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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 194)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 100)
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Intervención     Open Access  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Regional Sustainability     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.257
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 10 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2044-1266 - ISSN (Online) 2044-1274
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Mitigating tensions between ethics and aesthetics through community-led
           adaptive heritage reuse: the case of post-industrial Praga, Warsaw

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      Authors: Karim van Knippenberg , Beitske Boonstra
      Abstract: Heritage reuse, in which the aesthetics of heritage play a leading role, often leads to extreme commodification of heritage, place branding, gentrification and the exclusion of many narratives and voices. In order to understand how such processes of erosion and estrangement between heritage and local communities can be countered, while still redeveloping heritage buildings for contemporary urban needs, this paper explores with what kind of practices and heritage approaches these tensions can be mitigated, learning from recent experiences in Praga district. Based on qualitative semi-structured interviews in a case study of a living lab of ongoing heritage reuse practice in Praga district in the city of Warsaw, Poland, the authors identify practices and approaches that can help to overcome tensions between the ethics and aesthetics of heritage reuse. In rapidly changing district like Praga, local communities and others are struggling to compete process of change that impact their heritage, and the engagement with it. Although the local community is quite active in addressing various urban challenges and preserving the character of Praga including heritage elements, the conditions under which these community-led heritage reuse practices operate are quite impactful, as it appears that cooperation with local institutions is vital in order to embed community-led heritage reuse practices to overcome the tensions between ethics and aesthetics of heritage reuse. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of a living lab of community-led heritage reuse. As such, the paper highlights various practices of community organizations and citizen initiatives that address heritage reuse, as well as the conditions under which these initiatives operate.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-11-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2022-0105
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Carelessness in preserving manuscripts as a heritage: cases of local
           treatment in Indonesia

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      Authors: Fakhriati Fakhriati , Nyimas Umi Kalsum , Sugiarti Sugiarti , Husnul Fahimah Ilyas
      Abstract: This paper aims at examining the current condition of ancient manuscripts owned by locals in remote areas of Indonesia, which are mostly in poor condition. It is to describe the factors of these manuscript damages and the implications of the damage. The study employed qualitative design with philological, codicological and anthropological approaches. The participants are manuscript owners and keepers in Western, Central and Eastern parts of Indonesia. Data were collected by direct observations and interviews with the participants. This paper provides empirical insights on how manuscripts were damaged due to human and environmental factors. These factors have caused the loss of part or whole information in the manuscripts, hence causing disconnected knowledge linkage from past to present. Due to the selected scope and area of study, this study may lack generalizability. Further studies can be conducted to examine the physical aspect and the content of the manuscripts. This study suggests the urgency for stakeholders and local governments to preserve the manuscripts by taking specific measures that include preservation training to the locals and conducting a program for digitizing these manuscripts. This paper fulfils an identified need to study how the damages suffered by the local manuscripts.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-11-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Legacies of post-colonial internal migration in coastal India-the
           case of Udupi

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      Authors: Vidya Rao , Rama Devi Nandineni
      Abstract: Mainstream narratives in Indian history do not delve into the checkered history of the west coast. The reasons for this are many, including a predominantly center-outwards viewpoint of historians. West coast has always been open to sea route influences aiding its diversity. However, the lack of natural defense against colonizers from the sea destroyed indigenous and personal heritage. Small town narratives include uprooting, lack of access to past heritage and new settlement creation. The heritage of this everyday landscape shaped by human grit is the subject of the study. This qualitative ethnographic study includes document analysis, transect walking, architectural built form study, open interviews and participatory observations. The motivations for heritage management can be grouped into economic, cultural and technological. From a financial point of view, the urban core studied is still relevant and sustainable. Likewise, the Krishna temple dominates the cultural discussion and architectural documentation as a religious center. However, the cultural heritage of business streets and the third motivation of building technology have been largely ignored. This disregard is evident from neglect and the pastiche use of monumental or ornamental styles alien to the region for restoration efforts. “Heritage is personal and individual as well as collective and universal” (Mire, 2016). The Pete heritage is not just crucial for the communities they house but the town as a whole. Their nonimpervious nature means that they hold collective memories for everyone. Attention to memories and monuments will increase the possibilities of shared responsibility between various stakeholders (Swenson et al., 2012). Therefore, they should be seen as a part of the larger whole. This paper argues for the recent global bottom-up approach in heritage management rather than the conventional established practices. Established heritage management focuses on the mainstream, royal or specific ethnic heritage in the Indian subcontinent. The heritage of the common person rarely has the grandeur of monumental architecture taken up for preservation by the state. As a result, societies' individual and collective heritage are at risk of rapid erasure under the pressures of modernization. Built forms are repositories of cultural information; therefore, a sustainable instrument for the preservation of everyday heritage can be created with culture as an actuator. This study looks at the narrative of the historical coastal small-town business core created by internal mass migration due to colonization.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0129
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Prospects of negative heritage management in Syria

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      Authors: Wesam Zarka , Salah Hajismail
      Abstract: This paper aims to illustrate some of the negative heritage created in Syria over the 11 bloody years following the start of the uprising in 2011 and how this heritage can be managed to promote justice. Different motives and methods for negative heritage management are exemplified and compared to find out the most appropriate one(s) that can be adapted and adopted in the Syrian context. Based mainly on Human Rights Watch (HRW) reports, suggestions are made for the management of three cases of negative heritage in Syria by planning measures and solutions to promote justice. The three cases are the targeting of schools and hospitals, chemical attacks and Aleppo’s River Massacre. The effectiveness of the proposals is discussed and piloted by conducting a one-on-one conversational interview in 2021, related to the first proposal, and soliciting feedback on a social media platform, related to the third proposal. Values-centred preservation based on the efforts of the community concerned with negative heritage, rather than the four existing governments in Syria, can lead to good management of recent negative heritage. The proposed virtual application of the proposals is a step that may itself be useful and may facilitate future practical application, as most of the exemplified sites are no longer accessible on the ground. Ethically productive management of the negative heritage is promoted to seek more value-oriented dimensions of the conflict. Considering a fruitful use of the conflict in Syria can encourage positive thinking and counter the passive attitude towards the prolonged conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-10-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0139
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Analysing the master plan development and urban heritage of Najaf
           City in Iraq

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      Authors: Sabeeh Lafta Farhan , Dhirgham Alobaydi , Daniel Anton , Zuhair Nasar
      Abstract: This paper is intended to assess the developments conducted on the master plan of Old Najaf, mainly in three areas: the Imam Ali Holy Shrine and its surroundings, the Great Market Area and the location of the Town of Visitors. In order to analyse the implementation of the transformation phases in Old Najaf, the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) technique was used to identify and organise the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to the examined case study of the city's historic centre. At the first stage, all available data (photographs, maps, documents and reports) were collected from different sources, including previous studies by governmental institutions, departments and agencies. Ultimately, the SWOT analysis was used for each identified phase in the morphological evolution of the historic centre. This can offer an opportunity to observe the implications of urban planning practices in Old Najaf from the mid-20th century to the present day. In order to identify the well-organised urban design practices and appropriate strategies, the implemented studies and projects were examined by the four factors of the SWOT analysis. The current results have revealed important urban transformations, already made and/or ongoing, of those aforementioned three main areas, which imply a great loss of the city's traditional character and urban heritage. Further, the environmental and socio-economic issues should be involved in the analysis to evaluate how they have influenced the current outcomes of Old Najaf in relation to the urban configuration and orientation. The rich cultural and architectural heritage of Al-Najaf historic centre is dramatically neglected and seriously threatened to be lost. Hence, conservation on both tangible and intangible levels is urgently needed. It is the first paper which focussed on this problem and tries to learn from the British Conservation Experiences in this field.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-10-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2020-0101
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Evaluation of bioclimatic design strategies in Esfahak village using
           Mahoney method

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      Authors: Akram Hosseini
      Abstract: Despite worldwide climate change and the problems caused by using fossil fuels, energy consumption in the world keeps rising every year. The areas with extremely cold or scorching climates are large, and significant amounts of energy are getting used in these areas for heating, cooling, and ventilation. The general purpose of this study is to investigate the possible relationship between the climatic characteristics of the Esfahak, a village located in the hot desert region of Iran, and the physical characteristics of its built environment. The method of this research is qualitative and somewhat descriptive-analytical. In this regard, the architectural features of Esfahak village are compared with the principles mentioned in the Mahoney tables to determine the degree of compliance of the architecture of this village with the climatic condition. The results show that design principles have been used in all indicators discussed in the Mahoney tables. By applying these principles, not only did the acute weather conditions not prevent the initial settlement in the village location, they have not caused inhabitants to leave the site over time as well. The impacts of bioclimatic design strategies on thermal comfort in hot desert regions are seldom studied. This research provides evidence-based and informed design recommendations that can help building designers and city authorities integrate bioclimatic design strategies at the earliest conceptual design phases in hot desert climates.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2021-0210
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The role of adaptive reuse in historic urban landscapes towards cities
           of inclusion. The case of acre

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Ana Jayone Yarza Pérez , Els Verbakel
      Abstract: Cities are facing challenges that dramatically affect their social and physical landscapes, leading to the increase of urban segregation and polarization. One response to these challenges is adaptive reuse, yet, in heterogeneous communities, these adaptations are often a source of conflict, because local actions often lack an integrative approach, leading to further exclusion. In this paper the authors explore the potential of adaptive reuse of urban heritage as a planning tool to support inclusiveness and heterogeneity. The city of Acre is used as a case study, where different scenarios for urban heritage are proposed and tested among stakeholders through interviews. These aim to explore how adaptive reuse processes can lead to the inclusion or exclusion of certain groups and how design interventions in historic urban landscapes challenge the way the current disconnected historic and urban layers interact. The paper presents the commonalities and differences between the interviewees' perceptions on Acre's functioning, their idea of inclusiveness and other aspects related to urban design. Moreover, it highlights the existing conflicts of interest, value prioritization and the adequacy of the proposed scenarios, serving as a way to verify the accuracy of the scenario building process. Testing an urban design tool related to adaptive reuse of urban heritage in a real and extreme case, based on the guidelines of the Historic Urban Landscape Recommendation; and critically analysing the sources of conflict and value systems to address inclusion in heterogenous settings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Philippine landscape heritage education: review of the preparedness of
           landscape architecture curricula in the Philippines for cultural landscape
           heritage conservation specialization

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      Authors: Kenneth Javier Tua , Gabriel Victor Aves Caballero , Susan C. Aquino-Ong
      Abstract: This paper serves as a pilot study for the education of cultural landscape heritage conservation (CLHC) and review the preparedness of landscape architecture curricula in the Philippines for the CLHC specialization. It proposes the utilization of the “Geodesign” framework in formulating a developmental process and validation of the interrelationship and collaborative activity created by the thematic areas towards landscape heritage education and professionalization. The goal of the study is to create new possibilities for the profession through the study and professionalization of cultural landscapes, thus, raising awareness and significance of cultural heritage and heritage conservation in the lenses of the Philippine landscapes. The research opted for literature reviews, comprehensive desktop reviews of the landscape architecture syllabi of higher education institutions (HEIs) and SWOT and PESTEL analyses as qualitative assessments, including stakeholder feedback discussions with the current four (4) HEIs, Philippine Association of Landscape Architects (PALA), Technical Committee for Landscape Architecture, Commission on Higher Education (TCLA CHED), Professional Regulation Commission–Board of Landscape Architecture (PRC–BOLA) and the ICOMOS IFLA International Scientific Committee on Cultural Landscapes, National Philippine Committee (Philippine NSCCL). The data were complemented by a quantitative assessment using Leopold and Lohani and Thann assessment matrix on importance (without considering magnitude), and for this study, it is the level of preparedness and integration. The paper brings forth to the conclusion that the landscape architecture curricula at the bachelor's degree level of the University of the Philippines – Diliman (UP – Diliman) in Quezon City and University of San Carlos (USC) in Cebu are prepared to integrate and/or consider updating their respective curriculum in accordance to the CLHC specialization. The curricula of Bulacan State University (BulSU) in Malolos, Bulacan, and the University of San Agustin (USA) in Iloilo may need to consider introducing courses related to the thematic areas to be able to create an area of basis for integration. The study is initiated as part of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) Philippines Internship programme during a master degree study wherein the research is bounded within the limit of its duration. Therefore, the study was able to only identify and chose the possible thematic areas and course concentrations for the specialization of CLHC; select, review and propose courses related to CLHC; screen courses from the landscape architecture curricula of the universities based on its course title, course information (if provided) and cross–checked with Government syllabi; and allocation of units and time per identified course as well as required prerequisite from thematic areas was not covered in this study. The paper can be used as a tool to engage discussions with the PRC–BOLA in its development of the specialization of CLHC currently being planned. Study topics and themes identified can be the starting point of training programmes that can benefit students of the current four universities in the study and landscape architecture professionals alike. This will eventually translate to benefits to society as heritage conservation methodologies are developed by practitioners who can apply such knowledge to places of cultural and natural significance and develop learnings to concrete heritage laws and policies protecting landscapes. This paper serves as a pilot study for the education and professionalization of CLHC in the Philippines. Significantly, the development of CLHC specialization in the Philippines shall open various opportunities in developing Philippine cultural landscape heritage conservationists trained at the local context.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2021-0194
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Adaptive reuse for leftover urban landscape: ruins, remains, waste and
           monsters for an approaching genealogy of future

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Annalisa Metta
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the topic of adaptive reuse referring to urban open spaces into a more-than-human perspective. It underlines that dealing with heritage means being part of an inherent and ongoing process of transformation and so that reuse is inextricably an adaptive practice, constantly facing mutations, and that adaptation is a coral practice that involves different kinds of users and makers, inclusive of human and not human livings. This paper looks at the lexicon of abandonment, in search of the more essential and intense meanings of words, and at some pioneering practices in Europe to comprehend the aesthetic and ethical implications of adaptive reuse of neglected landscapes. Processes of reuse involve many different communities of users who in turn continuously redesign the site, into a comprehensive, coral and conflicting collaboration, whose results are never given once for all and are both uncanny and beautiful, scaring and marvellous, like a monster. Accepting the idea that humans are not the only users and makers of urban sites can widen the range of tools, methods and values involved in heritage adaptive reuse. This paper tries to widen the meanings of adaptation into a multispecies perspective. It intends to broaden the range of agents that can be involved as users and makers, assuming a more-than-human point of view that is not yet commonly applied.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2022-0118
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Living heritage sites in the M'zab valley (Algeria): community and
           continuity

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      Authors: Naimeh Rezaei , Abdelaziz Khouadja
      Abstract: The ancient settlements of the M'zab Valley in Algeria, called ksour, are still being used by local inhabitants a thousand years after their construction. The main objective of this study was to discover why, despite the formation of new residential areas, these settlements have been able to survive and maintain their original functions. The authors used the concept of living heritage sites as an analytical framework. The field data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed through qualitative content analysis. This study revealed that the reasons for the survival of these settlements were cultural and social rather than physical. Four main factors play a role in the survival of these settlements: (1) solidarity and unity among the inhabitants, (2) built environment as an ancestral heritage and a symbol of identity, (3) comfort and convenience in ksour and (4) social control and adherence to tradition. However, some concerns have arisen in recent decades that may endanger the viability of these settlements in the future, requiring more attention from the government. While previous studies on urban heritage and World Heritage Sites (WHSs) have mainly focused on tourism development and conservation issues, this paper emphasized a less-studied aspect of these sites, i.e. continuity and sustainability. All previous studies on the WHSs of the M'zab Valley have addressed the traditional architecture and the climatic design of houses without sufficiently addressing other factors that have contributed to the sustainability and resilience of these settlements.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Interconnections and continuity among planning documents of Kota Lama
           Semarang development within the context of urban heritage conservation

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      Authors: Anisa Nurul Kartikasari , Bambang Hari Wibisono
      Abstract: Urban conservation is an integral part of urban development planning and it is incorporated into land use rules and plans. In order to achieve the goals of an ideal heritage conservation policy, there are spatial plans, building codes and relevant regulations that should be well prepared as reference for development projects. Kota Lama Semarang (Old City of Semarang) area has been recognized as part of the origin of the development of Semarang City, the capital city of Central Java. This area has been designated as a cultural heritage area both at the city and national level since 2020. The Heritage City Conservation Program (P3KP) encourages Kota Lama Semarang Area to experience fairly massive development since 2013. On one hand, to control and manage the area, the Semarang City Government issued several official planning documents, i.e. (a) Kota Lama Semarang Area RTBL documents (2003); (b) Kota Lama Semarang Grand Design (2011); and (c) Kota Lama Semarang Site RTBL (2020), which consecutively were used as references of development projects. On the other hand, the results of development projects indicated that there are no coherent physical improvements in the area. The study was conducted to show whether there are consistencies or mismatches between the three planning documents. This study used a qualitative deductive method with content analysis technique to compare three planning documents, using the predetermined variables. The results showed that the consistency between the three planning documents was not fully demonstrated, but they are mutually interconnected. The research focused only on three formal planning documents, for which comparative analysis was undertaken using content analysis to identify consistencies and inconsistencies based on determined 9 variables. Good planning documents should be consistent, since they are used as development references. Inconsistencies among planning documents produced segmented urban environments in Kota Lama Semarang Area/Site, which are mostly due to the different institutions preparing the documents. The segmented urban development in the area has reduced the historical and cultural values of the area. Revitalization program that was undertaken has some implication to the sustainability of the local economy. The paper explores both the consistencies and mismatches among the three planning documents, which have been used as references in implementing development projects in Kota Lama Semarang Area. Failures in maintaining consistencies among documents are supposed to produce inconsistent physical development in the area, unless adjustment to current development has to be made.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2021-0181
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Twentieth-century built urban heritage potential of the Somali region, its
           management, challenges and opportunities: the case of Jigjiga, Qebridahar
           and Erer cities

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      Authors: Muhammed Hamid Yasien , Tesfamichael Teshale Kebede
      Abstract: The research works concerned with heritage management, in general, are available domestically and globally, but they are not as abundant as required when it comes to the management of twentieth-century urban heritages, particularly the Somali region. Thus, this research is assumed as innovative and evocative of additional research initiatives in the management of twentieth-century urban heritages, and it can assure the development of sustainable heritage tourism in the research area. The study employed a cross-sectional survey as the research design, and qualitative data of both primary and secondary types were collected for this research. Therefore, purposively selected knowledgeable individuals in heritages of the study area were involved in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions, and field surveys of twentieth-century built urban heritage sites were conducted in Jigjiga, Erer and Qebridahar cities. Generally, observation, face-to-face interview interviews and focused group discussions were used to collect primary data, and document analysis was also used to collect secondary data. The findings of the study revealed that the Somali region is rich in twentieth-century urban built heritage. The imperial palace, administrative centers, mosques, shrines, churches, military camps, Italian-built architecture sites, patriot centers, statues of local heroes, older bus stations and city centers are among the twentieth-century built heritages in the region. However, most of these heritages were not recognized. Consequently; conservation, promotion and use of the twentieth-century urban heritages for sustainable development are given little attention despite that there are infrastructural facilities for tourists in the region and the proximity of the region to the heritage tourism corridors of Harar and Dire Dawa. Awareness should be made to the concerned institutions and societies about socio-economic and cultural values of the twentieth-century urban built heritage. The Federal Culture and Tourism Ministry and Culture and Tourism Bureau of the Somali region should cooperatively develop a short and long-term plan of action to manage the twentieth-century built urban heritage of the region and use them for sustainable development through the participation of the society. The local institutions, communities and individuals should be aware of and involved in the conservation, promotion and use of the twentieth-century built urban heritages for sustainable social, cultural and economic development. As far as the researchers' knowledge is concerned, there is no research of a similar type in which the setting and results are closer to this. Therefore, this research is original and is based on extensive primary data gathered from field surveys.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2022-0020
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Comparative analysis of military heritage in Slovakia, Slovenia and Poland
           with emphasis on its use in tourism

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      Authors: Martin Drobňák , Radoslav Turik , Anna Šenková , Dagmara Ratnayake Kaščáková , Jan Derco
      Abstract: The paper deals with battlefield tourism and war monuments in the Slovak Republic, Slovenia and Poland. The care of these monuments and their use in tourism today takes place separately and it is interesting to see how the same potential can be used in different ways. One of the aims of the paper is to draw attention to this fact and at the same time to present the possibilities of how to improve the use of this heritage by mutual cooperation. It is based on field research of the care of military-historical monuments. At the same time, it presents, in the form of retrospective studies, basic experiences from abroad – specifically the construction of thematic trails in Slovakia, Slovenia (The Walk of the Peace) and Poland (The First World War's Eastern Front Trail). The paper points out aspects such as the care of battlefield tourism sites, cross-border cooperation in the creation of tourism products, the creation of a strategic conceptual framework for the protection of World War I monuments, their presentation to tourists, cooperation between the state, local government and the third sector. There was no systematic research in this area in Central and Eastern Europe.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2022-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The World Heritage Convention at 50: management, credibility
           and sustainable development

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      Authors: Sophia Labadi
      Abstract: The World Heritage Convention has reached a milestone, and this year, in 2022, it is celebrating its 50th anniversary. The aim of this article is to review whether and how the goals of the strategic action plan (SAP) for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention (2012–2022) have been reached. This article starts by considering the outcomes for three of the SAP goals, dealing with protection and management; the credibility of the World Heritage List and sustainable development, using additional information from the final implementation report of the SAP (UNESCO, 2021a), which provides key performance indicators and the implementation status for each goal and associated outcomes. This article then compares and contrasts available data, trends and examples to provide more in-depth analyses of the implementation of the three goals. Data have been gathered from my own research and from the work of other academics and practitioners. The article finds several key positive changes, including the recent revisions of the Operational Guidelines to include provisions from the 2015 UNESCO Policy on World Heritage and Sustainable Development. However, a number of concerning or worsening trends relating to the protection and management of the World Heritage List, its increasing lack of credibility and sustainable development make it difficult to conclude that the implementation of the goals has been positive. The article concludes with suggestions for addressing these issues. This paper fills a gap, as not much has yet been published on the state of implementation of the Convention at 50 years old.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-0077
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Identification, documentation and promotion of cultural heritage: problems
           and prospects in the Indian context

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      Authors: T.K. Gireesh Kumar
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to overview the current state of affairs of the Indian heritage treasures, which are being identified, restored, preserved and promoted by various organizations at national and international levels with an emphasis on its documentation aspect. Lack of information about the heritage sites, structures and its significance, especially unprotected and unidentified, leads to its permanent loss. One of the prominent measures to safeguard from such irrevocable cultural deprivation is its documentation. Further, the study aims to examine the significant challenges associated with identifying unrevealed heritage assets of the country in the context of its preservation, documentation and promotion. As a suggestive measure, the study aims to propose the need for developing a comprehensive cultural heritage register assisted with technological aids focusing on community participation in taking stock of the heritage items they possess and enable them to effectively document. The present study extracts the cultural heritage data available with the UNESCO belongs to Indian heritage assets inscribed in its World Heritage portal. The collected data has been analyzed and interpreted to overview the country's recognition at the global level. The data collected from the official portal is further explored and customized to have a lucid account. The details about the organizations and institutions working on heritage conservation and preservation activities in India are also collected. A review of published literature on the related areas has also been performed to identify the issues and challenges associated with the documentation of heritage assets to support this study. The study also included the researcher’s experience in working with cultural heritage documentation. India holds a substantial quantity of cultural as well as natural heritage items. However, an exhaustive effort to document them at the national level is not being accomplished to its full potential. Many of the assets, inheritances or sites of cultural importance have not been fully identified, preserved or documented; hence, it is unrecalled forever once lost. Some organizations and individuals working on cultural heritage lack clarity in its function and do not follow any common standards in its documentation. For any conservation activity, documentation is prime, and the local community's support is also essential. Means of international collaboration for managing and promoting the heritage are required to be encouraged. Findings of the study demand the need for utilizing digital technologies to assist the documentation process. It emphasizes the requirement of having a web-based single window online gateway where an individual or community can dispense the knowledge and resources they possess hence contributing to heritage conservation, preservation and sustainability. The study limited to Indian scenario and the data on the heritage sites are collected from UNESCO's World Heritage portal. Only the documentation and promotional aspects of the cultural heritage are discussed. There are many lesser-known and unprotected cultural heritage in different parts of the country with artistic value. The unique characteristics that have not been recorded anywhere are to be documented systematically to reduce the frequency and severity of losses. The implication of the study highlights the present scenario of cultural heritage documentation in India and the need for a comprehensive heritage information gateway supported with a register facility to precisely document and retrieve. Aspects of culture which are inherited from the past to the present are to be preserved for future generations. Digital archives of cultural heritage and the use of digital tools to document them are effective mechanisms to protect and store the data on endangered heritage items. For any such conservation effort, documentation is its first step. Developing and facilitating access to an exclusive database of cultural heritage at risk boast its sustainability and can be enriched by the involvement of local communities. Public access to such a database would greatly support administrators, tourist departments, culture departments, development administration and conservation activists to gather the details of unprotected heritage items of the country, its present condition, risk of damage, etc. which further helps in its preservation, conservation, sustainability and promotion in a constructive manner. To the authors' best knowledge, no such single and comprehensive mechanism in the country allow the individuals to contribute to the inventory list holding information about the identified, unprotected and unidentified heritage assets which are having a risk of damage, threat, decay, vulnerable, neglect, lack of use or inappropriate maintenance and development. Developing such a system with technological and data infrastructure helps to pool all the cultural heritage resources under one umbrella. It imparts the value and significance of protecting and promoting heritage inheritances and a safe haven of them from the risk of its chronic loss. The system can also support all the activities related to heritage protection and bring the local community to timely support and initiate such heritage conservation activities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A method for detecting and monitoring changes to the Okotoks Erratic –
           “Big Rock” provincial historic site

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      Authors: Peter Dawson , Jack Brink , Alireza Farrokhi , Fengman Jia , Derek Lichti
      Abstract: Designing and implementing effective strategies for managing heritage resources throughout the world has become critically important as the impacts of climate change and human-caused destruction are increasingly felt. Of particular importance is the ability to identify and track fast- and slow-moving processes associated with weathering, erosion and the movement or removal of heritage objects by natural and human agents. In this paper, the authors demonstrate how 3D laser scanning can be used to detect and monitor changes to the Okotoks Erratic “Big Rock” Provincial Historic Resource in Alberta, Canada, over a period of 7 years. Terrestrial laser scanning surveys of the Okotoks Erratic “Big Rock” Provincial Historic Resource were undertaken in 2013, 2016 and 2020. Registration was used to place the three epochs of point clouds into a unique datum for comparison using the cloud-to-cloud distance function in Cloud Compare. The movement/repositioning of rocks around the base of the erratic, the emergence of “unofficial” paths and changes to interpretive trails and fencing were all identified at the site over the time period of the study. Current conservation at the Okotoks Big Rock focus primarily on the rock art panels that are scattered over the erratic. The results of this study indicate they should be broadened so that the geological integrity of the site, which is intrinsically linked to its cultural value, can also be maintained. This is the first study the authors are aware of that utilizes terrestrial laser scanning + change detection analysis to identify and track changes to a heritage site over a period as long as 7 years.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2021-0183
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring the outcomes of digital marketing on historic sites' visitor
           behaviour

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      Authors: Luzia Arantes de Amorim , Bruno Barbosa Sousa , Álvaro Lopes Dias , Vasco Ribeiro Santos
      Abstract: Digital communication and social media have an increasing importance in society and in tourism boosting. This study aims to analyse the role of digital marketing in the destination image and visitor loyalty of historic sites. Using a mixed-method approach combining survey data from 318 respondents and three in-depth interviews. Using structural equations modelling results reveals experience, satisfaction, image and loyalty are concepts to be considered by the destinations' digital marketing promotion, as well as the increasing use of digital marketing by tourists, in the sense that tourists are increasing the habit of checking the opinion of others before scheduling their trip and gives them more importance, and a growing importance is given by tourists to the web/social networks of places they intend to visit. This study contributes to the theory on tourism digital marketing which can be transposed to organizations management in order to encourage discussion on the processes of capture, retention and loyalty of target audiences. To enhance the importance of digital marketing in the process of the tourist development of the city, it is fundamental to define a clear strategy for attracting and responding to the greatest demand from cultural tourists who are increasingly interested in actively participating in learning experiences. The results show that digital communication and social media have an increasing importance in society and in tourism boosting and economy recovery. The paper presents digital marketing as a possible factor in tourism development and social inclusion, advancing practical measures aimed at social justice through a fairer distribution of tourism revenues and the defence of historic centre residents' way (i.e. Barcelos’), and quality of life. The authors suggest the development of a strategic digital marketing plan applied to the development and promotion of tourism in the city of Barcelos (Portugal), to complement the research presented here, thus contributing with a more practical perspective of the subject under study.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2021-0202
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Assessing the adaptive reuse of heritage houses in Sultanate of Oman

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      Authors: Eman Hanye Mohamed Nasr , Mohamed Ali Mohamed Khalil
      Abstract: Oman has a rich built heritage due to its strategic location, making its history full of events, which resulted in remarkable cultural and social heritage. The government works on preserving the built environment through the adaptive reuse strategy of abandoned buildings or sites, which is considered a comprehensive approach to sustainability. The adaptive reuse process often involves complex factors especially through decision-making, which influence the success of the generated project. The research aims at proposing an assessment strategy that offers guidelines that can help to achieve comprehensive adaptive reuse. This paper analyzes and assesses adaptive reuse interventions of selected five heritage projects in Oman. The assessment was conducted based on semi-structured interviews with stakeholders and local community representatives, as well as onsite observations, documentation and relevant data analyses. The results display that a comprehensive sustainable management plan for adaptive reuse projects is essential to ensure the success of the new uses in promoting the local economy, enhancing social values, preserving the cultural identity and adapting to the local environment. This contribution proposes a comprehensive strategy for assessing the adaptive reuse projects' performance that can be used as a checklist for achieving more social, cultural, environmental and economic benefits. This strategy can be further developed by extending to include more categories.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0057
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Exploring the spatial structure of Toon historical town courtyard houses:
           topological characteristics of the courtyard based on a configuration
           approach

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      Authors: Hamed Kamelnia , Pirouz Hanachi , Mina Moayedi
      Abstract: In response, this study developed a mathematical and computational method, through spatial configurations with justified plan graph (JPG), drawn from Space Syntax to extract essential information of the spatial topology of 13 valuable traditional courtyard houses located in Toon historical city of Iran. Historical vernacular housing has always been designed to incorporate and reflect the local lifestyle and cultural conditions. “Courtyard” is a fundamental part of traditional Iranian houses. This traditional building type includes a walled boundary and a complex of open, semi-enclosed and enclosed spaces. This study investigates the traditional houses in Toon historical town. Toon is one of the ancient towns in southeast Iran, including old courtyard houses in its heritage context. The spatial influence of the courtyard contributes to the formation of this famous architectural type. The results show the remarkable impact of this space on dominating the plan of traditional Toon houses configuration compared to other spaces in all cases. Furthermore, spatial accessibility has changed over time, and the Safavid period had a higher level of integration and lower level of accessibility (mean i = 7.03) rather than the Qajar period (mean i = 6.34); also, privacy has decreased progressively. The knowledge of characteristics of this historical architecture needs to be gathered for the preservation and conservation of the built heritage. Hence, the principle behind traditional Iranian courtyards was investigated to recognize the difference between the spatial influence of the courtyard and other spaces and the changes in the courtyard over time.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Planning policies for transition from historical quarters of the global
           city of Yazd to urban creativity, a case study: Fahadan quarter

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      Authors: Fereshte Rezaeian , Najma Esmailpoor
      Abstract: The inscription of Yazd historical fabric in United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) world heritage list has provided the city with the opportunity of international competence and to achieve a global identity. Fahadan is one of the nine historical quarters and the core of formation of the Yazd city. Fahadan is one of the nine historical quarters and the core of formation of Yazd city. The article intends to provide suitable policies for converting it into a sample creative quarter in Yazd historical fabric. The article benefits from qualitative research and the strategic planning method based on a creative city approach, uses SWOT technique (a technique for finding an organization's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) for situation analysis and the Oregon model for visioning. Two categories of hard and soft factors play a role in transitioning Fahadan quarter into a creative quarter. By expanding the scope of jobs related to jewelry, and creating its supporting activities in the food and leisure sector, a creative economy can be discovered in Fahadan quarter which alongside reinforcement of unique physical features of the area, forms a creative place. Its goal will be viewed as the place where artisans pave their way for reaching a creative quarter with new management. The research presents policies to realize soft and hard factors required for creativity in the quarter, and shows step by step a small-scale pattern in the context of urban creativity planning, that can be used in historical fabrics with similar situation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0150
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Scrutinising community-held knowledge transfer into world heritage site
           management plans: a multidisciplinary method

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      Authors: Gizem Parlak , Clarice Bleil de Souza , Federico Cerutti
      Abstract: The UNESCO World Heritage Committee requires management plans for world heritage site (WHS) nominations including the evidence of involvement of all stakeholders. Many studies report different engagement methods to ensure the participation of the local communities in these plans. However, this study aims to assess and gauge the community-held knowledge transfer and the quality of their contribution to heritage management plans by proposing an interdisciplinary method. The method had been developed to scrutinise community-held knowledge transfer in WHS management plans, combining the domains of knowledge representation with qualitative social research. Local knowledge transferred into WHS management plans is poor. The proposed method gauged three levels of community knowledge transfer to WHS. The method enables results to be quantified and the process to be reproducible. The method can be used to quality control the design of WHS management plans. The method can be used to inform evaluation protocols to be developed by UNESCO. The proposed method can be used to inform evaluation protocols to be developed by ICOMOS and IUCN, which safeguard holistic aspects of heritage in WHS management plans. The method provides reproducible, quantifiable results from clear premises. Despite being applied to a case study in Turkey, it can be adjusted to any context as WHS management plans tend to follow a standard format. It, therefore, provides a tool to quality control the design of these plans.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2021-0216
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The Juukan Gorge destruction: a case study in stakeholder-driven and
           shared values approach to cultural heritage protection

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      Authors: Vicki Antonia Oliveri , Glenn Porter , Chris Davies , Pamela James
      Abstract: In 2020, mining activity by Rio Tinto destroyed rock caves in Western Australia's Juukan Gorge that are considered sacred sites by the First Nation Peoples of that area, the Puutu Kunti Kurrama and Pinikura (PKKP) Peoples. This paper examines the public response to the damage caused at this culturally sensitive site and identifies cultural heritage protection strategies that emerged in the aftermath of this catastrophic event. This research applies a qualitative case study method and analysis of open-sourced official policy documents, media reports and published institutional statements. The research identified specific cultural heritage protection strategies, including stakeholder-driven advocacy and shared values approach to business practices to help foster a greater appreciation of the connections between people, objects and lands. Whilst the mining activities were considered lawful, significant gaps in the legislation to protect heritage sites were also exposed. Using a recent case that occurred in 2020, this paper unpacks how the motivations for accessing minerals can override cultural sensibilities and legal/ethical frameworks established to protect cultural heritage. This paper brings to light the liabilities associated with the mining industry when operating in a culturally significant environment where appropriate due diligence to manage cultural heritage is not thoroughly applied. The paper highlights the role the community can play in demanding improved corporate social responsibility which can, in turn, act as a strategy for cultural heritage protection.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2021-0208
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mitigating visual impacts of built structures: the contribution of mayors
           in the collaborative managing of a UNESCO cultural landscape

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      Authors: Fabrizio Aimar
      Abstract: Analyses of cultural landscapes need to combine natural and social-cultural components to promote discussions on landscape planning and heritage management. This qualitative research explores the integrated case study of ten municipalities in the “Vineyard Landscape of Piedmont: Langhe-Roero and Monferrato”, Italy, a UNESCO World Heritage cultural landscape. The research aims to raise awareness of its aesthetic-perceptive features, the importance of effective identification of visual impacts and to promote mitigation strategies/actions for updating the current Management Plan. Two rounds of interviews and focus groups with mayors were performed in 2015 and 2020 to identify trends and drivers of change affecting the territories. Potential mitigation strategies and actions were voted on and selected in response to five critical themes that emerged from the survey, mainly related to real estate and its supplies. The results suggest tools and policies in the fields of landscape architecture and landscape design that could benefit planning and management at different levels. They support the design of sustainable scenarios, improving mayors' understanding of the significance of cultural landscapes and promoting them as heritage managers. Furthermore, they intend to preserve the authenticity of the landscape by supporting its attributes for long-term conservation. The research makes an original contribution on the visual implications of anthropogenic landscape transformations in ten municipalities constituting this serial property, six years after its UNESCO nomination (2014).
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0017
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Atmospheric assemblages: the affective space of adaptive reuse

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      Authors: Federico De Matteis
      Abstract: Adaptive reuse entails the physical modification of abandoned architectural structures, with the activation of processes and practices leading to the re-incorporation of heritage into the contemporary life of communities. This transformation entails an affective adaptation, a re-modulation of how citizens attune to a built environment that has been returned to urban, shared forms of use. By observing the emotional ties that are established between subjects and the spaces they inhabit, affecting forms of dwelling, attachments and corporeal responses, the author can clarify how adaptation purports this affective modification, where the original ambiance is not necessarily altogether overwritten, but may rather merge with the supervening situation to give life to unique assemblages of spatialized feelings. Drawing from contemporary phenomenological theories, with their specific focus on the affective and embodied dimension of lived experience, this paper describes and discusses two instances of adaptive reuse, one in Brussels, the second in Rome, highlighting their different processes and spatial outcomes. The paper implements recent literature on spatial experience to bring to light conditions found in cases of adaptive reuse. By describing the generators of shared emotions – objects, movements, expressions, materialities, textures – it highlights how the layering of the physical world can lead to both the domestication of affects and to discrepancies and discontinuities in the fabric of experienced space. There is only a limited literature dedicated to the description of adaptive reuse processes from the contemporary phenomenological perspective. This kind of description can clarify the dynamics unfolding between citizens and experienced space in cases of heritage reuse.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Building passport for the sustainable conservation of built heritage
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Joana Dos Santos Gonçalves , Ricardo Mateus , José Dinis Silvestre , Ana Pereira Roders , Luís Bragança
      Abstract: This research presents the development of a Building Passport for Sustainable Conservation (BPSC) as a questionnaire with a set of 23 core indicators, for a baseline assessment of heritage buildings. The aim of this tool is to identify priorities for future interventions, by recognising the contributions of heritage buildings to sustainability that should be preserved and the fragilities that need to be improved. The BPSC uses a selection of core indicators for sustainability observable on heritage buildings. It was applied to four different case studies of modern heritage in the Netherlands, to verify its applicability and limitations. The results suggest that this tool has the potential to contribute to an expedite assessment, reaching consensual evaluations of priorities for sustainable conservation, while reducing the time and cost of the process, contributing to support informed redesign decisions. Recently, existing building sustainability assessment (BSA) tools have been adapted and new BSA tools developed for heritage buildings. Some tools target existing buildings, but seldom cover cultural significance and heritage values. Others target the after-redesign situations – aiming at assessing how sustainable the redesign is. Often BSA tools are complex and time-consuming, with extensive indicators and data requirements. The BPSC developed in this research covers the main aspects of sustainability and related heritage values, in a simpler tool for a baseline assessment.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2021-0177
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Preserving the historical heritage by burying new constructions
           underground: the Segovia Bridge and the M-30 motorway tunnel in Madrid

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      Authors: María Jesús Rosado García , Daniel Crespo Delgado
      Abstract: This work aims to demonstrate the feasibility of fully preserving the historical heritage at the same time reordering the cities and their traffic. This paper describes the sustainable solution designed for the landscape change required and to maintain the bridge integrity by excavating under the pier with the maintenance of traffic during its execution. It is concluded that the elimination of urban motorways on the surface often leads to the excavation of tunnels under the existing buildings, with little coverage in most of them. This complicates the implementation of burials in cities with an important historical heritage, which must be given conservation priority in the choice of technical solutions. The Segovia Bridge over the Manzanares River, the oldest bridge in Madrid, was built in the 16th century. With the burial of the M-30 motorway, it has been necessary to build a tunnel immediately under one of the bridge piers, practically without lining between the foundations and the upper slab of the tunnel.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0034
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How to feed a culturally sustainable development plan over time: evidence
           from the Tuscan Mining UNESCO Global Geopark

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Michela Magliacani , Alberto Francesconi
      Abstract: This research explores the community's role in feeding a culturally sustainable development project over time and the practices which operationally allow the bridging of cultural heritage management and sustainable development according to the approach of “culture as sustainability”. The primary and secondary sources relate to nearly 20 years of life of the Tuscan Mining Geopark case belonging to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) European and Global Geopark Networks. Textual analysis was applied to the dataset. The interpretative approach was aligned with other investigations within this research field. The results highlight how a bold project in an uncertain context harnessed bottom-up mobilisation and accountability to stimulate a sustainable community empowerment. The ability to experiment and learn from experience depicts an organisational logic far from the top-down and predefined design practice widely contested in the literature. Despite a single case study was analysed, it enables researchers to craft a conceptual model for culturally sustainable development projects, and it fills the literature gap on how to operationalise culture as sustainability under the managerial perspective. The model assembles an organisational process view and practices that can be tailored to a cultural context with insights for developing culturally sustainable projects. The research increases the observations of community empowerment within culturally sustainable development projects. It demonstrates how the “incompleteness of the design” was not a weakness but rather a trigger of effective organisational practices.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Perceived value in a UNESCO World Heritage Site: the case of Quito,
           Ecuador

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Jessenia Moreno-Manzo , Ariadna Gassiot-Melian , Lluís Coromina
      Abstract: The city of Quito is a World Heritage Site (WHS) in Ecuador and the city owns one of the best-preserved and extensive historic centers in Latin America for cultural tourism. This study aims to identify the factors that constitute perceived value construct at the WHS of Quito. This research collects data from tourists who have visited the city of Quito, Ecuador. A total of 381 on-site questionnaires are used. Data have been analyzed using exploratory factorial analysis. Results regarding the dimensional structural framework of perceived value indicate that perceived value at the WHS of Quito has five factors: (1) monetary and non-monetary costs (MNC), (2) staff service quality (SSQ), (3) tourist offer accessibility (TOA), (4) destination attractiveness (DA) and (5) information accessibility (IA). Two new factors of accessibility have been proposed in this study for measuring consumer value at a WHS. Perceived value and accessibility have been treated as two separate subjects in academic literature before. However, this article contributes to the understanding of perceived value at WHS, including factors linked to accessibility. Both managerial and theoretical implications for WHS are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The de-industrialisation discourse and the loss of modern industrial
           heritage in the Arab world: Jordan as a case study

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      Authors: Nedhal Jarrar , Suha Jaradat
      Abstract: Industrial heritage is considered an essential part of cultural heritage in the world. This heritage suffers from continued marginalisation in the Arab world, particularly in Jordan, where many industrial heritage sites have not been protected or studied well due to the lack of a clear definition of cultural heritage. Most of these sites, built in the 20th century, are gradually disappearing or scheduled for demolition. This paper explores the de-industrialisation discourse and the loss of modern industrial heritage in the Arab world, especially in Jordan. This research investigates the modern industrial heritage in Jordan as a case study in the Arab world. A comprehensive understanding of the industrial heritage has been obtained by adopting a case study approach and using a reconnaissance survey of potential industrial heritage sites in Jordan. Seven categories were used in the analysis of the de-industrialisation phenomenon of heritage sites: ownership, location, design and types; structure, significance, deterioration and physical condition and conservation attempts and alterations. Three main approaches to industrial heritage were identified: demolition, occasional maintenance and rare examples of conservation and adaptive reuse. This study sheds light on the ownership issue of industrial structures in Jordan and invites policymakers, relevant authorities, private organisations and the public to consider the challenges and impact of de-industrialisation of such sites. This research raises awareness of the de-industrialisation discourse, and highlights the value of industrial architecture dating back to the modernity period, which was short-lived in Jordan. It also calls for serious consideration of these sites to support sustainable development in the Arab World.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0037
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The potential role of cultural heritage resources in tourism and community
           development at Musina municipality, Limpopo province, South Africa

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      Authors: Azwindini Isaac Ramaano
      Abstract: This study evaluates “the potential role of cultural heritage resources in tourism and community development at Musina Municipality, Limpopo, South Africa.” Data on the local communities were collected by questionnaire surveys, focus group discussions and field observations. The study revealed a variety of cultural and heritage resources; however, with current fewer implications of tourism welfare on the livelihoods statuses of the communities. Thus, there was a need for a potentially sound tourism strategy in cultural heritage resources to empower the local communities in the study area. Musina Municipality has some of the most challenging impoverishment attributes within the province, defined by evident poor livelihoods. However, it remarkably possesses rich natural biodiversity and tourism destination areas. In line with the probe on the role of cultural heritage resources in tourism and community development, the study uncovers the values of attributing factors associated with the current nature of social heritage resources and their impacts on tourism and community developments. Issues of heritage and cultural resources on tourism and community development have become of main interest within the tourism industry.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The changing real estate investment dynamics in Indian holy cities: effect
           of spirituality on property buying behavior

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      Authors: Taran Kaur , Sanjeev Bansal , Priya Solomon
      Abstract: Holy cities in India are seeing tremendous gentrification. This study aims to investigate the effect of the changing lifestyle of people towards spirituality and the changing lifestyle's impact on consumer buying behavior on properties in Indian holy cities which has not been studied anecdotally. The research is exploratory in nature. A questionnaire has been sent to collect primary data through SurveyMonkey. Simple random sampling was used to collect a sample of 450 respondents which was also verified using G* software. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and partial least square–structured equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Findings obtained through the structural model using bootstrapping technique suggest that intrinsic and extrinsic factors are attracting tourists leading to an increase in the demand for real estate in holy cities. The research findings may vary as per the cultural differences and belief in spirituality, which is subject to perceptual biases in different holy cities. The traditional determinants of property buying behavior are considered inadequate to attract real estate investments. The inclusion of these behavioral aspects – intrinsic and extrinsic factors may improve the investment inflows in India. Spirituality connects to the concept of behavioral real estate, where the decision to buy property is largely affected by the emotional attachment of people. This research adds value to fill the gap by finding out the latent determinant – emotional reasons impacting transnational gentrification in India.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0075
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Archaeological site management and the legislation challenge in Vietnam: a
           case study of Vuon Chuoi

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      Authors: Ky Nam Nguyen , Quang Anh Phan , Ngoc Minh Nguyen
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine the management status quo of archaeological heritage in Vietnam seen in the case of Vuon Chuoi, a complex of Bronze Age sites located in Central Hanoi, which has been believed to be Hanoi’s first human settlement. Like other archaeological sites located in urban areas, this site has been under threat of destruction caused by land encroachment pressure. Although researchers have long waged a campaign for preservation, the dissensus among key stakeholders and the dispute over responsibility have left this site at the heart of an interminable polemic over legislation. This research utilises a qualitative approach, and the primary data were collected throughout multiple field trips in 2019 and 2020. Several open-ended interviews were conducted with various state and nonstate actors involved in the Vuon Chuoi Complex’s management process. The discussion was also supported by analysing related legal documents retrieved from national archives and official online directories. This paper dissects the current legislative and administrative framework applied in governing heritage in general and archaeological sites in Vietnam, in particular. The results indicate that existing flaws in Vietnam’s legal system are detectable, and the unsystematic organisation has led to deferment of the decision-making processes. Also, there is an apparent difference found in the attitude of the bodies in charge toward the treatment of listed and unlisted sites. This research outlines that in the wake of urbanisation and industrialisation in Vietnam, a consensus among key stakeholders and an inclusive legal system are required to help preserve archaeological sites in urgent need of attention. Although several Vietnamese laws and regulations have been put into practice, they have shown critical barriers and gaps in conserving Vietnamese cultural heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Lay down your heart” []: heritage as a driver for urban regeneration
           in the East-African stone town of Bagamoyo

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      Authors: Nikolaas Vande Keere , Bie Plevoets , Peggy Winkels , Livin Mosha
      Abstract: The paper aims to elaborate on the potential for regeneration of Bagamoyo (Tanzania) through adaptive reuse of its heritage sites. The town was the most important harbour for ivory and slaves of the East-African mainland during the 19th and early 20th century and the colonial capital of German East-Africa between 1885 and 1890. Today, it has 85,000 inhabitants who mainly live in informal settlements while stone town closer to the coast is largely abandoned with its historical buildings in a poor state of conservation. The first part of the paper describes the history and heritage of the old stone town Bagamoyo, and how it impacts its identity. Additionally, it summarises the critical reception of the town's role in the application to UNESCO World Heritage for “The Central Slave and Ivory Trade Route”. This, in order to consider the reuse of its heritage sites more as part of a layered regeneration process than of a singular narrative for preservation. The second part presents research-by-design proposals investigating the economic, social and cultural potentialities of three spatial layers: the main street, the coastal strip and the shoreline. The identity and therefore also urban regeneration of post-colonial towns such as Bagamoyo is the result of a complex combination of different narratives rather than of a singular one. Bagamoyo's heritage has been studied as a driver for international tourism linked to slavery but without successful implementation. This study proposes an alternative perspective by investigating its potential for urban regeneration in line with local needs. Developed in the context of a master studio of architectural design, it presents an innovative didactic approach. Moreover, the methodology of research-by-design can be inspirational for other historical towns.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0137
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The built heritage as a resource for architectural education:
           documentation of the vernacular settlements and architecture in Oman

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      Authors: Naima Benkari
      Abstract: Through a project of cooperation between the Ministry of Heritage and Tourism (MHT) and Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), a team including faculty members, technicians and students from the SQU department of civil and architectural engineering (CAE), was involved in the project of documentation, survey and the development of management plans of four (4) Omani Vernacular settlements (Harat). Such an experience was meant to initiate students from different levels in undergraduate programs of civil and architectural engineering to the fieldwork and professional practice in the field of built heritage studies. The present research aims to explore the effect of such an experience on the learning process and skills acquired by the involved students. The research was undertaken with students of CAE undergraduate programs at SQU. The documentation method has been implemented in 4 different settlements with the same students. A questionnaire has been administered to the participating students after their graduation to collect their feedback regarding the benefits of this experience on their education and skills development. The data was complemented by active observation and semi-directive interviews with some students randomly selected among the respondents to the questionnaire. The outcome of each documentation campaign as well as the results of the questionnaires administered revealed that this experience has raised students' awareness about the importance of studying the built heritage and safeguarding it. The research has shown that important soft skills, such as team-working, leadership and communication, have been consolidated. It has also revealed that this experience was an opportunity for students to discover the variety of options within the profession of architecture and its intellectual and ethical responsibilities. Such aspects are hardly grasped when taught within a “classical” teaching/learning setting. The main limitations of this research were the hard working conditions during the summer in Oman and the direct interaction of the students with the buildings. Even cautious, such interaction represents a risk for an already fragile heritage. The paper includes a detailed description of the architectural documentation tools and methods used in the case studies. These tools and methods can easily be applicable, with slight adaptations, in other architectural documentation projects involving undergraduate students. The documentation methodology and the generated corpus of 3D digital models can be used in other documentation projects and further studies such as architectural typologies, bioclimatic properties, natural ventilation patterns, daylight performance, etc. This paper reports on the outcomes of the first experience of its kind in Oman and the Gulf region, where undergraduate students (predominantly females) were involved in an interdisciplinary project for the documentation of important vernacular settlements and their buildings. The added value of this research is that its methodology can be a reference for professors of Architecture and related specialties aiming to integrate research and field work with education.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2021-0211
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • World heritage designation and residential property values: the case
           of Old Rauma, Finland

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      Authors: Johari Hussein Nassor Amar , Tanja Tyvimaa
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of beneficial externality generated by the World Heritage List (WHL) on residential property values in order to offer new insights into heritage discourses. The study uses the hedonic price model to estimate empirically the difference in prices for residential properties located in the Old Rauma World Heritage. The study uses residential sales transaction data from the City of Rauma from January 2005 to September 2012 drawn from an online database called KVKL Hintaseurantapalvelu managed by the Central Federation of Finnish Real Estate Agencies. The research results indicate a positive, but insignificant, relationship between the property sale prices (euros/sqm) and heritage designation. However, the total sale prices are higher in Old Rauma as the properties are significantly larger in Old Rauma compared to other properties in Rauma. Studies in heritage economics have assessed the influence of the property market on heritage listing and designation at either the national level, the local level or a mix of national/local levels. This paper contributes to the literature by analysing the impact of a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) world heritage designation on residential property values. UNESCO is the leading global institution which deals with the protection of heritage sites that transcend national and local boundaries.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0121
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Considering luminous ambiance and spatial configuration within the Ottoman
           old heritage buildings (Algerian palaces) focusing on their modern-day
           utility

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      Authors: Selma Saraoui , Abdelghani Attar , Rahma Saraoui , Sonia Alili
      Abstract: The Ottoman cultural legacy in Algeria is made up of a diverse range of architectural structures. The Algerian government strategy in connection with the Ottoman old buildings is to restore them into museums. This study will attempt to present a contrastive analysis between two old palaces being under restoration (refurbishment), and the goal is to propose a museum route by calculating the ambiance aimed at circulating the rooms by visitors. The authors analyzed the architectural components of the various entities by observing in situ and taking measurements for a single case study to get a sense of the results for the mid-season (spring and fall). The configuration was next evaluated by modeling the space syntax and combining it with a simulation of daylight luminance, for the period when the authors could not make measurements on-site. The ultimate goal is to combine these findings to suggest the ideal in-route for the future museum. This research allowed the authors to propose a museum itinerary adapted to the new vocation of the palaces, which considers the daylight as an element of composition in the spaces of circulation. The paper proposes solutions to a flow management problem encountered in several similar palaces converted into museums. The study aims to raise questions on the museum, and to preserve such heritage from neglect by giving it a new life more adapted to the needs of the Algerian society. The authors believe that this contribution will be a creative solution for issues related to the operation of palaces that have been converted into museums.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2021-0178
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Local people's “sense of place” toward cultural heritage sites:
           correlation with demographic and socio-economic characteristics

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      Authors: Mohamed Nour El-Barbary , Mariko Ikeda , Yasufumi Uekita
      Abstract: The paper aims at identifying the underlying factors that differentiate the local people's demographic and socio-economic characteristics, which influence their sense of place (SoP) toward different types of cultural heritage sites in different urban regions. The paper draws on the sequential explanatory design, using quantitative and qualitative methods, respectively, to investigate the research themes in-depth. A total of 201, 207 and 228 questionnaires were collected on religious, non-religious/memorial and historic commercial buildings, respectively, at two different quarters in Historic Cairo, followed by 20 semi-structured interviews with a representative sample of local people in each quarter. The authors found an apparent similarity in the significant characteristics that influence the local people's SoP levels toward the different historic buildings at the same quarter and a notable variation between both quarters. Also, many factors determine the local people's influential characteristics on their SoP toward the different cultural heritage sites (e.g. the sites’ distance from the person's residence/workplace, economic value, people's awareness about its history, type of activities and targeted gender, feeling of stability and regions' characteristics) Identifying these underlying factors and priority local groups can assist policymakers in ensuring a sustainable management/conservation of the different cultural heritage sites. The paper demonstrates the causality of a significant correlation between local people's characteristics and their SoP levels toward the different types of historic buildings, apart from their religious symbolism or historical value, using the sequential explanatory design.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0162
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Heritage theory at work: how heritage policy in Toronto, Canada shapes a
           

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      Authors: Luke McElcheran , Mario Santana Quintero
      Abstract: Toronto's heritage program is reporting year over year growth in both the number of listed and designated properties and the amount of money secured for heritage projects. At the same time, it is widely recognized that heritage trade skills are in decline. The purpose of this research is to examine Toronto's heritage policy in its regulatory and economic context to understand why heritage trades are struggling while the heritage program and the market for heritage professional services flourish and to suggest solutions based on existing policy tools. This research looks at the policy documents at the federal, provincial and municipal level that determine the minimum standard for heritage conservation in Toronto. It refers to secondary research on the economic context for these regulations to understand how they are applied and why they tend to produce certain outcomes. It introduces the regulatory context set by Canada's Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places and the Ontario Heritage Act. It goes on to analyse Toronto's local policy in more detail including density bonusing programs, the Toronto Official Plan and Heritage Conservation District planning standards. Toronto's heritage policy creates asymmetrical opportunities for heritage professionals and heritage specializing tradespeople. While the work that heritage professionals do is required or strongly encouraged by policy and increases reliably with the amount of funding secured for heritage projects, heritage tradespeople do not enjoy similar advantages. Their work is not required in the same way as heritage professionals' or encouraged to the same degree, and money secured for heritage projects does not necessarily go towards work that would engage the building trades necessary to maintain heritage structures. The value of job creation in heritage trades is a mainstay of heritage economic advocacy, and there is growing interest in the value of these trades skills as a resource for sustainable building practices. There is relatively little research considering how heritage policy and theory affect career opportunities for workers with these trades skills, and none that addresses those systemic pressures in the context of municipal heritage programs in Canada.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0169
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Ibu-Ubu” boyhood initiation rites and the conservation of cultural
           heritage in Afikpo, southeastern Nigeria

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      Authors: Vitalis Nwashindu , Ambrose Onu
      Abstract: The study explores the nexus between Ibu-Ubu boyhood initiation and the conservation of cultural heritage in Afikpo, Southeast Nigeria. The study is motivated by the rarity of such cultural conservation through initiation rites in an age of Christian-inspired culture terrorism against Igbo traditional religion, arts and relics. The study adopted cultural anthropological research method. The boyhood initiation rite was studied through participant observation of the initiation between September and November 2017. As a cultural anthropological study, oral evidence was derived from the men who had undergone the rite. Through the oral evidence, interpretations were given to the material culture, monuments and heritage that have been conserved through Ibu-Ubu initiation rite. The study discovered that amid the deluge of Christian-motivated culture terrorism and erosion of Igbo cultural arts, relics and heritage, the people of Afikpo have preserved most of their tangible and intangible heritage through the Ibu-Ubu boyhood initiation rites. This study will assist in the reinvigoration of campaigns on environmental and heritage conservation in Igboland. It is sufficient to posit that Igboland is ridden with myriads of environmental and cultural terrorism, perpetrated by some Christian fanatics. The study reveals the relevance of the boyhood initiation rites in ensuring the preservation and conservation of Igbo cultural heritage in a century marked with fanatical Christian evangelism, culture-terrorism and destruction of both tangible and intangible heritages, which the Christians have labelled evil, barbaric and fetish.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0142
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Incorporating multidimensional images into cultural heritage destination:
           does it help to explain and analyse better'

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      Authors: Jason M.S. Lam , Zafir Khan Mohamed Makhbul , Norzalita Abd Aziz , Mohd Amirul Hafidz Ahmat
      Abstract: The present study aims to examine and explain cultural heritage destination by applying multiple dimension image model (cognitive–affective–conative aspects). A total of 233 international heritage-based tourists were surveyed on-site at some of the most prominent historical attractions in Malacca, one of the first cities in Malaysia declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The covariance-based structural equation modelling was applied to examine the hypotheses. The structural equation modelling validated that cognitive image aspects such as living culture, intangible and tangible are affected positively. The effects are statistically significant for conative and affective images. On the other hand, cognitive tangible image is an aspect that impacted affective image to a lesser degree than conative image. Whereas affective image attributes were found to have significant and positive influence on conative image. This study enriches the limited empirical research study on heritage image conceptualisation by expanding into tri-component model. The destination image has garnered a great deal of attention, particularly due to its significant and impactful influence on the decision-making and the sustainable behaviour of tourists, and it has since become the subject of many studies in the tourism and hospitality literatures. But most research concerning heritage image for destinations has considered the construct uni-dimensionally.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2021-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ongoing adaptive reuse: patterns of heritage resilience before and after
           COVID-19

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Federica Fava
      Abstract: The paper aims to assess the impact and responses to coronavirus disease 2019 in six European heritage labs (Horizon 2020 Framework Programme) selected for their adaptive heritage re-use practices based on participation, self-organisation and self-management. As they are naturally oriented towards building resilient urban systems, the hypothesis is that the co-production of cultural values and places promoted by these projects could create the conditions for equitable perspectives of resilience in the normality of contemporary urban life. The paper draws on data collected through a survey of six European Living Labs between January and May 2021. The survey results are framed by a literature review that defines adaptive reuse in terms of resilience. The five resilience characteristics described by Judith Rodin (awareness, diversification, integration, self-regulation and adaptability) are used to navigate the literature and organise the survey results. Combining survey results and insights from the literature, some modes and elements (territorial, social, financial) are presented that contribute to creating the conditions for resilience through adaptive heritage reuse according to community-based approaches. Without claiming to be exhaustive, this evidence should be considered in the design phase of resilience programmes, policies or projects related to cultural heritage. The concepts of community and resilience are becoming increasingly important in the field of cultural heritage. This paper makes a creative contribution to the ongoing debate by presenting and evaluating the contribution of adaptive reuse practices to resilience building.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0116
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Art and sustainability: can digital technologies achieve
           sustainability'

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      Authors: Sara A. Abdoh
      Abstract: This paper discusses art and sustainability in the 21st century; therefore, we can't ignore the huge technological revolution that currently exists. Art throughout history has been associated to religion, politics and economics, but now it is also connected to technology. Hence, the question arises: Can digital technologies achieve sustainability' In this regard, the research will address the effective role of digital technology in achieving sustainability in art field and its practices. The main research material is derived from my interviews with artists, professors, curators, gallerists and art historians. In addition to the references of sustainability in various fields that are related to art, as Sustainability has become a goal that all sectors are striving to achieve to preserve our planet, as much as we can, especially in the field of art which is closely related to the environment. This paper explores the possibility of achieving sustainability in art field and its practices through digital technologies. In addition, it reveals that countries that have developed digital technologies are able to apply the digital technologies in art and its practices to achieve sustainability, in contrast, developing countries they could not achieve sustainability through digital technologies. As part of a joint research project between a developing and developed country, the paper clarifies the different opinions from 14 countries about the extent to which sustainability in art is achieved through digital technology. It also outlines some successful and unsuccessful experiences in achieving sustainability in art.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Historic public paths in rural areas: engine of development and origin of
           new conflicts

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: David Moscoso-Sánchez , José María Nasarre-Sarmiento , Manuel Trujillo-Carmona , Manuel T. González-Fernández , Ana Luque-Gil , Víctor Sánchez-Sanz , Pablo Vidal-González
      Abstract: In this article, the authors analyse a complex social process affecting historic public paths in rural areas in southern Spain. Despite the fact that urban populations are demanding the enhancement of this type of natural heritage for tourism, sports and recreational use, some parts of the network have been abandoned or usurped. The study is multidisciplinary, comprising three interlinked studies. The cartographic study comprises an inventory of public paths in rural areas based on administrative sources. The legal study analyses local, regional and national regulations governing agricultural, environmental, heritage, sports and tourism uses of the infrastructure. The sociological study analyses social discourses on the uses of public paths, and identifies conflicts between farmers, landowners, environmentalists, sportspeople and tourists. The preliminary results identified an important public paths network in Andalusia, approximately 160,000 km. The legal study found that there are laws regulating use, although local authorities do not monitor compliance or provide solutions to enhance management. The sociological study determined the attribution of environmental, cultural and economic value to public paths, but also the existence of conflicts between rural and urban populations. Given that this is ongoing research, only state of the art and some preliminary albeit sufficiently consistent results are presented. The results could help to guide public policy and governance of public paths. Public paths promote rural development and a green/sustainable economy. The research results and conclusions are original.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Lime in Cuenca (Ecuador): from patrimonial to matrilineal

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      Authors: María del Cisne Aguirre Ullauri , Christian Hernán Contreras-Escandón
      Abstract: Through the case of Blanca Sinchi, the following analysis presents valuation criteria that have resulted in the invisibility of social actors and cultural patrimony (cultural heritage) elements, and some contradictions in their acknowledgment process. In addition, the paper explains how architecture, among other historic assets, has made women and their contributions invisible. Bibliographic analysis and semi-structured interviews were carried out to theorize about the thermodynamic system of lime to propose a matri-lineal system category and expand the understanding of the participation of women in the receipt, management and transmission of what is called patrimony. In heritage places, such as Cuenca (Ecuador), cultural richness extends from the Historic Center to the rest of the territory and its actors. However, there are intrinsic elements, such as unknown, but fundamental, oral or family traditions associated with the role of women. The case of Blanca Sinchi and lime is evidence of this, as it shows the typical scenario affected by gender and by disparate power dynamics that do not consider desirable attributes (authenticity, integrity, identity, bequest, option, existence, among others) in the conservation of architectural patrimony. A deep redefinition process, or even a change in the valuation system, is needed. Also, the history behind built heritage items must be explored to find the contributions made by women. Proposing a matri-lineal system category to expand the understanding of the participation of women in the receipt, management and transmission of what is called patrimony, allows redefining and rewriting local and global history, acknowledging the role of women. In this way, the proposal questions not only the hegemony of the term “cultural patrimony” pigeonholed in paternal legacy but also the term “cultural heritage” as a synonym and framework that, while expanding material values, it does not effectively include, at least for Ibero-Romance language territories, the broad set of tangible and intangible values, as well as the know-how and skills of artisans.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0168
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Nightlife in historical sites: between lights and shadows (visions and
           challenges)

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      Authors: Lina Nageb Fewella
      Abstract: The paper aims to describe the positive and negative effects of night lights in historical sites, as well as the most salient challenges faced by the visitors of these sites and determine ways to address them. The study aims to suggest several light-and-shadow approaches and designs to enhance the experience of visiting historical sites. This study identifies problems of nightlife in historical sites with an online international questionnaire to determine the preferences and difficulties faced by visitors of historical sites during day and night. After that Egypt was determined as a sample case of a developing country; its archaeological sites need to be improved. The main problems of historical Egyptian sites were investigated and approaches in developing historical sites with interactive lighting design were presented after an online questionnaire to the Egyptian society. The paper shows that archaeological sites need some development, especially in their technological and lighting aspects, to overcome visitors’ low night-time interest in archaeological sites. Research has found certain limitations in the effects of constructing artificial illumination. The study provides modern sustainable solution for some light challenges in historical sites with approaches and solutions to solve it. The results of that research could be applied in developing countries, but with larger specific studies to the historical urban locations according to the politics of the country. The paper includes sustainable approaches in developing historical sites with technological lighting design required to enhance historical sites at night-time and make visits more interactive and interesting. This paper presents an identified need of historical sites visitors’ to study applying modern approaches in enhancing urban historical sites.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0144
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Sustainability of historic rural settlements based on participatory
           conservation approach: Kemer Village in Turkey

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      Authors: Simay Cansu Ekici , Özgün Özçakır , Ayşe Güliz Bilgin Altinöz
      Abstract: This paper aims to address the issue of the conservation and management of rural cultural heritage, with the aim being to gain an understanding of current problems and needs through a participatory approach, in recognition of the uniqueness of the relationship between nature, humankind and the built environment as an area of study. To this end, a comprehensive case study – Kemer Village in Turkey – focusing on the social sustainability and participatory approaches for the sustainable development of rural settlements is given. Accordingly, possible conservation, management and sustainability strategies are put forward considering the priorities and perspectives of different stakeholders. This paper approaches the subject of rural heritage conservation and management from a social sustainability standpoint, involving an on-site investigation to understand the physical and social context of Kemer Village in Turkey, which has links to different periods in history, and contains significant examples of vernacular architecture and that has maintained its cultural characteristics. Tools and criteria for participatory planning approach were applied ensuring the involvement of the local community and stakeholders. The findings of the present study reveal rural settlements to be important factors in the cultural heritage conservation and indicate the importance of prescient management and the adoption of a sustainable development model. Achieving the desired level of sustainability in historical villages through conservation of the built environment with the involvement of the local community is possible, as can be seen in the case of Kemer Village in Turkey, where the villagers and the local authorities worked in cooperation to ensure the preservation of the village's integrity. This study will describe possible long-term strategies and actions aimed at involving the local community in the sustainable conservation of the rural cultural heritage while also embracing change. It is important that the concept of sustainability is realized with participatory planning methods. In addition to that, rural heritage and social sustainability together incorporate a widespread but rarely considered set of issues addressing local needs in conservation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2021-0087
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Destruction, heritage and memory: post-conflict memorialisation for
           recovery and reconciliation

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      Authors: Zeynep Ece Atabay , Alessandra Macedonio , Tarek Teba , Zeynep Unal
      Abstract: The destruction of armed confrontations – ranging from chronic armed conflicts to full-scale wars – leads to enormous loss of human lives and causes wide-scale devastation. They also leave deep and lasting traumas in the minds of those whose lives are torn apart because of a conflict. Memorialisation of conflict-affected sites plays an invaluable part in post-trauma recovery and can contribute to the reconciliation of different groups involved in a conflict as these sites are representatives of communities' collective memory, identity and a source of unity and resilience. This paper aims to investigate post-trauma recovery and reconciliation processes through the phenomena of memorialisation. It aims to answer how and if the memorialisation of sites of pain can contribute to the recovery and reconciliation of affected communities and serve as examples for other people around the world. The documentation of such processes and the lessons learnt can offer valuable information for conducting similar exercises in other settings ravaged by a conflict. To achieve this, a review of literature on trauma, memory, memorialisation and difficult heritage was conducted, while the memorialisation processes from different cases such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1939–1945), Beirut (1975–1990) and Sarajevo's Vijecnica and Mostar Bridge (1992–1995) were analysed. It was identified that the potential of memorialisation for post-trauma recovery and reconciliation is vast. However, if these processes can “heal” or “hurt” depend largely on who the stakeholders are; how the site and events are interpreted and presented; how pre/post-conflict relationships and dynamics are harnessed; how symbolic meanings (old and new) are [re]interpreted; the spatial-temporal nature of the site and those interacting with it; and the intended and perceived messages. Altogether, memorialisation of conflict-affected sites is a political and continuous process that should take into consideration all those directly and indirectly involved, the dynamics between them and all the symbolic meanings acquired and attributed to the site. The study critically explores frameworks of memorialisation and their impact on both the built environment and communities. It contributes to the wider discussion of difficult heritage memorialisation and approaches to reflect on sites and cities emerging from crises such as conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0103
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Motivations as predictors of religious tourism: the Muslim pilgrimage to
           the city of Mecca

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      Authors: Tahani Hassan , Mauricio Carvache-Franco , Wilmer Carvache-Franco , Orly Carvache-Franco
      Abstract: Religious tourism is one of the oldest and fastest-growing segments. This study analyzes religious tourism through the pilgrimage of Muslims to the holy city of Mecca and has the following objectives: (1) establish the motivational dimensions of religious tourism; (2) identify the motivational dimensions that predict the satisfaction of religious tourism and (3) determine the motivational dimensions that predict return, recommend and say positive things about religious tourism applied to the pilgrimage to a sacred city. The sample consisted of Muslim pilgrims who had visited Mecca. The sample was collected in Bahrain, a country located on the Persian Gulf, where most of its population is Muslim. A total of 380 valid questionnaires were obtained online. For the data analysis, factorial analysis and the multiple regression method enter were performed. The results show that religious motivations are more important when visiting a sacred city than secular ones. Three motivational dimensions were found: religious, social and cultural and shopping. The three dimensions found have a significant relationship with satisfaction and loyalty. Likewise, it was found that the religious motivational dimension is the factor that most predicts satisfaction and loyalty in the behavior of religious visits to a sacred city. The main limitation of the present study was the temporality in which the sample was taken because the demand may vary at another time of the year and therefore vary its results. The authors of the study recommend that holy cities increase the religious motivations of these travelers by periodically researching their needs and organizing services to suit their desired spiritual experience. Also, to improve the social and cultural part, travel agencies and tourist companies to Mecca should promote social and cultural motivation among travelers in an appropriate way by providing service packages that involve visits to cultural and social sites such as museums and cultural centers. This research will serve as a management guide for public institutions and private companies to develop more efficient planning in religious destinations and sacred cities. This study is the first to analyze the construct of motivations in the pilgrimage to the city of Mecca, to then establish what the main motivations are that predict satisfaction and loyalty in a religious city. Thus, its results provide important information for tourist destination managers and tourism service providers.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0005
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Craft culture revival through a sustainable approach of integrating
           tourism with craft promotion: case study of Puri, Odisha

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      Authors: Anisa Azharunnisa , Sumana Gupta , Sudha Panda
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to create optimally located Facilitation Centers on this tourist circuit, evaluated through network analysis, thus creating an effective linkage between tourism and economic activities of the craftsmen who are the custodians of the cultural heritage of Puri. The craft villages lying in and around this tourist circuit are surveyed to establish socio-economic condition of artisans, significance of the craft and spatial distribution of craft villages and the willingness of artisans to travel closer to the transport spine. Network analysis is used to assess the suitability of Facilitation Center location using travel time and distance as parameters. Finally, the sustainability of the Facilitation Centers is evaluated using a cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The Facilitation Centers can be spatially developed at the strategic locations to expand tourist market. This will help in leveraging the economic benefits of tourism to a marginalized rural artisan community by creating a sustainable model. The focus on festival can help to protect local cultural traditions, develop tourism and promote the economic, social and cultural developments of the destination. Dispersal strategies adopted aim to increase visitors' satisfaction with the product and thus entice them to stay longer in the destination.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0120
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Toward cultural significance awareness in HIS: a data model approach

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      Authors: Pierre Jouan , Pierre Hallot
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to address the challenging issue of developing a quantitative approach for the representation of cultural significance data in heritage information systems (HIS). The authors propose to provide experts in the field with a dedicated framework to structure and integrate targeted data about historical objects' significance in such environments. This research seeks the identification of key indicators which allow to better inform decision-makers about cultural significance. Identified concepts are formalized in a data structure through conceptual data modeling, taking advantage on unified modeling language (HIS). The design science research (DSR) method is implemented to facilitate the development of the data model. This paper proposes a practical solution for the formalization of data related to the significance of objects in HIS. The authors end up with a data model which enables multiple knowledge representations through data analysis and information retrieval. The framework proposed in this article supports a more sustainable vision of heritage preservation as the framework enhances the involvement of all stakeholders in the conservation and management of historical sites. The data model supports explicit communications of the significance of historical objects and strengthens the synergy between the stakeholders involved in different phases of the conservation process.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A holistic conservation and development approach for Gaziantep Rumkale
           archaeological site

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      Authors: M. Serhat Yenice , Emine Yagmur
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to determine the scope and content for a holistic conservation and development strategies in the case of Gaziantep Rumkale. This approach seeks an answer to the question of “How can Rumkale archaeological heritage be preserved with their original values and passed on to future generations'” The materials of the paper are based on field research and written and visual resource. The paper has been handled with a four-step method setup. The first stage is to examine the spatial and functional background of Rumkale and its immediate surroundings based on the historical development process. The second stage is to evaluate the upper- and lower-scale planning experiences of the heritage site. The third stage of the research methodology is strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis. The fourth stage is the creation of cultural heritage conservation-development strategies that define strategies for the protection and development of archaeological heritage in the context of sustainability. The paper emphasizes the development of a holistic perspective that theoretically deals with the archaeological heritage sites of Rumkale together with the surrounding rural areas. In this context, the paper suggests ecological, spatial, socio-cultural, economic and institutional protection development strategies for the Rumkale archaeological site together with the surrounding rural areas for their delivery to future generations. Although the area has an important cultural heritage value for different religions and cultures, it has not been subject to sufficient scientific research. The paper develops a holistic approach by considering Rumkale and its surroundings together.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0146
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Traditional Mossi housing–case studies in Baasneere (Burkina Faso)

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      Authors: María Lidón de Miguel , Lidia García-Soriano , Camilla Mileto , Fernando Vegas López-Manzanares
      Abstract: The common language behind vernacular architecture only seems to be maintained in societies that preserve a traditional way of life. Changes in these societies can threaten their cultural heritage, while research may be a tool for its conservation and enhancement. In this paper, the habitat of a Mossi community is therefore studied as a first stage in analysing the possibilities of its maintenance. After a previous study, data collection from a stay in Baasneere (Burkina Faso) and the analysis of 32 traditional residential units were completed. The research showed some common features which, when compared against the bibliography reviewed, could be defined as characteristic of the traditional architecture of this culture. The home for a family unit consisted in an enclosure formed by the grouping of adobe constructions around a courtyard. As the family grew so did the compound, in a relationship directly linking the scales of architecture and the levels of kinship. The main daily activities took place in the courtyards while the individual interior spaces were understood as private shelters. Other typologies such as granaries, kitchens, warehouses and sheds were also analysed. Some features of Mossi architecture already described in the existing bibliography were verified in the Baasneere case studies, showing that this tradition is still preserved. With a multidisciplinary approach, the house was examined not so much from the perspective of construction, but of its cultural configuration.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0149
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Integrated management of heritage sites: scale development and validation

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      Authors: A. Vinodan , S. Meera
      Abstract: The study explores the possibility of developing a valid scale for integrated management of heritage sites to bring a holistic approach to heritage properties' conservation practices. The study followed the exploratory sequential method. An in-depth interview was adopted for exploring indicators, and a questionnaire survey was administered for descriptive analysis. Cultural resources conservation strategies have been analyzed from a tourist, local communities and stakeholder's perspective with local-specific indicators. The study indicates that a multi-dimensional approach that integrates tourists, local communities and other stakeholders-based indicators can be developed at the destination level for the integrated management of heritage properties. Tourist-centric, local community-specific and stakeholder-oriented approaches could act as catalysts for more pragmatic conservation practices in the local areas based on the site-specific indicators. The study is limited to lesser-known heritage sites located in the southern provincial states of India. The technical conservation strategies on the structure and architecture are not part of the study. Theoretical implications on the study of this kind can contribute to the literature as it throws light on future studies seeking local-centric conservation and management practices of heritage sites hitherto less explored in the domain of conservation science. The scale provides insight into the appropriate form of intervention that the local communities, tourists and other stakeholders can do at the heritage sites, hence the possibility of garnering the attention of other discipline strivings towards the conservation of heritage sites and to apply along with other relevant variables. It is expected that the study might expedite the knowledge accumulation in conservation science. The scale can be used in a similar context for the integrated management of heritage sites. The study can assist the policymakers and planners in seeking the support of stakeholders, local communities and tourists for the implementation of heritage conservation and management programs. Such a local-centric management strategy promoting responsible consumption and production could contribute to SDG 12. Further, the study can also contribute towards SDG 11.4, which calls for strengthening the effort to protect and safeguard cultural and natural heritage. This scale can be a tool for destination management organizations (DMOs) to understand the level of intervention of local communities, tourists and other stakeholders at the heritage site. The integrated management approach of heritage conservation immensely helps the lesser-known heritage sites the world over as such structures are out of the focal point of government funding and other conservation efforts. The synergy of the integrated approach could protect lesser-known unfunded heritage sites, and thereby, the cultural reflections of the community concerned can be made available for future visitors’ consumption. The study attempted to understand the conservation approaches for lesser-known heritage sites with the support of both demand and supply-side stakeholders. Such a collaborative approach is the first of this kind in the conservation of heritage sites in India.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0158
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The perception of UNESCO World Heritage Sites' managers about concepts and
           elements of cultural sustainability in tourism

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      Authors: Rafael Almeida de Oliveira , Renata Maria Abrantes Baracho , Lorenzo Cantoni
      Abstract: The research aims to identify the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site (WHS) managers' perception of cultural sustainability concepts and elements in tourism. A literature review was carried out to identify the main speeches and characteristic elements of cultural sustainability present in the academic field, and then a quantitative survey was carried out with 60 managers of UNESCO WHSs to evaluate their perception of the theme. The results show that managers believe that the concept of cultural sustainability is much more closely linked to the social dimension of sustainability than to the economic and environmental dimensions. Thus, elements such as the preservation of tangible and intangible assets, the participation of society in the management of heritage, the democratization of access, the guarantee of the appreciation of culture and its preservation for future generations are basic elements for cultural sustainability. Finally, although they believe that understanding the concept of cultural sustainability is fundamental to their activities, they still lack knowledge of how to measure cultural sustainability in their spaces. Although the theme of sustainability has several published studies, most of the work focuses only on studies of its social, economic and environmental dimensions. The debates on the role of culture in sustainability are still incipient, and understanding the managers' perception of the topic enables the creation of more effective strategies that guarantee cultural sustainability in heritage by tourism.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Documenting cultural heritage in an INSPIRE-based 3D GIS for risk and
           vulnerability analysis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Elisabetta Colucci , Francesca Matrone , Francesca Noardo , Vanessa Assumma , Giulia Datola , Federica Appiotti , Marta Bottero , Filiberto Chiabrando , Patrizia Lombardi , Massimo Migliorini , Enrico Rinaldi , Antonia Spanò , Andrea Lingua
      Abstract: The study, within the Increasing Resilience of Cultural Heritage (ResCult) project, aims to support civil protection to prevent, lessen and mitigate disasters impacts on cultural heritage using a unique standardised-3D geographical information system (GIS), including both heritage and risk and hazard information. A top-down approach, starting from existing standards (an INSPIRE extension integrated with other parts from the standardised and shared structure), was completed with a bottom-up integration according to current requirements for disaster prevention procedures and risk analyses. The results were validated and tested in case studies (differentiated concerning the hazard and type of protected heritage) and refined during user forums. Besides the ensuing reusable database structure, the filling with case studies data underlined the tough challenges and allowed proposing a sample of workflows and possible guidelines. The interfaces are provided to use the obtained knowledge base. The increasing number of natural disasters could severely damage the cultural heritage, causing permanent damage to movable and immovable assets and tangible and intangible heritage. The study provides an original tool properly relating the (spatial) information regarding cultural heritage and the risk factors in a unique archive as a standard-based European tool to cope with these frequent losses, preventing risk.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Forest conservation by the indigenous Baduy community in the form of
           customary law

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      Authors: Donna Asteria , Putri Alvernia , Berliana Nur Kholila , Sabarina Isma Husein , Farha Widya Asrofani
      Abstract: The Baduy tribe has its own uniqueness and values regarding the forest; it manages the forest using customary law to keep it sustainable. This research aims to describe the position of customary law used by the Baduy tribe to conserve forest areas. This research is a qualitative research conducted in September 2019 and 2020 at Baduy. The data were collected through a literature study and in-depth interviews with informants related to the Baduy tribe. The collected data included documentation and interview transcripts that were translated into English. Data analysis was conducted in a descriptive manner, equipped with related evidence. The Baduy community holds firm to its customs and culture called pikukuh. The Baduy community applies the concept of sustainable forest management in that local communities are directly involved in forest management activities to improve welfare and implement sustainable forests. The implication of this research is that it is beneficial for forest conservation based on customary law, using the conservation approach of the Baduy tribe as a local community in protecting the sustainability of forest resources and their sustainability for the next generation. This study contributes as a guide for the government to formulate policies that will include local communities into conservation programs and government policies. It may apply to a study of coordination with related institutions such as the Ministry of Environment and Forestry in implementing forest conservation. This study uses primary data from the Baduy tribe, which has unique local traditional values regarding the territory and the important role of the forest. The originality of the findings from the excavation of each activity was based on the procedures and beliefs regulated in customary law regarding forest management. Preservation of traditional knowledge in customary law has contributed to the urgency of sustainable forest conservation and biodiversity conservation, which is part of the traditional knowledge of the Baduy tribe.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0171
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A review of ontologies for augmented reality cultural heritage
           applications

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      Authors: Apostolos Vlachos , Maria Perifanou , Anastasios A. Economides
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to review ontologies and data models currently in use for augmented reality (AR) applications, in the cultural heritage (CH) domain, specifically in an urban environment. The aim is to see the current trends in ontologies and data models used and investigate their applications in real world scenarios. Some special cases of applications or ontologies are also discussed, as being interesting enough to merit special consideration. A search using Google Scholar, Scopus, ScienceDirect and IEEE Xplore was done in order to find articles that describe ontologies and data models in AR CH applications. The authors identified the articles that analyze the use of ontologies and/or data models, as well as articles that were deemed to be of special interest. This review found that CIDOC-CRM is the most popular ontology closely followed by Historical Context Ontology (HiCO). Also, a combination of current ontologies seems to be the most complete way to fully describe a CH object or site. A layered ontology model is suggested, which can be expanded according to the specific project. This study provides an overview of ontologies and data models for AR CH applications in urban environments. There are several ontologies currently in use in the CH domain, with none having been universally adopted, while new ontologies or extensions to existing ones are being created, in the attempt to fully describe a CH object or site. Also, this study suggests a combination of popular ontologies in a multi-layer model.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0110
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Past, present and future challenges for Australia's indigenous heritage
           management national policy

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      Authors: Hilary du Cros
      Abstract: Australia appears to be encountering a crisis in the protection of certain heritage places, despite its strong reputation in heritage conservation built up since the 1970s. Consequently, this paper examines changes to national cultural heritage management policy over the last few decades to understand more about this crisis. Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage) was selected as the key focus. This paper applies a cultural heritage management framework tested first in Hong Kong to measure Australian paradigm change over 45 years. It found the 1990s shift away from the provision of independent technical advice on national heritage policy has had a major impact. This shift is based on a change in ethos away from the earlier Whitlam/National Estate broader vision of heritage responsibilities towards a narrower more conservative one at the national level. Also, it found that studies and policymaking should allow for Indigenous voices. More Indigenous input in heritage policy formulation at all levels of government would further decolonise Indigenous heritage governance to deal justly with Indigenous Australians and their heritage. Resources did not allow for comparative studies of the non-Indigenous (historic) and natural heritage as part of the current study. The study also included a consultation paper and an online conference presentation that have raised questions about the efficacy of current national policy on Indigenous places, on which a national conversation is urgently needed. The recent review of the National Heritage Strategy by the Australian Commonwealth Government based some of its proposed options on those listed in the consultation paper to initiate this conversation in a limited way. One finding is that attention to heritage policy and protection must be ongoing at all levels of government and inclusive of First People's human rights, particularly those concerning their heritage. In regard to Australia, most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander respondents in this study would like to see targeted funding return for more than just iconic Indigenous places and for the creation of a more independent heritage body that allows them more self-determination in the care of their heritage. The paper's value is that it investigates the Australian Heritage Commission's impact in the development of Australian cultural heritage management and associated national policy. Also, it provides insights for other postcolonial or New World settler societies dealing with the same issues or any decision-makers considering establishing a national independent body to oversee heritage protection and policymaking.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0079
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Not all deities were transformed in Igboland: a cultural history
           of the Api-Opi deity

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      Authors: Mathias Chukwudi Isiani , Stanley Jachike Onyemechalu , Somtochukwu C. Osinem , Sopuluchukwu Amarachukwu Dimelu , Ngozika Anthonia Obi-Ani
      Abstract: This study examines the cultural history of the Api-Opi deity in Opi, Nsukka, Enugu State of Nigeria. The study sets out to examine the re-emergence of youthful worshippers of Api-Opi, despite the penetration of Christianity in the area. The study employed ethnographic observation and field visits to the shrine of Api-Opi in Opi community of Enugu State, Nigeria. In addition, this study uncovers new information drawn from semi-structured interview questions undertaken in the study area between March and October of 2019. Against certain claims on the impact of Christianity on Africa's traditional religions, the study found that the Api-Opi deity has withstood these post-colonial changes, growing its followership, particularly amongst the youths. It demonstrated the resilience of Igbo Traditional Worship System even in the midst of culture clash and religious iconoclasm advanced by Christianity in Igboland, Nigeria. Evidence from this study helps debunk the notions of Eurocentric scholars who say African traditional religions are fetish, barbaric or primitive. It also shows how indigenous communities have protected and preserved their religious heritage despite the wave of modernization and other eternal influences. The study contributes to the increasing conversations about the role of traditional religion in the cultural resilience/revitalization of indigenous communities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0132
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • From mine industries to a place of culture, tourism, research and higher
           education: case study of the great mine Serbariu

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      Authors: Sara Pau , Giulia Contu , Vincenzo Rundeddu
      Abstract: This study aims to explore how closed factories could be transformed and provide a path for sustainable development for a territory. The authors focus on the case of the Great Mine Serbariu, located in Carbonia (Sardinia), which used to be the largest coal mine in Italy between 1939 and 1964. The authors adopt a qualitative research design based on an exploratory single-case study, drawing on interviews with the main stakeholders, on a survey conducted among 5,158 visitors, and on administrative documentation of the City Council. The analysis of the Great Mine Serbariu case showed that the regeneration of an exhausted mine serves a model of sustainable development, especially for the redevelopment of other urban and industrial degraded areas. The Great mine Serbariu was restored and turned into a place of culture, tourism, research and higher education, with the Italian Cultural Centre of Coal Mining (ICCCM) establishing its headquarters in the heart of the former mine. It attracted almost 220,000 visitors, generating both domestic and international tourist flows and making an industrial heritage a real resource for the area. This article advances the authors’ understanding of how closed industries could become an instrument for sustainable development on the social, economic, touristic and cultural levels. This study would help local governments with examples to enhance the historical resources to create a new identity that led to a sustainable development of an urban landscape, and to create networks with other comparable museums all over Europe to better exploit the touristic and cultural potential.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ancient routes, new gateways: a systematic literature review of
           China's cultural route heritage

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Ke Zhang , Almudena González del Valle-Brena , Ignacio Ramos Riera , Jingli Zhao
      Abstract: The study aims to understand how cultural route heritage is conceptualized and managed in China by systematically reviewing the research literature on Chinese cultural route heritage (CRH). The study intends to inspire further discussion on the theoretical and practical development of cultural routes since the development is still at a liminal stage in China. A total of 253 research articles related to Chinese cultural rote heritage from major Chinese and English research databases China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Web of Science (WOS) and Scopus have been comprehensively identified and reviewed for the purpose of the study. Four major themes of research on Chinese CRH have been identified: conceptual evaluation, list of the routes and characteristics of the routes, conservation and utilization. The results revealed that China has very rich resources in CRH, many of which were formed a long time ago, which exist across vast geographic regions and have assumed multiple functions and undergone dynamic reciprocal exchanges among diverse cultures and ethnicities. The paper summarizes some major obstacles faced by CRH in China and proposes a strategic model to address the need for a more sustainable development of CRH in the Chinese context. The paper offers a comprehensive overview of CRH in China and discusses practical issues in management and development of heritage great in size, number and complexity.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ecotourism motivations and segmentation in a Fauna Production Reserve in
           Ecuador

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      Authors: Mauricio Carvache-Franco , Wilmer Carvache-Franco , Orly Carvache-Franco , José Borja-Morán
      Abstract: In recent years, tourists have been progressively increasing their interest in the natural environment and its enjoyment. The objective of this study was: (1) identify the underlying variables or motivational dimensions in ecotourism; and (2) analyze the demand segmentation in ecotourism. The empirical analysis was carried out in “Puntilla de Santa Elena” Fauna Production Reserve in Ecuador. The sample consisted of 369 surveys obtained in situ. For the data analysis, a factor analysis and a nonhierarchical K-media segmentation were performed. The results show six motivational dimensions in ecotourism: “Self-development and Interpersonal relationships,” “Building personal relationships,” “Escape and ego-defensive function,” “Marine nature,” “Terrestrial nature” and “Rewards.” Also, according to their motivations, three segments of ecotourists emerged: “Reward and escape,” “Marine nature” and “Multiple motives.” The limitation is the temporality with which the study was carried out. Another limitation was the number of the samples used. As future lines of research, it is proposed to investigate the offer related to ecotourism products and services adapted to the demand segments found. Among the practical implications, operators and companies linked to the tourism sector can plan more efficient strategies, adapted to the specific needs of each segment to improve the satisfaction of tourists and the intentions of returning to the destination, providing greater benefit to the tourists, to the sustainable development of the destination and the community. The findings of this research can help public institutions and private companies to improve the tourism supply, create sustainable plans and potentially develop more efficient marketing planning. Protected areas will benefit from information about demand. The communities will be able to elaborate products according to the motivations and found segments. Administrators will be able to create sustainable management plans for ecotourism. As ecotourism grows, it is vital to understand the ecotourists' motivations and segmentation to improve each segment service offering. This study presents original results of the motivations and segmentation of the demand for ecotourism based on a reserve area for the production of coastal marine fauna. To obtain valid results, a study was carried out in Ecuador, this being a country with a great variety of flora and fauna ideal for ecotourism.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Heritage futures: A conversation
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Cornelius Holtorf , Annalisa Bolin
      Abstract: This article explores the concept of “heritage futures”, the role of heritage in managing relations between present and future societies. It assesses how thinking strategically about the future changes, complicates and contextualises practices of heritage. What might an attention to the future bring to work in heritage, and simultaneously, what challenges—both practical and ethical—arise' This article takes the form of a conversation about the nature of heritage futures and how such a project may be implemented in both heritage practice and field research in heritage studies. The two authors are heritage scholars who integrate heritage futures questions into their research in different ways, and their conversation uncovers potentialities and difficulties in the heritage futures project. The discussion covers the particular ethical issues that arise when the dimension of time is added to heritage research and practice, including questions of continuism, presentism and specificity. The conversation argues for the importance of considering the future in heritage studies and heritage practice and that this forms a key part of understanding how heritage may be part of building a sustainable present and future. The future is an under-examined concept within heritage studies, even as heritage is often framed as something to be preserved “for future generations”. But what impact might it have on heritage practice to really consider what this means, beyond the platitude' This article suggests that heritage scholars and practitioners direct their attention to this often-neglected facet of heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Stakeholders' consciousness of cultural heritage and the reconciliation of
           different needs for sustainable development

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      Authors: Selena Aureli , Mara Del Baldo
      Abstract: The paper aims to investigate the approach and tools adopted by an Italian city, included amongst the UNESCO World Heritage sites (WHS), to involve different stakeholders in the protection and valorisation of its historical centre to achieve the goals of sustainable development. The paper focusses on the role of local authorities as the key actors that should engage different city users to jointly achieve heritage conservation and socio-economic development. Data were collected, thanks to the researchers' direct participation in a project launched by the municipality of Urbino, which involved several local stakeholders and lasted about a year. Participant observation allowed the authors to collect informal interviews, join collective discussions and reflect on the direct observation of the activities undertaken. The case study analysed suggests how participatory governance may be effective in fostering responsible principles in “asset usage” by any type of city users and how citizens actively co-design and co-implement initiatives of heritage revitalisation when engaged in cultural heritage (CH) policies. The paper addresses a long-standing problem that has never been solved: how to enhance the consciousness of the CH amongst stakeholders and reconcile their different and conflicting needs in the historical urban environment in the process of revitalisation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development

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