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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 142 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Museum Novitates     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 246)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 383)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chelonian Conservation and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access  
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access  
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eco-Entrepreneur     Open Access  
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 207)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 100)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Environment and Natural Resources Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intervención     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Media Konservasi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Natureza & Conservação : Brazilian Journal of Nature Conservation     Open Access  
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Northeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Northwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Acidification     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recycling     Open Access  
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Sustentabilidade em Debate     Open Access  
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The American Midland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
The Southwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.874
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1035-3712 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5494
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [23 journals]
  • Scars of human–elephant conflict: patterns inferred from field
           observations of Asian elephants in Sri Lanka
    • Authors: Chase A. LaDue, Rajnish P. G. Vandercone, Wendy K. Kiso, Elizabeth W. Freeman
      Abstract: Chase A. LaDue, Rajnish P. G. Vandercone, Wendy K. Kiso, Elizabeth W. Freeman

      Human–elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the long-term survival of Asian elephants. The present study described unique scars incurred by elephants during HEC incidents adjacent to a protected area in Sri Lanka, and we described differences in scar patterns on the basis of age, sex, and body condition. These results illustrated the need for adaptive conservation strategies to address HEC in Sri Lanka and elsewhere, and these scar patterns may be useful for monitoring HEC in this elephant population. Photograph by Chase LaDue.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20175
       
  • Rodenticide baiting black rats (Rattus rattus) in mangrove habitats
    • Authors: David Ringler, Nicolas Guillerault, Mickaël Baumann, Martin Cagnato, James C. Russell
      Abstract: David Ringler, Nicolas Guillerault, Mickaël Baumann, Martin Cagnato, James C. Russell

      Tidally inundated habitats are challenging environments for invasive rat eradication. We investigated black rat population biology as well as rodenticide availability in mangrove forests and showed that although mangroves are an important reservoir for rats, large bait blocks on the ground and ‘bait bolas’ may be effective bait delivery options. We suggest practitioners consider these alternative methods to adapt current eradication best practices. Photograph by James Russell.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20178
       
  • Animal welfare testing for shooting and darting free-ranging wildlife: a
           review and recommendations
    • Authors: Jordan O. Hampton, Jon M. Arnemo, Richard Barnsley, Marc Cattet, Pierre-Yves Daoust, Anthony J. DeNicola, Grant Eccles, Don Fletcher, Lyn A. Hinds, Rob Hunt, Timothy Portas, Sigbjørn Stokke, Bruce Warburton, Claire Wimpenny
      Abstract: Jordan O. Hampton, Jon M. Arnemo, Richard Barnsley, Marc Cattet, Pierre-Yves Daoust, Anthony J. DeNicola, Grant Eccles, Don Fletcher, Lyn A. Hinds, Rob Hunt, Timothy Portas, Sigbjørn Stokke, Bruce Warburton, Claire Wimpenny

      Shooting and darting of wildlife are techniques that rely on ballistics and impose animal-welfare risks. The present study reviews assessment methods suitable for animal welfare testing of new ballistic technology and the consequences of forgoing testing. We make recommendations for how to assess ballistic techniques before widespread use. Photograph by Richard Barnsley.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-28
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20107
       
  • Can flexible timing of harvest for translocation reduce the impact on
           fluctuating source populations'
    • Authors: Simon J. Verdon, William F. Mitchell, Michael F. Clarke
      Abstract: Simon J. Verdon, William F. Mitchell, Michael F. Clarke

      Species translocations are an important conservation tool, but they may negatively affect source populations. We tested whether the timing of harvest can be altered to reduce impact on a fluctuating source population of Mallee Emu-wrens, Stipiturus mallee in south-eastern Australia. Harvest timing (i.e. prevailing population trajectory) was an important determinant of harvest impact and we recommend harvesting Mallee emu-wrens after high-rainfall years, when source populations are likely to have increasing trajectories. Photograph by Tom Hunt.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20133
       
  • Tree hollow densities reduced by frequent late dry-season wildfires in
           threatened Gouldian finch (Erythrura gouldiae) breeding habitat
    • Authors: I. J. Radford, S. L. J. Oliveira, B. Byrne, L.-A. Woolley
      Abstract: I. J. Radford, S. L. J. Oliveira, B. Byrne, L.-A. Woolley

      Threatened Gouldian finches are obligate tree-hollow nesters and are, therefore, susceptible to fire regimes that can influence abundance of hollows. We found that late dry-season fire frequency, and not total fire frequency, has the greatest influence on hollow availability. We recommend fire management of finch breeding habitat not to exclude fire, but to use patchy early dry-season burning to reduce the incidence of late-season wildfires that are detrimental to finch breeding habitat. Photograph by David Bettini.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20108
       
  • The effects of harvest frequency on coarse woody debris and its use by
           fauna
    • Authors: C. G. Threlfall, B. Law, N. Colman
      Abstract: C. G. Threlfall, B. Law, N. Colman

      Multiple rotations of timber harvesting affect coarse woody debris and use by fauna. We found significantly greater volume of medium-sized pieces in sites harvested three times versus unharvested sites. Camera trapping found that fauna used a variety of logs, including large and small logs in various states of decay. No relationships were found between fauna and frequency of timber harvesting. Photograph by Caragh Threlfall.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20140
       
  • Rocky escarpment versus savanna woodlands: comparing diet and body
           condition as indicators of habitat quality for the endangered northern
           quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus)
    • Authors: Hannah Thomas, Skye F. Cameron, Hamish A. Campbell, Mariana A. Micheli-Campbell, Ellie C. Kirke, Rebecca Wheatley, Robbie S. Wilson
      Abstract: Hannah Thomas, Skye F. Cameron, Hamish A. Campbell, Mariana A. Micheli-Campbell, Ellie C. Kirke, Rebecca Wheatley, Robbie S. Wilson

      The northern quoll has contracted to rocky refugia on mainland Australia. However, on island refuges they persist in savanna woodland. Here, we assess diet and stable isotopic niche width to investigate one aspect of habitat quality. Quolls from savanna woodland had good body condition and a wider isotopic niche width than did quolls from rocky escarpment. We suggest that savanna woodlands are important for the persistence of this endangered species. Photograph by Skye Cameron.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20032
       
  • Developing a correction factor to apply to animal–vehicle collision
           data for improved road mitigation measures
    • Authors: Tracy S. Lee, Kimberly Rondeau, Rob Schaufele, Anthony P. Clevenger, Danah Duke
      Abstract: Tracy S. Lee, Kimberly Rondeau, Rob Schaufele, Anthony P. Clevenger, Danah Duke

      There has long been concern about the number of unreported animal–vehicle collisions (AVC). We developed a method to calculate a correction factor to correct traditional AVC road survey data and account for unreported AVCs. In our case study, applying the correction factor increased the number of road sections where road mitigation is cost effective. Photograph by Gerry Smith.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20090
       
  • The demographics of knowledge, attitudes and emotions toward coyotes
    • Authors: Jerry J. Vaske, Carly C. Sponarski
      Abstract: Jerry J. Vaske, Carly C. Sponarski

      This article supported the premise that demographic variables are related to the publics’ cognitions and emotions. However, (1) not all demographics were related to all cognitions, (2) the strength of the relationships were often small, and (3) interaction effects must be considered. By understanding the demographics, natural resource managers can target the most appropriate message for a given stakeholder group. Photograph by Laura Barisonzi.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20071
       
  • Conservation issues using discordant taxonomic and evolutionary units: a
           case study of the American manatee (Trichechus manatus, Sirenia)
    • Authors: Camilla S. Lima, Rafael F. Magalhães, Fabricio R. Santos
      Abstract: Camilla S. Lima, Rafael F. Magalhães, Fabricio R. Santos

      The conservation strategy of widely distributed endangered species depends on the definition of population units with relative evolutionary independence. However, controversies may appear when the identification of evolutionarily significant units is in conflict with current taxonomic subdivisions. The present study has re-evaluated genetic evidence to characterise conservation units of American manatee (Trichechus manatus) and compare it to the current conservation management strategies adopted for this species. We suggest that conservation priorities should ensure the maintenance of historical population structure and dynamics, even if they are contradictory to traditional taxonomic subdivisions that are not fully supported by evolutionary evidence.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20197
       
  • Plasticity in daily activity patterns of a key prey species in the Iberian
           Peninsula to reduce predation risk
    • Authors: Esther Descalzo, Jorge Tobajas, Rafael Villafuerte, Rafael Mateo, Pablo Ferreras
      Abstract: Esther Descalzo, Jorge Tobajas, Rafael Villafuerte, Rafael Mateo, Pablo Ferreras

      Some prey species can shift their daily activity patterns to reduce predation risk. We tested whether European rabbits can adapt their activity depending on predation risk by mesocarnivores in areas with different activity of mesocarnivores. We conclude that rabbits adapt their daily activity patterns by being more nocturnal in the fenced plot where the risk of mongoose (diurnal) predation is higher. Photograph by Jorge Tobajas.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-09
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20156
       
  • The canid pest ejector challenge: controlling urban foxes while keeping
           domestic dogs safe
    • Authors: Margarita Gil-Fernández, Robert Harcourt, Alison Towerton, Thomas Newsome, Hayley A. Milner, Sanjana Sriram, Natalie Gray, Sergio Escobar-Lasso, Victor Hugo González-Cardoso, Alexandra Carthey
      Abstract: Margarita Gil-Fernández, Robert Harcourt, Alison Towerton, Thomas Newsome, Hayley A. Milner, Sanjana Sriram, Natalie Gray, Sergio Escobar-Lasso, Victor Hugo González-Cardoso, Alexandra Carthey

      Control of foxes in cities is vital to protect native species; however, it faces multiple challenges because of the proximity to humans. We assessed the safety of the canid-pest ejector as a potential method of fox control in cities. We provide recommendations for fox control using ejectors in urban areas, including safe places to use the ejector and the effect of distance from habitation. Photograph by Margarita Gil-Fernandez (from camera traps).

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-24
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20078
       
  • An overview of the history, current contributions and future outlook of
           iNaturalist in Australia
    • Authors: Thomas Mesaglio, Corey T. Callaghan
      Abstract: Thomas Mesaglio, Corey T. Callaghan

      Citizen science data are increasingly being integrated with professional science, allowing the collection of data at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. This review outlines the history of the global citizen science platform iNaturalist from an Australian perspective, and summarises Australian biodiversity data contributed to the platform. We discuss important future directions both to better understand how iNaturalist contributes to biodiversity research in Australia, and to maximise the usefulness of Australian iNaturalist data for research and conservation. Photograph by Phil Malin.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20154
       
  • Fine-scale vertical habitat use of white sharks at an emerging aggregation
           site and implications for public safety
    • Authors: Megan V. Winton, James Sulikowski, Gregory B. Skomal
      Abstract: Megan V. Winton, James Sulikowski, Gregory B. Skomal

      The effectiveness of education-based, non-invasive shark mitigation campaigns depends on an understanding of shark habitat use near swimming beaches. This study characterised the vertical habitat use of white sharks off Cape Cod, Massachusetts, a popular vacation destination, and determined that sharks spent almost half of their time at shallow depths where they may overlap with recreational water users. Our results can be used to better understand the risk posed to humans at this emerging white shark aggregation site and to inform public safety practices. Photograph by Wayne Davis.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-18
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20029
       
  • The assemblage of birds struck by aircraft differs among nearby airports
           in the same bioregion
    • Authors: William K. Steele, Michael A. Weston
      Abstract: William K. Steele, Michael A. Weston

      When aircraft strike wildlife, substantive economic and safety costs are realised. We show that the composition of species struck by aircraft can differ between airports, even between nearby airports, with similar habitat and species. Photograph by M. A. Weston.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-18
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20127
       
  • Data sharing among protected areas shows advantages in habitat suitability
           modelling performance
    • Authors: Mattia Falaschi, Stefano Scali, Roberto Sacchi, Marco Mangiacotti
      Abstract: Mattia Falaschi, Stefano Scali, Roberto Sacchi, Marco Mangiacotti

      The collection of data on species presence is a key step in wildlife monitoring and management. We assessed how the sharing of species presence data among protected areas may influence the reliability of habitat suitability models in various situations. We showed that data-sharing is usually the winning option, notably when sampling effort is limited.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-17
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20196
       
  • How much survey effort is required to assess bird assemblages in
           fire-prone eucalypt forests using acoustic recorders'
    • Authors: Michael J. M. Franklin, Richard E. Major, Ross A. Bradstock
      Abstract: Michael J. M. Franklin, Richard E. Major, Ross A. Bradstock

      Changes to forest fire regimes under climate change will impact birds, so reliable and efficient methods of assessing and monitoring avian responses are required. This study aimed to optimise survey of bird assemblages using autonomous acoustic recorders, and found that using five 20-min post-dawn samples on each of 2 days was satisfactory for many types of studies. This method provides an effective option for surveying birds in montane dry sclerophyll forests. Photograph by M. Franklin.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20099
       
  • Sign surveys can be more efficient and cost effective than driven
           transects and camera trapping: a comparison of detection methods for a
           small elusive mammal, the numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)
    • Authors: Anke Seidlitz, Kate A. Bryant, Nicola J. Armstrong, Michael C. Calver, Adrian F. Wayne
      Abstract: Anke Seidlitz, Kate A. Bryant, Nicola J. Armstrong, Michael C. Calver, Adrian F. Wayne

      Determining the most efficient detection method for a target species is key for successful wildlife monitoring and management. This study compared driven transects, sign surveys and camera trapping for detecting numbats (Myrmecobius fasciatus) in the Upper Warren region, Western Australia. Sign surveys were more successful and had the lowest cost per detection. We recommend sign surveys with occupancy modelling for long-term monitoring of numbats in the Upper Warren. Photograph by Anke Seidlitz.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-10
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20020
       
  • Adult capture on the nest does not affect hatching success of masked
           lapwing (Vanellus miles) eggs on a fox-free island
    • Authors: Daniel Lees, Adam P. A. Cardilini, Craig D. H. Sherman, Peter Dann, Michael A. Weston
      Abstract: Daniel Lees, Adam P. A. Cardilini, Craig D. H. Sherman, Peter Dann, Michael A. Weston

      Capture of shorebirds on their nests is standard practice used by research and conservation organisations across the world. We aimed to assess if the capture of adult masked lapwings on the nest and associated techniques (ringing, flagging and blood sampling) adversely affects hatching success. Trapping incubating lapwings using our current protocols does not compromise the hatching success of eggs, at least where foxes are absent. We urge that studies involving the capture of adult shorebirds on the nest to frequently analyse any potential adverse effects of their methods, especially where foxes are present. Photograph by Daniel Lees.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20129
       
  • Short-term responses of tree squirrels to different-sized forest patches
           on new clearcuts in a fragmented forest landscape
    • Authors: Thomas P. Sullivan, Druscilla S. Sullivan
      Abstract: Thomas P. Sullivan, Druscilla S. Sullivan

      The American red squirrel and northern flying squirrel disappear when clearcut harvesting leaves essentially no forested habitat. We tested the hypothesis that abundance, reproduction and body mass of these tree squirrel populations would be greater in large than small patches of retention forest on new clearcuts. Our results were short-term but habitat quality, although variable, was apparently sufficient to maintain the occurrence of both species across patch sizes ranging from 0.3 to 20.0 ha. Photograph by Druscilla Sullivan.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20002
       
  • Rapid colonisation, breeding and successful recruitment of eastern barn
           owls (Tyto alba delicatula) using a customised wooden nest box in remnant
           mallee cropping areas of southern Yorke Peninsula, South Australia
    • Authors: Kelly M. Meaney, David E. Peacock, David Taggart, James Smith
      Abstract: Kelly M. Meaney, David E. Peacock, David Taggart, James Smith

      Avian predators play a key role in rodent pest ecology but are limited by the availability of nesting resources. This study aimed to design a suitable pole-mounted nesting box for eastern barn owls on remote, house mouse-affected crops in southern Australia, and found that the prototype was successful for barn owl reproduction and observation. This design promotes barn owl welfare and breeding while maximising minimally invasive monitoring techniques for future research. Photograph by Kelly Meaney (Scoutguard Trail Camera).

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20021
       
  • Domestic dogs and water-availability effects on non-volant mammals in a
           protected area, south-eastern Brazil
    • Authors: Priscila Stéfani Monteiro-Alves, Atilla Colombo Ferreguetti, Marina Mello Allemand, Juliane Pereira-Ribeiro, Maja Kajin, Carlos Frederico Duarte Rocha, Helena Godoy Bergallo
      Abstract: Priscila Stéfani Monteiro-Alves, Atilla Colombo Ferreguetti, Marina Mello Allemand, Juliane Pereira-Ribeiro, Maja Kajin, Carlos Frederico Duarte Rocha, Helena Godoy Bergallo

      Our results indicate that the negative impact of domestic dog generates changes in the composition and local distribution of the species. Management action in this protected area must initiate control of domestic dogs to minimise their impact. Photograph by Atilla Ferreguetti.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20075
       
  • Lowland tapir exposure to pesticides and metals in the Brazilian Cerrado
    • Authors: Emília P. Medici, Renata Carolina Fernandes-Santos, Caroline Testa-José, Antonio Francisco Godinho, Anne-Fleur Brand
      Abstract: Emília P. Medici, Renata Carolina Fernandes-Santos, Caroline Testa-José, Antonio Francisco Godinho, Anne-Fleur Brand

      Voracious pesticide consumption is a serious threat to the rich biodiversity of the Brazilian Cerrado, the country’s main frontier for large-scale agriculture and livestock production. This study aimed to assess the exposure of the lowland tapir – a threatened, large herbivorous mammal – to these chemicals in this area. This is the first dataset of synthetic pesticide and metal concentrations in wild lowland tapirs, with some reported values raising concern over potential adverse health effects. Photograph by Emília P. Medici.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19183
       
  • How quoll-ified are northern and spotted-tailed quoll detection dogs'
    • Authors: La Toya J. Jamieson, Amanda L. Hancock, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray
      Abstract: La Toya J. Jamieson, Amanda L. Hancock, Greg S. Baxter, Peter J. Murray

      Determining species presence and distribution is crucial for effective population management, particularly in the assessment of environmental impacts of proposed actions on threatened species. In Australia, environmental referral guidelines require evaluation of new survey methods (e.g. wildlife detection dogs) before their inclusion. Evaluation of new methods is also important for advancing population monitoring, particularly for threatened species. This study determined quoll detection dogs were an accurate and effective survey method, and a beneficial complimentary method for detecting quoll population presence. Photograph by Ivell Whyte.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1071/WR19243
       
  • A spatial genetic framework for koala translocations: where to'
    • Authors: Janette A. Norman, Les Christidis
      First page: 193
      Abstract: Janette A. Norman, Les Christidis

      Current koala translocation policies lack an appropriate spatial framework to guide conservation actions. Herein, we outline a framework based on knowledge of population genetic structure and associated dispersal parameters estimated from molecular data. Application of the proposed framework would improve site selection for the release of translocated animals and should underpin the development of translocation strategies to support the demographic and genetic recovery of bushfire-affected koala populations and koala management more broadly. Photograph by Holger Detje (from Pixabay).

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20055
       
 
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