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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.257
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 10 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2044-1266 - ISSN (Online) 2044-1274
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Preventive conservation: environmentally friendly sustainable current
           practices in Asian libraries

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      Authors: Yeni Budi Rachman, Wiwit Ratnasari, Shuri Mariasih Gietty Tambunan
      Abstract: This study aims to identify current practices of environmentally friendly sustainable preventive conservation in Asian libraries. This study uses a predominantly quantitative survey for data collection with a combination of open and closed questions. From 237 survey links sent, 22 responses were received from libraries in 16 Asian countries. This study uncovers current practices in four areas of environmentally sustainable preventive conservation in Asia: collection preservation, environmental monitoring and management, integrated pest management, and collections care and handling. Challenges to implementing sustainable preventive conservation were also revealed. The response rate was relatively low, and responses were not received from all countries in Asia. As such, while the study provides a starting point for further research, it cannot be assumed that the findings are representative of Asian libraries in general. In addition, some aspects of preventive conservation (for example, disaster preparedness, exhibition) and library preservation management were excluded from the study, and research on these topics, together with environmental and economic factors, is encouraged, along with qualitative research methods. This study highlights the environmentally friendly sustainable initiatives that libraries employ in their preservation programmes and increases awareness of challenges to implementing those initiatives. To date there has been little research on environmentally sustainable preventive conservation practices within Asia's libraries. This study therefore makes a valuable contribution to understanding current practices of preventive conservation in Asia.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2023-0128
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Actual and virtual food heritage walking tour for building better
           citizenship understanding (insight from Indonesia)

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      Authors: Ghifari Yuristiadhi Masyhari Makhasi
      Abstract: This study aims to analyze the extent to which the walking tour in virtual version appeals to the younger generation and still provides lessons about cultural acculturation that can inspire citizenship today compared to an actual walking tour. This quasi-experimental design uses pre-test and post-test with structured interviews for data collection from five purposive participants who related the experience and storytelling that they experienced from the tours. This study finds while virtual tours cannot replace physical walking tours because of real multisensory experiences, storytelling and guiding interpretation through virtual tours is more likeable than walking tours Due to some potential disturbance in the field. However, the guiding interpretation related to the message of multiculturalism still reaches tourists both through actual and virtual tours. This study has limitations regarding the number of participants. A larger number of participants may provide greater objectivity. In addition, regarding the quasi-experimental method used, it is possible to have different results if the actual walking tour precedes the virtual tour, and this can be a broad discussion space for future researchers. Practically, this walking tour is expected to be a model for civic education, especially in Indonesia, which is delivered in a fun way through a walking tour. This study offers a novelty regarding the development of a walking tour based on citizenship education, which can be seen from its impact on the younger generation when it is held virtually or actually.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0110
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • How does heritage contribute to inclusive growth'

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      Authors: Brenda Denise Dorpalen, Eirini Gallou
      Abstract: The first objective of this article is to analyse the reasons to pursue inclusive growth, that is economic growth accompanied by a reduction of social inequalities in different dimensions. The second objective of the article is to develop a systematised framework to understand the different channels and enablers by which heritage can contribute to inclusive growth through a review of specialised literature. The methodology of this article is based on an exhaustive review of existing literature around models of economic development and their ability to decrease social inequalities. It critically reviews theoretical and empirical studies on existing economic approaches and links them with the heritage policy field. The article finds that countries should pursue inclusive development since it is a fundamental condition for social cohesion, trust and society's overall well-being and because it enables economic growth to be sustainable through time. It also identifies four channels through which heritage can contribute to inclusive development: in its public good dimension, in its capacity to equalise opportunities, in its ability to reduce social, educational and health disparities and in its capacity to decrease spatial income inequalities through regeneration processes. The framework, that is developed to categorise the different channels and enablers through which heritage could contribute to inclusive growth, is not empirically tested. Further research could approach this by estimating a difference in difference model. However, data limitations could limit this objective in the short-term. Its originality relies in the development of a conceptual framework that is aimed at shaping heritage policies that target, at the same time, the reduction of inequalities and economic growth.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Leveraging digitalization and people-centeredness: an investigation of the
           attractiveness of Italian museums and cultural institutions

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      Authors: Rocco Palumbo
      Abstract: The evolving visitors' expectations and the unfolding digital transformation compel rethinking on the service offering of museums and cultural institutions. Although digitalization and people-centeredness are widely exploited to enhance the visiting experience, there is limited evidence of their implications on organizational attractiveness. The article investigates this issue, examining the service attributes that entice visitors. The study collected secondary data from the latest census study by the Italian Institute of Statistics on museums and cultural institutions. Two hierarchical regression models have been run on a sample of large publicly owned organizations (n = 312) to identify the service factors that were most effective in attracting Italian and foreign visitors. Museums and cultural institutions undergoing a digital transformation were more effective in attracting visitors. The delivery of virtual tours and online events captivated the Italian audience. Foreigners appreciated the opportunity to use applications augmenting the on-site visit. Digitalization and people-centeredness improve the attractiveness of museums and cultural institutions. Using digital channels to engage visitors fosters their desire to interact with cultural heritage. Furthermore, digitalization enriches the on-site visit, expanding conventional services with virtuality. However, the adverse effects on cultural heritage should be carefully handled. This study highlights the service attributes that add to the attractiveness of museums and cultural institutions, enabling them to engage visitors and improve the visiting experience.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2023-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Architectural historicism: the reflection of Western medieval
           architecture on contemporary churches. Jordan as a case study

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      Authors: Safa A. Alhusban, Ahmad A. Alhusban, Mohammad-Ward A. Alhusban
      Abstract: This research purpose was to explore the meaning of historicism, architectural historicism, the architectural attributes, design principles, elements and ornamentations of churches in medieval Western architecture, and how they were reflected in contemporary churches' design in Jordan. This research used the historical descriptive–interpretive qualitative research method. Around 24 Western medieval churches were selected, studied and analyzed to explore the common design attributes of each historical era. The design attributes of each era were segmented under three categories: Design principles (plans' typology, facades, shapes, details, composition and building form), design elements (openings, towers and entrances) and ornamentation (sculptures, paintings and interior decoration). Additionally, three modern Jordanian churches were analyzed using the same method to compare with the historical churches through personal observations, field trips, researchers' memories, site visits, archival records, plans, images, books, slides, details and note-making. Different types of evidence were used, such as determinate, contextual and inferential. In addition, different tactics for analysis were used in analyzing the historical churches: site familiarity, use of existing documents, virtual and visual inspection and comparison with conditions elsewhere. Credibility was achieved when the results were reviewed and compared with the original and similar information. Early Christian design principles, elements and ornamentations were reflected in Jordanian churches more than in Byzantine, Renaissance, Romanesque and Gothic. The design principles of Western medieval architecture were reflected in the selected Jordanian churches more than in ornamentation and design elements. Moreover, this research found that the highest reflection of Western medieval architecture on Jordanian churches was in designing the plans, which is a basilica with a central nave and aisles followed by opening styles, façade, shapes, entrances design, composition, painting and the minimum reflection was in sculptures. Additionally, there was no reflection on tower design and interior decoration. This research encourages architects to enhance architectural historicism by focusing on historical styles in contemporary designs and using design elements, principles and decorations of historical styles in medieval architecture to enrich the variety and originality of architectural design and create new modern stylistic architecture. Architectural historicism increases historical self-awareness and helps a generation of architects to answer the question: In what style should be built. Learning the design principles, not copying the past, is becoming a trend for most architects. Architectural historicism introduces new temporal elements, gives a new meaning and primary function to architecture to become socio-temporal and contextual contrast and reflects the essential points of references of the past through design methodology to express the present. The advantage of this research is to put an end to architects' role in syncretism and subjectivism. Instead, historicism architects equipped with the necessary knowledge and supported by the published research and inventors of historical architecture, can choose, imitate, adapt, borrow and use the correct historical forms that originated in a given period.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2023-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Research on the production, application and management of virtual reality
           in the National Palace Museum

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      Authors: Shao-Chun Wu, James Quo-Ping Lin
      Abstract: Virtual reality (VR) can be used as an alternative mean for viewing collections at home when it is not possible to visit museums due to COVID-19. This study took the development process of VR at Taiwan's National Palace Museum (NPM) as a case to discuss the characteristics of VR developed there in different periods and how NPM transforms the contents of its collections into VR. This study used a case study to analyze the development process of VR at NPM from 2014 to 2019 and summarized the characteristics of the development and application of VR. The authors find that the history of VR application in NPM is a process from exploring the technology to gradually getting familiar with the potential of its application. Its development can be divided into the exploration and experiment stage from 2014 to 2015, the single collection interpretation stage in 2016 and the multipurpose application stage from 2017 to 2019. It is suggested that museums should adopt a long-term strategy to introduce VR, make plans carefully and pay attention to the limitations of VR application. The results of this study are suitable for art and history museums. Many research studies on the application of VR in museums mostly focused on the benefits and technologies of adopting VR in museums as well as specific museum VR projects. There is still scant literature on the development process of museum VR from the perspective of museum organizations.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2022-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Frameworks for climate risk management (CRM) in cultural heritage: a
           systematic review of the state of the art

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      Authors: Olufemi Samson Adetunji, Jamie MacKee
      Abstract: A comprehensive understanding of the determining factors and implications of the frameworks for appreciating the relationships between climate risks and cultural heritage remains deficient. To address the gap, the review analysed literature on the management of climate risk in cultural heritage. The review examines the strengths and weaknesses of climate risk management (CRM) frameworks and attendant implications for the conservation of cultural heritage. The study adopted a two-phased systematic review procedure. In the first phase, the authors reviewed related publications published between 2017 and 2021 in Scopus and Google Scholar. Key reports published by organisations such as the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) and International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) were identified and included in Phase Two to further understand approaches to CRM in cultural heritage. Results established the changes in trend and interactions between factors influencing the adoption of CRM frameworks, including methods and tools for CRM. There is also increasing interest in adopting quantitative and qualitative methods using highly technical equipment and software to assess climate risks to cultural heritage assets. However, climate risk information is largely collected at the national and regional levels rather than at the cultural heritage asset. The review establishes increasing implementation of CRM frameworks across national boundaries at place level using high-level technical skills and knowledge, which are rare amongst local organisations and professionals involved in cultural heritage management. The review established the need for multi-sectoral, bottom-up and place-based approaches to improve the identification of climate risks and decision-making processes for climate change adaptation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Methodological approach for an Atlas of architectural design in built
           heritage: contributions of the School of Porto

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      Authors: Teresa Cunha Ferreira, David Ordóñez-Castañón, Rui Fernandes Póvoas
      Abstract: This research seeks to provide methodological bases for the identification, documentation and critical reflection of good practices of architectural design in built heritage. These are applied explicitly to the School of Porto architects, which express a high sense of pedagogy and community practice in this field. The methodological approach defines the selection criteria for a georeferenced inventory and the procedures for in-depth analysis of adaptive reuse strategies. The works included in the inventory were selected according to geographical, chronological, typological, qualitative and quantitative criteria. The cases chosen for in-depth analysis have been studied along four thematic axes to dissect all the intervention processes (previous state, design/construction and final state). This approach is supported by a cross-analysis of different sources (oral, written, graphic) and using drawing as a fundamental research tool. The research has collected and disseminated up to 150 works by 44 architects, providing a comprehensive portrait of heritage intervention by the School of Porto over the past decades. The selection of 22 buildings for in-depth documentation reveals a particular sensibility toward the cultural values through a case-by-case approach based in deep knowledge of the preexisting context and the introduction of contemporary additions in continuity and harmonious relation with the environmental and sociocultural context. This work provides a novel methodology suitable for further extension and adaptation to other case studies, as a first contribution to a more comprehensive “Atlas of Architectural Design in Built Heritage” with European case studies. The research aims to introduce new and deeper perspectives on reference works that may constitute pedagogy for the future practice of architects within contextual, inclusive and sustainable approaches.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-11-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2023-0131
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Engaging institutions in crowdsourcing close-range photogrammetry models
           of urban cultural heritage

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      Authors: Eugene Ch'ng
      Abstract: The need to digitise is an awareness that is shared across our community globally, and yet the probability of the intersection between resources, expertise and institutions are not as prospective. A strategic view towards the long-term goal of cultivating and digitally upskilling the younger generation, building a community and creating awareness with digital activities that can be beneficial for cultural heritage is necessary. The work involves distributing tasks between stakeholders and local volunteers. It uses close-range photogrammetry for reconstructing the entire heritage site in 3D, and outlines achievable digitisation activities in the crowdsourced, close-range photogrammetry of a 19th century Cheah Kongsi clan temple located in George Town, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Penang, Malaysia. The research explores whether loosely distributing photogrammetry work that partially simulates an unorganised crowdsourcing activity can generate complete models of a site that meets the criteria set by the needs of the clan temple. The data acquired were able to provide a complete visual record of the site, but the 3D models that was generated through the distributed task revealed gaps that needed further measurements. Key lessons learned in this activity is transferable. Furthermore, the involvement of volunteers can also raise awareness of ownership, identity and care for local cultural heritage. Key lessons learned in this activity is transferable. Furthermore, the involvement of volunteers can also raise awareness of identity, ownership, cultural understanding, and care for local cultural heritage. The value of semi-formal activities indicated that set goals can be achieved through crowdsourcing and that the new generation can be taught both to care for their heritage, and that the transfer of digital skills is made possible through such activities. The mass crowdsourcing activity is the first of its kind that attempts to completely digitise a cultural heritage site in 3D via distributed activities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0107
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Adaptive reuse of built heritage: conserving and designing with values

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      Authors: Nadin Augustiniok, Claudine Houbart, Bie Plevoets, Koenraad Van Cleempoel
      Abstract: Adaptive reuse processes aim to preserve heritage values while creating new values through the architectural interventions that have become necessary. This claim provokes a discussion about the meaning of values, how we can preserve them in practice and how we can translate them into architectural qualities that users experience. Riegl's understanding of the different perspectives of heritage values in the past and present opens up the possibility of identifying present values as a reflection of current social, material and political conditions in the architectural discourse. This qualitative and practical study compares two Belgian projects to trace the use of values in adaptive reuse projects from an architectural design perspective. The Predikherenklooster, a 17th-century monastery in Mechelen that now houses the public library, and the C-Mine cultural centre in Genk, a former 20th-century coal mine, are compared. The starting point is Flemish legislation, which defines significance through values, distinguishing between 13 heritage values. The study demonstrates the opportunities that axiological questions offer during the design process of an adaptive reuse project. They provide an overarching framework for tangible and intangible aspects that need to be discussed, particularly in terms of the link between what exists, the design strategy and their effect. Adaptive reuse can draw on approaches from both heritage conservation and contemporary architecture and explore values as a tool for “re-designing” built heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2023-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • UnDoing: a research-through-curation project that investigates the reuse
           of the built environment

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      Authors: Sally Helen Stone, Laura Sanderson
      Abstract: This paper considers the exhibition: UnDoing. This research-through-curation project examined interactions within existing spaces and situations. This established links between the selected exhibits, the gallery, the city and with the continuum of the previous exhibition. Carefully selected architects, designers and artists were invited to contribute—those who pursued a contextual approach; whose practice explored the way buildings, places and artefacts are reused, reinterpreted and remembered. Through the act of curation, this research uncovered a series of different approaches to constructed sites and existing buildings, from layered juxtaposition, the refusal to undo, to interventions of new elements within architectural works. Curation offered the opportunity to consider works of architecture and of art through the same lens, for direct comparisons to be made and the influence of one upon the other to be comprehended. The examination processes the architect employs is similar to that of the artist; the development of an understanding of place, and from this synthesis, creative interpretation. However, despite the similarities in the starting position, the elucidation developed by the artist can be vastly different to that of the architect. The juxtaposition and new classifications created by the exhibition encouraged visitors to look at art, architecture and the city in a different way; to grasp the direct link between the different subjects; and the possibilities created. The two driving factors for UnDoing were places of previous occupation and the city of Manchester. The qualities of surrounding constructed environment combined were combined with attitudes towards existing structures and places.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-10-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2023-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Genoa, former church of Saints Gerolamo and Francesco Saverio and former
           university library: conservation, reuse and enhancement proposals

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Stefano Francesco Musso, Giovanna Franco
      Abstract: This article sets out to show how principles and questions about method that underlie a way of interpreting the discipline of conservation and restoration can find results in research and studies, aiming at achieving even conscious reuse process. The occasion is the very recent research performed on the former Church of Saints Gerolamo and Francesco Saverio in Genoa, Italy, the Jesuit church annexed to the 17th-century College of the order. It is a small Baroque jewel in the heart of the ancient city, former University Library and actually abandoned, forgotten for years, inaccessible and awaiting a new use. The two-year work carried out on the monumental building was conducted according to a study and research methodology developed and refined over the years within the activities of the School of Specialisation in Architectural Heritage and Landscape of the University of Genoa. It is a multidisciplinary and rigorous approach, which aims to train high-level professionals, up-to-date and aware of the multiple problems that interventions on existing buildings, especially of a monumental nature, involve. The biennal study has been carried out within the activities of the Post-Graduate Programme in Architectural Heritage and Landscape of the University of Genoa. The work methodology faces the challenges of the contemporary complexity, raised by the progressive broadening of the concept of cultural “heritage” and by the problems of its conservation, its active safeguard and its reuse: safety in respect of seismic risk, fire and hydro geological instability, universal accessibility – cognitive, physical and alternative – resource efficiency, comfort and savings in energy consumption, sustainability, communication and involvement of local communities and stakeholders. The goals of the work were the following: understanding of the architectural heritage, through the correlated study of its geometries, elements and construction materials, surfaces, structures, spaces and functions; understanding of the transformations that the building has undergone over time, relating the results of historical reconstructions from indirect sources and those of direct archaeological analysis; assessment of the state of conservation of the building recognising phenomena of deterioration, damage, faults and deficits that affect materials, construction elements, systems and structures; identification of the causes and extent of damage, faults and deficits, assessing the vulnerability and level of exposure of the asset to the aggression of environmental factors and related risks; evaluation of the compatibility between the characteristics of the available spaces, the primary needs of conservation, the instance of regeneration and possible new uses; the definition of criteria and guidelines for establishing the planning of conservation, restoration and redevelopment interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-10-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2023-0069
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The role of attributes defining intervention concepts in international
           doctrinal documents on built heritage

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Mi Lin, Ivan Nevzgodin, Ana Pereira Roders, Wessel de Jonge
      Abstract: Attributes conveying cultural significance play a key role in heritage management, as well as in differentiating interventions in built heritage. However, seldom the relation between interventions and attributes, either tangible or intangible, has been researched systematically. How do both tangible and intangible attributes and interventions relate' What attributes make interventions on built heritage differ' This paper conducts a systematic content analysis of forty-one international doctrinal documents—mainly adopted by the Council of Europe, UNESCO and ICOMOS, between 1877 and 2021. The main aim is to reveal and compare the selected eight intervention concepts, namely—restoration (C1), preservation (C2), conservation (C3), adaptation (C4), rehabilitation (C5), relocation (C6), reconstruction (C7) and renewal (C8)—and their definitions, in relation to attributes, both tangible and intangible. The intensity of the relationship between intervention concepts and attributes is determined based on the frequency of the mentioned attributes per intervention. There were three key findings. First, although the attention to intangible attributes has increased in the last decades, the relationship between interventions and tangible attributes remains stronger. The highest frequency of referencing the tangible attributes was identified in “relocation” and “preservation,” while the lowest was in “rehabilitation.” Second, certain attributes play contradictory roles, e.g. “material,” “use” and “process,” which creates inconsistent definitions between documents. Third, as attributes often include one another in building layers, they trigger the intervention concepts in hierarchical patterns. This paper explores and discusses the results of a novel comparative analysis between different intervention concepts and definitions, with a particular focus on the attributes. The results can support further research and practice, clarifying the identified differences and similarities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-10-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2023-0095
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Struggling with globalization challenges: addressing the oversupply of
           cultural facilities in the world heritage city of Cuenca, Ecuador

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: David Sánchez Alvarado, Nicolás Arízaga Hamilton, Verónica Cristina Heras, Julia Rey-Pérez
      Abstract: Cuenca, a World Heritage City, faces urban expansion as residents move to the outskirts, leaving the historic center abandoned and deteriorating. The challenge now is to relocate these spaces into sustainable and cohesive nodes. This research aims to identify cultural facility oversupply in the city center and understand the required usage for heritage buildings to promote a habitable, sustainable and cohesive historic center. The study consisted of two phases. Firstly, a georeferenced spatial analysis and monthly usage frequency of each facility is proposed. Secondly, interviews explored the criteria for designating heritage buildings as cultural facilities. Additionally, a survey assessed urban habitability in three historic center parishes, measuring aspects like coverage, satisfaction and security from residents' perspectives. The underutilization of cultural facilities demonstrates both inefficient heritage management and a lack of resident interest in cultural activities and neighborhood decision-making. Thus, ensuring collective ownership of heritage assets becomes crucial. Additionally, the municipality's approach to heritage must be reconsidered. While implementing a cultural program may seem faster and cheaper, the long-term cost-benefit of maintaining a cohesive historical center outweighs that of a dispersed city. This paper calls for a fundamental reimagining of the concept of built heritage, emphasizing the need for a more inclusive and integrated approach that goes beyond museum and tourism-driven strategies. This perspective recognizes the importance of social, cultural and environmental sustainability in revitalizing the historic center, considering the broader context of the city and its diverse inhabitants.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-09-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2023-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • How stakeholders collaborate' Meeting the challenges and availing the
           opportunities of military heritage tourism

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      Authors: Prachi Mahajan, Bharti Gupta, Sarath Chandra Kanth Pedapalli
      Abstract: The goal of this study is to identify the problems of marketing military heritage as a tourism resource as well as to show how studies are linking the tourism industry with military historical sites to valorize epic wars and great tragedies as tourism development resources. In this study, evaluation of recently published research papers, articles and publications on military tourism is conducted. While most DMOs (Destination Management Organizations) and tourism organizations have been slow to acknowledge the potential benefits of military heritage tourism, the examples offered show how stakeholders can help promote military heritage tourism. The study has suggested managerial implications that will aid in the integration of stakeholder participation in the development of military heritage tourism. This paper examines the constraints and potential benefits of military heritage tourism, as well as collaboration between stakeholders and military historic sites.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0127
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Assemblage urbanism: the role of heritage in urban placemaking
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Torgrim Sneve Guttormsen, Joar Skrede, Paloma Guzman, Kalliopi Fouseki, Chiara Bonacchi, Ana Pastor Pérez
      Abstract: The paper explores the potential value of urban assemblage theory as a conceptual framework for understanding the role heritage has in social sustainable urban placemaking. The authors conceptualise urban placemaking as a dynamic and complex social assemblage. Heritage is one of the many dimensions of such a complex and dynamic urban assembly. Based on the approach to urban assemblage theory, the authors aim to uncover how postindustrial city-making unfolds. When approaching the case studies, the authors ask the following: Whose city for which citizens are visible through the selected case studies' How is social sustainability achieved through heritage in urban placemaking' The main research material is derived from theoretical literature and the testing of an assemblage methodological approach through three Norwegian urban regeneration case studies where heritage partake in urban placemaking. The three case studies are the Tukthus wall (what is left of an 19th century old prison), the Vulkan neighbourhood (an 19th century industrial working area) and Sørengkaia (an 19th century industrial harbour area) in Oslo, Norway. The three case studies are representing urban regeneration projects which are common worldwide, and not at least in a European context. The paper reveals the dynamic factors and processes at play in urban placemaking, which has its own distinct character by the uses of heritage in each of the case study areas. Placemaking could produce “closed” systems which are stable in accordance with its original functions, or they could be “open” systems affected by the various drivers of change. The paper shows how these forces are depending on two sets of binary forces at play in urban placemaking: forces of “assemblages” co-creating a place versus destabilising forces of “disassembly” which is redefining the place as a process affected by reassembled placemaking. For research, the authors focus on the implications this paper has for the field of urban heritage studies as it provides a useful framework to capture the dynamic complexity of urban heritage areas. For practice, the authors state that the paper can provide a useful platform for dialogue and critical thinking on strategies being planned. For society, the paper promotes the significance in terms of fostering an inclusive way of thinking and planning for urban heritage futures. The paper outlines dynamics of urban regeneration through heritage which are significant for understanding urban transformation as value for offering practical solutions to social problems in urban planning. The assemblage methodological approach (1) makes awareness of the dynamic processes at play in urban placemaking and makes the ground for mapping issue at stake in urban placemaking; (2) becomes a source for modelling urban regeneration through heritage by defining a conceptual framework of dynamic interactions in urban placemaking; and (3) defines a critically reflexive tool for evaluating good versus bad (heritage-led) urban development projects.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-09-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2022-0208
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Ancient theatre acoustical qualities reconstruction dilemma for modern use
           and the international charters

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      Authors: Naif Adel Haddad
      Abstract: The general attitude of the ancient theatre conservation strategies and policies is still concerned primarily with their architectural physical appearance without considering their authentic scientific acoustical qualities. The paper attempts to illustrate and discuss how to enhance their acoustic heritage to arouse the audience's interest and needs. Thus, supporting their reconstruction based on recent acoustical research and community needs-related concerns and opportunities for ancient theatre's modern use. It is based on reviewing the main issues related to reconstruction in the international charters and conventions and how to infuse ancient theatres with their full role. It discusses the dilemma and debates regarding the theatre stage wall, colonnade (portico) restoration and anastylosis. Is it sufficient enough to recover the theatre sound volume' Or to rethink for full physical reconstructions of these missing related acoustical theatre architectural elements to their original level and layout as in ancient times in parallel to their virtual reconstruction' The cultural significance of the authentic theatre's acoustical qualities needs to reform the conservation strategies and policies for a more flexible and resilient approach. It should be postulated, re-examined and advocated parallel to their 3D virtual reconstruction in the related international charters and conventions. The paper's implications are not immediate; it is far-reaching. It suggests the importance of acoustics in analysing historic theatre performance venues and reforming conservation strategies and approaches. This issue is especially critical for architects, conservators, the heritage community and the public audience. Recommendations are made for potential bold reconstruction actions that may be taken to achieve further sustainability, comfort, and permeability in modern theatre-use performances. Their physical reconstruction for improving the performance of contemporary theatre use regarding retaining the acoustic cultural significance should be more flexible and resilient in the charters.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0126
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “No religion is superior”: history, culture, politics and heritage
           preservations of  deity

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      Authors: Mathias Chukwudi Isiani, Benjamin Chukwudebelu, Uchechukwu Onyishi
      Abstract: The main objective of this research is to interrogate the cultural and historical significance of deities in Igbo land, using the Ogwugwu Mmiri deity in Okija as a case study. The study presents evidence that the Ogwugwu Mmiri in Okija has helped preserve the Igbo cultural heritage and traditional values, norms and precepts, which counters the narrative that Christianity undermined these aspects of Igbo society in the past. The research on the Ogwugwu Mmiri deity in Okija centered its discussion on the Okija community in the present-day Anambra State, Southeastern Nigeria. The research relied on qualitative methodology through the participant observation method. Primary and secondary sources of data were used to interpret the study area. The researchers visited the research site and maintained the Covid-19 protocol during the interview sessions. The study reveals that Africans practiced religion prior to the arrival of missionaries and challenges the prevailing notion that colonial religions erased the indigenous beliefs of the Igbo people. By examining the worship of the Ogwugwu Mmiri deity, the research observes that the community has embraced a dual religious system, where both Christian and traditional worshipers revere the deity. However, the study concludes that the deity's existence in Okija was not impacted by the government's invasion in 2004. The traditions, beliefs, customs and norms of a society reflect past events and guide daily interactions with the environment. This is exemplified by the historical discourse surrounding the Ogwugwu Mmiri deity in the Okija community, where the deity's activities align with Christian beliefs and norms. The research demonstrates how young people and indigenous inhabitants protect and preserve their cultural heritage and traditions from external influences.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0082
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The effectiveness and functioning of air cavities on architectural
           heritage with pathology caused by rising damp

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      Authors: M.Teresa Gil-Muñoz, Félix Lasheras-Merino
      Abstract: Rising damp affects the deterioration and conservation of architectural heritage. Air cavities built next to the base of these buildings on an unsaturated floor can reduce the damage to foundations and walls due to this. These are passive systems, which are usually designed with no objective data to show their functioning and effectiveness. This is why the authors are presenting this study. This study is presented starting with simple field equipment for representative types for a previous cataloguing of cases in Spain. The physical parameters of the air in this research are air speed and evaporation in the cavities and the base, taking the local climate and the particular formal and construction characteristics of each case study as a reference. The results of the analysis validate the method and the efficiency of such cavities, whose performance is greater in systems with a variety of features, that is to say, those which work by thermal or wind flow rather than those which only use hygric flow. This work is novel because there are not in situ experimental works which prove the functioning and effectiveness of these systems.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2022-0160
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Comparative analysis of responses to COVID-19 in UNESCO Landscapes and
           World Heritage sites from Southern Europe and America

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      Authors: Aida López-Urbaneja, Sergio Escribano-Ruiz, Ainara Cortés-Vizanda, Álvaro Gutierrez Ilabaca, Juan José Aramburu Lasa, Mikel Garai Lopez, Kepa Castro Ortiz de Pinedo, Alberto García Porras, Agustin Azkarate Garai-Olaun
      Abstract: Due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, UNESCO Landscapes and World Heritage sites have faced unstable situations. Both at the sites themselves and in the research centres, universities and even the homes of the people involved, they have acted and responded to the best of their ability. In this context, the aim of the comparative analysis of different cases carried out here is to understand the main effects of the pandemic in the short term. On the one hand, the purpose is to determine what the general response trends have been and, on the other, to measure the resilience capacity in each case. Up to eight cases studies representing different and diverse kinds of Heritage and Protected Natural sites from Southern Europe and America are compared. In a context of uncertainty, new responses, unique opportunities and hitherto unseen weaknesses have arisen in research and management of natural and cultural heritage. In general terms, the dialogue between officials, technicians and researchers that have put together this article underlines the need to work towards a governance model that engages everyone in dialogue. Discrepancies between overlapping strategies and plans, which is the main conflict detected, should be avoided while a decentralisation of policies could be more operational. In this sense, situated knowledge may be of help in configuring practical management tools. This paper compares and contrasts for first time the effects of the pandemic in Europe and Latin America. This exercise has provided a valuable diagnostic for present and future heritage management.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2022-0092
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Assessment of stakeholders' perspectives on infill buildings in the
           historical settings of an eastern India state – Odisha

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      Authors: Rabi Narayan Mohanty, Ashaprava Mohanta
      Abstract: The infill design approach for heritage settings is a challenging task, and it draws the attention of design professionals and residents. The extant literature has advocated for a contextual design approach for new buildings in heritage sites. However, the degree of contextualism for a new building in heritage sites is subjective, and it varies between exact replication and contrast scales. This study aims to evaluate an appropriate design approach for historic precincts of Odisha, an eastern state of India. Two prime eastern heritage sites (Puri and Ekamra Kshetra) are selected as cases in this study. This research methodology involves identifying key architectural elements from both sites and a questionnaire (prepared by design experts) based on interviewing 400 residents and 36 design professionals on their aesthetic preferences for the different architectural styles and elements. The questionnaire was prepared by the design experts based on the identified architectural styles and elements of both sites. Descriptive statistics and correlation analysis are used to measure the significance of design approaches and elements. This study's outcome confirms that most of the respondents (design professionals and residents) prefer the replication design approach with traditional architectural elements of Odisha. Also, documentation of the chronological development of architectural styles and elements of heritage sites of Odisha is done in this research. This study has a few limitations: first, the land use characters (mixed, residential, commercial, etc.) of buildings in the heritage precinct are not considered in this research; second, this research has not included the financial aspect of infill design and last, the impact of respondents' socioeconomic factors on their aesthetic perceptions is not considered in this research. The development authorities can use the outcomes of this research to implement a design strategy for infill buildings in the historical sites of Odisha. This research article has documented traditional architectural elements of two prime heritage sites of India. To date, no quantitative research has been done on infill design approaches in any Indian heritage precincts. This is the first quantitative research on the perception of stakeholders and users on the infill design in historical settings of Eastern India. This research has identified key architectural styles, elements and materials of the heritage sites.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2022-0094
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Historic development of policies and regulations concerning residential
           heritage in the Old City of Aleppo

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Christine Kousa, Barbara Lubelli, Uta Pottgiesser
      Abstract: Housing interventions carried out in accordance with current regulations in the Old City of Aleppo, both before and after the Syrian war, are minor in comparison to those carried out without a license and illegally. This suggests current policies are inadequate and needs upgrading. This article critically reviews current Syrian policies and their implementation on residential heritage in the Old City of Aleppo with the aim to identify gaps and propose directions for modifications. Next to a review of the text of official policies and implementation documents, the archive of the Directorate of the Old City has been consulted and license applications, presented in the period 2018–2022, have been examined. Moreover, interviews with decision-makers from academics and practice were conducted. Major limitations of these policies and relative application procedures have been identified: these involve: legal/administrative, economic and social aspects. The specific needs have been highlighted and some proposals for improvement made.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Safeguarding intangible cultural heritage for sustainable development. The
           case of traditional salt activity

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Laura del Valle
      Abstract: The authors have carried out a research project on artisanal salt activity in the Gulf of Cadiz, providing a new vision of the theories of intangible cultural heritage. The main objective has been to characterise artisanal salt activity in terms of its cultural and sustainable values, a perspective that had not been addressed until now. Moreover, the replacement of this activity by a more industrialised one has contributed to problems in the preservation of this heritage and a transformation of its places. The research has combined qualitative methodology, based on observation and fieldwork, with a statistical review of the phenomenon under study. Finally, the data has been triangulated to understand the heritage and sustainable value, as well as its historical evolution. All this contributes to understanding the importance of artisanal salt activity as an element of the intangible cultural heritage of the region, for the conservation of biodiversity and sustainable ways of life in the marshes of the Gulf of Cadiz, and the possibility of preserving it in the face of the problems of globalisation. To date, there has been no research that combines sustainability and heritage in the field of salt activity. Likewise, until this study was carried out, there had been no research on salt activity from the perspective of intangible cultural heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-08-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The heritage of historic villages: an asset for the development of
           cultural tourism (case of the Oued Labiod valley in the Aures, Algeria)

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      Authors: Sonia Mechiat, Djamel Dekoumi
      Abstract: This article aims to clarify the link between heritage and development, focussing on how this wealth can be a resource for the promotion of tourism in the villages of the Oued Labiod valley in the Aures and reduce their backwardness. The paper opted for a qualitative empirical study, through interviews and direct observations. The data were supplemented by literature searches. The collected data were then analysed to obtain results. The results show that the problem of the heritage of historic villages can no longer be reduced to the contemporary phenomenon of decay and physical mutations of traditional buildings. It is a more complex issue that encompasses major concerns requiring curious, comprehensive and constitutive solutions. Due to the particularity of the architecture and the specificity of the topography and climate of the study area, the results of the research may not be generalisable and are limited to the chosen example. The document offers advice to local actors to ensure that heritage properties are taken into consideration in all development policies and determines that the success of these projects depends on the involvement of the local population and the improvement of the legal framework. As the first study on the issue of sustainable tourism development of the cultural heritage of the Oued Labiod valley, the document proposes new ways of development that respect the historical values and authenticity of the heritage and involve the inhabitants.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-07-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2022-0144
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Adaptive reuse of an operating urban infrastructure: a conversation with
           raumlabor about the Floating University Berlin

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      Authors: Marco Ranzato, Federico Broggini
      Abstract: The adaptive reuse of heritage has the potential to socially and culturally re-signify dilapidated or suspended structures in the urban landscape. However, the scope of adaptive reuse could be broadened to include the constellation of infrastructure such as water and sewerage system, waste disposal facilities, power and communication plants and networks that support urban life but whose access – and maintenance patterns – remain the preserve of specialized technicians. A conversation with some of the architects from the raumlabor collective involved in the Floating University Berlin project, about the stormwater detention basin of the former Berlin Tempelhof airport, provides an insight into the mechanisms by which adaptive reuse can also concern the infrastructural world in operation. In Tempelhof's change of function from an international airport to a large abandoned urban space and then to a park, the detention basin has never ceased to function. But the subsequent process of reuse has reshaped the patterns of maintenance of the reservoir, leaving room for first non-human and then unskilled human action. From this still overlooked reading perspective, it becomes clear how precisely flexible reuse, consisting of a constantly renegotiated interweaving of violated protocols and backward steps, allows the scope of adaptive reuse to be extended to infrastructures in operation. From secret domains of nature's transformation, they become places of openness in which to experience and better understand the entanglement of contemporary socio-ecological relations that underlie the urban condition.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-07-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2023-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Aesthetics, gentrification and new identities: the comparison of adaptive
           reuse practices in contemporary Budapest and Warsaw

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      Authors: Katarzyna Sadowy, Hanna Szemző
      Abstract: Post-socialist urban development changed cityscapes and city life profoundly, reusing public space in a different manner and reinterpreting the role of work, heritage, and consumption among others. Focusing on two case studies – the Outer Józsefváros in Budapest and the Praga North district in Warsaw – the paper examines this transformation, following how and to what extent these characteristic neighbourhoods have changed, how local heritage has been reconceptualised and what role work has played in this process. The comparative analysis combines a literature review with a case study investigation that includes interviews, on-site visits, experiments with locally driven adaptive reuse, and document analysis. The two case studies put heritage conservation, identity building and value determination processes in the context of architectural design, economic investment and labour market. The paper shows the relation between aesthetics and economic transition, how work, or its loss, has shaped the areas, creating a milieu of transition in a physical and a social sense, offering a reconceptualization of local identity. It also highlights the seminal value of civic initiatives and artists/artisans to increase the engagement of the local community. The paper provides a rarely done comparison between two former Socialist cities undergoing similar transformations. It focuses on work as intangible heritage, the connected architectural aesthetics and their role in shaping the identity of various groups.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-06-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2022-0172
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Hybrids and heritage resources: rethinking the social foundation
           of historic environment records in England

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: William R. Illsley
      Abstract: By reconsidering the concept of the historic environment, the aim of this study is to better understand how heritage is expressed by examining the networks within which the cultural performances of the historic environment take place. The goal is to move beyond a purely material expression and seek the expansion of the cultural dimension of the historic environment. Conceptually, the historic environment is considered a valuable resource for heritage expression and exploration. The databases and records that house historic environment data are venerated and frequented entities for archeologists, but arguably less so for non-specialist users. In inventorying the historic environment, databases fulfill a major role in the planning process and asset management that is often considered to be more than just perfunctory. This paper approaches historic environment records (HERs) from an actor network perspective, particularizing the social foundation and relationships within the networks governing the historic environment and the environment's associated records. The paper concludes that the performance of HERs from an actor-network perspective is a hegemonic process that is biased toward the supply and input to and from professional users. Furthermore, the paper provides a schematic for how many of the flaws in heritage transmission have come about. The relevance here is largely belied by the fact that HERs as both public digital resources and as heritage networks were awaiting to be addressed in depth from a theoretical point of view.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-06-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2022-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Industrial heritage identification process in North Africa:
           19th and 20th century flour mills in Algeria

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      Authors: Abdelhamid Hati, Amina Abdessemed-Foufa
      Abstract: The protection of industrial heritage emerged as a major concern when those buildings and installations representative of the industry, became at risk. North Africa, considered the geographical gateway to European countries, experienced enormous industrial activity during the French colonial era. Industrial buildings such as the flour mills, were built during this era of colonial rule. Today, a lack of legislation concerning industrial heritage has left this type of buildings with no protection, leading this paper to a preservation process. The aim of this paper is to locate and identify the flour mills of the 19th and 20th centuries in Algeria. This research consists of cross-referencing data from archived documents against the geographical location. The results obtained are the first step in the process of preservation. The success of this research can be summarized as follows: identification of 88.46% of the flour mills in Algeria by means of the inventory data collected, and their location, with the use of a crisp logic, the remaining 9.62% with the use of fuzzy logic by the attribution of a “fuzzy radius” with a total localization and identification of 98.08%. The use of both crisp (Boolean) and fuzzy logic as part of the geographical localization method.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-05-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The “Venice syndrome” in Tallinn Old Town

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      Authors: Triin Talk, Liis Ojamäe, Katrin Paadam, Riin Alatalu
      Abstract: The article aims to elucidate the impact that neoliberal tourism development has had on the living environment of the Old Town of Tallinn through the perceptions of residents and property owners. This article's empirical analysis is based on a sociological survey conducted amongst 338 residents and property owners of Tallinn Old Town. The research showed quite low tourism tolerance amongst the residents of Tallinn Old Town, the host community, in comparison to the city's residents in general. Half of the residents estimated the tourism load to be too heavy during the high season before the pandemic. The differences in perceptions based on geographical location indicated that people who lived in the most touristic areas of the Old Town were more critical about all aspects about their living environment. The article provides a detailed insight into the social impact of tourism in a historical urban area, where the post-socialist neoliberal context has enabled unrestricted tourism growth and increasing vulnerability of the local community. The roots of these processes can be traced back to Soviet urban and housing policies. The case exemplifies the significance of local time-space specificities to be considered in building an understanding of contemporary touristification and its impact on local communities in heritage areas.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-05-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0046
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Values and interventions: dynamic relationships in international doctrines
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Mi Lin, Ana Pereira Roders, Ivan Nevzgodin, Wessel de Jonge
      Abstract: Even if there is a wealth of research highlighting the key role of values and cultural significance for heritage management and, defining specific interventions on built heritage, seldom the relation to their leading values and values hierarchy have been researched. How do values and interventions relate' What values trigger most and least interventions on heritage' How do these values relate and characterize interventions' And what are the values hierarchy that make the interventions on built heritage differ' This paper conducts a systematic content analysis of 69 international doctrinal documents – mainly adopted by Council of Europe, UNESCO, and ICOMOS, during 1877 and 2021. The main aim is to reveal and compare the intervention concepts and their definitions, in relation to values. The intensity of the relationship between intervention concepts and values is determined based on the frequency of mentioned values per intervention. There were three key findings. First, historic, social, and aesthetical values were the most referenced values in international doctrinal documents. Second, while intervention concepts revealed similar definitions and shared common leading values, their secondary values and values hierarchy, e.g. aesthetical or social values, are the ones influencing the variation on their definitions. Third, certain values show contradictory roles in the same intervention concepts from different documents, e.g. political and age values. This paper explores a novel comparison between different interventions concepts and definitions, and the role of values. The results can contribute to support further research and practice on clarifying the identified differences.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-05-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2022-0178
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Understanding intention of Gen Z Indians to visit heritage sites
           by applying extended theory of planned behaviour: a sustainable
           approach

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      Authors: Sujood, Samiha Siddiqui, Naseem Bano, Ramzi Al Rousan
      Abstract: In 2019, Generation Z (Gen Z) accounted for 32% of the world population, as per the report by Bloomberg, Gen Z in India is world's largest with 472 million people, still there is very limited research conducted to explain their intention to visit heritage sites. This paper aims to report the findings of an empirical research focussing on Gen Z Indians' intention to visit heritage sites by applying theory of planned behaviour (TPB) with two additional constructs, i.e. environmental concern (EC) and environmental friendly activities (EFA). As a fundamental theoretical framework, the TPB model is used. Data consists of responses of 434 Gen Z Indians which were collected through online questionnaires. Using structural equation modelling (SEM) technique, the measurement and structural model were tested with the help of AMOS 22 and SPSS 25 software. The results of SEM indicate that the hypothesized relationships between attitude (AT), subjective norms (SN), EC, EFA and intention to visit heritage sites were all supported. However, perceived behavioural control (PBC) did not influence intention. The study's findings have substantial practical implications for organizations/travel companies that primarily deal in heritage sites. The findings of this study contribute to the body of knowledge about intention to visit heritage sites. As the study focuses mostly on Gene Z Indians, it is difficult to extrapolate the findings to other countries. This paper will help the researchers and practitioners to understand the Gen Z Indians' intention of visiting heritage sites. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study that predicts intention of Gen Z Indians to visit heritage sites.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-05-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Ruin heritage and its reuse: the case of ruin bars in Budapest

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      Authors: Dóra Mérai, Volodymyr Kulikov
      Abstract: The paper discusses ethical issues related to the adaptive reuse of ruin heritage on the example of the so-called ruin bars in Budapest's District VII. It explores how heritage discourse can contribute to the sustainable development of urban neighborhoods. The authors address the question by focusing on how a processual approach can be instrumental in identifying responsible and socially sustainable ways to reuse dilapidated heritage in a residential area. The problem is analyzed through a case study based on field observation, participant observation, stakeholder interviews, policy analysis and media and social media content analysis. The authors argue that ethical reuse of ruin heritage must take into consideration the values and interests of multiple stakeholders and the broadest range of consequences at the level of neighborhood and city. An integrated heritage and planning policy should consider and involve as active participants all the heritage communities concerned. Importantly, these groups, comprising both new and longtime residents, must include the vulnerable and marginalized. The findings can be used by heritage managers for identifying and addressing ethical issues in their adaptive heritage reuse practices and by policymakers for integrating heritage management in urban development and making cities more inclusive (SDG #11). The paper explores how ethical it is for business enterprises to build on the ruin esthetics in a residential district and what the ethical implications of this reuse process are for various stakeholders.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0108
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • D&C technique as an MCDM tool for managing the heritage value assessment
           

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      Authors: Emad Hani Ismaeel
      Abstract: The value assessment process of the built heritage is a multipart procedure that includes diverse aspects with overlapping requirements. This process requires various measures to obtain better results, making it a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) process. In post-disaster cases, a management system is required to promptly evaluate the degree of risk and damage and to set the preservation priorities in order to effectively supervise and protect the heritage places. MCDM is utilized for configuring and solving decision and planning problems encompassing multiple criteria, to assist decision-makers. This paper suggests an approach as a tool to be used in the development of the Built Heritage Record for Mosul Old City. It proposes a D&C technique as an MCDM effectual tool for solving multifaceted problems of heritage significance assessment process in post-conflict cities, adopting the conservation of the traditional houses of Mosul Old City as a case study. The research results showed the need for a method to solve the complexity of the decision-making problem regarding the process of determining the value and significance of heritage buildings and sites in the old city of Mosul, and how to develop a methodology to facilitate decision-making within databases related to such a multi-criteria issue. For an effective judgment of the expert or participant in the evaluation process, and to contribute to the decision-making more objectively, exploiting digital management programs including an interactive user interface with the ability to share on the Internet is the focal next intention of the project. The paper shows that by using specific software, a database for heritage places of the old city of Mosul could be generated to apply the proposed system. The expert can utilize the software to calculate and define the total value of the place automatically according to the entered data.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Paint repair appraisal for heritage buildings: the adoption of green
           maintenance model in Banda Aceh and Melaka

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      Authors: Laina Hilma Sari, Brit Anak Kayan, Zahriah Zahriah, Zulfikar Taqiuddin, Cut Nursaniah, Siti Norbaya Mohd Konar
      Abstract: This paper is an appraisal using the life cycle assessment (LCA) of paint repair for heritage buildings based on the green maintenance model. Calculation procedures of green maintenance model within cradle-to-site boundaries of LCA approach were undertaken. The calculations evaluate embodied carbon expended from paint repair of Gunongan, Banda Aceh and Melaka Stamp Museum, Melaka. The findings show that the type and number of coats applied will determine the lifespan of the paint. The lifespan of paint influences the frequency of its repair, thus affecting environmental maintenance impact (EMI). Green maintenance model is not confined to heritage buildings and can be applied to any repair types, materials used and building forms. The model supports and stimulates research dedicated to the sustainable development of cultural heritage. This results in the attainment of environmentally focused conservation, promoting sustainable repair approach and inculcating sustainable development of the historic environment. Green maintenance model highlights the efficiency of repair options that may be adopted for heritage buildings, thus cultivating skills and knowledge in cultural heritage and sustainable development. The paint repair appraisal of heritage buildings in different countries and localities, which share similar tropical climate, can be undertaken. It demonstrates how different approaches by relevant agencies to the paint repair of heritage buildings impact on embodied carbon expenditure.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2022-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Factors affecting the development of Lipu Yi costumes: intangible cultural
           heritage tourism

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Xiaohua Fu, Thanawan Sittithai, Thitinan Chankoson
      Abstract: The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of tourists' perceived value, satisfaction and behavioral intention on the development of Lipu Yi costume culture to promote the development of intangible cultural tourism and better construct a model of the influencing factors of Lipu Yi costumes in the development of intangible cultural heritage tourism. The study site is the intangible cultural district of Panzhihua, Sichuan Province, China. This study examines the interrelationships between tourists' perceived value of experience, behavioral intention and satisfaction as the tourists relate to Lipu Yi costume and intangible cultural heritage tourism. A sample of 225 tourists who had visited Panzhihua at least once was selected for the study. All seven of the survey's hypotheses were supported. Therefore, this study concludes that tourists' perceived value, satisfaction and behavioral intention directly affect the development of intangible cultural tourism and significantly positively impact the growth of Lipu Yi costumes culture. Descriptive analysis, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) investigation methods were used. This paper analyzes tourists' perceived value of Lipu costume culture and tourists' satisfaction and behavioral intention during the tourism process. This study provides a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between Lipu Yi costume and non-heritage tourism factors. Practical methods and approaches are sought to further develop Lipu Yi costume non-heritage tourism.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-04-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • New technologies for the conservation and preservation of cultural
           heritage through a bibliometric analysis

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      Authors: María Belén Prados-Peña, George Pavlidis, Ana García-López
      Abstract: This study aims to analyze the impact of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) on heritage conservation and preservation, and to identify relevant future research trends, by applying scientometrics. A total of 1,646 articles, published between 1985 and 2021, concerning research on the application of ML and AI in cultural heritage were collected from the Scopus database and analyzed using bibliometric methodologies. The findings of this study have shown that although there is a very important increase in academic literature in relation to AI and ML, publications that specifically deal with these issues in relation to cultural heritage and its conservation and preservation are significantly limited. This study enriches the academic outline by highlighting the limited literature in this context and therefore the need to advance the study of AI and ML as key elements that support heritage researchers and practitioners in conservation and preservation work.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Web accessibility of Indian cultural heritage information: an analytical
           study of museum websites

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      Authors: Rahul Pandey, Vinit Kumar
      Abstract: This paper compares the web accessibility of Indian museum websites assessing the level of compliance to the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.1 (WCAG 2.1). The study aims to assess the accessibility of Indian museum websites in terms of their severity. The accessibility evaluation of 11 Indian museum websites was conducted using Siteimprove Accessibility Checker (SAC), an automated website testing tool. The study results indicate that the mean conformance score for the Indian museum websites for level A was 19.27, while for level AA and AAA, it came out to be 2.63 and 4.09, respectively, with the highest severity scores for error (16.3) followed by review (5.81) criteria and warning (3.81). The major findings indicate that the websites of Indian museums poorly conform to web accessibility guidelines. The study's findings will assist the museum's website creators, managers and administrators in determining the level of conformity as per standard accessibility guidelines helping them make strategic decisions to improve the accessibility. Most of the studies available in the field of website accessibility range from the web accessibility of educational institutions, tourism websites, municipal websites and ministerial websites, but there are very few studies investigating the accessibility of museum websites. A quantitative evaluation of different aspects of accessibility was conducted in the study, which can pave the way for the better design of web sites by addressing deficiencies.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0153
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The role of fantasy in architectural heritage conservation –
           a systematic review

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      Authors: Liangjun Gooi, Camelia Kusumo, Johannes Widodo
      Abstract: This paper has aimed to systematically review the existing literature regarding the role of fantasy in heritage conservation, establishing a research gap and investigating the different facets of fantasy that contribute to a conservation undertaking. This systematic literature review adopted the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) model with literature from the SCOPUS-indexing database. This review has indicated a lack of input from Eastern scholarship, the absence of quantitative research, the lack of discussion concerning fantasy within the architecture discipline and the lack of attention towards fantasy's role in architectural heritage conservation. A better understanding of the role of fantasy within architectural heritage studies would improve conservation practice, specifically the existing cultural significance value evaluation framework and the management of stakeholders' expectations. The present paper serves as a preliminary insight into the value of fantasy within the architecture discipline, allowing for more empirical-based research and knowledge to be added in this domain in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2022-0168
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The building as a palimpsest: heritage, memory and adaptive reuse beyond
           intervention

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      Authors: Francesca Lanz
      Abstract: This paper contributes to this special issue on the ethics and aesthetics of adaptive reuse with a reflection on the specific case of the reuse of those sites and buildings that can be regarded as “difficult”, “uncomfortable”, or “neglected” heritage (MacDonald, 2009; Logan and Keir, 2009; Pendlebury et al., 2018; Lanz, 2021). By doing so it is the author's intention to add to the most recent research-driven and theory-oriented strand of the contemporary architectural debate on adaptive reuse (Lanz and Pendlebury, 2022). They also intend to encourage increased research engagement within such a debate, both across disciplines and with methods and approaches that may be able to bring in greater critical consideration of the more-than-architectural aspects involved in adaptive reuse practices. Building equally on a comprehensive literature review on the subject and extensive field work, the paper works through one paradigmatic example – the San Girolamo mental asylum in Volterra, Italy – and combines on-site observation, field notes, qualitative interviews and archival research with theory-driven reflections to discuss the ramifications of adaptive reuse processes in place-based memory and heritage practices. The case of the former mental asylum San Girolamo in Volterra, today abandoned and decaying on the landscape, is discussed via the metaphor of the building as palimpsest to explore the significance of this built heritage in both its materiality and meanings. The San Girolamo asylum demonstrates the value, complexity and potential of this heritage site, and other alike, to act as a powerful place which connects the past and present that might serve as a platform to promote productive discourses about contemporary sensible topics, ethics of care and human rights. Drawing on these observations, the paper concludes by expanding on how the case of the San Girolamo former asylum both showcases and advocates the need for developing more creative, explorative, trans-disciplinary and collaborative approaches and methodologies to the study and implementation of adaptive reuse projects for these site “beyond intervention”. This paper draws on and contributes to the more recent research-driven and theory-oriented corpus of studies focussing on adaptive reuse.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-03-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2022-0106
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Legislation and practice: the case of historic concrete buildings

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      Authors: Silvia Naldini, Ioannis Ioannou, Maria Hadjimichael, Stefano F. Musso, Federica Pompejano, Ondřej Dušek
      Abstract: Only recently have historic concrete buildings received attention and the need for their protection has been understood. Their listing as architectural heritage in most countries is ruled by legislations. The research carried out within the framework of the CONSECH20 JPI project on the conservation of historic concrete buildings in the Czech Republic, Cyprus, Italy and the Netherlands has allowed to study the legislations in the four aforementioned countries and how these are brought to practice. This paper aims at the evaluation of these legislations and of their function in practice. The legislations have been examined focussing on the protection of historic buildings and the guidelines to achieve a correct technical conservation. These were assessed in practical situations. The situations of the four countries were studied and the parameters used allowed comparisons. Concrete buildings are at risk and the guidelines should be further developed to meet actual conservation needs, including historical and aesthetical compatibility. The re-use of listed concrete buildings often means transforming and adapting these to a variety of modern needs and norms: the complexity of this assignment asks for a multidisciplinary teamwork. The bottom-up Dutch programme for quality in conservation, striving to bring ethical and technological principles to practice, could be a sound basis for developing respectful conservation strategies of heritage concrete buildings. The research concerns the four countries involved in the CONSECH30 project and could be extended to include more countries. More stakeholders have to be involved in the process of conservation and transformation of heritage concrete buildings. This should be directed by the legislation. No direct social implications are foreseen from the outcome of the research. However, the suggestion is made that social involvement is essential in planning concrete building transformations. The study focussed on the application of theory (the legislation) to practice (thus showing the limits of the legislation), which is an innovative way of contributing to the conservation of historic concrete buildings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-03-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0048
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Measuring “sustainable development” in vernacular settlements: a case
           study Behramkale, Türkiye

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      Authors: Ebru Ergöz Karahan, Özgür Göçer, Didem Boyacıoğlu, Pranita Shrestha
      Abstract: The main objective of this paper is to critically assess sustainable development in the context of Behramkale, a vernacular village in Türkiye. Vernacular Heritage Sustainable Architecture analysis framework has been adopted to understand and assess vernacular architecture and sustainable development in Behramkale. The vernacular design of the old Behramkale settlement has shown more sustainable characteristics as compared to the new development area. Key findings show that trade-offs were made with respect to environmental and sociocultural aspects of sustainable development to achieve economic sustainability. Future research with more in-depth interviews would be helpful to find out the inhabitants’ response to the conservation practices. Based on the research conducted, life cycle analysis and sustainable strategies of vernacular settlements can be useful tools to design, develop and improve old settlements, as well as newly established settlements. Key lessons learned from conservation practices can help to identify well-adapted solutions to respond to the needs of local communities in Türkiye and similar vernacular settlements in the Mediterranean region. This paper critically assesses sustainable development in the context of vernacular architecture, heritage conservation and rural sustainability. Conservation practices in Türkiye are evaluated deeply as there is limited research in this field within the Mediterranean heritage conversation and sustainable development context.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-03-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2022-0100
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Citizens' perceptions of World Heritage values: the case of Cuenca,
           Ecuador

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Barbara Molina, Gabriela Eljuri, Xavier Roigé Ventura
      Abstract: This paper aims to study possible differences between the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) defined in the designation of Cuenca as a World Heritage (WH) site and its inhabitants' perceptions of heritage value. The study is based on research conducted in the historic centre of Cuenca in Ecuador, which was accorded WH status in 1999. The research employs both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, providing a complementary approach to the research subject. Quantitative research involved a probability survey of 400 informants randomly selected from the population of the canton of Cuenca, while qualitative research included 40 semi-structured interviews with residents and traders in the historic centre and 150 further written consultations with residents of the city. Following the introduction, methodology and description, the paper presents the data gathered from the survey and interviews. These indicate inhabitants' perceptions of the meaning, values, and uses of WH in Cuenca and reveal differences between their perceptions and those of the official OUV. Although there are several studies on WH residents' perceptions of UNESCO OUV, few highlight the mismatch between local community views of heritage and those established by UNESCO. This study reflects critically on the concept of OUV, which is based on technical and political criteria rather than social participation. The study employs methodologies that could be applied in other case studies and used to improve heritage management. This is the only study on local perceptions of Cuenca's OUV.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Approach towards service design process for heritage preservation and
           sustainability of Bodo Dokhona

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      Authors: Chaitali Brahma, Bhaskar Saha, Anirban Chowdhury
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to understand the perception of the local weavers amongst the Bodos, a tribe of the North-east (NE) India. Towards this a concept of a service pipeline process in the field of heritage attire preservation of Bodo Dokhona was focused that would endorse the local weavers' community for its wellbeing and sustainability. The design approaches have been framed after interactions with the local weavers through a survey conducted for understanding the issues pertaining to weavers. Towards sustaining the Bodo heritage attire Dokhona, a service design pipeline for better management system was developed in three phases. Interactions with the local weavers through survey and validation for its feasibility were undertaken. This research paper focuses on publishing innovative survey research and practice related to cultural heritage management of the Bodo traditional wear Dokhona and sustainability conservation of the pipeline process. Therefore, developing both skill and knowledge for the weavers' community of the region. The design pipeline approach in this paper has been shared with the local weavers' for easy understanding of the step-by-step process of weaving a Dokhona made of eri silk. A progressive Bodo weaver will gain skill training which would lead to weavers' empowerment. Developing and documenting an innovative service design approach. In this context, an insight for women empowerment leading to preservation of Bodo heritage is valued.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2022-0093
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Sociocultural discrepancy in archaeological sites of Mexico: an overview
           of the situation in the state of Morelos

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      Authors: Emmanuel David Gonzalez Armenta
      Abstract: The aim is to expose the lack of recognition of archaeological sites as a symbolic identity and cultural integrator, showcasing how a deconstructed ideal of public policies and social practices resulted from mismanagement in the processes of safeguarding the historical culture of the sites. It is intended to highlight this discrepancy as to raise awareness on the equivocal direction these complications are heading to and to stress the advocacy for knowledge dissemination government sectors should aim on promoting. The article draws substantively on the analysis of case studies at state and national level. The archaeological cultural value interpretation is supported by the analysis of historical records such as exploration logs, government organizations’ workbooks, norms and regulations of archaeological conservation and literature review. The current deconstructed cultural value of archaeological sites is interpreted given trends of promotion of archaeological heritage, which ultimately resulted in a misconception of origins. The subsequent analysis shows that present-day political and social activities on archaeological sites are predisposed by a mismanagement of cultural promotion. The preference for activities that differ from indigenous traditions, commercialization of culture and urban growth have diverged the ideal of culture integration and knowledge dissemination these sites were rescued for, leading to the ignorance of the population towards their cultural value. This phenomenon demonstrates that archaeology in Morelos is currently submerged in a misconception of origins. The article aims to expose an array of references to issues of the usefulness of archaeological heritage for political and economic purposes as a referent for future studies.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-02-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0073
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Indigenous (stone) towers in remote regions: cross cultural perspective
           Asir region of Saudi Arabia, the Caucasus and Sichuan of China

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      Authors: Hani M. Alqahtany, Wadee Ahmed Ghanem Al-Gehlani
      Abstract: The author’s interest in vernacular architecture, over the years, has attracted the author’s attention to three distinctive and similar forms of architecture in faraway regions of the globe. These are; Asir region of Saudi Arabia, The Caucasus including the republic of Georgia, Chechenia, and North Ossetia, and Sichuan region in China. Stone towers dominate the landscape of these remote regions. The similarity of these towers in these far away regions is quite remarkable. This paper will introduce these towers in their geographic, social and natural context. Although several studies have been done on these regions, it is the aim of this paper to introduce their architecture in a comparative approach to explore how these remotes corners of the globe with different historical, ethnic and cultural backgrounds developed similar architectural forms in total isolation from each other. Architecture is a physical production of different and diverse factors. Geographically, isolated regions with similar natural and social factors, mountainous landscape, tribally-based, agrarian societies, produces similar architectural forms. This paper is a clear testimony to the human nature and how people think, react and build, under similar conditions. Architecture becomes a manifestation of human oneness, unity, believes and behaviour.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-02-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2022-0180
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Delineating protective boundaries using the HUL approach a case study:
           heritage waterways of Isfahan

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      Authors: Elnaz Chitsazzadeh, Mahsa Chizfahm Daneshmandian, Najmeh Jahani, Mohammad Tahsildoost
      Abstract: The UNESCO recommendation under the historic urban landscapes (HUL) title and Operational Guidelines (OPG) were used to create dynamic protective boundaries to maintain the integrity and authenticity of Isfahan's heritage waterways. Accordingly, by using GIS and Isfahan urban layers, three protective zones were proposed and evaluated; the central zone, the functional zone and the visual zone. Heritage waterways in historic cities are not adequately protected against the negative impacts of urban development, and there is a lack of a dynamic protective system to protect their integrity and authenticity. The problem can be observed in Isfahan, a historic Iranian city, where the boundaries of urban heritage waterways (Madi canals) are usually rigid and arbitrary. This study aims to develop a practicable paradigm for determining protection boundaries for Isfahan's Jolfa Madi, an urban heritage waterway. Compared to the current protective boundaries, the authors found that proposed protective boundaries create a greater amount of protection space, which makes a strong connection among the ecological, historical and socio-economic characteristics of the urban context. Furthermore, the protective zones based on the HUL approach give Isfahan's urban planning policy the opportunity to consider participatory tools, financial tools and regulatory systems. Many studies have emphasized a fixed-width buffer or an arbitrary distance from the urban waterway's axis (urban heritage) or its banks. Although these protections include technical conservation or setting restrictions on the adjacent buildings and blocks, studying crucial concepts such as urban dynamic, urban heritage context and producing a particular technique for protected boundaries has not been investigated. In this article three dynamic boundaries are delineated with various functions in order to provide urban heritage with dynamic preservation and sustainable development for the historic urban landscapes.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • From values to valuing: an ethnographic approach to get a grip on the
           implicit disclosure of built heritage

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      Authors: Roel De Ridder, Hanne Van Gils, Bert Timmermans
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to map the process of (social) valuing by people encountering built heritage in their daily environments. Value-based approaches are not well researched and formalized in Flemish policy context. New questions and issues are emerging in relation to values-based heritage management and the (adaptive) reuse of heritage within a context of spatial development and urban renewal practices. This paper firstly focus on what factors influence the process of (social) valuing, secondly on the hybrid character of the process and finally at the conflicts between the values frames of the different actors. This way it also inquires the potentials of participatory design supporting alternative regimes of care. Within the research trajectory, the authors approached built heritage as a social construction and a social product, where there are as many stories as users. What heritage is and how heritage is dealt with, forms the basis of negotiation and valuation processes. An ethnographic approach was embarked on to get a grip on the socio-cultural significance of immovable property heritage in Flanders. This paper describes the process of (social) valuing of by people encountering built heritage in their daily environments and offers an integrated conceptual framework for this kind of dynamic processes. New questions and issues are emerging in relation to values-based heritage management and the (adaptive) reuse of heritage within a context of spatial development and urban renewal practices. This paper firstly focuses on what factors influence the process of (social) valuing, secondly on the hybrid character of the process and finally at the conflicts between the values frames of the different actors.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2022-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
 
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