerrado
    • Authors: Emília P. Medici, Renata Carolina Fernandes-Santos, Caroline Testa-José, Antonio Francisco Godinho, Anne-Fleur Brand
      Abstract: Emília P. Medici, Renata Carolina Fernandes-Santos, Caroline Testa-José, Antonio Francisco Godinho, Anne-Fleur Brand

      Voracious pesticide consumption is a serious threat to the rich biodiversity of the Brazilian Cerrado, the country’s main frontier for large-scale agriculture and livestock production. This study aimed to assess the exposure of the lowland tapir – a threatened, large herbivorous mammal – to these chemicals in this area. This is the first dataset of synthetic pesticide and metal concentrations in wild lowland tapirs, with some reported values raising concern over potential adverse health effects. Photograph by Emília P. Medici.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19183
       
  • How quoll-ified are northern and spotted-tailed quoll detection dogs'
    • Authors: La Toya J. Jamieson, Amanda L. Hancock, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray
      Abstract: La Toya J. Jamieson, Amanda L. Hancock, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray

      Determining species presence and distribution is crucial for effective population management, particularly in the assessment of environmental impacts of proposed actions on threatened species. In Australia, environmental referral guidelines require evaluation of new survey methods (e.g. wildlife detection dogs) before their inclusion. Evaluation of new methods is also important for advancing population monitoring, particularly for threatened species. This study determined quoll detection dogs were an accurate and effective survey method, and a beneficial complimentary method for detecting quoll population presence. Photograph by Ivell Whyte.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19243
       
  • Lethal control of eutherian predators via aerial baiting does not
           negatively affect female spotted-tailed quolls (Dasyurus maculatus
           maculatus) and their pouch young
    • Authors: Andrew W. Claridge, Guy Ballard, Gerhard Körtner, Peter J. S. Fleming, Trent Forge, Abby Hine
      Abstract: Andrew W. Claridge, Guy Ballard, Gerhard Körtner, Peter J. S. Fleming, Trent Forge, Abby Hine

      The impact of aerial baiting for wild dogs on female spotted-tailed quolls and their young was examined at two field sites in New South Wales. More than half of the adult quolls that were collared interacted with 1080 baits, but none was killed. There were also no obvious adverse effects on young. These findings parallel those of previous experimental studies that have shown negligible population-level impacts of aerial baiting on the species. Photograph provided by Gerhard Körtner and taken by a Reconyx PC800 camera trap from within the Byadbo Wilderness study site in southern New South Wales, Australia.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-05
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20109
       
  • Density and activity patterns of Pallas’s cats, Otocolobus
           manul, in central Mongolia
    • Authors: Stefano Anile, Claudio Augugliaro, Bariushaa Munkhtsog, Fabio Dartora, Andrea Vendramin, Giovanni Bombieri, Clayton K. Nielsen
      Abstract: Stefano Anile, Claudio Augugliaro, Bariushaa Munkhtsog, Fabio Dartora, Andrea Vendramin, Giovanni Bombieri, Clayton K. Nielsen

      The ranges of many small, at-risk felid species occur almost entirely in unprotected areas, where research efforts are minimal; hence, data on their density and activity patterns are scare. Our study aimed to fill this gap by estimating the population density and the activity pattern of Pallas’s cats on unprotected land in Mongolia by using camera-trapping: Pallas’s cat density was estimated at approximately 15 individuals per 100 km2 and activity pattern varied with the seasons. We make recommendations for implementing future surveys on this small cat. Photograph by Claudio Augugliaro.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-02
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20061
       
  • Cat ecology, impacts and management in Australia
    • Authors: Sarah Legge, John C. Z. Woinarski, Chris R. Dickman, Tim S. Doherty, Hugh McGregor, Brett P. Murphy
      Abstract: Sarah Legge, John C. Z. Woinarski, Chris R. Dickman, Tim S. Doherty, Hugh McGregor, Brett P. Murphy - Volume 47(8)
      Environmental context. The quality of drinking water can be greatly compromised by the presence of dimethyl polysulfides. We studied the rate and mechanism of decomposition of dimethyl polysulfides in aqueous solution under solar irradiation, and found that they decompose photochemically in seconds to minutes, i.e. much faster than under dark conditions. These results suggest that photochemical pathways of dimethyl polysulfide decomposition may prevail in euphotic zones of natural aquatic systems.

      Citation: Wildlife Research - Volume 47(8)
      PubDate: 2020-10-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WRv47n8_ED
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 8 (2020)
       
  • Minimising mortalities in capturing wildlife: refinement of helicopter
           darting of chital deer (Axis axis) in Australia
    • Authors: Jordan O. Hampton, Matthew Amos, Anthony Pople, Michael Brennan, David M. Forsyth
      Abstract: Jordan O. Hampton, Matthew Amos, Anthony Pople, Michael Brennan, David M. Forsyth

      Helicopter darting is a useful capture technique for large mammals but presents considerable animal welfare risks. This study assessed helicopter darting for chital deer in Australia and demonstrated that the technique caused considerable adverse animal welfare events including mortalities. We make recommendations for how to monitor and refine helicopter darting for chital deer. Photograph by Jordan Hampton.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-12-23
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20106
       
  • Comparison of morphological and molecular methods to identify the diet of
           a generalist omnivore
    • Authors: Stuart Dawson, Natasha Tay, Telleasha Greay, Alexander Gofton, Charlotte Oskam, Patricia A. Fleming
      Abstract: Stuart Dawson, Natasha Tay, Telleasha Greay, Alexander Gofton, Charlotte Oskam, Patricia A. Fleming

      The diet of a species is key for gaining an understanding of its ecology. We compared microscopic analysis and DNA barcoding of scats of the greater bilby, and show that the methods are best used in concert. Researchers and land managers should use both approaches to gain a robust understanding of the bilby diet, and manage landscapes accordingly. Photograph by Stuart Dawson.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-12-08
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19079
       
  • When do predator exclusion fences work best' A spatially explicit
           modelling approach
    • Authors: C. Pacioni, M. S. Kennedy, D. S. L. Ramsey
      Abstract: C. Pacioni, M. S. Kennedy, D. S. L. Ramsey

      Exclusion fences are increasingly used to prevent interactions between predators and assets of interest. We aimed to quantify the interaction among factors that affect fencing efficiency. Our results demonstrated that exclusion fences can be a very effective and should be used either as a preventive measure, or when the initial predator density is very low. Photograph by DPIRD (camera trap).

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19192
       
  • Small mammal diversity is higher in infrequently compared with frequently
           
    • Authors: Stefania Ondei, Lynda D. Prior, Hugh W. McGregor, Angela M. Reid, Chris N. Johnson, Tom Vigilante, Catherine Goonack, Desmond Williams, David M. J. S. Bowman
      Abstract: Stefania Ondei, Lynda D. Prior, Hugh W. McGregor, Angela M. Reid, Chris N. Johnson, Tom Vigilante, Catherine Goonack, Desmond Williams, David M. J. S. Bowman

      We evaluated the influence of fire regimes and vegetation type on species richness and detection rate of small mammals in the north Kimberley. Low fire frequency and, to a lesser extent, presence of rainforests were associated with more diverse and abundant small mammal assemblages. These findings support the theory that disturbance regimes might contribute to small-mammal decline. Photograph by Stefania Ondei (camera trap).

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20010
       
  • Seasonal movements and site utilisation by Asian water buffalo (Bubalus
           bubalis) in tropical savannas and floodplains of northern Australia
    • Authors: Hamish A. Campbell, David A. Loewensteiner, Brett P. Murphy, Stewart Pittard, Clive R. McMahon
      Abstract: Hamish A. Campbell, David A. Loewensteiner, Brett P. Murphy, Stewart Pittard, Clive R. McMahon

      The Asian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is an introduced herbivore of the savannas and floodplains of northern Australia. Using animal telemetry and remote sensing data, we show that buffalo clans exhibit different late dry season ecological strategies depending on whether they inhabit lowland floodplain or upland savanna. This causes different scales and types of environmental damage and should be considered when managing buffalo population densities. Photograph by Jessie Northfield.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-24
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20070
       
  • Red deer allocate vigilance differently in response to spatio-temporal
           patterns of risk from human hunters and wolves
    • Authors: Nathan J. Proudman, Marcin Churski, Jakub W. Bubnicki, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Dries P. J. Kuijper
      Abstract: Nathan J. Proudman, Marcin Churski, Jakub W. Bubnicki, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Dries P. J. Kuijper

      Ungulates must optimally balance vigilance and feeding. This study assessed red deer vigilance patterns in response to human hunters and wolves in the Białowieża Forest, Poland, via camera trapping. Red deer showed increased vigilance during the hunting season and were more vigilant at night within reserves, when wolf activity is highest, and more vigilant during the day outside of reserves, when human risk is highest. Understanding the interplay between risk effects from humans and predators is vital for forest management. Photograph by Adam Wajrak.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20059
       
  • The relationships between land use and amphibian assemblages in a
           traditional agricultural area, the Sun Moon Lake, of Taiwan
    • Authors: Chau-Ren Jung, Sheng-Hai Wu
      Abstract: Chau-Ren Jung, Sheng-Hai Wu

      Understanding the relationships between land use and amphibian habitat selection would help make conservation-management and habitat-restoration decisions. The present study aimed to assess the associations between different land-use types and individual anuran species in a traditional agricultural area of Taiwan. We also tested the hypothesis that connectivity and land-use heterogeneity are important in determining species richness. Our data suggested that land-use heterogeneity should be a primary consideration for increasing amphibian species richness. Photograph by Chau-Ren Jung.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-06
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20025
       
  • Harvesting predators: simulation of population recovery and controlled
           harvest of saltwater crocodiles Crocodylus porosus
    • Authors: Yusuke Fukuda, Grahame Webb, Glenn Edwards, Keith Saalfeld, Peter Whitehead
      Abstract: Yusuke Fukuda, Grahame Webb, Glenn Edwards, Keith Saalfeld, Peter Whitehead

      Management of saltwater crocodiles in the Northern Territory is shifting from restoring depleted population to managing an abundant population through controlled harvests for commercial purposes and public safety. Simulations suggested that harvesting since protection has had no adverse impact and survival of adults has a much larger impact than egg harvest, which should be accounted for in future harvest scenarios. Photograph by Yusuke Fukuda.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-28
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20033
       
  • Calling behaviour in the invasive Asian house gecko (Hemidactylus
           frenatus) and implications for early detection
    • Authors: Jaimie M. Hopkins, Megan Higgie, Conrad J. Hoskin
      Abstract: Jaimie M. Hopkins, Megan Higgie, Conrad J. Hoskin

      The Asian house gecko continues to spread into new areas, globally, including natural habitats. We assessed calling behaviour as a means for detection. The conspicuous ‘chik, chik, chik…’ call is only uttered by males, primarily as adults, and more when paired with a female than another male. There are clear peaks in calling just before sunrise and at sunset. These results can be used to guide optimal call surveys. Photograph by Jaimie Hopkins.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20003
       
  • Flooding-induced mortality of loggerhead sea turtle eggs
    • Authors: Colin J. Limpus, Jeffrey D. Miller, Joseph B. Pfaller
      Abstract: Colin J. Limpus, Jeffrey D. Miller, Joseph B. Pfaller

      Marine turtle eggs are vulnerable to flooding throughout incubation. We evaluated the interactive effects of flooding duration and incubation stage on the hatching success of loggerhead turtle eggs and found that eggs in the middle portion of incubation can tolerate some flooding, whereas eggs within 1 week of laying or hatching are less tolerant to flooding. Our results inform management practices of marine turtles in the face of climate change. Photograph by Colin J. Limpus.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-06
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20080
       
  • Optimising deployment time of remote cameras to estimate abundance of
           female bighorn sheep
    • Authors: Jace C. Taylor, Steven B. Bates, Jericho C. Whiting, Brock R. McMillan, Randy T. Larsen
      Abstract: Jace C. Taylor, Steven B. Bates, Jericho C. Whiting, Brock R. McMillan, Randy T. Larsen

      Biologists accumulate large quantities of images from remote cameras. We estimated bighorn sheep abundance by using counts from the days cameras were deployed at water sources. We obtained precise abundance estimates with 12 days of sampling and could have avoided analysing >80% of images, saving time and money. Our findings can help researchers reduce cost of setting and analysing photographs for ungulate population monitoring. Photograph by Jace Taylor.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-09-28
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20069
       
  • Lost at sea: determining geographic origins of illegally traded green sea
           turtles (Chelonia mydas) rescued on Hainan Island, China
    • Authors: Daniel Gaillard, Frederick C. Yeh, Liu Lin, Huai-Qing Chen, Ting Zhang, Shu-Jin Luo, Hai-Tao Shi
      First page: 55
      Abstract: Daniel Gaillard, Frederick C. Yeh, Liu Lin, Huai-Qing Chen, Ting Zhang, Shu-Jin Luo, Hai-Tao Shi

      Historically, illegal harvesting and by-catch by fishermen have caused dramatic declines in green turtle (Chelonia mydas) populations in Southeast Asian waters, and, alarmingly, these activities continue today. We obtained confiscated green turtles from Hainan Island, China, and used a genetic approach to determine that the Paracel Islands and the Sulu Sea rookeries are the most heavily affected areas by Hainan fishermen. We suggest that more work by the Chinese government needs to be undertaken to deter collection, and to increase the protection of turtles, at nesting rookeries in the Paracel Islands. Photograph by Liu Lin.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-06
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19127
       
  • Damage to silo bags by mammals in agroecosystems: a contribution for
           mitigating human–wildlife conflicts
    • Authors: Emmanuel Zufiaurre, Agustín M. Abba, David Bilenca
      First page: 86
      Abstract: Emmanuel Zufiaurre, Agustín M. Abba, David Bilenca

      Breaks in silo-bag linings alter the internal atmosphere causing losses of stored harvest. We described the incidence and intensity of breaks in silo bag by mammals and recorded damage in 49% of 306 silo bags sampled. Our results showed that farmer’s decision on the location of silo bags has significant implications in mitigating human–wildlife conflicts. Photograph by Agustín M. Abba.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20045
       
  • Cat-dependent diseases cost Australia AU$6 billion per year through
           impacts on human health and livestock production
    • Authors: Sarah Legge, Pat L. Taggart, Chris R. Dickman, John L. Read, John C. Z. Woinarski
      First page: 731
      Abstract: Sarah Legge, Pat L. Taggart, Chris R. Dickman, John L. Read, John C. Z. Woinarski

      Cats are critical in the lifecycle of five pathogens that affect people or livestock in Australia. We estimate the annual cost of four of these pathogens at AU$6.07 billion (range AU$2.12–10.7 billion). Reducing cat populations and securely containing pet cats could provide substantial benefits to human health and livestock production. Photograph by Community Eye Health CC BY-NC 2.0 FLICKR.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20089
       
  • Integrating feral cat (Felis catus) control into landscape-scale
           introduced predator management to improve conservation prospects for
           threatened fauna: a case study from the south coast of Western Australia
    • Authors: S. Comer, L. Clausen, S. Cowen, J. Pinder, A. Thomas, A. H. Burbidge, C. Tiller, D. Algar, P. Speldewinde
      First page: 762
      Abstract: S. Comer, L. Clausen, S. Cowen, J. Pinder, A. Thomas, A. H. Burbidge, C. Tiller, D. Algar, P. Speldewinde

      This paper summarises a landscape-scale feral cat and fox baiting program that was delivered across reserves on the south coast of Western Australia that were occupied by the critically endangered western ground parrot (Pezoporus flaviventris) in the early 2000s. Up to 500 000 ha of national parks and natures reserves were baited with Eradicat®. Monitoring was established to evaluate both the efficacy of landscape-scale baiting in managing feral cat populations, and the response of several native fauna species, including the western ground parrot, to an integrated introduced predator control program. Photograph by IFRP Team, DBCA South Coast Region.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2020-10-13
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19217
       
 
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