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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 142 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Museum Novitates     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 245)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 382)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chelonian Conservation and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access  
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access  
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eco-Entrepreneur     Open Access  
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 100)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 52)
Environment and Natural Resources Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intervención     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Media Konservasi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Natureza & Conservação : Brazilian Journal of Nature Conservation     Open Access  
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Northeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Northwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Acidification     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recycling     Open Access  
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Sustentabilidade em Debate     Open Access  
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The American Midland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
The Southwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.257
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 10  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 3 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2044-1266 - ISSN (Online) 2044-1274
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Surviving the aftermaths of natural disasters: the earthen vessels of
           Kerala, India
    • Authors: Devaki Vadakepat Menon, Vanaja Menon Vadakepat
      Abstract: Since 2018, the two floods and droughts that struck Kerala's economy have threatened the state's sustainable earthen vessel production. Current studies allocate focus to the pottery industry's techno-social impacts and ethnography of the potter community; hence, there is a gap in understanding consumers, who are responsible for environmentally conscious behaviors, and their switch from earthen vessels to other materials adaptable to modern kitchens. This study aims to bridge gaps in understanding the reasons behind their demand shift and the challenges of earthenware consumption and production after the disasters. This quantitative research explored the perceptions of pottery producers and consumers in Kerala. The sample for the primary survey comprised 590 randomly selected consumers and one master artisan from each of Kerala's total of 44 registered pottery communities. Unpublished records provided the secondary data on production and sales. An upward shift in the demand for earthen vessels after natural calamities is observed. Quality, availability and adaptability are consumer concerns. The Markov chain analysis predicts that future consumption of earthen vessels depends on improved marketing mix strategies. After natural disasters, persistent demand exists for earthen vessels, but sustainable production is challenged due to the deteriorating quality and shortage of clay along with the consequent increase in procurement costs of raw materials. As the earthen vessel industry was affected by disasters very recently, this study contributes an immediate exploration of its sustainable production and consumption challenges.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2020-0093
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Model for the maintenance-focussed heritage building conservation
    • Authors: Arturo Cruz, Vaughan Coffey, Tommy H.T. Chan, Miljenka Perovic
      Abstract: This paper presents and illustrates the model of a maintenance-focussed conservation plan developed in the thesis. It proposes a framework which puts more emphasis on maintenance in conservation than reconstruction, restorations, repairs or even a “do-nothing” approach. The research was conducted in an Australian context, where many major buildings are categorised as being “modern heritage”. However, the main problem with modern heritage is that although it has become more celebrated within the architectural historical sector, maintenance is still only in the background of most facility management (FM) operations, and its critical importance has yet to become accepted as a potential solution to greatly facilitate the proper preservation of the nation's architectural legacy. Challenges and barriers to this approach were evaluated, whilst opportunities were identified to improve a failing current situation that has resulted in the loss of many existing heritage structures. The paper makes a strong case in order to highlight the necessity of embedding a maintenance approach in preserving the historical fabric of buildings in the heritage conservation sector. This research examines the key strategies for a maintenance-focussed conservation system. The paper tackles experiences and issues in Australia about a lack of focus on maintenance as a conservation intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0127
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Stakeholder preference mapping: the case for built heritage of Georgetown,
           Malaysia
    • Authors: Eric C.W. Lou, Angela Lee, Yoke Mui Lim
      Abstract: While there is an established body of literature that discusses the importance of stakeholder management, and also the need for involvement of all stakeholders so that all values of a heritage site can be captured in a heritage management plan, the concepts are not generally developed in ways that make them useful in practice. This research seeks to bring greater clarity to the practice of stakeholder engagement in built heritage, so that organisations can manage their stakeholders in ways that meet their strategic goals. This study proposes a novel method to identify stakeholders, a stakeholder preference mapping approach, which will depict their influence on decisions based on a of power-interest scale. This research posits a stakeholder preference mapping approach. Virtual Stakeholder Groups (VSG) were identified and stakeholder's significance impacts were measured using the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 to determine in-depth consideration of each stakeholder's power and interest against differing stages of a heritage project. Participants were convened through a 5-day workshop, consisting of 20 Malaysian and 19 international participants (80% academics and 20% Malaysian civil servants). The Multi-Attribute Decision Analysis (MADA) technique was then used to demonstrate how stakeholder identification and analysis can be used to help heritage teams meet their mandates. The research identified eight virtual VSG (Extremist, Expert, Economic, Social, Governance and Tourists) and their scale of power-interest influence at different stages of the heritage management process. The findings reveal varying levels of engagement from each of the different groups of stakeholders at each work stage – with Stage 5 (Construction) being the least engaged. It is anticipated that through stakeholder preference mapping, heritage teams can increase the robustness of their strategies by identifying and effectively managing the important concepts; heritage teams can effectively manage the interface between the many (often competing) demands of differing stakeholders. Using Georgetown as a case study, the research team were able to delineate the interaction and interplay between the various stakeholders in the complex decision-making processes for a UNESCO heritage site. Applying the RIBA 2013 Plan of Work as a framework to the heritage management process enables a formalised mapping approach to the process.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0114
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The adaptive reuse potential of underused heritage gaols in Australia: a
           case study of Richmond Gaol, Tasmania
    • Authors: Waled Shehata, Craig Langston, Marja Sarvimäki, Ranka Novak Camozzi
      Abstract: Many heritage-listed gaols in Australia have become obsolete in terms of their original function and were decommissioned decades ago. As a default management practice, decommissioned gaols are usually transformed into museums which are mostly empty and underused without considering other viable alternatives. This research challenges this mainstream thinking and demonstrates that among the entire stock of heritage-listed gaols in Australia, even the least ranked gaol in terms of its potential for reuse can be turned into a thriving and vibrant new function. Hypothetically, if the least ranked Australian heritage-listed gaol in terms of its potential for reuse is in fact “reusable”, then the remaining heritage gaols have more chance of being successfully reused to accommodate a vibrant new function. To be able to test this hypothesis, first, the Adaptive Reuse Potential (ARP) model is applied to rank Australia's decommissioned heritage gaols which are spatially and structurally sound to accommodate new uses. Second, an architectural design concept was designed to adaptively reuse the lowest scored gaol (Richmond Gaol) to a boutique hotel. The conceptual design proposal was then assessed by three local heritage architecture firms to validate its applicability and viability. The research showed that Richmond Gaol can be reused successfully to at least one function, and accordingly, the whole stock of heritage gaols can be expected to also be reused to more sustainable purposes. The research identifies several considerations for the reuse of heritage gaols in Australia: the careful intervention to their significant fabric; maintaining sufficient evidence of the gaol's original components, the importance of the new use being compatible to the gaol's morphology to ensure minimum alterations or demolitions in the significant fabric of the site; and evaluating the new use and its components to achieve financial viability. Due to the continuing closure of Tasmania's state borders amid the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the researchers were not able to travel to Tasmania to conduct a site visit and to run the in-depth interviews with the architects in person. Most of the data of the current status of the site, its current layout, museum elements, historical data and photos were provided by Heritage Authorities in Tasmania and the Tasmanian State Library and Archive Service. Supplementary information and photos were acquired in March 2020 from visitors of the gaol who uploaded their trip images to Google maps or to their travel blogs. Topographical data of the site was gathered from Topographic Base-map of Land Information System Richmond Tasmania (2020). Due to travel restrictions, in-depth interviews with the local architects were done virtually, or over the phone in one case. Challenges discussed in this research encourage creating nationally designed support programs to better vitalise and help preserve Australia's carceral heritage. This research utilises architectural design in an empirical research paradigm.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0142
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Improvement of the cultural heritage perception potential model by the
           usage of eye-tracking technology
    • Authors: Huriye Armağan Doğan
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to develop and present the methodology of the model which can predict the perception and assessment of cultural heritage by the point of view of the non-experts through analysing the façades of buildings for adaptive re-use and sustainable development strategy. This paper focuses on the improvement and validation of the original cultural heritage perception potential model (CHPP) by adding new indicators which can be used as a part of the model. The method adopted includes the explanation of the older (original) model and its limitations. The assessment process follows the Integrated Cultural Heritage Management Approach to identify the new indicators which can be implemented on understanding the cultural heritage from the user/observer perspective, furthermore, for the sustainability of the environment. The results demonstrate that the perception of the society regarding the perception of the built heritage can be affected by various indicators. When the indicators are well identified, it is possible to predict the potential of the buildings to be perceived as cultural heritage or not. The knowledge which is gained by the proposed model can assist the sustainability and continuity of both heritage objects and the environment by helping the adaptive re-use process and strategies. No similar prior studies on the perception of cultural heritage as an approach to adaptive re-use strategies have been carried out. Furthermore, the usage of eye-tracking technology in the field of cultural heritage is rare. Therefore, it is hoped that the experiments performed in this study and the model which is created can lead and guide further research.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0174
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Toward developing a sustainable regeneration framework for urban
           industrial heritage
    • Authors: Parsa Arbab, Gelareh Alborzi
      Abstract: Regeneration of industrial heritage aims to display the patrimony assets by launching measures to convert them into cultural spaces associated with sustainable initiatives for satisfying environmental, social and economic demands in the city. The adaptive transformation and reusing process of industrial heritage constitutes a crucial cultural objective and consequently must be identified in a way that simultaneously integrates preservation with conversion and conservation with refurbishment. Hence, this paper explores to develop a framework for the sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities. By reviewing the current literature, research and experiences on urban industrial heritage, including existing approaches, frameworks, and case studies, this study brings a theoretical and conceptual approach to sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage, which is a fundamental start point for conducting further research and performing practical projects. Three key phases of the Initiation as decision context, including understand the characteristics and assess the significance, the Planning as decision problem, including study the feasibility, develop a policy, and prepare a proposed reuse plan, and the Execution as decision output, including implement the plan, monitor the results and review the plan should be considered regarding the sustainable regeneration of urban industrial heritage. The suggested framework considers sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities as a decision-making process, which requires defining the decision context, analyzing the decision problem, and finally, results in the decision output. Accordingly, it seems to help bridge the gap between various discourses and planning perspectives and make all stakeholders' involvement easier, more effective and efficient regarding the sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0059
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Rescuing industrial memory: the industrial heritage of Isla Teja sixty
           years after the natural disaster
    • Authors: Virginia Arnet
      Abstract: This paper explores tools and methodologies associated with the recovery of industrial areas from a territorial and urban perspective. This study describes the theoretical foundations of a specific industrial reality, using the city of Valdivia as a case study. Intermediate cities are resilient urban areas that support the changes derived from deindustrialization. Here, we present the contextualization of a contemporary recovery tool in Valdivia. First, industrial and geographical antecedents are described. Then, essential aspects of memory, territory and society are defined. Finally, challenges and opportunities derived from the contextual approach of the proposed recovery model are discussed. Three thematic lines were used to design the proposed heritage recovery model: memory, territory and society. The recovery of industrial memory, a programmatic reconstruction that includes a contemporary and environmentally sensitive utilization of the territory, and the restoration of the lost connection between the city and the territory, proved to be essential in this task. This proactive research allowed an in-depth analysis of the addressed topic and the exhaustive design of a tool for heritage recovery, following the provisions of the regional legislation. However, the authors acknowledge that the contextualization of the contextualization of the project actual project may limit the project execution. This paper explores the development of a new tool for the evaluation, intervention, and preservation of the industrial heritage of intermediate cities, as an alternative to the traditional methods of intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0049
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Collections, local interactions, conservation and tourism aspects of
           monastic heritage sites in the Lake Tana region of Ethiopia: the case of
           Mandeba Medahinealem Monastery
    • Authors: Abraham Genet, Marshet Kebede
      Abstract: Along with the varied values of heritages which are rationale for their safeguarding, sustainable conservation and tourism development have become central agendas in the field of heritage management in contemporary world. This study attempts to elaborate such interconnected issues at Mandeba Monastery, emphasizing not only cultural heritages but also mutually reflecting on natural features which are integral part of the monastery. Interviewing and systematic observation alongside secondary sources were used to generate data which were analyzed thematically. Being a site for incredible collections, Mandeba maintained a tradition of not only heritage conservation and benevolent communal interaction but also of ecological sustainability. The rich collections together with its spectacular location on the shore of Lake Tana enable Mandeba to have highly noticeable tourism potentials. However, Mandeba encounters such challenges as inadequate museum, safety and security problems, lack of sufficient budget, professional, parasitic animal damages, weak promotion and lack of tourist facilities which hamper both conservation and tourism development on the site, which need to be tackled for the overall improvement of the monastery. This research is original, presenting the ground knowledge and practice regarding the relationship between heritage conservation on the one hand, and local livelihood, environmental management and tourism sustainability on the other hand, with regard to the immovable cultural/religious heritage site of Mandeba Medahinealem Monastery.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2020-0026
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Becoming a smart old town – How to manage stakeholder collaboration
           and cultural heritage

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Ulrika Lundh Snis, Anna Karin Olsson, Iréne Bernhard
      Abstract: Within the ongoing digitalization of society and dimensions of integration, equality, citizen needs, sustainability and quality of life are of increasing importance as driving forces for cities to become smart. The purpose of this paper is to examine participatory management challenges in becoming a smart old town in the context of cultural heritage. An explorative approach was applied on a qualitative single case study including in-depth interviews with 21 stakeholders representing local entrepreneurs, nonprofit organizations, the municipality, politicians, tourism organization and residents of an old town district in a Norwegian city. Additionally, participatory observations and document studies were performed. Findings were continuously validated with the respondents. The present study contributes with stakeholder views on challenges arising from the development of a smart old town and suggests possible innovative solutions for participatory management. The transformation of a city with cultural heritage into a smart city require efforts that go beyond smart ICT implementations into issues of social sustainability. The study brings forward the opportunities that lie in the dynamics of interaction between the spirit of cultural heritage and the body of participatory management. It con-tributes by responding to calls for further research to deepen the insights into stakeholder inclusion in cultural heritage-based city transformation. This explorative study has its limitations as it is based on one qualitative single case. Participatory management insights and recommendations for smart city transformation are provided. The study addresses socially sustainable outcomes to create democratic conditions that promote inclusion and community building by understanding what people need and expect from the place where they live and work. This study is positioned as unique in terms of its complex nature of transforming an old town to become a smart old town based on cultural heritage and an open and coordinated inclusion of stakeholders. Smartness in context of city transformation is revealed in many dimensions ranging from technology-driven to more participant-driven.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0148
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Stakeholder participation in Lopburi Old Town conservation master plan
    • Authors: Tritsana Sorat, Nug-Rob Rawangkarn, Wee Rawang, Kanang Kantamaturapoj
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the meaningful public participation in activities relating to the master plan development and, at the same time, propose some recommendations for improvement. The study was carried out with in-depth interviews of 35 key-informants selected from various stakeholder groups involving in public participation activities. The evaluation frameworks for meaningful participation were developed from various scholars. The evaluation showed that the public hearings partially met the criteria of information provision and representativeness. However, there are rooms for improvement on participation in decision-making process, social learning and influence over policy decision-making. Therefore, this study proposes two recommendations. First, more flexible form of public participation is needed to enable discussions among various groups of stakeholders. Second, the organizer should communicate with stakeholders about how their opinions influence the final master plan in order to create sense of belonging among community members. This research developed the evaluation framework for public participation in old town conservation master plan in developing country.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0150
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Sociodemographic aspects and their relationship with motivations,
           satisfaction and loyalty in ecotourism: a study in Costa Rica
    • Authors: Mauricio Carvache-Franco, Orly Carvache-Franco, Ana Gabriela Víquez-Paniagua, Wilmer Carvache-Franco, Allan Perez-Orozco
      Abstract: The objectives of this study were to (a) analyze the relationship between sociodemographic aspects and motivations in ecotourism and (b) identify the relationship between sociodemographic aspects and satisfaction and loyalty variables. The research was carried out in the Arenal National Park and the Caño Negro National Wildlife Refuge in Costa Rica, an ecologically important ecotourism destination. The sample consisted of 310 surveys obtained in situ. For data analysis, factor analysis and the multiple regression method were used. The results show that younger tourists tend to be more motivated by self-development, whereas older tourists and lower-income tourists are more motivated toward strengthening interpersonal relationships with family and friends. In contrast, tourists with lower education levels are highly motivated by novelty, feel more satisfied with the visit and are more willing to recommend and say positive things about the destination. Besides, repeat visitors are most likely to return. The present study was limited by the timing in which it was carried out. Among the future lines of research, studies that address the relationship between sociodemographic variables in the different ecotourism segments should be conducted. Regarding the practical implications, this study helps companies related to tourism to pay attention to the sociodemographic characteristics of tourists to design activities and services according to their motivations, satisfaction and loyalty. For younger tourists who are motivated by self-development, activities and services related to learning about nature can be planned to encourage their personal growth, new abilities and individual skills. Regarding elderly and lower-income tourists, who are motivated to be with family and friends, recreational activities to improve family and friendship relationships can be promoted. These findings will serve to plan attractions and services in protected areas, benefiting the destinations and the communities sustainably. One of the contributions of this study is to find a negative relationship between the level of education and other variables such as satisfaction, intentions to recommend and intentions to say positive things about the destination. This research also identified a negative relationship between age and the self-development motivational dimension, a positive relationship between age and being with family and friends dimension, a negative relationship between income and being with family and friends dimension and a negative relationship between the number of visits and the novelty dimension.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0184
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Dry stone constructions – intangible cultural heritage and
           sustainable environment
    • Authors: Celeste Jiménez de Madariaga
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how safeguarding intangible cultural heritage contributes to environmental conservation and favours sustainable development of natural landscapes. To do so, the authors will focus on a study of dry stone constructions, which have been recognised by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as Intangible Cultural Heritage. The research has been carried out through three methodologies: the search and review of archives (historical and administrative documents), ethnographic methodology (field work and interviews) and case studies. The abandonment of dry stone constructions is placing rural zones at risk, as they assume a strategic role in environmental conservation efforts. This article seeks to highlight the importance of safeguarding this cultural heritage. The art of dry stone walling has its origins in ancient times and can be found in numerous regions around the world. The main ideas of this paper may be applied to many of the places where this vernacular architecture can be found. Some stakeholders may apply the results of this study to identify new uses for heritage resources that allow maintenance of ecosystems while at the same time safeguarding intangible cultural heritage. This paper stresses the importance of raising public awareness of cultural heritage and vernacular architecture, its link with traditional activities such as farming and livestock raising, the rural landscape and reinforcement of cultural identity and historical memory. This study illustrates the actions taken by UNESCO to safeguard intangible cultural heritage and the effects of those actions. It also considers dry stone constructions from the perspective of environmental sustainability, an area that has been subject to limited study.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0180
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Formation of clusters in cultural heritage – strategies for
           optimizing resources in museums
    • Authors: Héctor Moreno - Mendoza, Agustín Santana - Talavera, José Molina - González
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to affirm that it is possible to segment visitors of cultural heritage into homogeneous groups according to a series of characteristics to detect the variables that have statistical significance to identify visitor clusters. Four case studies were selected, where a total of 500 questionnaires were made to visitors. The authors proceeded with cluster analysis using SPSS software to differentiate visitor segments. Four groups of visitors were first identified and which have subsequently been reduced to three, according to several factors. The main contributions of this paper are: (1) the segment to which each one of the determinants of the cultural tourism product is dedicated; (2) the variable object of the analysis, i.e. the formation of visitor segments; and (3) the inclusion of less studied variables such as type of accommodation contracted, treatment offered in the museums or entrance price. The analysis has been developed in different museums, with different management models, in a specific place. However, the results are generalizable to other places and to other institutions that manage cultural heritage. The implications are management strategies for a sustainable cultural development in institutions of tourism and heritage. From a practical point of view, the results are useful for cultural managers, travel agencies, tour operators, tourism companies or political offices, among others, because they generate new ideas and strategies focused on maximizing the use of the resources of cultural institutions. For both local and non-local agents, the knowledge of the factors that make up the groups of visitors in the heritage sites represents a strategy in aspects of marketing, promotion and distribution, thus generating capacities for the different intermediaries, and the possibility of negotiating lower prices with better benefits. It is also possible to create new products destined for other publics. The study is original because this has not been published.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2019-0155
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Low carbon of lime plaster repair: life cycle assessment approach in
           achieving sustainable maintenance management for heritage buildings
    • Authors: Brit Anak Kayan, Deanne Seanuau Kely Jitilon, Mohammad Nazmi Mohd Azaman
      Abstract: Low carbon repair epitomises sustainable maintenance management for heritage buildings. However, there is little recognition of this aspect, coupled with impractical assessment of repair impact strategies. This paper aims to present a decision-making process based on life cycle assessment (LCA) approach of lime plaster repair options for heritage buildings. Calculation procedures of LCA were carried out to enable sustainable maintenance management appraisal for heritage buildings upon embodied carbon expenditure expended from lime plaster repair during the maintenance phase. Calculation procedures could be understood as a carbon LCA of lime plaster repair and recognised in reducing CO2 emissions. This underpins low carbon of lime plaster repair in achieving sustainable maintenance management of heritage buildings. It must be emphasised that the LCA approach is not limited to heritage buildings and can be applied to any repair types, materials used and building forms. This supports environmentally focused economies and promotes sustainable maintenance management solutions. The LCA approach highlights the efficiency of repair impact strategies through evaluation of low carbon repairs options. The LCA approach results show that low carbon repair, contextualised within maintenance management, relays the “true” embodied carbon expenditure and stimulates sustainable development of heritage buildings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2020-0068
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • How to assess the impact of commercially reused immovable cultural
           heritage on local, sustainable development in a holistic way'
    • Authors: Zdzisława Elżbieta Niemczewska
      Abstract: The paper is to propose a tool for holistic impact assessment of commercially reused immovable cultural heritage resources on local, sustainable development along with the possibility to ensure the cultural sustainability of these assets themselves. The paper contains a case study using the proposed tool. The case study concerns a historic object in the form of a Polish manor house located in rural areas in Poland adapted for commercial purposes – restaurant, painting gallery and renovation of antique furniture. The author proposes a holistic approach based on aspects, to impact assessment of given heritage resources on the economic, social, cultural and environmental pillars of sustainable development and the sustainable use of heritage assets themselves. Above that, the approach proposes to use the assumptions of EMAS or ISO 14001 systems for assessment of environmental aspects in case of reused cultural heritage assets. The test study showed that the proposed tool allows determining whether, how and to what extent the contemporary commercial function of a given element of immovable cultural heritage contributes to local sustainable development and whether and to what extent the cultural sustainability of a given cultural heritage is ensured. In the proposed approach, very detailed quantitative data cannot be included because of the need to simplify the research. The proposed tool can be used by owners of reused historic buildings, local authorities, services responsible for the protection of cultural heritage and financing institutions to determine whether a given contemporary commercial function of cultural heritage resources contributes to local sustainable development in holistic approach and whether this function ensures the preservation of its cultural sustainability. The use of the proposed tool will give the opportunity to take appropriate actions to increase the impact of historic objects on local sustainable development including social aspects. Moreover, it will be possible to increase the cultural sustainability of these objects. There are not many studies and tools that provide a possibility to assess a holistic impact of reused cultural heritage on local sustainable development. Research usually concerns one or two pillars: social and economic. Above that, the study of the cultural appreciation in two different groups: direct users and the local community is a novelty in the perception of contribution to cultural development. It may contribute to the different way of measurement of appreciation of cultural heritage and its contribution to social and cultural development. In addition, to study the environmental pillar, the author proposes an approach used in environmental management (ISO 1400 and EMAS), i.e. the application of activities related to eliminating the potentially harmful impact of a new function of the historic resource on the natural environment.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2019-0089
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • A risk-reduction framework for urban cultural heritage: a comparative
           study on Italian historic centres

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Francesca Giuliani, Rosa Grazia De Paoli, Enrica Di Miceli
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present and validate a large-scale methodology for risk assessment and management in cultural heritage sites, taking into account their specific tangible or intangible values. Emphasis is given to historic centres that are key resources in building resilience to disasters but are also highly vulnerable due to several factors, such as the characteristics of the built environment, the community and social life, the lack of risk awareness and maintenance and finally the poor regulatory framework for their management and valorisation. The multi-step procedure starts from the assessment of the attributes of cultural heritage in order to identify priorities and address the analysis. Then, it evaluates the primary and secondary hazards in the area, the vulnerabilities and threats of the site and the impacts of the chain of events. Finally, it allows for calibrating a site-specific set of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery measures. The application to two case studies in the Italian peninsula, the historic centres of San Gimignano and Reggio Calabria, allows for identifying research gaps and practical opportunities towards the adoption of common guidelines for the selection of safety measures. By providing a qualitative assessment of risks, the research points out the potentialities of the methodology in the disaster risk management of cultural heritage due to its capacity to be comprehensive and inclusive towards disciplines and professionals.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-01-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2020-0099
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • A quantitative approach for evaluating intervention-value relations:
           historic mosques of Manisa, Turkey
    • Authors: Suna Büyükkılıç Koşun, Mine Hamamcıoğlu Turan
      Abstract: This study aims to propose a systematic way of evaluating the impact of historic and current interventions on cultural asset values of monuments that have preserved their authentic functions so that future interventions can be better guided. The study focuses on the Mosque typology. The case studies are chosen from a region that has a rich historic background, but has generally undergone rapid urbanization and faces extensive restorations today. Conventional site survey, archive and historical research and visual analysis are made, but the evaluation process has been designed. As a result, scale and intensity of interventions and disasters and the vulnerability of the monument should be identified for each period of the asset. Variations in the intensity of esthetic or historic qualities and the environmental settings should be credited, rather than the utilitarian necessities. Mosques and their environs are most vulnerable in terms of their architectural authenticity and site aesthetics. The objects studied in the previous studies present a variation, but the majority of the work is carried out with conventional evaluation methods with the emphasis on building scale. However, the mosques are affected by the interventions and disasters, not only as single architectural entities but also as the focal elements of their neighborhoods. So, the intervention-value relations should be understood both for building and site scales. An evaluation process is proposed for understanding the change of values with respect to interventions and disasters throughout history by combining qualitative and quantitative techniques.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-01-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0005
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Vernacular rural heritage in Turkey: an intuitional overview for a new
           living experience
    • Authors: Esin Hasgül, İnci Olgun, Erhan Karakoç
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to emphasize passive energy refurbishment of vernacular building heritages and propose new application principles of sustainability from these vernacular heritages into contemporary architecture. This paper is based on a research project (The Creation of a Prototype Project within the Application of Traditional Methods in Kastamonu, Küre Rural Settlements, 2017), through which vernacular architecture examples were analyzed, projecting for future interpretations for rural environments. Defining vernacular rural design principles is centrally important for the purposes of this project. As a case study from the Black Sea Region in Turkey, this example is investigated, and the outcomes of the analysis are used to reproduce in contemporary architectural terms the energy efficiency and rural patterns of the flexible rural house experience. The research provides design principles for developing a new living experience in rural environments. The overall planning and architectural analysis are made in five neighborhoods in Küre, and three of unique vernacular architecture examples are chosen according to several criteria defined in “Kastamonu-Küre Ersizlerdere Village Design Guideline Project, 2014” to get the optimum data. Materials, orientation, form, spatial organization and building's indoor-outdoor relationship were analyzed by Autodesk's “Ecotect Analysis” simulation program. Results of the proposed design principles of rural housing will be useful for new housing interpretations related to better rural development. While defining energy efficiency criteria of vernacular itself, the results of this paper suggest new local solutions to ecological building design and engage with critical regionalism principles referring to the potentials of what traditional dwellings can teach contemporary design.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0021
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Environmental ethics, religious taboos and the Osun-Osogbo grove, Nigeria
    • Authors: Yemi Adewoyin, Ekene Michael Mokwenye, Ndidiamaka Vivian Ugwu
      Abstract: The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) identifies building and development, a major corollary of population growth and urbanization, as the number one primary threat to the conservation of heritage sites worldwide. With efforts at conserving these sites focussing on anthropocentrism and ecocentrism, this study introduces and examines the role of the traditional African religion as a conservation strategy using the Osun-Osogbo grove in Nigeria as a case study. Satellite imageries of the grove and surrounding areas were analysed for land-use and land cover change using Geographic Information Systems (GISs). A review of documentary evidence and key-informant interviews were also carried out on the state of the grove and how religious beliefs impact same. Results showed that between 1986 and 2017, vegetal covers decreased by 77.1% while built-up areas grew by 342.4%. Despite the phenomenal rate of urbanization in the study area, the grove remained largely intact and even recorded a marginal increase in its vegetal cover and plant species. Qualitative data revealed that the fear of the religious taboos associated with the resident goddess of the grove, rather than a moral responsibility to the environment, was responsible for these outcomes. The application of remote sensing and GIS in a transdisciplinary study of cultural heritage makes the work novel and contributes to the methodological approaches for such studies. The findings also show the potency of religion in environmental and cultural conservation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0019
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Digital cultural heritage of rural tourism facilities in Poland
    • Authors: Karol Król
      Abstract: At the turn of 2018 and 2019, a certain era in the history of Polish Internet came to an end. Most of the websites of rural tourism facilities hosted on free servers no longer exist; however, the very phenomenon has significantly distinguished itself in the promotion of rural tourism in Poland. The paper presents archaic websites or rural tourism facilities in Poland as digital cultural heritage assets. Its purpose is to propose attributes potentially indicative of content or phenomenon being part of digital cultural heritage. In total, 211 websites of rural tourism facilities in Poland, hosted on free servers, were analysed. The study investigated digital artefacts, i.e. only the websites that no longer exist but whose archival copies are found at the Internet Archive (IA). The structure of most websites of rural tourism facilities was based on tables. None of the websites were responsive. The graphics of 132 websites (65%) were never changed, with the oldest recorded copies dating back to 2001 and the newest ones to 2018. On many websites, components that are relatively rarely found these days were noted, e.g. “marquee”-type “floating” objects or online surveys. The phenomenon of using free-of-charge hosting services by rural tourism facilities in Poland in the years 2004–2012 is part of the history of Polish Internet and an example of digital cultural heritage. Archaic websites of rural tourism facilities in Poland are digital artefacts but not all of them have cultural values. In total, three groups of attributes are proposed that can be important for determining whether a website, content or phenomenon can be considered digital cultural heritage assets.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2019-0130
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Protecting silent identities of heritage from the ruining living
           identities in current and futuristic creative cities: the case of Egypt
    • Authors: Mohamed Hesham Madbouly Khalil
      Abstract: With the increasing number of creative cities as well as the reported incidences of deterioration to physical heritage, this paper aims to protect silent identities of heritage from the ruining living identities of modern generations in current and futuristic creative cities. The research aim is achieved through trait-related mixed methods, since the variances are not method-related, to answer three research questions. The first method was a survey questionnaire distributed to the creative architectural sector because it was the best sector to meet the identified criteria. It aimed to answer if the upperground layer in creative cities considers the underground layer's diversity as a main cause for heritage deterioration and for being a barrier to developing creative solutions. A hypothesis for the first question was tested through a t-test. The second method was to study cases of heritage in present and futuristic creative cities to answer if living identities threaten physical heritage of all ages at the same extent and if the same creativity concepts are applied to all heritage. The underground layer's diversity identities were found as a major barrier to the creative architectural sector. The R-value indicated a negative relationship between heritage age and its condition. Cases witnessed different creative expressions, but cases within the same period faced similar concepts of expressed creativity. The proposed tree diagram is a framework that gives numerical guidelines for the interrelationship between every heritage age and creativity concept for novel and conscious creative practices at the upperground layer to solve the conflicts in creative cities. The selection of Egypt does not possess a limitation because methodological considerations required for generalising the findings to a broader area were met. Findings in this paper are applicable to all upperground creative sectors that seek to understand the underground layer's diversity. Results are useful for protecting heritage silent identities in all existing and futuristic creative cities in countries that have heritage, of any age, facing deterioration. The research work in this paper is novel in thought and resolves a perpetual conflict between silent identities and expressive living identities in current and futuristic creative cities through the proposed numerical framework for the upperground creative layer to develop novel conscious solutions. This framework represents a novel synthesis that adds to the existing body of knowledge, as it resolves a critical problem highlighted in previous research studies.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2019-0073
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Social media as a pathway to environmental conservation in protected
           areas: a case study on Lake Tana Biosphere Reserve
    • Authors: Zemenu Bires, Sahil Raj
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to uncover the impact of social media in supporting environmental conservation (EC) in protected areas. The study has employed both quantitative and qualitative approaches of a cross-sectional type with simple random and purposive sampling were followed. Primary and secondary data sources were also entertained. A total of 146 observations were used in the analysis. A multiple linear regression analysis was used to measure the impact of social media. The result revealed user-generated content and ease of language were significant in explaining EC. Environmental activism and social media usage shall be enhanced with environmental concerns (EnvCs) and objectives. This is s an original research that tried to address the impact social media on EC and its dimensions in Lake Tana Biosphere Reserve. Unlike the research studies so far, this research attempted to uncover the impact of each social media element's impact on each EC dimensions. Besides, the impact of social media element is also assessed on EC as a construct in general. Thus, it will be helpful for policy makers, government and destination management organizations and other stakeholders to identify the areas which should be promoted and areas that need intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2019-0134
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The phonological process of language from the phonemic into phonetic
           realization
    • Authors: I Nyoman Suparsa
      Abstract: The current study aims firstly to explain the origin of the morphemic segments of Rongga language, either at the phonological or the phonetic level and the terms of the morphemic structure of Rongga, whether related to positive or if-then conditions. The second objective is to describe the phonological process of Rongga from the changing process of phonemic into phonetic realization. As far as the methodology is concerned, three methods are applied including (1) method of collecting data, (2) data analysis methods and (3) method of presenting the result of data analysis. The literary method is defined as a way of obtaining written materials that can support the primary data as additional data. The findings of compression placement on Rongga reveal that firstly, the monosyllabic words, whether or not preceded by a consonant, whether or not preceded by a consonant stressed on a single syllable and whether or not preceded by a consonant or before the second syllable, both of which either precedes the consonant or do not follow a word boundary. Second, three and four monosyllabic words will be stressed on the last syllable if they precede the consonant or not. The results are expected to be considered as one of the primary contributions to the determination of the orthographic system of Rongga, in particular, the consonant and unique vowel in Rongga.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0012
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • New approaches for cultural heritage: scientific symposium advisory
           committee – heritage as urban regeneration tool
    • Authors: Flavia Mabel Rinaldi, Lucía Maglio, Iliana Pisarro, Laura Basterrechea
      Abstract: This presentation intends to illustrate through the example of a few specific cases of urban actions and projects, those instances in which the existence of built heritage leads to the recognition of identity and valuable contribution as a tool to regenerate, promote residence and economic development. Introducing a conceptual framework for identity and culture it is possible to start the recognition of buildings, spaces, stories that configure own particularity to cities. And those would be the elements that would be configured as tools to involve the actions and transformation of the area. Studying each one of the heritage elements detected it is possible to trace a chorus line that impulse the new activity proposal. Cases presented in this article were really astonishing in terms of impact and provoked many favorable externalities around them. It is possible to confirm that history and stories as good as buildings and determined places can help regeneration with its own promotion and new ideas applied for better results. In fact, heritage as a concept, cultural tangible and intangible, is a powerful tool to regenerate cities, to promote economical activity and bind communities toward social development.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2019-0045
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Embedding sustainability dimensions in university collections management:
           a “scientific journey” into a natural history museum
    • Authors: Michela Magliacani, Daniela Sorrentino
      Abstract: The purpose of this research aims at extending the knowledge on whether and how universities include sustainability dimensions in managing their collections. Precisely, the study focusses on the creation of a university museum (UM), as an embryonic stage of life during which management concerns both strategic and operational issues. Sustainability is envisioned as a multifaceted concept, composed of the economic, cultural, environmental and social dimensions. Resorting to an acknowledged theoretical model for sustainable development in museum management, a qualitative interpretative study is carried out, gathering data from multiple sources. The empirical setting is the University of Pavia, which has recently created a new Museum of Natural History (Kosmos). Results highlight how sustainability dimensions intertwin in UM creation. Moreover, the economic dimension emerges as a basement for the others. Value for the community, expressed in economic terms, must be ensured in UMs creation as well as throughout its entire life, in order to support cultural, environmental and social sustainability. Focussing on the embryonic stage of UMs life allowed to consider how sustainability is embedded in relevant strategic and operational decisions. Nevertheless, scholars are encouraged to replicate the study in other stages of UMs' life, in a way to provide insights on its dynamics. University collections managers can benefit from this research by acknowledging the role played by the economic dimension of sustainability. Notwithstanding their mission, universities should pay attention to extracting economic value from the management of their collections, as a means to ensure innovative and sustainable management on the cultural, environmental and social respects. Furthermore, this research suggests how a higher education system is able to create a new museum by relying on interdisciplinary competencies, which support sustainability since the embryonic stage. This research contributes to the cultural heritage management literature by proposing an updated version of the sustainable development model for museums, which highlights the different relevance of the sustainability dimensions with particular regard to the UM creation and management.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2020-0044
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Late Ottoman period preventive health institutions in Istanbul: an
           architectural approach
    • Authors: Sümeyye Gider, Zeynep Gül Ünal
      Abstract: The preventive health institutions were founded in Istanbul as a result of the Ottoman Empire's policy to fight epidemic diseases that affected all parts of the world in the nineteenth century. The purpose of this paper is to examine the historical and current state of these heritage buildings. Through the original documents, photographs and floor plans dating nineteenth and early twentieth century obtained from the Ottoman State Archives, historical development and architectural features of the buildings have been identified. And the original geographical locations of the buildings, especially the destroyed ones, are investigated by the historic maps. Plan and façade features, construction techniques are examined according to the information gained from the newspapers, journals and health annuals of the period. This paper presents the findings of an MSc thesis conducted on the historical approach of preventive health institutions and preservation problems of the Pendik Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology. In the study, it has been examined that institutes in five different functions which were established after the foundation of the Quarantine Council in 1838 with parallel to the course of epidemics and scientific development in the West. In Istanbul, eight quarantine stations, three disinfection stations, one rabies laboratory, one vaccination institute and five bacteriology institutes have been documented. Some of these institutions fell out of use due to the loss of their original function and have been abandoned and demolished, some of them have survived with functional changes. The extant samples of these preventive health institutions are studied on the purpose of investigating their conditions of preservation. Late Ottoman period preventive health institutions in Istanbul have been the subject of the researches within the field of medicine and science history to date. There is no study in Turkish and International literature discussing these institutions in terms of architecture. In the study these buildings have been thoroughly examined based on their architectural features and heritage values. The glass plate photographs of the Pendik Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, floor plans and some photographs of the other institutions which are obtained from Ottoman State Archives and newspapers of the period have been published for the first time in this paper.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2020-0082
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Heritage-led development and historic churches: professional roles in the
           case of Hamra, Sweden
    • Authors: Maria Nyström
      Abstract: Departing from a study of a heritage-led economic development project of a Swedish historic church, the purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss how professional roles within the heritage field are negotiated through a development-centered heritage discourse, focusing on the implications for religious heritage sites. A synchronic discourse analysis was conducted on a number of documents originating from the case study project, as well as five semi-structured interviews with key actors from the heritage field and the Church of Sweden. The findings of the paper show that professional heritage discourses and practice limit and prevent nonstate heritage actors to engage in heritage-led development schemes of historic churches. Additionally, the professional roles and skills of nonheritage actors are perceived as ambiguous within the current governance system. Examining emerging forms of management of religious heritage sites can provide inspiration and indicate possible conflicts that need to be addressed by heritage professionals in order to achieve successful management. While studies of heritage-led economic development projects have previously focused on impact assessment and community engagement, this paper sheds light on how the discourses of these projects affect the conception of professional roles and practices.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0008
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Cultural landscapes: exploring local people's understanding of cultural
           practices as “heritage”
    • Authors: Elena Settimini
      Abstract: A vital testimony of human presence landscape is recognised and protected by international, national and local documents as an identity resource and one of the factors that contribute to the identity building processes (UNESCO, 1994; European Landscape Convention, 2000). The validation of landscape as cultural heritage presents not only new challenges but also opportunities for the heritage sector. In fact, a landscape plays a dual role: as part of the cultural heritage, which has to be preserved for its values, and as a “living” site, where individuals and groups live and work. This implies that the acknowledgement of its cultural significance should not be exclusively determined on the basis of discipline-driven frameworks and benchmarks but should rather be the result of a shared awareness within local communities. Through the analysis of the vineyard landscape of Langhe-Roero and Monferrato (Italy), the author discusses how the selection of a World Heritage site driven by “outstanding universal values” risks presenting a top-down approach to heritage processes. In this article, the author explores how people living in this cultural landscape articulate their understandings of heritage values, and she addresses issues concerning their participation in decision-making processes, questioning whose values and meanings do the “outstanding universal value” legitimise or not. What the author argues is that the World Heritage listing's focus on extraordinary values risks constructing heritage around a consensus that privileges only some actors, whose voices and stories enliven the prestige of the wine production of this cultural landscape, omitting other values, memories and practices from the identity and meaning making processes. Does the identification and representation processes validated through World Heritage status capture how a landscape is understood by individuals and groups living within it' If not, how do these differences affect people's engagement' A further point of discussion is whether individuals and groups want to be engaged in decision-making processes and on which terms.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2020-0042
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Contextualizing “traditional crafts” in historic urban areas
    • Authors: Niyati Jigyasu
      Abstract: Traditional crafts, practised by local communities, contribute significantly towards intangible heritage. The study situates traditional crafts in historic urban areas, establishes its relevance and deliberates on the factors affecting it. The methodology included questionnaire survey followed by semi-structured interviews. On-site observations were also taken as part of the methodology. The study contextualizes traditional crafts in historic areas and throws light on the transformation processes in these crafts due to socio-cultural, economic, political and other factors. Through studies at three different historic settlements, it provides a wider understanding of the dynamics of the same craft in different setting. The study would help in formulating guidelines for heritage management with respect to traditional crafts in historic urban areas. The study brings out the role of intangible cultural heritage that is inherent to the local communities in historic urban areas. Traditional crafts have been largely studied in their independent context. This study looks at the context specific to the place of creation of these crafts within the larger ecosystem of raw material-production-sale in historic urban areas. Also, with discussions on intangible heritage in context of the historic urban areas being largely an unexplored territory till recent times, this study will add to the earlier dialogue.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-10-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2020-0025
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Online communities and their contribution to local heritage knowledge
    • Authors: Manal Ginzarly, Jacques Teller
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore the potential of social media as a framework for people-centered heritage. With a focus on the interpretation and display of heritage by online communities, this paper aims at providing insights into the social production of heritage – the social co-construction of meanings of everyday landscape and the making of the collective and local identity. This paper proposes a methodological roadmap for the digital ethnography of everyday heritage. It reveals (1) the fundamental principles according to which people make value judgments and associate meanings to the urban landscape, and (2) the role of online communities in conveying collective identity and heritage values within the community realm. As a case study area for the implementation of the proposed method, three Facebook community group pages for Tripoli, Lebanon were chosen. The posts and comments were translated into English and uploaded to NVivo 12 plus and a deductive thematic approach to qualitative data analysis was applied. The data was coded into three main nodes: the actors, the tangible assets and the value registers. Results show that Facebook users are concerned with environmental equality, common interests, utility, right to the city and representativeness, while the beautification of heritage is often perceived as a threat to these values. This investigation goes beyond heritage attributes (what) and values (why) to examine how values are assigned by local communities. It provides a comprehensive understanding of value judgment and the rationale and arguments used to justify positions and mobilize online community members in order to contribute to the digital co-construction of everyday heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-10-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2020-0023
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Towards an inclusive curation of WWI heritage: integrating historical
           aerial photographs, digital museum applications and landscape markers in
           “Flanders Fields” (Belgium)
    • Authors: Birger Stichelbaut, Gertjan Plets, Keir Reeves
      Abstract: Over a century of state-sponsored construction of monuments, historic mythmaking and nationalist framings of WWI has ensured that it has become notoriously difficult to present the heritage of the Great War in an inclusive and non-selective way. In this paper the authors present a strategy and technology-driven solutions to overcome the selective heritage curation of modern conflict. Building on a suite of tools, applications and cultural heritage management plans developed by the In Flanders Fields Museum (IFFM), this paper explores the challenges of preserving and curating conflict heritage. The authors investigate the philosophy, cultural heritage management strategies and exhibitions used to curate the heritage of the Ypres Salient (Belgium). The paper argues that historical aerial photographs integrated in multimedia exhibits present themselves as a fascinating source bringing the landscape within the walls of the museum. Mobile augmented reality (AR) applications developed by the museum go one step beyond and bring museum techniques to the landscape. This paper presents a strategy to present, manage and curate the entirety of conflict heritage from the modern period. Faced with growing politicisation and memorialisation of modern conflict, it is extremely important that inclusive heritage management and curation is insured. The reflections on different curatorial techniques used by the IFFM can contribute globally towards a better heritage engagement. An innovative and meaningful framework enables a more historically nuanced visitor experience to key heritage sites throughout the Ypres Salient. Ensuring a non-selective heritage experience is especially pressing today. Over the past century canonised and national narratives have prescribed our understanding of the First World War across Europe and beyond. Adopting a critical stance towards the proliferation in AR apps and applying theories from anthropology and phenomenology has been developed combining AR with arboreal landscape relics.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-10-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0056
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Climate change adaptation planning for cultural heritage, a national scale
           methodology
    • Authors: Cathy Daly, Caroline Engel Purcell, Jacqui Donnelly, Clara Chan, Michael MacDonagh, Peter Cox
      Abstract: Ireland's Climate Action and Low Carbon Development Act 2015 established the requirement for a National Adaptation Framework (NAF) composed of nine sectoral plans, of which Built and Archaeological Heritage is one. All the plans were written according to the six-step process outlined in Sectoral Planning Guidelines for Climate Change Adaptation produced by the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment (DCCAE, 2018) which is also the government department charged with coordinating the NAF. This article will summarise the application of the methodology to heritage resources in Ireland, the issues encountered and the results achieved. The plan was informed by existing research and incorporated expert, stakeholder and public consultation throughout the process. It also closely considered published plans from other sectors in order to aid consistency within the NAF and to ensure cross-cutting issues were highlighted. Of the many potential impacts of climate change, those identified as priorities for adaptation planning in Ireland were flooding (inland and coastal), storm damage, coastal erosion, soil movement (landslip or erosion), changing burial preservation conditions, pests and mould, wildfires and maladaptation. Goals, objectives and an action plan were developed commensurate with the five-year term of the plan, but also initiating a long-term strategic vision. A monitoring strategy was developed to monitor progress, identify problems and inform improvements to the adaptation plan as part of an iterative process. Much work is being done on the topic of climate change and cultural heritage, yet at the time of writing Ireland is believed to be the only country to have adopted a national adaptation plan for cultural heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-09-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0053
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • State policy in the sphere of protection of cultural heritage in Ukraine
    • Authors: Nataliia Malysh, Viktoriya Shevchenko, Olena Tkachuk-Miroshnychenko
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the efficacy of the state policy of Ukraine in the sphere of protection of tangible and intangible cultural heritage, measures of safeguarding cultural property in the event of armed conflict and to assess how and why the state funding of culture has changed. The proposal is to investigate this by discussing the national and international policy frameworks through case study by using quantitative and qualitative methods to disclose if state cultural policy initiatives promote public interest in cultural issues and how the political events in the country affect the distribution of the state funding of culture. Ukrainian state cultural policy initiatives appear to be effective in protecting cultural heritage at both central and local levels despite redistribution in the state funding of this sphere. In cooperation with international agencies, Ukraine effectively promotes its intangible cultural heritage properties. Interest of the public in the state cultural policy issues has grown considerably. Problems exist with the protection of Ukrainian cultural sites located in war zones and disputed territories. These findings demonstrate how the state policies aimed at protecting Ukrainian cultural heritage may be effectively implemented at different levels in cooperation with international agencies; how the political landscape in the country promotes the public interest in cultural policy issues. This case forms an example of steps aimed at protecting cultural properties on disputed territories in cooperation with intermediaries, such as UNESCO.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-09-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2020-0047
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Relevance of heritage safeguarding plans in the Algerian Medina
    • Authors: Hana Salah-Salah
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the heritage management of the Algerian medinas subject to standardized safeguarding plans, referring only to the general community model, and then ignoring their particularities. Two medinas were selected as a case study: Annaba and Constantine. Several methodologies of a descriptive historical issue and an exploratory study approach were used to determine the physical and cultural values of the two medinas. The objective is to see to what extent the medinas can be claimed as a place of affirmation and diffusion of urbanity. On the basis of the results obtained, this work aims to articulate the tangible and intangible heritage as two inseparable dimensions to rethink the heritage of the Algerian medinas, taking into account the specificities and peculiarities of each of them. This paper responds to an identified need to examine the issue of identity as a new approach that depends on the available characteristics of the historic center and the way in which planners and decision-makers use these resources as a guideline for implementing a new vision of safeguarding.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-09-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2019-0126
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Sustainability-oriented innovation (SOI) in the cultural village: an
           actor-network perspective in the case of Laweyan Batik Village
    • Authors: Budi Harsanto, Chrisna T. Permana
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the development of sustainability-oriented innovation (SOI) in the cultural village. SOI has recently generated widespread interest, both academically and practically, by factoring in environmental and social impacts in addition to economic aspects. However, previous works have mostly been performed at profit organisations, with few discussed at the non-profit, and likewise, in the cultural village. This study uses a qualitative approach by focusing on a unique case, Laweyan Batik Village in Surakarta, Indonesia. Founded in the 15th century, Laweyan Batik Village remains the oldest batik village in Indonesia. Batik is the traditional fabric of Indonesia, influenced by Arabian, Chinese and European patterns, that was recognised in 2009 by UNESCO as part of the World's Intangible Cultural Heritage. The actor-network theory (ANT) is used as an analytical framework to understand the process of SOI development through the role of actors in developing innovations. The findings suggest that, it is not only in mainstream business sectors and formal settings, as already evidenced by existing literature, that SOI can be promoted, but also in community sectors and within informal settings. This paper has found that the development of sustainability innovation in these settings is challenged by the dynamics of the actors and the institutional settings. The overall development process of sustainability innovation has been undertaken through so-called “collaborative practices”, emphasising the involvement of government actors and non-government actors, highlighting community leaders, academics and NGOs as the “in-between” actors who provide knowledge sharing and maintain communications to ensure the promotion of the SOI concepts and programmes. This research contributes in two main ways: first, an understanding of the process of sustainability innovation in a cultural village that has not been deeply explored by current literature; and second, the use of the actor network theory as an analytical framework from which to map the process of SOI collaborative development through networking dimensions.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-09-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2019-0102
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The Kathmandu Valley's indigenous practices of safeguarding heritage: an
           assessment of present-day challenges
    • Authors: Monalisa Maharjan, Filipe Themudo Barata
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand the traditional practices of safeguarding intangible cultural heritage (ICH) through “Guthi”, that is continued by the indigenous community of Kathmandu Valley. It explores the ancient system as a management practice rather than just a social costume. By analyzing existing laws and policies relevant to intangible heritage of Nepal, it aims to find scope for the Guthi in the formal heritage conservation practice and its relevancy in present context of 2003 Convention, where community participation plays a pivotal role. To study the traditional method of safeguarding heritage “Guthi system”, the case of “Yehya Punhi Festival” also known as “Indra Jatra” of Kathmandu was taken as a case. Qualitative research methodology was used to study various sub festivals within Yenya, its functions, funding mechanism and its way of continuity by Guthi. Review of various legislations associated with the heritage of Nepal, published and unpublished official documents as well as international conventions and recommendations were done. In addition to semi-structured interview with Guthi members, experts and locals; the observation of eight days long festival was also conducted, The study found that traditional Guthi system still holds a strong value in the social structure and safeguarding of traditional practices even with negative impact of modernization. Guthi is the main reason for the continuity of the Yenya Punhi festival, along with various associated rituals, while the national legislations of Nepal do not recognize Guthi as a safeguarding practice. Traditional practice could be a way forward for implementation of 2003 convention in Nepal when Nepal has already ratified the convention. Guthi could be sustainable way of safeguarding heritage if integrated well in the formal heritage practices. Guthi has been studied by many researchers from anthropological perspectives and even conservation for tangible heritage but not as a mechanism of safeguarding ICH. Guthi could be one of the excellent examples of Safeguarding Intangible Heritage and could also be a good recipe for management with community participation, sustainability and indigenous knowledge. More research and publication like this is necessary to push government to look into homegrown solutions than implementing new management plan.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-09-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0050
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Assessment of food heritage to improve virtuous cycles
    • Authors: Fahimeh Khatami, Enrico Sorano, Marco Bechis
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to contribute the advancement of knowledge on food heritage and indigenous entrepreneurship in a non-Western country, specifically in the Persian gardens as the touristic destination for increasing the tourism and food businesses in Iran. The methodological approach adopted is based on qualitative and quantitative approaches to compare two representative gardens named as Bagh-Chehel-Sotoun and Bagh-Fin, as famous examples of a Persian garden in Iran. The methods supported the research to explain the lack of strategies for improving virtuous cycles in Persian gardens despite their potentials as the main places to attract many tourists. Regarding local food and the quality of servicing, most of the visitors and tourists (85–90%) had interest to test local and traditional foods around both gardens, but they had no sufficient awareness of Iranian traditional foods. According to the tourists’ interests, the authors concluded the lack of servicing and facilities to present and introduce local and traditional food for tourists. Despite the limitation of local food services and lack of awareness of tourists about local foods, the implication of the study offers possible avenues to promote local food business. The results could be useful for cultural heritage and tourism organizations and for investors in the economic sector due to more exploitation of the tourism industry. The paper is the first work evaluating the Persian garden with a new perspective of local foods in Iran.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2019-0035
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The sociocultural impact of adaptive reuse of immovable cultural heritage
           from the perspective of direct users and the local community
    • Authors: Zdzisława Elżbieta Niemczewska
      Abstract: The purpose is to show the results of research on sociocultural impact – as one of the pillars of sustainable local development which can be stimulated among others by immovable cultural heritage. The research concerned two groups of respondents: the local community, which does not directly use heritage re-adopted to commercial functions and the community using the heritage in a direct way. Surveys and in-depth interviews were used for the study. Two groups of respondents were surveyed: direct users of immovable re-adopted heritage who have the possibility to use it directly by buying services offered in the studied heritage and the local community representatives for which access to the re-adopted heritage is limited. In the case of heritage re-adopted to commercial functions, there are differences in sociocultural impact. The very presence of heritage and only awareness of its existence in a given area is not enough for creating a sociocultural function by it in some aspects. Such heritage does not use its potential fully. Results of the study may be taken into account by some stakeholders in the case of giving heritage resources contemporary functions especially commercial ones (owners of re-used cultural heritage resources, representatives of local authorities as well as entities responsible for the protection, appropriate use of cultural heritage resources and decision-making processes) to eliminate negative or insufficient effects in creating the sociocultural function of heritage in sustainable local development. Suggested actions undertaken on the basis of this research can increase the impact of immovable cultural heritage adapted for commercial purposes on a larger range of beneficiaries especially the local community. Hence, the extent of such heritage's impact on the sociocultural pillar of sustainable development would increase. So far, studies on the differences in the sociocultural impact of immovable cultural heritage adapted to commercial, contemporary functions on direct users and no-direct users have not been conducted. Results obtained by this study supplement a certain gap regarding the sociocultural impact of heritage resources on this two groups of stakeholders: groups that have direct access to the heritage resource and groups that have no access to them or this access is limited.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2019-0093
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Local community support, attitude and perceived benefits in the UNESCO
           World Heritage Site
    • Authors: Mohd Hafiz Hanafiah, Mohd Raziff Jamaluddin, Agus Riyadi
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the support and attitudes of the local community together with the benefits of living in the vicinity of George Town UNESCO World Heritage Site. George Town is one of the popular UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Malaysia. A total of 319 respondents residing in the gazetted area of George Town World Heritage Sites were interviewed. The covariance-based structural equation modelling (CB-SEM) analysis was conducted to test the study’s hypotheses. The community's attitudes and personal benefits were identified to strongly influence community’s support towards the conservation and development of the World Heritage Sites in George Town. While a small number of community members acknowledged the significant opportunities through tourism, majority of them expected economic and non-economic benefits from the development of World Heritage Sites. The findings from this study are expected to contribute to the ongoing debate on the perceived effects, benefits and future support of the World Heritage Sites from the local community's perspectives. Understanding the behaviour of the local community to create successful tourism planning, especially in delicate heritage destinations. This study enriches the scarce empirical research study on community’s behaviour living in the vicinity of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, especially in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (ASEAN) region.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-08-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2020-0034
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Dignity of the heritage and the heritage communities
    • Authors: Riin Alatalu
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reasons why the human rights-based approach should be used in the preservation of cultural heritage. The article is a combination of an essay and illustrative case studies. The thesis is based on experience in heritage protection on national and international level and the discussions of the “Heritage and Human Rights” training in Estonia 1.-6.05.2019. Cultural heritage is the common good regardless of its ownership. The protection of something, especially in living environments, includes compromises in the rights of one or another counterpart. Restrictions are often ground for conflicts that can be settled with good communication, but sometimes just communication is not enough. In these cases, human rights-based approaches enable to identify the problems, scale the rights of different stakeholders and thus enable discussion to reach consensus. The research is useful for heritage conservationists, policy makers and urban planners with regards to management and implementation of human rights-based approach and community involvement in heritage protection on World Heritage, national and local levels. The research is a part of a series of discussions, trainings and project reports of the Our Common Dignity – Rights Based Approaches (OCD-RBA) working group of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) and contributes to the follow-up activities worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2019-0064
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Colonized by the development discourse: life and living heritage in the
           shadow of antiquities
    • Authors: Olga Bialostocka
      Abstract: Tangible and intangible aspects of living heritage shape the identity of communities whose daily experience is integrated into heritage cultural spaces. Interference in this intricately woven, historically rich context may have significant sociocultural and material consequences for the people inhabiting it. Using the example of the ancient Theban Necropolis and “modern” Gurna, the paper looks at the loss of contemporary cultural heritage in favor of Pharaonic antiquities to question the model of heritage management and development practiced through violence in Egypt. Written from a decolonial perspective, the paper is positioned within the post-development school of thought. It applies subjectivist epistemology to argue for pluriversality. Focusing on the historical context of the community of Gurnawis, the paper highlights power inequalities among heritage stakeholders and discusses the violence of coloniality that challenges the freedom of human experiences and representations. Decolonial in nature, the paper has a futuristic horizon. It calls for decolonization of the discourse of development, which remains marred by the Western understanding of “civilizational advancement” seen as modernization, industrialization and economic growth. It further argues for imagining alternatives to the current social realities, which would account for the diversity of human experiences and consider a pluriverse of meanings. The paper applies a decolonial perspective to the study of heritage to demonstrate the impact of colonial rationality on the theory and practice of the discipline of archaeology, as well as its consequences for heritage management in Egypt. Speaking from the standpoint of the marginalized population of Gurna, the paper further reveals the damage done by the colonial discourse of development to those who dare to create and live their own reality.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-08-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2019-0042
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Systemic preconditions and ontological modeling for peri-urban communities
    • Authors: Susu Nousala, Kim Blanca Galindo, David Romero, Xin Feng, Pedro Aibeo
      Abstract: This research presents an ontological model, to communicate the impact of dynamic preconditions for peri-urban communities. As such, this paper approaches perturbation communities as social-complex-adaptive-systems. Previous assessment of dynamic preconditions have typically been based on top-down approaches. Through the lens of social-complex-adaptive and systemic design approaches (requiring a range of different disciplines), this work focuses on providing a broader view towards periurban research. The methodological approach involved academic literature, fieldwork observations, in-depth discussions with community, government, experts and research groups, focusing on a region called “Xochimilco” on the outskirts of Mexico City, a unique pre-Hispanic, Aztec ecosystem. This evolving man made agricultural/ecological structure of island plots, still provides environmental services to Mexico City. This region provides the basis of the research and subsequent ontological model. Ontology, in this instance, refers to the nature of being within a range of constraining dynamic forces relating to resilient behaviors of the current Xochimilco perturbation ecosystem. Xochimilco can be considered as a longitudinal phenomenon that contributed to the understanding of observable resilient and precondition elements between the past and present of a living complex-adaptive-system. The research has provided a better understanding of community resilience through preconditions, contributing towards preparation of environmental change and future urbanization. To this end, the research focused on visualizing key dynamics elements for communities attempting to absorb new urban conditions (being continuously pushed into it). The outcomes of this research have provided specific systemic, bottom up approaches with ontological modeling to assist with visualizing and understanding intangible dynamic conditions that impact high complex areas of perturbation regions.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-07-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2020-0074
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Safeguarding the colonial era's ecclesiastical heritage: towards a
           sustainable protection-use model
    • Authors: Reyhan Sabri, Oluseyi Akinola Olagoke
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the current conservation state of colonial-era ecclesiastical buildings in Yorubaland (South-Western Nigeria) and the mechanics of their upkeep. The article also discusses the parameters of formulating a balanced protection-use model for the management of these buildings. This study adopts a mixed-methods approach, combining participatory observations and documentation, semi-structured interviews and the review of church compendiums. Forty-four church buildings were identified and surveyed, and sixty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted. A gradual change in how communities value colonial-era churches in contrast to other structures with ecclesiastical legacies has been identified. The challenges and threats to their protection are investigated, revealing a variety of contextual constraints in the current management structure, which prioritizes the expansion of useful space over the conservation of the original fabric, often resulting in extreme modifications. However, there are also opportunities in the current system that could be mobilized to resource a self-sustaining conservation management practice, based on a mutually developed protection-use balance. Heritage policy has not directly addressed the management of ecclesiastical buildings erected during the modern colonial era. This paper is the first in-depth investigation of colonial-era religious structures in the Nigerian context, and one of the few, if not the first, in a former African colonial nation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-07-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0017
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • To what extent Iranian primary school textbooks mirror the philosophy of
           heritage education'
    • Authors: Rabeeh Barghi, Aswati Hamzah, S. Mostafa Rasoolimanesh
      Abstract: This paper evaluates the content of Iranian primary school textbooks – as the fundamental educational tool in transmitting of key components – to highlight to what extent the content pursues the philosophy of heritage education. Heritage preservation, known to be fostering of the sustainable development, is successfully achieved through the education of young people. The philosophy of heritage education is to cultivate the sense of responsibility toward heritage preservation through the approaches of education through heritage, about heritage and for heritage in which students obtain knowledge, understand the value and develop their attitudes. This study applies the content analysis approach to evaluate the subject textbooks of the Iranian primary school curriculum. The content analysis was conducted for 51 textbooks across nine subjects and the teacher guidebooks for the art and physical education subjects. Historic country of Iran with a rich local and world cultural and natural heritage is significant context for this study. The findings show that, however, heritage elements are applied for conveying the content of some subjects, there is the lack of clarifying of the concept and importance of heritage and cultivating the sense of responsibility toward its preservation. The results contribute significantly in the heritage education literature as well as improving heritage education in Iran by highlighting the key points which should be considered to design heritage education programs.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2018-0087
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Discussing natural resource extraction in cultural landscapes as a
           cultural value
    • Authors: Patricia O'Donnell, Christophe Rivet
      Abstract: Natural resource extraction is perceived as a destructive aspect of human culture. This characterization is widespread, despite the activity having shaped relationships between communities and their environment to create entire sets of cultural values and expressions through settlement patterns, traditional skills and practices, innovation and technology, intangible cultural expressions, local economies and more. The cultural dimensions of natural resource extraction landscapes were discussed at the ICOMOS ADCOM Annual Symposium in La Plata, Argentina, in December 2018. The workshop included experts in cultural landscapes, sustainability, industrial archaeology and industrial heritage. This paper reports on these issues and deliberations focusing on World Heritage cultural landscapes of extraction. The report considers a broad survey of the World Heritage List and sites on national Tentative Lists to identify those related to natural extraction sites and distinguishing between categories of relict vs. living, and between the types of natural resources being extracted. The conclusion is that the World Heritage Committee has yet to address the living value of natural resource extraction. Furthermore, the workshop attendants concluded that there is a pressing need to do so in light of the type, nature and sustainability of these sites. As the source of materials for many outstanding sites on the World Heritage List and the decreasing availability of some resources, the question requires consideration to ensure the sustainable use and livelihood of communities. The limitations are set by the general terms of the survey and the limited engagement of knowledgeable individuals. The practical implications are related to guidance to review and analyse potential living cultural landscapes related to natural resource extraction. There is no general discussion on this topic yet amongst professionals. The initiative of the workshop identified that gap and its related necessity to provide guidance.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-07-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2019-0086
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Redefining urban heritage value for Hanoi trade streets
    • Authors: Saori Kashihara
      Abstract: This study aims to redefine the urban heritage value of trade streets in Hanoi's Ancient Quarter (AQ) and propose an expanded notion of the “historicity” found through intangible cultural heritage (ICH). A longitudinal analysis was conducted to examine the historical transitions of trade streets, thereby providing an alternative value perspective for considering the area's conservation management. The trade streets were specifically analysed from the pre-colonial era to 2017 using past survey data concerning the distribution and concentration of trade types, statistical documents from the colonial era and recent fieldwork data from investigations into 79 trade streets, thus identifying seven patterns of change. Individual trade streets contribute to the unique identities of their respective streets while collectively providing experiential value through the overall variety and density of trade types. Further, the value of modernised trade streets can be found in their support of the area's systemic and experiential values. Current management approaches should shift to include non-traditional trade streets that have experienced gradual changes or retained specific businesses for long periods of time. This was the first study to conduct a longitudinal analysis of AQ trading with partial support from statistical data. It explored an expanded way of interpreting historicity from the viewpoint of dynamic ICH along the two axes of pace and intensity by tracing changes in commercial activities over time.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-07-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2019-0147
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Applying the MOA (motivation-opportunity-ability) model for the evaluation
           of residents' participation in built heritage rehabilitation: the case of
           Constantine
    • Authors: Iqbal Benedjma, Aissa Mahimoud
      Abstract: It has been widely recognised that the participation of residents is a significant issue in contemporary urban heritage conservation. However, studies confirm that the reasons behind residents' engagement are still difficult to assess, particularly in emerging countries. This paper aims to evaluate the factors that incite or prevent residents from participating in built heritage rehabilitation in the old city of Constantine, by applying the motivation-opportunity-ability (MOA) model. A questionnaire-based survey was used to collect information from the residents. The collected data were then analysed using the structural equation model (SEM). The findings show that the most significant factors affecting residents' participation were related to their motivations and abilities. Interestingly, factors related to the opportunities did not influence participation. Thus, autonomous rehabilitation according to the residents' motivation and abilities is more likely to be adopted. These findings are limited to the selected sample, and some variables have been eliminated through the SEM analysis. However, as a first attempt to study residents' participation in built heritage rehabilitation in Constantine, the paper proposes a different perspective for assessing participation by considering its means and ends simultaneously. The paper also provides guidance to local decision-makers to improve the legal framework by implementing factors that encourage residents' involvement in sustainable heritage management.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-06-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2018-0055
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The importance of museums in the tourist development and the motivations
           of their visitors: an analysis of the Costume Museum in Viana do Castelo
    • Authors: Laurentina Vareiro, Bruno Barbosa Sousa, Sónia Sousa Silva
      Abstract: This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Considering the challenges inherent in the efficient correlation of these three areas, this study intends to demonstrate the clear benefits resulting from knowledge sharing and effective cooperation. Based on the objectives outlined, the authors conducted a survey of the visitors of the Costume Museum, which was chosen for being one of the unmistakable icons identifying the cultural heritage of Viana do Castelo (Portugal). In an increasingly competitive tourist market, with demand resulting from growing specialization, the integration of museological spaces as patrimonial and cultural elements in the supply of tourist destinations is an important factor in differentiation and development. To enhance the importance of the Costume Museum in the process of the tourist development of the city, it is fundamental to define a clear strategy for attracting and responding to the greatest demand from cultural tourists who are increasingly interested in actively participating in learning experiences. It is believed that a larger sample could strengthen the conclusions, eventually more relevant and closer to the reality. The results show that visitors to the Costume Museum very positively evaluated the museum with regard to several factors covered in this study. However, there is a great dependence on school visits. On the other hand, lower qualitative evaluations were made by older age groups and those with higher academic degrees, although the evaluations remain positive. The paper presents museums as a possible factor in tourism development and social inclusion, advancing practical measures aimed at social justice through a fairer distribution of tourism revenues and the defence of historic centre residents' way, and quality, of life. This paper examines the importance of the Costume Museum in the tourist development of Viana do Castelo (Portugal). This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Particular attention is given to visitors' motivations for visiting and their opinions about the quality of service, satisfaction and loyalty regarding this museum.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2020-0065
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Formulation of historic residential architecture as a background to urban
           conservation

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Mesut Dinler
      Abstract: The paper explores how interpretations of vernacular traditional architecture played a significant role in the development of urban conservation practice in Turkey in the 1960s and 1970s. At the turn of the 20th century, the value of Ottoman historic residential architecture began to develop with the label of the Turkish House. At the turn of the 20th century, historic residential architecture of the Ottoman Empire gained a heritage value and labeled as the Turkish House. Thus, these houses became a part of a national heritage discourse, though their preservation only came to agenda in the early 1970s through preservation programs for Istanbul's waterfront mansions (yali). Turkey simultaneously adapted international heritage developments throughout the 1960s and the 1970s and introduced urban conservation both in practice and in theory to heritage management system of Turkey. The main research material is derived from the archives of the primary preservation council of Turkey that functioned from 1951 to 1983. The earlier works of the members of the council, journals of the period and urban projects are investigated to outline the complexities of urban conservation. This paper explores how modernist efforts of the early 20th century framed traditional Ottoman architecture with the label “Turkish House.” In addition, it reveals how preserving the Turkish House was a major motivation that triggered early urban conservation attempts primarily along Istanbul's Bosporus shores. The paper outlines dynamics of urban conservation. It outlines that urban conservation did not only emerge as a response to postwar context, but it was also a historic continuation of modernist understandings of “cultural heritage.”
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2020-06-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2019-0113
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
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