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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 194)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 100)
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Intervención     Open Access  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Sustainability     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.874
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1035-3712 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5494
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Lion (Panthera leo) diet and cattle depredation on the Kuku Group Ranch
           Pastoralist area in southern Maasailand, Kenya

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Iain R. Olivier, Craig J. Tambling, Lana Müller, Frans G. T. Radloff
      Abstract: Iain R. Olivier, Craig J. Tambling, Lana Müller, Frans G. T. Radloff

      Retaliatory killing of lions is a threat to African lion (Panthera leo) populations. Our study took place in the Tsavo–Amboseli ecosystem, Kenya, assessing lion diet and cattle depredation. The most common species consumed by lions were cattle, whereas lag rainfall was an important predictor of cattle depredation. The findings provide opportunities to develop proactive husbandry interventions to reduce cattle depredations. Photograph by Iain Olivier.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-06
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22019
       
  • Livestock depredation by wild carnivores in the highlands of Wolaita zone,
           southern Ethiopia

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      Authors: Yigrem Deneke, Aberham Megaze, Wondimagegnheu Tekalign, Taye Dobamo, Herwig Leirs
      Abstract: Yigrem Deneke, Aberham Megaze, Wondimagegnheu Tekalign, Taye Dobamo, Herwig Leirs

      Livestock depredation by carnivores is a major conservation challenge around the world, causing substantial economic losses of people living around protected areas. This study aimed to assess livestock depredation by carnivore in the highlands of Wolaita, southern Ethiopia, and results showed that most losses occurred mainly during the night-time and dry season. We make recommendations for how to minimise human–carnivore conflicts by adjusting livestock guarding time and seasonality. Photograph by Yigrem Deneke.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-29
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21166
       
  • Irruptive dynamics of the brush-tailed bettong (Bettongia penicillata)
           when reintroduced to a fenced sanctuary with feral cats present

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      Authors: Jeff Short
      Abstract: Jeff Short

      The brush-tailed bettong or woylie is considered ‘Critically Endangered’, despite 50 years of conservation effort. This study follows the establishment, growth and subsequent decline of a translocated population to a fenced sanctuary, but with feral cats being present. Woylies successfully established, overshot their food resources and declined, with predation playing a minor role in limiting growth. Population declines resulting from food shortage induced by irruption and drought are likely to be a common medium-term outcome of unmanaged translocations to predator-free sites. Photograph by Jeff Short.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22063
       
  • Demographics, attitudes and emotions as predictors of support for bear
           management

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      Authors: Jerry J. Vaske, Craig A. Miller, Brent D. Williams, Samantha G. Pallazza, Xiohan Zang
      Abstract: Jerry J. Vaske, Craig A. Miller, Brent D. Williams, Samantha G. Pallazza, Xiohan Zang

      The Illinois Department of Natural Resources was mandated by legislation to develop management plans for American Black Bears. This article examined how Illinois residents’ demographics, emotions, and attitudes were related to support for black bear management strategies (e.g. active reintroduction, natural recolonisation). Both demographic and psychological characteristics were correlated with support for bear management, but these relationships are complex. Photograph by Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21179
       
  • Winter denning behaviour of striped skunks and interspecific den activity
           at their dens: implications for pathogen transmission

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      Authors: Katelyn M. Amspacher, F. Agustín Jiménez, Clayton K. Nielsen
      Abstract: Katelyn M. Amspacher, F. Agustín Jiménez, Clayton K. Nielsen

      Winter denning behaviour of striped skunks is highly variable but may influence interspecific interactions at den sites. Our study assessed winter denning behaviour of striped skunks and interspecific den activity in southern Illinois, USA, and found that dens were visited by numerous mammal species and striped skunk denning was influenced by weather and landscape variables. We highlight how this could influence pathogen transmission, especially across an urban–rural gradient. Photograph by Katelyn Amspacher.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22002
       
  • Evaluation of oral baits and distribution methods for Tasmanian devils
           (Sarcophilus harrisii) †

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      Authors: Sean Dempsey, Ruth J. Pye, Amy T. Gilbert, Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Jennifer M. Moffat, Sarah Benson-Amram, Timothy J. Smyser, Andrew S. Flies
      Abstract: Sean Dempsey, Ruth J. Pye, Amy T. Gilbert, Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Jennifer M. Moffat, Sarah Benson-Amram, Timothy J. Smyser, Andrew S. Flies

      This study aimed to test oral baits as potential vaccine-delivery vehicles for Tasmanian devils. Captive and wild devils consumed placebo versions of commercial baits used on mainland Australia. Abundant non-target species, such as brushtail possums, Tasmanian pademelons, and eastern quolls consumed most baits in the wild. Implementation of automated bait dispensers increased bait uptake by devils to over 50% at the same regional field sites. Photograph by Jennifer M. Moffat.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22070
       
  • Spatial constraints and seasonal conditions but not poaching pressure are
           linked with elevated faecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations in
           white rhino

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      Authors: Zoliswa N. Nhleko, Andre Ganswindt, Sam M. Ferreira, Robert A. McCleery
      Abstract: Zoliswa N. Nhleko, Andre Ganswindt, Sam M. Ferreira, Robert A. McCleery

      The conservation of large African mammals in small protected areas might come at a physiological cost. This study investigated the effects of poaching pressure, protected area size (<500 km2), season and rainfall on white rhinos’ physiological condition. We found that elevated adrenocortical activity was associated with smaller protected areas and the dry season. We recommend careful consideration of density of white rhinos and other large mammals in small protected areas. Photograph by Zoliswa N. Nhleko.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22020
       
  • Recounting bias can affect abundance estimates from intensive helicopter
           surveys of feral goats

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      Authors: John P. Tracey, Peter J. S. Fleming
      Abstract: John P. Tracey, Peter J. S. Fleming

      The possibility of recounting animals during helicopter surveys of wildlife is rarely investigated. Using simultaneous ground observers, we investigated the movements of feral goats in response to intensive helicopter surveys. Goats moved away from already flown transects more frequently than towards those transects, which is likely to have resulted in recounting and consequent overestimation of population size. We make design recommendations to overcome this issue. Photograph by Peter Fleming.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22097
       
  • The effect of scent lures on detection is not equitable among sympatric
           species

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      Authors: Marlin M. Dart, Lora B. Perkins, Jonathan A. Jenks, Gary Hatfield, Robert C. Lonsinger
      Abstract: Marlin M. Dart, Lora B. Perkins, Jonathan A. Jenks, Gary Hatfield, Robert C. Lonsinger

      Camera trapping is a popular method for studying wildlife communities and scent lures are often used to improve detection of carnivores without considering the influence on other species. This study evaluated how a scent lure influenced detection of four species across foraging guilds and demonstrated disparate effects on species. We recommend that researchers avoid using scent lures or account for potential variation in their influence on detection for each species when assessing wildlife communities with cameras. Photograph by Marlin M. Dart.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22094
       
  • Translocating captive female white-tailed deer

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      Authors: Jace R. Elliott, Chad H. Newbolt, William D. Gulsby, Stephen S. Ditchkoff
      Abstract: Jace R. Elliott, Chad H. Newbolt, William D. Gulsby, Stephen S. Ditchkoff

      Throughout much of North America, female white-tailed deer are purchased from captive-breeding facilities and released into private shooting preserves&#x003B; yet, little is known about the survival or reproductive success of these animals. We found that translocating captive female white-tailed deer is likely to suppress survival and reproductive success, although survival of resulting offspring was comparable to wild deer. Our findings suggest that this practice resulting in increased average antler size within a recipient population is not feasible because of the survival and reproductive success observed in this study. Photograph by Auburn University Deer Lab.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22036
       
  • Abundance, demography, and harvesting of water snakes from agricultural
           landscapes in West Java, Indonesia

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      Authors: Mirza D. Kusrini, Ramdani Manurung, Fata Habiburrahman Faz, Aristyo Dwiputro, Arief Tajalli, Huda Nur Prasetyo, Pramitama Bayu Saputra, Umar F. Kennedi, Ditro Wibisono Parikesit, Richard Shine, Daniel Natusch
      Abstract: Mirza D. Kusrini, Ramdani Manurung, Fata Habiburrahman Faz, Aristyo Dwiputro, Arief Tajalli, Huda Nur Prasetyo, Pramitama Bayu Saputra, Umar F. Kennedi, Ditro Wibisono Parikesit, Richard Shine, Daniel Natusch

      Millions of water snakes are captured and killed for trade in Indonesia each year, questioning the sustainability of this offtake. We surveyed for snakes in highly modified agricultural landscapes on the island of Java and showed that water snakes remain exceptionally abundant despite harvesting. Our study showed that whereas habitat changes affect many species, other species are likely to increase their abundance in these resource-rich landscapes. Photographs by Ramdani Manurung.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22079
       
  • Detections of house mice on Gough Island approach zero within days of
           aerial baiting

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      Authors: Araceli Samaniego, Kim L. Stevens, Vonica Perold, Steffen Oppel, Pete McClelland
      Abstract: Araceli Samaniego, Kim L. Stevens, Vonica Perold, Steffen Oppel, Pete McClelland

      How quickly house mice succumb after aerial baiting on islands is not well understood. We used trail cameras to assess mouse activity before and after an aerial mouse eradication operation on a temperate island, and found a dramatic population collapse within 3 days and almost zero activity after 7 days. We discuss the value of camera monitoring to inform eradication strategies and to confirm eradication outcome. Photograph by RSPB.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-08
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22103
       
  • Reproductive biology of the rainbow mudsnake (Enhydris enhydris) in West
           Java, Indonesia

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      Authors: Quraisy Zakky, Amir Hamidy, Slamet Priambada, Alamsyah Elang Nusa Herlambang, Evy Arida, Awal Riyanto, Mumpuni, Richard Shine, Daniel J. D. Natusch
      Abstract: Quraisy Zakky, Amir Hamidy, Slamet Priambada, Alamsyah Elang Nusa Herlambang, Evy Arida, Awal Riyanto, Mumpuni, Richard Shine, Daniel J. D. Natusch

      Thousands of rainbow mudsnakes are captured and killed for trade in Indonesia each year, questioning the sustainability of this offtake. We examined the reproductive biology of Enhydris enhydris collected from disturbed landscapes in West Java. Collected snakes are mostly adults, quick to mature, reproduce frequently and have large litters. These traits render this species resilient to intensive harvesting. Photograph by Alamsyah Elang Nusa Herlambang.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22086
       
  • Set free: an evaluation of two break-away mechanisms for tracking collars

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      Authors: Leticia F. Povh, Nicole Willers, Patricia A. Fleming
      Abstract: Leticia F. Povh, Nicole Willers, Patricia A. Fleming

      The ethical and welfare challenges with radio tracking animals is ensuring that the device is removed from the animal at the conclusion of the study. We tested two types of collar break-away mechanisms, designed to release the collars over time. One is Cotton Thread weak-link and a second Timed Release Device. For both break-away types, the release timing was unpredictable, and poor collar recovery rates show the importance in adding camera traps to monitor collared animals. Photograph by Leticia F. Povh.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21176
       
  • Short-term response of research activities on white shark behaviour

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      Authors: Yuri Niella, Brett Simes, Andrew Fox, Andrew Wright, Matt Waller, Madeline Riley, Lauren Meyer, Michael Drew, Hugh Pederson, Charlie Huveneers
      Abstract: Yuri Niella, Brett Simes, Andrew Fox, Andrew Wright, Matt Waller, Madeline Riley, Lauren Meyer, Michael Drew, Hugh Pederson, Charlie Huveneers

      Researchers studying animals, particularly threatened or protected species, must ensure their activities are as harmless and non-disruptive as possible. We evaluated changes in white shark residency following three types of research activities and found evidence that none of them might have negatively affected these animals. Similar assessments should be performed when working with other species to ensure best practice and abide by codes for the care and use of animals. Photograph by Andrew Fox.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22004
       
  • Spatially structured brown-headed cowbird control measures and their
           effects on Kirtland’s warbler long-term population sustainability

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      Authors: Eric L. Margenau, Nathan W. Cooper, Donald J. Brown, Deahn M. Donner, Peter P. Marra, Pat Ryan
      Abstract: Eric L. Margenau, Nathan W. Cooper, Donald J. Brown, Deahn M. Donner, Peter P. Marra, Pat Ryan

      Brood parasitism can strongly impact songbird productivity and was a major factor resulting in the historical decline of the Kirtland’s warbler. We found contemporary cowbird brood parasitism rates were around 1.5% within the primary breeding area of the Kirtland’s warbler, the species can withstand a reduction in productivity of 13–18% before declining, and high parasitism rates in the peripheral breeding area are sustainable long-term if cowbird removal occurs in the core breeding area. Our study provides parasitism thresholds to assist with development of management strategies to ensure long-term viability of this conservation-reliant species. Photograph by Nathan W. Cooper.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22037
       
  • Vegetation cover and configuration drive reptile species distributions in
           a fragmented landscape

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      Authors: S. J. Mulhall, H. Sitters, J. Di Stefano
      Abstract: S. J. Mulhall, H. Sitters, J. Di Stefano

      Reptiles are vulnerable to habitat loss and fragmentation, yet the influence of landscape structure on species distributions is unknown. In this study we modelled the distributions of 40 reptile species in Victoria, Australia, and found that the cover and spatial configuration of native vegetation influence the distribution of most species. Knowledge of how landscape structure influences species’ distributions will help to improve biodiversity management in fragmented landscapes. Photograph by S. J. Mulhall.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-28
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21063
       
  • A comparison of lead-based and lead-free bullets for shooting sambar deer
           (Cervus unicolor) in Australia

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      Authors: Jordan O. Hampton, Andrew J. Bengsen, Jason S. Flesch, Simon D. Toop, Christopher Davies, David M. Forsyth, Niels Kanstrup, Sigbjørn Stokke, Jon M. Arnemo
      Abstract: Jordan O. Hampton, Andrew J. Bengsen, Jason S. Flesch, Simon D. Toop, Christopher Davies, David M. Forsyth, Niels Kanstrup, Sigbjørn Stokke, Jon M. Arnemo

      There is increasing awareness of the threats posed by lead-based ammunition in Australasia. We quantified outcomes for 276 sambar deer shot at with lead-based and lead-free bullets and compared flight distances for 198 deer that were killed with a single thoracic shot. The two bullet types produced similar outcomes&#x003B; hence, a lead-free transition would have few animal welfare trade-offs. Photograph by Geoff Rayment.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22099
       
  • Fox and cat responses to fox baiting intensity, rainfall and prey
           abundance in the Upper Warren, Western Australia

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      Authors: William L. Geary, Adrian F. Wayne, Ayesha I. T. Tulloch, Euan G. Ritchie, Marika A. Maxwell, Tim S. Doherty
      Abstract: William L. Geary, Adrian F. Wayne, Ayesha I. T. Tulloch, Euan G. Ritchie, Marika A. Maxwell, Tim S. Doherty

      Invasive predators are major drivers of global biodiversity loss. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) have contributed to the decline and extinction of many native species in Australia. We aimed to understand what influences the association between fox baiting intensity, red fox activity and feral cat activity. Although the association between fox baiting and fox activity is unclear, our results indicate that fox baiting may be most effective at decoupling the positive association between fox activity and prey activity. Our results also suggest a positive association between fox baiting intensity and feral cat activity, meaning integrated fox and cat management is required in the Upper Warren. Image created by the authors.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-24
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21184
       
  • What factors affect species richness and distribution dynamics within two
           Afromontane protected areas'

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      Authors: Eustrate Uzabaho, Charles Birasa Kayijamahe, Abel Musana, Prosper Uwingeli, Christopher Masaba, Madeleine Nyiratuza, Jennifer Frances Moore
      Abstract: Eustrate Uzabaho, Charles Birasa Kayijamahe, Abel Musana, Prosper Uwingeli, Christopher Masaba, Madeleine Nyiratuza, Jennifer Frances Moore

      Understanding trends in species richness and distribution is crucial for species conservation. We assessed population trends using camera traps coupled with multi-season occupancy models and found an increase in species richness and distribution for most species overtime. These results give insights on ways of tackling illegal activities and human–wildlife conflict on the basis of species commonly found along the park boundary. Photograph by TEAM Network.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-21
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21171
       
  • Coastal dolphins and marine megafauna in Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia:
           informing conservation management actions in an area under increasing
           human pressure

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      Authors: Kate R. Sprogis, Guido J. Parra
      Abstract: Kate R. Sprogis, Guido J. Parra

      Exmouth Gulf, Western Australia, is under increasing human pressure from industrial activities. The aim was to (1) provide data on the distribution, encounter rate, group size and behaviour of dolphins, and (2) report on the occurrence of other marine megafauna in the western gulf. The results provided are applicable for the spatial management and conservation efforts of marine megafauna, and aid in informing environmental impact assessments of individual and cumulative pressures. Photograph by Kate Sprogis.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-17
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22023
       
  • A comparison of methods for monitoring a sparse population of the red fox
           (Vulpes vulpes) subject to lethal control using GPS telemetry, camera
           traps and sand plots

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      Authors: Andrew Carter, Joanne M. Potts, Joanne Stephens, David A. Roshier
      Abstract: Andrew Carter, Joanne M. Potts, Joanne Stephens, David A. Roshier

      Foxes threaten the survival of many Australian wildlife species, yet little is known about their population numbers. We monitored a fox population for four consecutive years and compared a variety of monitoring methods and analytical techniques. Our findings will help land managers design fit-for-purpose monitoring programs to better understand the threat posed by foxes and the efficacy of efforts to manage their populations. Photograph by Andrew Carter.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22017
       
  • Nutritional stress and population density influence risk/reward decisions
           by elk

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      Authors: Rob Found
      Abstract: Rob Found

      Understanding the influence of population density and competition on animal risk/reward decisions is important for the management of hyperabundant ungulates. Using forage/novel objects to compare behavioural responses I found that elk in a high density enclosure took greater risks, showed more exploratory behaviour, and increased activity compared to low density elk. Because exploratory behaviour is correlated with other personality traits such as aggression, these results show how human-disturbance can select for animal behaviours that directly increase human–wildlife conflict. Photograph by Rob Found.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22040
       
  • Snow track counts for density estimation of mammalian predators in the
           boreal forest

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      Authors: Mark O’Donoghue, Brian G. Slough, Kim Poole, Stan Boutin, Elizabeth J. Hofer, Garth Mowat, Dennis Murray, Charles J. Krebs
      Abstract: Mark O’Donoghue, Brian G. Slough, Kim Poole, Stan Boutin, Elizabeth J. Hofer, Garth Mowat, Dennis Murray, Charles J. Krebs

      Estimation of abundance for cryptic species such as forest meso-carnivores is challenging. This manuscript evaluates the utility of snow-track indices for estimating abundance of Canada lynx and coyotes with data from three different intensive studies in northern Canada, and shows that track counts may be reliably used to monitor trends in numbers. We evaluate factors affecting track counts and make survey design recommendations. Photograph by Mark O’Donoghue.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-10-04
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21159
       
  • Tree use by koalas after timber harvesting in a mosaic landscape

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      Authors: Bradley Law, Chris Slade, Leroy Gonsalves, Traecey Brassil, Cheyne Flanagan, Isobel Kerr
      Abstract: Bradley Law, Chris Slade, Leroy Gonsalves, Traecey Brassil, Cheyne Flanagan, Isobel Kerr

      A better understanding of habitat use by threatened species can help optimise management when habitats are disturbed. Koalas were radio-tracked 5–10 years after timber harvesting and a wide range of tree species, sizes and topographic positions were used. Koalas commonly used trees regenerating after timber harvest, although preferences for medium-sized trees, and tallowwood at night, provide guidance for fine-tuning existing regulations. Photograph by Bronwyn Ellis.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR22087
       
 
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