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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 170)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 225)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 114)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 94)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intervención     Open Access  
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Regional Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.874
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1035-3712 - ISSN (Online) 1448-5494
Published by CSIRO Publishing Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Patterns of livestock depredation by snow leopards and effects of
           intervention strategies: lessons from the Nepalese Himalaya

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      Authors: Marc Filla, Rinzin Phunjok Lama, Tim Filla, Marco Heurich, Niko Balkenhol, Matthias Waltert, Igor Khorozyan
      Abstract: Marc Filla, Rinzin Phunjok Lama, Tim Filla, Marco Heurich, Niko Balkenhol, Matthias Waltert, Igor Khorozyan

      Livestock depredation drives large carnivores into conflicts with humans and poses a major threat to snow leopards in Asia. This study in the Nepalese Himalaya, which assesses livestock depredation by snow leopards regarding suitable intervention strategies, shows an urgent need for improved herding practices, predator-proofing corrals, and deterrent applications. We recommend controlled experiments to assess the effectiveness of different interventions – and wide application of the most effective ones to promote human–snow leopard co-existence. Photograph by Marc Filla.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21169
       
  • Increasing fire severity negatively affects greater glider density

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      Authors: Jarrah C. May-Stubbles, Ana Gracanin, Katarina M. Mikac
      Abstract: Jarrah C. May-Stubbles, Ana Gracanin, Katarina M. Mikac

      Increases in wildfire severity in Australia’s temperate forests is a major threat to forest-dependant species. Our study assessed the effect of differing levels of fire severity on the greater glider population density in southern New South Wales and found lowest densities in high fire-severity sites. We highlight the importance of low fire-severity sites as refuges in the short-term after wildfires. Photograph by Monica Knipler.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21091
       
  • Chainsaw hollows carved into live trees provide well insulated
           supplementary shelters for wildlife during extreme heat

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      Authors: Stephen R. Griffiths, Kylie A. Robert, Christopher S. Jones
      Abstract: Stephen R. Griffiths, Kylie A. Robert, Christopher S. Jones

      Hollow-dependent endotherms can experience hyperthermia and dehydration when occupying poorly insulated nest boxes during extreme heat. In this study, we compared cavity microclimates inside different artificial hollows during extremely hot summer weather, and showed that chainsaw hollows carved into live trees provide a much more stable and buffered microclimate than do log hollows and nest boxes. We recommend that managers consider incorporating chainsaw hollows into wildlife conservation programs in regions that experience extremely hot weather events. Photograph by Stephen Griffiths.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21112
       
  • Animal welfare outcomes of professional vehicle-based shooting of
           peri-urban rusa deer in Australia

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      Authors: Jordan O. Hampton, Darryl I. MacKenzie, David M. Forsyth
      Abstract: Jordan O. Hampton, Darryl I. MacKenzie, David M. Forsyth

      Vehicle-based shooting is widely used to control peri-urban deer populations, but the animal welfare outcomes of this technique have not been quantified in Australasia. We assessed the animal welfare outcomes of professional vehicle-based shooting of peri-urban rusa deer in eastern Australia. Our study showed that animal welfare outcomes varied among shooters and with shooting distance, and that the frequency of the most adverse animal welfare event (escaping wounded) was 3.5% of deer that were shot at and hit. Image by Juliana D. Spahr.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21131
       
  • Seasonal population dynamics and movement patterns of a critically
           endangered, cave-dwelling bat, Miniopterus orianae bassanii

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      Authors: Emmi van Harten, Ruth Lawrence, Lindy F. Lumsden, Terry Reardon, Andrew F. Bennett, Thomas A. A. Prowse
      Abstract: Emmi van Harten, Ruth Lawrence, Lindy F. Lumsden, Terry Reardon, Andrew F. Bennett, Thomas A. A. Prowse

      Knowledge of the seasonal movements of small insectivorous bats is essential for their conservation. We describe the seasonal cycle of congregation and movement patterns of the southern bent-winged bat, a critically endangered taxon in southeastern Australia. We record previously unknown movements by this taxon, and a more-than doubling of the overnight flight distance currently used to define management buffer zones. These findings have important implications for managing emerging risks, such as mortalities at windfarms and potential spread of exotic disease. Photograph by Emmi van Harten.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21088
       
  • Bayesian modelling reveals differences in long-term trends in the harvest
           of native and introduced species by recreational hunters in Australia

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      Authors: Paul D. Moloney, Andrew M. Gormley, Simon D. Toop, Jason S. Flesch, David M. Forsyth, David S. L. Ramsey, Jordan O. Hampton
      Abstract: Paul D. Moloney, Andrew M. Gormley, Simon D. Toop, Jason S. Flesch, David M. Forsyth, David S. L. Ramsey, Jordan O. Hampton

      Recreational hunting is popular across Australia for native and introduced wildlife species but little is known about long-term trends in harvest. We assessed recreational harvest levels via hunter surveys from three groups of wildlife (deer, ducks and quail) over 11 years in Victoria, Australia. Our study revealed that harvest levels for introduced deer have increased markedly, but there has been little change for native ducks and quail. Changes in hunter numbers, behaviour and efficiency are important to monitor for sustainable wildlife use. Photograph by Steven Wade.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21138
       
  • Space use and daily movement patterns in an arid zone agamid lizard
           †

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      Authors: Adam Bernich, Kimberly Maute, Isabella C. Contador-Kelsall, Paul G. Story, Grant C. Hose, Kristine French
      Abstract: Adam Bernich, Kimberly Maute, Isabella C. Contador-Kelsall, Paul G. Story, Grant C. Hose, Kristine French

      Data on the space use and movement patterns of a species are important, but are lacking for many species. Here we tracked central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) across different seasons to describe their space use and movement patterns, and to investigate what influences these patterns. Movement patterns were, as expected, driven by temperature, but unlike related species, there were a high proportion of individuals roaming over large areas. Photograph by Adam Bernich.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20152
       
  • Estimating habitat characteristics associated with the abundance of
           free-roaming domestic cats across the annual cycle

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      Authors: Hannah E. Clyde, D. Ryan Norris, Emily Lupton, Elizabeth A. Gow
      Abstract: Hannah E. Clyde, D. Ryan Norris, Emily Lupton, Elizabeth A. Gow

      Managing free-roaming cats requires understanding where cats are found and how this varies across the year. Using trail cameras in rural and urban areas in southern Ontario, Canada, cats were more likely to be found near buildings and away from agriculture in the spring/summer and near major roads and away from coyotes in the fall/winter. Our results have important implications for the development of management plans and the design of future studies. Photograph by Emily Lupton.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20205
       
  • Diverse moth prey identified in the diet of the critically endangered
           southern bent-wing bat (Miniopterus orianae bassanii) using DNA
           metabarcoding of scats

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      Authors: Johanna G. Kuhne, Jeremy J. Austin, Terry B. Reardon, Thomas A. A. Prowse
      Abstract: Johanna G. Kuhne, Jeremy J. Austin, Terry B. Reardon, Thomas A. A. Prowse

      The southern bent-wing bat is a critically endangered insectivorous miniopterid bat, the diet of which has never been described. Our study used metabarcoding of arthropod DNA in bat scats and guano to show the species feeds predominately on moths, many of which are agricultural pest species. Our research provides crucial diet knowledge and a framework for further study of insectivorous bat diets. Photograph by Steve Bourne.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21052
       
  • Impacts of ‘Curiosity’ baiting on feral cat populations in
           woodland habitats of Kangaroo Island, South Australia

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      Authors: Rosemary Hohnen, James Smith, Josh Mulvaney, Tom Evans, Trish Mooney
      Abstract: Rosemary Hohnen, James Smith, Josh Mulvaney, Tom Evans, Trish Mooney

      A feral cat eradication program is underway on Kangaroo Island, but controlling cats in large stretches of woodland remains a significant challenge. To address this issue, we tested the efficacy of the feral cat bait ‘Curiosity’ in woodland habitats. After baiting, the density of feral cats fell from 1.18 to 0.58 cats km −2, and 75% (six of eight) of GPS-collared cats within the zone died. Photograph by Rosemary Hohnen.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21090
       
  • Improving access to conservation detection dogs: identifying motivations
           and understanding satisfaction in volunteer handlers

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      Authors: Nicholas J. Rutter, Arthur A. Stukas, Tiffani J. Howell, Jack H. Pascoe, Pauleen C. Bennett
      Abstract: Nicholas J. Rutter, Arthur A. Stukas, Tiffani J. Howell, Jack H. Pascoe, Pauleen C. Bennett

      Conservation Detection Dogs (CDDs) are a highly effective means of collecting data on elusive and low-density plant and animal species, yet they can be inaccessible for many conservation organisations. A model in which skilled and committed volunteers participate in CDD training and deployment may increase CDDs accessibility. This study explores the motivations and satisfaction of handlers in a volunteer-based CDD model over 3 years and discusses implications for recruitment and retention to promote long-term cost effectiveness of volunteer-based programs. Photograph by Naomi Hodgens.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21113
       
  • Remote sensor camera traps provide the first density estimate for the
           largest natural population of the numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)

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      Authors: Sian Thorn, Marika Maxwell, Colin Ward, Adrian Wayne
      Abstract: Sian Thorn, Marika Maxwell, Colin Ward, Adrian Wayne

      A density estimate derived from camera trapping and spatially explicit capture recapture (SECR) modelling was produced for the first time for the numbat, a small cryptic mammal with individually distinct coat patterns. This has resulted in better population estimates. With refinements, this could form the basis of a standardised approach to assessing and monitoring numbat populations and their responses to translocations, threats and management, leading to better biodiversity conservation outcomes. Photograph by remote sensor camera, Department of Biodiversity Conservation and Attractions.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21115
       
  • Unique utilisation pattern responses of five sympatric ungulates to local
           phenological gradients

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      Authors: Hila Shamon, Andy J. Boyce, Kyran Kunkle, William J. McShea
      Abstract: Hila Shamon, Andy J. Boyce, Kyran Kunkle, William J. McShea

      Many studies have investigated single-species resource/habitat selection; however, there are still gaps in our understanding of multi-species systems and resource/habitat partitioning. We used an array of camera traps to investigate sympatric-ungulate responses to seasonal phenological gradients. We found unique species-specific utilisation patterns, emphasising that generalisations are difficult when managing multiple-species resources. Photograph by Smithsonian Institution.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20185
       
  • Grizzly bear response to translocation into a novel environment

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      Authors: Gordon B. Stenhouse, Terrence A. Larsen, Cameron J. R. McClelland, Abbey E. Wilson, Karen Graham, Dan Wismer, Paul Frame, Isobel Phoebus
      Abstract: Gordon B. Stenhouse, Terrence A. Larsen, Cameron J. R. McClelland, Abbey E. Wilson, Karen Graham, Dan Wismer, Paul Frame, Isobel Phoebus

      To mitigate conservation conflict, large carnivores are often translocated into novel environments, and are not typically monitored afterwards. We investigated the impacts of translocation by comparing translocated and resident grizzly bears, and found differences in exploration behaviour, habitat use, and response to human-caused mortality risk. Managers and the public should recognise that translocated bears require both time and space to adapt to their new environment. Photograph by Mark Bradley.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21060
       
  • Varying degrees of spatio-temporal partitioning among large carnivores in
           a fenced reserve, South Africa

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      Authors: Emma E. M. Evers, Mariëtte E. Pretorius, Jan A. Venter, Terry-Lee Honiball, Mark Keith, Nokubonga Mgqatsa, Michael J. Somers
      Abstract: Emma E. M. Evers, Mariëtte E. Pretorius, Jan A. Venter, Terry-Lee Honiball, Mark Keith, Nokubonga Mgqatsa, Michael J. Somers

      The spatio-temporal partitioning of large African carnivores (lions, spotted hyaenas and leopards) influences interspecific competition and coexistence within small, enclosed reserves. We deployed 110 camera traps (unbaited and baited) across Madikwe Game Reserve in South Africa and found temporal and spatial exclusion between lions and spotted hyaenas. However, no evidence was found of spatio-temporal partitioning between lions and leopards, and spotted hyaenas and leopards. Photograph by Emma E. M. Evers.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21045
       
  • Thermal imaging outshines spotlighting for detecting cryptic, nocturnal
           mammals in tropical rainforests

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      Authors: Avril H. Underwood, Mia A. Derhè, Susan Jacups
      Abstract: Avril H. Underwood, Mia A. Derhè, Susan Jacups

      Thermal imaging technology shows promise for improving detection rates of cryptic rainforest mammals. We found significantly more individuals of six species of nocturnal, arboreal mammals in the Australian Wet Tropics using a thermal imaging device than by spotlighting. We recommend thermal imaging be adopted as a main survey methodology for arboreal mammals in rainforest environments. Photograph by Avril Underwood.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-28
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21130
       
  • Exploring seasonal variation in the faecal glucocorticoid concentrations
           of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) living in a drought-prone,
           anthropogenic landscape

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      Authors: Georgia Troup, Robert Heinsohn, Lucy E. King, Katie L. Edwards
      Abstract: Georgia Troup, Robert Heinsohn, Lucy E. King, Katie L. Edwards

      Climate change is impacting the availability of resources for wildlife, potentially leading to elevated stress levels harmful to their health. Our research shows that African elephants living in Kenya’s Tsavo ecosystem may be physiologically unaffected by reduced habitat quality during typical dry seasons. Privately protected areas provide crucial habitat for wildlife during dry seasons, but elephants should be closely monitored regarding their stress response to increasingly severe drought periods.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21003
       
  • Predicting spatial and seasonal patterns of wildlife–vehicle
           collisions in high-risk areas †

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      Authors: Hanh K. D. Nguyen, Matthew W. Fielding, Jessie C. Buettel, Barry W. Brook
      Abstract: Hanh K. D. Nguyen, Matthew W. Fielding, Jessie C. Buettel, Barry W. Brook

      Roads and traffic often cause injury or death of wildlife through vehicle collisions. We aimed to identify the predictors associated with road-kill risk, finding that forested areas with no roadside fence on curved sections of road posed the highest risk to animals. We illustrated the value of using data-driven approaches to predictive modelling and offer a guide to practical management interventions that can mitigate road-related hazards. Photograph by Barry Brook.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21018
       
  • Wildlife–Human Survey: a rapid appraisal tool to assess mammal
           diversity and human–wildlife interactions in rural settings

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      Authors: Camila Alvez Islas, Cristiana Simão Seixas, Luciano Martins Verdade
      Abstract: Camila Alvez Islas, Cristiana Simão Seixas, Luciano Martins Verdade

      Quick and cost-effective field assessments of ecological and socioeconomic data are needed to aid wildlife conservation. In this study, we present a structured interview protocol, the Wildlife–Human Survey, and investigate its effectiveness in a pilot study in southeast Brazil. We present the pros and cons of using this protocol to gather information on mammal assemblages and human interactions in rural landscapes shared by both. We also highlight its potential for contributing to wildlife research and management. Photograph by Edinaldo Mesalino.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
      DOI: 10.1071/WR20189
       
  • Citizen science and community action provide insights on a threatened
           species: nest box use by the brush-tailed phascogale (Phascogale
           tapoatafa)

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      Authors: Jessica A. Lawton, Greg J. Holland, Chris Timewell, Asha Bannon, Elizabeth Mellick, Andrew F. Bennett
      Abstract: Jessica A. Lawton, Greg J. Holland, Chris Timewell, Asha Bannon, Elizabeth Mellick, Andrew F. Bennett

      Conservation actions and habitat restoration frequently depend on the motivation of community groups, often stimulated by ‘flagship’ species of concern. In south-eastern Australia, the installation of nest boxes to support hollow-dependent wildlife is a common activity of such groups. Analysis of monitoring data collected by a community group on nest box use by a threatened marsupial provides insights into the ecology of this species, and into the strengths and limitations of community-based, citizen science monitoring. Photograph by Jessica Lawton.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21102
       
  • Telemetry tails: a practical method for attaching animal-borne devices to
           small vertebrates in the field

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      Authors: K. A. Cornelsen, C. M. Arkinstall, J. van Weenen, A. K. Ross, J. C. Lawes, K. E. Moseby, A. Elphinstone, N. R. Jordan
      Abstract: K. A. Cornelsen, C. M. Arkinstall, J. van Weenen, A. K. Ross, J. C. Lawes, K. E. Moseby, A. Elphinstone, N. R. Jordan

      Attaching animal-borne devices to small vertebrates can present various logistical and animal welfare challenges for researchers. We describe a method for tail-mount attachment of devices to model species (order Peramelemorphia) that is both practical in the field and modifiable to accommodate various species and applications. We make recommendations on how this method can be applied, test the performance of devices and attachments in the field, and discuss the animal welfare considerations for its use. Photograph by Rick Stevens.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21107
       
  • The animal welfare impacts of a gas explosive device used for the
           management of wild rabbits in Australia

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      Authors: T. M. Sharp, S. R. McLeod
      Abstract: T. M. Sharp, S. R. McLeod

      Gas explosive devices are used to kill rabbits and disrupt small warrens where other methods, such as poisoning or ripping, are not suitable. We conducted trials in artificial and natural warrens to assess the animal welfare impact of the R3 Unit (formerly called the Rodenator™), and found that a blast pressure of at least 67 psi is required throughout the warren to kill rabbits quickly and humanely. Photograph by Brian Lukins.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-03
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21111
       
  • Behaviour of a large ungulate reflects temporal patterns of predation risk

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      Authors: Kevyn H. Wiskirchen, Todd C. Jacobsen, Stephen S. Ditchkoff, Steve Demarais, Robert A. Gitzen
      Abstract: Kevyn H. Wiskirchen, Todd C. Jacobsen, Stephen S. Ditchkoff, Steve Demarais, Robert A. Gitzen

      Prey response to temporal changes in predation risk is foundational to predator–prey dynamics and important when managing game populations. We examined white-tailed deer response to temporal patterns of recreational hunting in Alabama, USA. Deer altered movements during high-risk periods, although population-level responses were detected only when accounting for temporal scale of risk fluctuation. Our results demonstrated the awareness of a large ungulate to variation in predatory threats, and the need to consider temporal scale of risk fluctuation in future studies. Photograph by Kevyn H. Wiskirchen.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21047
       
  • It’s a trap: effective methods for monitoring house mouse
           populations in grain-growing regions of south-eastern Australia

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      Authors: Peter R. Brown, Steve Henry, Roger P. Pech, Jennyffer Cruz, Lyn A. Hinds, Nikki Van de Weyer, Peter Caley, Wendy A. Ruscoe
      Abstract: Peter R. Brown, Steve Henry, Roger P. Pech, Jennyffer Cruz, Lyn A. Hinds, Nikki Van de Weyer, Peter Caley, Wendy A. Ruscoe

      Wild house mice cause significant economic damage to grain crops; so, robust methods are required to monitor changes in population size and inform management decisions. We aimed to determine which survey methods could provide useful, effective information across large areas. Live-trapping supplemented with data from chew cards and active burrow counts remains the best approach to determine regional trends. Photograph by Peter Brown.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21076
       
  • Risk of predation and disease transmission at artificial water stations

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      Authors: Elliot B. Webb, Clare McArthur, Laura Woolfenden, Damien P. Higgins, Mark B. Krockenberger, Valentina S. A. Mella
      Abstract: Elliot B. Webb, Clare McArthur, Laura Woolfenden, Damien P. Higgins, Mark B. Krockenberger, Valentina S. A. Mella

      Providing supplemental water is a conservation technique that can provide an immediate positive impact to wildlife. This study aimed to assess the potential negative effects of predator presence and disease transmission at water stations constructed for koalas. We show that the risks associated with the use of water stations is low, but still exists for visiting wildlife and managers of the water stations. Photograph by The University of Sydney.

      Citation: Wildlife Research
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1071/WR21044
       
 
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