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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 142 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Museum Novitates     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 245)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 382)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chelonian Conservation and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access  
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access  
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eco-Entrepreneur     Open Access  
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 100)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Environment and Natural Resources Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intervención     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Media Konservasi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Natureza & Conservação : Brazilian Journal of Nature Conservation     Open Access  
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Northeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Northwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Acidification     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recycling     Open Access  
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Sustentabilidade em Debate     Open Access  
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The American Midland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
The Southwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover
Wildfowl
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.582
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0954-6324 - ISSN (Online) 2052-6458
Published by Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Contents and Dedication

    • Authors: Eileen Rees
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Defining flyways, discerning population trends and assessing conservation
           challenges of key East Asian Anatidae species: an introduction

    • Authors: Lei Cao, Xueqin Deng, Fanjuan Meng, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: Long-distance migratory waterbirds contribute many ecosystem functions and services, not least as important huntable quarry species, as well as posing challenges to human societies, through agricultural crop damage, threats to flight safety and pathogen transmission. As a result, throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, they have received considerable research attention to identify discrete population flyways upon which to build monitoring programmes, a basis for their effective internationally-coordinated conservation management, especially in North America and Europe. However, until recently, we lacked comparable information about migratory Anatidae populations in Far East Asia, despite long-term monitoring programmes and some knowledge of migration routes based on Japanese satellite tracking. In this article, we set the scene for the presentation of the species accounts for 10 large-bodied Anatidae species, which follow in this Special Issue of Wildfowl, and which attempt to fill some of the gaps in knowledge about these important species in Far East Asia. Papers in the Special Issue combine new telemetry data, winter counts and expert knowledge on the 10 species, to update maps of the extent of breeding and wintering areas, and to define the flyways that connect them. Critical stopover sites and the remotely-sensed habitats that these waterbird populations exploit along the way are also described, to provide a basis for their more effective future conservation.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Two distinct flyways with different population trends of Bewick's
           Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii in East Asia

    • Authors: Lei Fang, Junjian Zhang, Qingshan Zhao, Diana Solovyeva, Didier Vangeluwe, Sonia B. Rozenfeld, Thomas Lameris, Zhenggang Xu, Inga Bysykatova-Harmey, Nyambayar Batbayar, Kan Konishi, Oun-Kyong Moon, Bu He, Kazuo Koyama, Sachiko Moriguchi, Tetsuo Shimada, Jinyoung Park, Hwajung Kim, Guanhua Liu, Binhua Hu, Dali Gao, Luzhang Ruan, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Alexey Antonov, Anastasia Mylnikova, Alexander Stepanov, George Kirtaev, Dmytry Zamyatin, Savas Kazantzidis, Tsuneo Sekijima, Iderbat Damba, Hansoo Lee, Beixi Zhang, Yanbo Xie, Eileen C. Rees, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: Two of the most fundamental ecological questions about any species relate to where they occur and in what abundance. Here, we combine GPS telemetry data, survey data and expert knowledge for the first time to define two distinct flyways (the East Asian Continental and West Pacific flyways), migration routes and abundance for the Eastern population of Bewick’s Swan Cygnus columbianus bewickii. The Eastern population is the largest flyway population, supporting c. 77% of Bewick’s Swan numbers globally. GPS telemetry data showed that birds breeding in the Russian arctic from the Yamal Peninsula to c. 140°E (including the Lena and Yana Deltas), winter in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River in China (which we label the “East Asian Continental flyway”). Bewick’s Swans breeding from the Indigirka River east to the Koluchin Bay winter in Japan, mostly in Niigata, Yamagata and Ishikawa Prefectures (the “West Pacific flyway”). There was no overlap in migration routes used by tagged individuals from the two flyways. Counts of Bewick’s Swans in the East Asian Continental flyway during the 21st century have shown wide between-year variations, reflecting incomplete coverage in earlier years. Bewick’s Swans in this flyway currently numbers c. 65,000 birds based on extensive wintering survey coverage, compared to c. 81,000 in the early 2000s, based on less complete coverage. Chinese-wintering swans now concentrate mainly (c. 80%) at Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province and Hubei Lakes (mostly in Longgan Lake), compared to a more widespread distribution both within Poyang and throughout the Auhui Lakes in 2004 and 2005. In contrast, Bewick’s Swans of the West Pacific flyway now numbers c. 40,000, compared to just 542 in 1970. This population has shown no significant overall change since 2004, when it numbered c. 45,000 birds. Small numbers within this population probably also winter in South Korea. These results provide our first basic understanding of the winter distribution of Chinese- and Japanese-wintering Bewick’s Swans in relation to their breeding areas, confirming the need to coordinate future research and monitoring in the two flyways, as well as the need for more information on swans wintering in South Korea.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Migration routes and conservation status of the Whooper Swan Cygnus cygnus
           in East Asia

    • Authors: Peiru Ao, Xin Wang, Fanjuan Meng, Nyambayar Batbayar, Sachiko Moriguchi, Tetsuo Shimada, Kazuo Koyama, Jinyoung Park, Hwajung Kim, Ming Ma, Yang Sun, Jiandong Wu, Yajie Zhao, Weihu Wang, Lixun Zhang, Xin Wang, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Iderbat Damba, Eileen C. Rees, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: The migration routes and migratory patterns of Whooper Swans Cygnus cygnus summering in western Mongolia have not previously been described and the status of East Asian population is currently uncertain. Here we therefore use a combination of satellite tracking data, sightings of colour-marked individuals, published literature and expert knowledge to determine their distribution and site-use more precisely. Results indicated that the swans’ summer distribution extended further than had previously been recorded, with three new wintering areas (in Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu and Beijing) identified for the species in China. The East Asian Whooper Swan population was estimated to number 57,690 individuals, generating a new 1% threshold of 577 birds for determining sites of international importance for the species in the region. Using count data from winters 2011/12–2018/19, we identified eight wintering sites of international importance for the species in China, six in South Korea and 14 in Japan. Annual variation in national count totals highlighted the need to improve survey effort in China. Individual swans showed considerable within-winter fidelity to their wintering sites, with limited exchange between wintering areas. Migration duration, stopover duration, the number of stopover sites and migration legs were significantly greater in spring than in autumn, whilst migration speed was slower in spring than in autumn. Assessment of the habitats frequented found seasonal variation in the proportion of time that the swans spent on arable crops, pasture, wetlands and open water. From their GPS locations, 46.9%, 25.5%, 35.3% and 0.0% of the tagged swans were in protected areas during the summer, autumn staging, winter and spring staging periods, respectively. Our results provide a basis for the conservation of Whooper Swans in East Asia and illustrate the need for improved monitoring and further research into their migration, particularly for informing the protection and management of the main stopover and wintering sites for the species in China.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • The migratory Mute Swan Cygnus olor population in East Asia

    • Authors: Fanjuan Meng, Liding Chen, Beixi Zhang, Chang Li, Gerelt Zhao, Nyambayar Batbayar, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Iderbat Damba, Songtao Liu, Kevin A. Wood, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: Until recently, almost nothing was known about the migration routes, flyway structure and population status of the Mute Swan Cygnus olor in East Asia. Here, we use a combination of GPS telemetry data, collar resightings, published literature and expert advice to update existing knowledge of its summer and winter distribution in the region, and to provide a preliminary description of the swans’ migration and habitat use. Three flyway units were indicated for the Mute Swan in East Asia. The Eastern China-wintering unit includes swans summering along the lower Selenga River in Russia, in central Mongolia and Inner Mongolia in China, which winter on the coast of eastern China, where 403 swans were counted in 2014/15, but where less than 30 have been counted in very recent years. In the absence of better data, we conservatively estimate this Chinese-wintering group at 400 birds. Mute Swans in the Korean-wintering unit are individuals that winter along the Korean Peninsula and summer in Inner Mongolia (China) and the Amur region (on the border of China and Russia); they are poorly covered by the mid-winter waterbird counts in South Korea and we have no knowledge of numbers wintering in North Korea. Finally, mid-winter counts of the introduced and sedentary population of Mute Swans in Japan have amounted to c. 240 birds in the last five years. We therefore suspect that there are likely c. 1,000 Mute Swans in Far East Asia, but await improved coverage throughout the entire wintering grounds to provide a better population estimate, with the species confirmed as one of the poorer known of the migratory waterbirds in the region. A single GPS-tagged Mute Swan tracked successfully provided detailed information on its migration routes, timing of migration and habitat use (almost exclusively waterbodies) over four complete migration episodes. It summered at Dalai Lake, China, used three stopover sites (on the borders of Russia and North Korea, in North Korea, and Baicheng City in China) during spring and autumn migration, and showed site fidelity to summer, winter and stopover sites. Combined count data and GPS data suggested that Mute Swans mostly occur within protected areas throughout the year. However, further research is required to establish the true distribution and abundance of this small and scattered species within these three flyways in East Asia, as well as to confirm its population structure and migration routes. 
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Flyway structure, breeding, migration and wintering distributions of the
           globally threatened Swan Goose Anser cygnoides in East Asia

    • Authors: Iderbat Damba, Lei Fang, Kunpeng Yi, Junjian Zhang, Nyambayar Batbayar, Jianying You, Oun-Kyong Moon, Seon-Deok Jin, Bo Feng Liu, Guanhua Liu, Wenbin Xu, Binhua Hu, Songtao Liu, Jinyoung Park, Hwajjung Kim, Kazuo Koyama, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Hansoo Lee, Oleg Goroshko, Qin Zhu, Luyuan Ge, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: Telemetry data, wintering waterbird surveys and expert knowledge are used here to describe the links between the summer and winter distributions of the Swan Goose Anser cygnoides in East Asia, and to determine the status of the species. Updated information suggests the existence of at least two discrete migratory flyways in the region: an “Inland flyway” and a “Coastal flyway”. The Inland flyway consists of birds that summer in Mongolia, the Durian steppe and northeast China, extending east to Khanka Lake in far eastern Russia. These geese winter in the Yangtze River floodplain in China, congregating at Poyang and Shengjin Lakes. Total wintering numbers for this group of birds were estimated at c. 54,400 in recent years, a decline from c. 78,000 in the early 2000s. Birds of the Coastal flyway seem discrete from those following the Inland flyway and occur further east, spending the summer at Udyl Lake and northern Sakhalin Island in Far East Russia. They migrate to winter mainly on the Minjiang River estuary (Fujian Province, China), with a few remaining to winter in South Korea. About 400 Swan Geese have been counted in the Coastal flyway population in recent years, and, following declines from 800 in the early 2000s, it is thought that they currently face extinction. Our results highlight that urgent and effective conservation efforts are needed to protect this declining population of a globally threatened species, especially those wintering in Korea and the Minjiang Estuary. New data provide a scientific basis for the conservation of this species in the region, but also highlight the need for improved monitoring and management of the declining numbers wintering in China.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Population trends and migration routes of the East Asian Bean Goose Anser
           fabalis middendorffii and A. f. serrirostris

    • Authors: Chang Li, Qingshan Zhao, Diana Solovyeva, Thomas Lameris, Nyambayar Batbayar, Inga Bysykatova-Harmey, Hansoo Li, Vladimir Emelyanov, Sonia B. Rozenfeld, Jinyoung Park, Tetsuo Shimada, Kazuo Koyama, Sachiko Moriguchi, Jianhua Hou, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Hwajung Kim, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Iderbat Damba, Guanhua Liu, Binhua Hu, Wenbin Xu, Dali Gao, Oleg Goroshko, Alexey Antonov, Olga Prokopenko, Otgonbayar Tsend, Alexander Stepanov, Aleksandr Savchenko, Gleb Danilov, Nikolai Germogenov, Junjian Zhang, Xueqin Deng, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: Our ability to define the population status, migration routes and seasonal distribution of Bean Geese Anser fabalis throughout the annual cycle in East Asia is severely compromised by the presence of two subspecies (Eastern Taiga Bean Goose A. f. middendorffii and Eastern Tundra Bean Goose A. f. serrirostris), which are difficult to differentiate in the field. In this analysis, using tracking data from telemetry-tagged geese, count survey data and expert knowledge, we attempt to update existing knowledge of the ranges covered by both subspecies of Bean Goose in East Asia. We suggest that, in summer, the Eastern Tundra Bean Goose ranges from the Taimyr Peninsula in the west to the Anadyr River in the east. Taiga Bean Geese breed further south in the taiga zone, and results indicate that they occur in north-western Mongolia, Yakutia and the Kamchatka Peninsula during the summer months. The winter distribution of both subspecies extends through China, Japan and South Korea. Tracking data from 154 individuals revealed a major overlap in the migration routes of Tundra Bean Geese wintering in China, South Korea and Japan, but discrete flyways for Taiga Bean Geese wintering in different regions. Long-term ground surveys carried out in the wintering range showed that numbers of Bean Geese in China and South Korea have increased significantly, to number 253,100 and 88,300 individuals respectively, of which roughly 10% are considered to be Taiga Bean Geese, about which subspecies we need to know more. Numbers of Japanese-wintering Bean Geese are slowly rising, currently numbering c. 10,300 (c. 900 Tundra Bean Geese and c. 9,400 Taiga Bean Geese). On the basis of these national and flyway estimates, derived from counts over the last five years, we identify new key wintering sites for the species in East Asia. Distributional changes at sites in China showed that wintering Bean Geese (most likely of the Tundra form) have become more widespread and numerous in the Yangtze River floodplain since the early 2000s. We argue for future strengthening of international cooperation to continue tracking and monitoring of Bean Geese, to provide a sound scientific basis for the effective management and protection of the flyway populations of both Bean Goose subspecies throughout East Asia.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Flyway connectivity and population status of the Greylag Goose Anser anser
           in East Asia

    • Authors: Ming Yan, Kunpeng Yi, Junjian Zhang, Nyambayar Batbayar, Zhenggang Xu, Guanhua Liu, Binhua Hu, Bofu Zheng, Aleksei Antonov, Oleg Goroshko, Gerelt Zhao, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Tuvshinjargal Erdenechimeg, Jugdernamjil Nergui, Iderbat Damba, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: European populations of the Greylag Goose Anser anser have been studies for over 50 years, but those in the East Asian flyway are less well known. Here we describe the breeding and wintering distribution of Greylag Geese wintering in China, based on historical and newly-reported telemetry data (from 31 individuals contributing complete migrations), wintering waterbird surveys and expert knowledge. Historical records, and also the data presented here, indicate that Greylag Geese breeding in the north of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, and in Mongolia east of 93°E, through Inner Mongolia to western parts of Heilongjiang Province, China, likely almost all winter east of 107°E in China (97% in the Yangtze River floodplain and 3% in the Yellow River floodplain). Annual mid-winter waterbird counts confirm that very few Greylag Geese winter in Japan and South Korea. Count data suggest that the Far East Asia Greylag population wintering in China currently numbers 30,000 individuals, a major increase compared to 3,263 counted in 2005. Historical records however indicate that the wintering distribution was far greater 30 years ago, and that Greylag Geese are now less common than previously in Guangdong, Guizhou, Hainan, Henan, Hunan, Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces, as the species has become more concentrated further north in the Yangtze and Yellow River floodplains. On the basis of count data from winters 2010/11–2019/20, we identified 21 current key wintering sites (holding ≥ 1% of the flyway population, i.e. 300 birds) in the Yangtze River floodplain and one in the Yellow River floodplain for this population. Increasing use of farmland in winter, as well as site protection and sympathetic local management of wintering sites may have contributed to recent increases in Greylag Goose abundance in the flyway. These results provide a more robust basis for assessing the current status of the Far East Asia Greylag Goose population and a guide to priorities for further internationally coordinated research of the species.  The need to improve monitoring and habitat management for maintaining the increasing numbers wintering in China is also emphasiseduropean populations of the Greylag Goose Anser anser have been studies for over 50 years, but those in the East Asian flyway are less well known. Here we describe the breeding and wintering distribution of Greylag Geese wintering in China, based on historical and newly-reported telemetry data (from 31 individuals contributing complete migrations), wintering waterbird surveys and expert knowledge. Historical records, and also the data presented here, indicate that Greylag Geese breeding in the north of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China, and in Mongolia east of 93°E, through Inner Mongolia to western parts of Heilongjiang Province, China, likely almost all winter east of 107°E in China (97% in the Yangtze River floodplain and 3% in the Yellow River floodplain). Annual mid-winter waterbird counts confirm that very few Greylag Geese winter in Japan and South Korea. Count data suggest that the Far East Asia Greylag population wintering in China currently numbers 30,000 individuals, a major increase compared to 3,263 counted in 2005. Historical records however indicate that the wintering distribution was far greater 30 years ago, and that Greylag Geese are now less common than previously in Guangdong, Guizhou, Hainan, Henan, Hunan, Anhui and Jiangsu Provinces, as the species has become more concentrated further north in the Yangtze and Yellow River floodplains. On the basis of count data from winters 2010/11–2019/20, we identified 21 current key wintering sites (holding ≥ 1% of the flyway population, i.e. 300 birds) in the Yangtze River floodplain and one in the Yellow River floodplain for this population. Increasing use of farmland in winter, as well as site protection and sympathetic local management of wintering sites may have contributed to recent increases in Greylag Goose abundance in the flyway. These results provide a more robust basis for assessing the current status of the Far East Asia Greylag Goose population and a guide to priorities for further internationally coordinated research of the species.  The need to improve monitoring and habitat management for maintaining the increasing numbers wintering in China is also emphasised.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Contrasting trends in two East Asian populations of the Greater
           White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons

    • Authors: Xueqin Deng, Qingshan Zhao, Diana Solovyeva, Hansoo Lee, Inga Bysykatova-Harmey, Zhenggang Xu, Katsumi Ushiyama, Tetsuo Shimada, Kazuo Koyama, Jinyoung Park, Hwajung Kim, Guanhua Liu, Wenbin Xu, Binhua Hu, Dali Gao, Bu He, Yong Zhang, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Sachiko Moriguchi, Daria Barykina, Alexei Antonov, Alexander Stepanov, Junjian Zhang, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: East Asian Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons populations are less well defined and monitored than those in Europe and North America. Here, we combine historical and newly-reported telemetry data, wintering waterbirds surveys and expert advice to synthesis and update our knowledge of movements between the breeding and wintering distributions for Greater White-fronted Geese in East Asia. These sources suggest the existence of two biological flyway populations with contrasting population trends. The first consists of birds breeding on the Russian arctic, extending from the Khatanga River to east of Svyatoy Nos Cape (near Yana Bay, Yakutia), which migrates to winter in China where it is now almost totally confined to the Yangtze River floodplain. In recent years, this population has numbered between 30,000–55,000 individuals (compared to 140,000 in the 1990s), with > 70% concentrated at Poyang Lake in winter. The number of key sites identified for the species in China has increased with improved survey coverage since 2004. Birds from the second population also breed in arctic Russia, from east of Svyatoy Nos Cape to the Anadyr River, and winter in Japan and South Korea where 224,000–242,000 (in 2017/18 and 2018/19) and 178,000–182,000 (2018/19 and 2019/20) occur respectively, compared to a total population size of 60,000 reported in the late 1990s. Although the telemetry studies provide single examples of tracked birds moving between the two populations, suggesting some permeability, we contend that the populations are relatively discrete, but recommend retaining three management units (for China-, Japan- and Korea-wintering birds) because of the count, management and legislative logic of doing so. The results given here provide a robust assessment of the current status of these populations, but between-year differences in count totals underline the need for continued improvement of the count system in China. They also build a stronger basis for the effective conservation for this species in the region, highlighting the need for improved monitoring and management for the declining numbers wintering in China.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Rapid decline of the geographically restricted and globally threatened
           Eastern Palearctic Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus

    • Authors: Peiru Ao, Xin Wang, Diana Solovyeva, Fanjuan Meng, Toshio Ikeuchi, Tetsuo Shimada, Jinyoung Park, Dali Gao, Guanhua Liu, Binhua Hu, Tseveenmyadag Natsagdorj, Bofu Zheng, Sergey Vartanyan, Batmunkh Davaasuren, Junjian Zhang, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: The Lesser White-fronted Goose Anser erythropus, which breeds across northern Eurasia from Norway to Chukotka, is globally threatened and is currently classified as Vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. The Eastern Palearctic population of the species was thought to breed in arctic Russia, from east of the Taimyr Peninsula to Chukotka, and to winter in East Asia, but its precise status, abundance, breeding and wintering ranges, and migration routes were largely unknown, reducing the effectiveness of conservation efforts. In this paper, we combined results from satellite tracking, field surveys, a literature review and expert knowledge, to present an updated overview of the winter distribution and abundance of Lesser White-fronted Geese in the Eastern Palearctic, highlighting their migration corridors, habitat use and the conservation status of the key sites used throughout the annual cycle. Improved count coverage puts the Eastern Palearctic Lesser White-fronted Geese population at c. 6,800 birds in 2020, which represents a rapid and worrying decline since the estimate of 16,000 in 2015, as it suggests at least a halving of numbers in just five years. East Dongting Lake (Hunan Province) in China is the most important wintering site for the species in East Asia, followed by Poyang Lake (Jiangxi Province) and Caizi Lake (Anhui Province), with one key wintering site in Miyagi County in Japan. Satellite tracking showed that eight individuals captured during summer on the Rauchua River, Chukotka, Russia wintered in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River floodplain in China. Their migration speed was slower in spring than in autumn, mainly because of longer stopover duration at staging sites in spring. The tracked geese mainly used cultivated land on migration stopovers (52% in spring; 45% in autumn), tundra habitat in summer (63%), and wetlands (66%) in winter. Overall, 87% of the GPS fixes were in protected areas during the winter, far greater than in spring (37%), autumn (28%) and summer (7%). We urge more tracking of birds of differing wintering and breeding provenance to provide a fuller understanding of the migration routes, staging sites and breeding areas used by the geese, including for the birds wintering in Japan. The most urgent requirement is to enhance effective conservation and long-term monitoring of Lesser White-fronted Geese across sites within China, and particularly to improve our understanding of the management actions needed to maintain the species. Collaboration between East Asian countries also is essential, to coordinate monitoring and to formulate effective protection measures for safeguarding this population in the future.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Migration routes and population status of the Brent Goose Branta bernicla
           nigricans wintering in East Asia

    • Authors: Yusuke Sawa, Chieko Tamura, Toshio Ikeuchi, Kaoru Fujii, Aisa Ishioroshi, Tetsuo Shimada, Shirow Tatsuzawa, Xueqin Deng, Lei Cao, Hwajung Kim, David Ward
      Abstract: Of the world’s Brent Goose Branta bernicla populations, the migration routes and winter distribution of the East Asian population of Brent Geese B. b. nigricans are the least well known. We therefore marked Brent Geese at their primary pre-migratory staging area in Notsuke Bay, Hokkaido, Japan to describe their migration between breeding and wintering areas in East Asia. Additionally, count data were compiled from the literature to identify important wintering and staging sites for the species, following Ramsar Convention criteria, and to assess trends in numbers of Brent Geese recorded in Japan and South Korea. The tracking data provided the first direct evidence of migratory connectivity between staging sites in northern Japan and the Korean Peninsula. A total of 26 internationally important sites were identified in the Russian Far East (7), northern Japan (16), northeast China (2) and the Korean Peninsula (1). Autumn surveys made at staging sites in Japan indicate that the East Asian population is increasing, although more extensive surveys for Brent Geese in China and on the Korean Peninsula are needed to confirm overall population trends and to identify critical habitats and wintering sites. We encourage the continuation of tracking studies, to describe more precisely the main migration routes, staging areas and, importantly, the breeding grounds for this vulnerable Brent Geese population.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Contrasting changes in abundance of Falcated Duck Mareca falcata wintering
           in the Yangtze River floodplain and on the eastern coast of China

    • Authors: Beixi Zhang, Xin Wang, Fanjuan Meng, Sergey Kharitonov, Binhua Hu, Dali Gao, Guanhua Liu, Yong Zhang, Aleksei Antonov, Davaasuren Batmunkh, Oleg Goroshko, Taej Mundkur, Lei Cao, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: The Falcated Duck Mareca falcata, which is considered Near Threatened by IUCN, winters almost exclusively in East Asia, with greatest numbers occurring in the Yangtze River floodplain and along the coasts of eastern China. Given gaps in knowledge of its distribution and population status, we combined tracking studies, winter surveys and expert knowledge, to revise the geographical definition of its summer range in eastern Russia, Mongolia and Japan, and the main wintering range in China, South Korea, Japan and India. Data from six tagged individuals tracked on migration between their wintering and breeding grounds, combined with a single ring recovery, indicated that Falcated Ducks wintering in the Yangtze River migrate via the Northeast China Plain to breed over an extensive area in eastern Russia and northeast China. However, in the absence of telemetry data from birds wintering in the Indian sub-continent, Japan and the Korean Peninsula, we cannot yet define a flyway structure for the species. Mid-winter field surveys of Yangtze River floodplain wetlands in January 2004/05, 2015/16 and 2019/20 showed Falcated Ducks to be widely distributed, with 17 key sites supporting > 93% of the total wintering numbers counted in the region. Falcated Ducks in the Yangtze River floodplain increased from c. 15,000 counted in winter 2004/05, to c. 40,000 in 2015/16, and 88,000 in 2019/20, ascribed to a combination of improved survey coverage as well as increases in local abundance (based on sequential counts at key sites in 2004/05, 2015/16 and 2019/20). Coastal surveys undertaken in eastern China in winters 2003/04–2006/07 identified two key sites, which together supported 84.9% of the 14,904 individuals recorded. Between 2015/16 and 2019/20, abundance at these two sites had declined by 78.8% and 99.4% respectively, likely attributable to habitat loss through land reclamation during that period. More telemetry research, combined with comprehensive surveys of wintering, stopover and breeding sites is required to improve our understanding of migratory connectivity and the major migration routes of this species. The wide distribution of Falcated Duck also requires further comprehensive surveys in other wintering areas (e.g. central China and along the eastern coasts of China) to track changes in local abundance within its winter quarters, which in turn should confirm whether increases in abundance in the Yangtze River floodplain reflect an increase or a redistribution of the population. Long-term monitoring and sympathetic management of key staging and wintering sites used by the Falcated Duck in China, and across the rest of its range, are also required to ensure the efficacy of conservation measures for the long-term survival of the species.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Moving forward: how best to use the results of waterbird monitoring and
           telemetry studies to safeguard the future of Far East Asian Anatidae
           species

    • Authors: Lei Cao, Fanjuan Meng, Junjian Zhang, Xueqin Deng, Yasuke Sawa, Anthony D. Fox
      Abstract: This special issue of Wildfowl has summarised our knowledge of the biogeographical populations of ten key Anatidae species in East Asia, their current and recent estimated abundance and distributions, their migration routes and movements, and sites of importance to these populations at key stages of their annual cycles. The analysis was possible only through the active cooperation of the many biologists and site managers involved in studies of these species in different countries participating in a collaborative programme of monitoring, research and analysis. Development of new telemetry and bio-logging technology has played a key role in our ability to describe linkages between the breeding, moulting, staging and wintering areas used by individual waterbirds. Compilation of movement data recorded for tracked individuals of each species has provided initial information on flyway delineation and range definition, which forms the basis for future identification of biogeographical populations. Additionally, the tracking data have identified critical stopover and wintering sites for the different species which, when overlaid upon site protection boundaries, has enabled a preliminary appraisal of the effectiveness of current site safeguarded networks in providing adequate protection for waterbird populations along their flyways. Synthesis and analysis of new count data has permitted a description of recent population trends and a reassessment of their current size, together with recommendations for improving population monitoring into the future. High rates of utilisation of farmland habitats during staging periods within China, especially during spring migration, contrast with low levels of winter use, when most species are largely confined to natural habitats. We discuss the significance of these facets of habitat use and the need for improved study of feeding ecology throughout the non-breeding periods, to determine optimal land management and thus inform their conservation requirements at different times of year. Finally, we consider the way forward, with a view to maintaining and building on the impressive international collaboration established to date, in order to ensure that these long distance migratory waterbirds are safeguarded for future generations.
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
  • Instructions for Authors

    • Authors: Eileen Rees
      Issue No: Vol. 0
       
 
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