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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access  
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access  
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 170)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 226)
Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 115)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 94)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Environment and Planning E : Nature and Space     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environment Conservation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access  
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intervención     Open Access  
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access  
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access  
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access  
Recycling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Regional Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access  
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.257
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 8 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 2044-1266 - ISSN (Online) 2044-1274
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • World heritage designation and residential property values: the case
           of Old Rauma, Finland

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      Authors: Johari Hussein Nassor Amar , Tanja Tyvimaa
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of beneficial externality generated by the World Heritage List (WHL) on residential property values in order to offer new insights into heritage discourses. The study uses the hedonic price model to estimate empirically the difference in prices for residential properties located in the Old Rauma World Heritage. The study uses residential sales transaction data from the City of Rauma from January 2005 to September 2012 drawn from an online database called KVKL Hintaseurantapalvelu managed by the Central Federation of Finnish Real Estate Agencies. The research results indicate a positive, but insignificant, relationship between the property sale prices (euros/sqm) and heritage designation. However, the total sale prices are higher in Old Rauma as the properties are significantly larger in Old Rauma compared to other properties in Rauma. Studies in heritage economics have assessed the influence of the property market on heritage listing and designation at either the national level, the local level or a mix of national/local levels. This paper contributes to the literature by analysing the impact of a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) world heritage designation on residential property values. UNESCO is the leading global institution which deals with the protection of heritage sites that transcend national and local boundaries.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0121
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Considering luminous ambiance and spatial configuration within the Ottoman
           old heritage buildings (Algerian palaces) focusing on their modern-day
           utility

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      Authors: Selma Saraoui , Abdelghani Attar , Rahma Saraoui , Sonia Alili
      Abstract: The Ottoman cultural legacy in Algeria is made up of a diverse range of architectural structures. The Algerian government strategy in connection with the Ottoman old buildings is to restore them into museums. This study will attempt to present a contrastive analysis between two old palaces being under restoration (refurbishment), and the goal is to propose a museum route by calculating the ambiance aimed at circulating the rooms by visitors. The authors analyzed the architectural components of the various entities by observing in situ and taking measurements for a single case study to get a sense of the results for the mid-season (spring and fall). The configuration was next evaluated by modeling the space syntax and combining it with a simulation of daylight luminance, for the period when the authors could not make measurements on-site. The ultimate goal is to combine these findings to suggest the ideal in-route for the future museum. This research allowed the authors to propose a museum itinerary adapted to the new vocation of the palaces, which considers the daylight as an element of composition in the spaces of circulation. The paper proposes solutions to a flow management problem encountered in several similar palaces converted into museums. The study aims to raise questions on the museum, and to preserve such heritage from neglect by giving it a new life more adapted to the needs of the Algerian society. The authors believe that this contribution will be a creative solution for issues related to the operation of palaces that have been converted into museums.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2021-0178
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Local people's “sense of place” toward cultural heritage sites:
           correlation with demographic and socio-economic characteristics

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      Authors: Mohamed Nour El-Barbary , Mariko Ikeda , Yasufumi Uekita
      Abstract: The paper aims at identifying the underlying factors that differentiate the local people's demographic and socio-economic characteristics, which influence their sense of place (SoP) toward different types of cultural heritage sites in different urban regions. The paper draws on the sequential explanatory design, using quantitative and qualitative methods, respectively, to investigate the research themes in-depth. A total of 201, 207 and 228 questionnaires were collected on religious, non-religious/memorial and historic commercial buildings, respectively, at two different quarters in Historic Cairo, followed by 20 semi-structured interviews with a representative sample of local people in each quarter. The authors found an apparent similarity in the significant characteristics that influence the local people's SoP levels toward the different historic buildings at the same quarter and a notable variation between both quarters. Also, many factors determine the local people's influential characteristics on their SoP toward the different cultural heritage sites (e.g. the sites’ distance from the person's residence/workplace, economic value, people's awareness about its history, type of activities and targeted gender, feeling of stability and regions' characteristics) Identifying these underlying factors and priority local groups can assist policymakers in ensuring a sustainable management/conservation of the different cultural heritage sites. The paper demonstrates the causality of a significant correlation between local people's characteristics and their SoP levels toward the different types of historic buildings, apart from their religious symbolism or historical value, using the sequential explanatory design.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0162
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Heritage theory at work: how heritage policy in Toronto, Canada shapes a
           

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      Authors: Luke McElcheran , Mario Santana Quintero
      Abstract: Toronto's heritage program is reporting year over year growth in both the number of listed and designated properties and the amount of money secured for heritage projects. At the same time, it is widely recognized that heritage trade skills are in decline. The purpose of this research is to examine Toronto's heritage policy in its regulatory and economic context to understand why heritage trades are struggling while the heritage program and the market for heritage professional services flourish and to suggest solutions based on existing policy tools. This research looks at the policy documents at the federal, provincial and municipal level that determine the minimum standard for heritage conservation in Toronto. It refers to secondary research on the economic context for these regulations to understand how they are applied and why they tend to produce certain outcomes. It introduces the regulatory context set by Canada's Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places and the Ontario Heritage Act. It goes on to analyse Toronto's local policy in more detail including density bonusing programs, the Toronto Official Plan and Heritage Conservation District planning standards. Toronto's heritage policy creates asymmetrical opportunities for heritage professionals and heritage specializing tradespeople. While the work that heritage professionals do is required or strongly encouraged by policy and increases reliably with the amount of funding secured for heritage projects, heritage tradespeople do not enjoy similar advantages. Their work is not required in the same way as heritage professionals' or encouraged to the same degree, and money secured for heritage projects does not necessarily go towards work that would engage the building trades necessary to maintain heritage structures. The value of job creation in heritage trades is a mainstay of heritage economic advocacy, and there is growing interest in the value of these trades skills as a resource for sustainable building practices. There is relatively little research considering how heritage policy and theory affect career opportunities for workers with these trades skills, and none that addresses those systemic pressures in the context of municipal heritage programs in Canada.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0169
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “Ibu-Ubu” boyhood initiation rites and the conservation of cultural
           heritage in Afikpo, southeastern Nigeria

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      Authors: Vitalis Nwashindu , Ambrose Onu
      Abstract: The study explores the nexus between Ibu-Ubu boyhood initiation and the conservation of cultural heritage in Afikpo, Southeast Nigeria. The study is motivated by the rarity of such cultural conservation through initiation rites in an age of Christian-inspired culture terrorism against Igbo traditional religion, arts and relics. The study adopted cultural anthropological research method. The boyhood initiation rite was studied through participant observation of the initiation between September and November 2017. As a cultural anthropological study, oral evidence was derived from the men who had undergone the rite. Through the oral evidence, interpretations were given to the material culture, monuments and heritage that have been conserved through Ibu-Ubu initiation rite. The study discovered that amid the deluge of Christian-motivated culture terrorism and erosion of Igbo cultural arts, relics and heritage, the people of Afikpo have preserved most of their tangible and intangible heritage through the Ibu-Ubu boyhood initiation rites. This study will assist in the reinvigoration of campaigns on environmental and heritage conservation in Igboland. It is sufficient to posit that Igboland is ridden with myriads of environmental and cultural terrorism, perpetrated by some Christian fanatics. The study reveals the relevance of the boyhood initiation rites in ensuring the preservation and conservation of Igbo cultural heritage in a century marked with fanatical Christian evangelism, culture-terrorism and destruction of both tangible and intangible heritages, which the Christians have labelled evil, barbaric and fetish.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0142
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Incorporating multidimensional images into cultural heritage destination:
           does it help to explain and analyse better'

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      Authors: Jason M.S. Lam , Zafir Khan Mohamed Makhbul , Norzalita Abd Aziz , Mohd Amirul Hafidz Ahmat
      Abstract: The present study aims to examine and explain cultural heritage destination by applying multiple dimension image model (cognitive–affective–conative aspects). A total of 233 international heritage-based tourists were surveyed on-site at some of the most prominent historical attractions in Malacca, one of the first cities in Malaysia declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The covariance-based structural equation modelling was applied to examine the hypotheses. The structural equation modelling validated that cognitive image aspects such as living culture, intangible and tangible are affected positively. The effects are statistically significant for conative and affective images. On the other hand, cognitive tangible image is an aspect that impacted affective image to a lesser degree than conative image. Whereas affective image attributes were found to have significant and positive influence on conative image. This study enriches the limited empirical research study on heritage image conceptualisation by expanding into tri-component model. The destination image has garnered a great deal of attention, particularly due to its significant and impactful influence on the decision-making and the sustainable behaviour of tourists, and it has since become the subject of many studies in the tourism and hospitality literatures. But most research concerning heritage image for destinations has considered the construct uni-dimensionally.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2021-0192
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ongoing adaptive reuse: patterns of heritage resilience before and after
           COVID-19

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Federica Fava
      Abstract: The paper aims to assess the impact and responses to coronavirus disease 2019 in six European heritage labs (Horizon 2020 Framework Programme) selected for their adaptive heritage re-use practices based on participation, self-organisation and self-management. As they are naturally oriented towards building resilient urban systems, the hypothesis is that the co-production of cultural values and places promoted by these projects could create the conditions for equitable perspectives of resilience in the normality of contemporary urban life. The paper draws on data collected through a survey of six European Living Labs between January and May 2021. The survey results are framed by a literature review that defines adaptive reuse in terms of resilience. The five resilience characteristics described by Judith Rodin (awareness, diversification, integration, self-regulation and adaptability) are used to navigate the literature and organise the survey results. Combining survey results and insights from the literature, some modes and elements (territorial, social, financial) are presented that contribute to creating the conditions for resilience through adaptive heritage reuse according to community-based approaches. Without claiming to be exhaustive, this evidence should be considered in the design phase of resilience programmes, policies or projects related to cultural heritage. The concepts of community and resilience are becoming increasingly important in the field of cultural heritage. This paper makes a creative contribution to the ongoing debate by presenting and evaluating the contribution of adaptive reuse practices to resilience building.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0116
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Art and sustainability: can digital technologies achieve
           sustainability'

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      Authors: Sara A. Abdoh
      Abstract: This paper discusses art and sustainability in the 21st century; therefore, we can't ignore the huge technological revolution that currently exists. Art throughout history has been associated to religion, politics and economics, but now it is also connected to technology. Hence, the question arises: Can digital technologies achieve sustainability' In this regard, the research will address the effective role of digital technology in achieving sustainability in art field and its practices. The main research material is derived from my interviews with artists, professors, curators, gallerists and art historians. In addition to the references of sustainability in various fields that are related to art, as Sustainability has become a goal that all sectors are striving to achieve to preserve our planet, as much as we can, especially in the field of art which is closely related to the environment. This paper explores the possibility of achieving sustainability in art field and its practices through digital technologies. In addition, it reveals that countries that have developed digital technologies are able to apply the digital technologies in art and its practices to achieve sustainability, in contrast, developing countries they could not achieve sustainability through digital technologies. As part of a joint research project between a developing and developed country, the paper clarifies the different opinions from 14 countries about the extent to which sustainability in art is achieved through digital technology. It also outlines some successful and unsuccessful experiences in achieving sustainability in art.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2022-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Historic public paths in rural areas: engine of development and origin of
           new conflicts

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: David Moscoso-Sánchez , José María Nasarre-Sarmiento , Manuel Trujillo-Carmona , Manuel T. González-Fernández , Ana Luque-Gil , Víctor Sánchez-Sanz , Pablo Vidal-González
      Abstract: In this article, the authors analyse a complex social process affecting historic public paths in rural areas in southern Spain. Despite the fact that urban populations are demanding the enhancement of this type of natural heritage for tourism, sports and recreational use, some parts of the network have been abandoned or usurped. The study is multidisciplinary, comprising three interlinked studies. The cartographic study comprises an inventory of public paths in rural areas based on administrative sources. The legal study analyses local, regional and national regulations governing agricultural, environmental, heritage, sports and tourism uses of the infrastructure. The sociological study analyses social discourses on the uses of public paths, and identifies conflicts between farmers, landowners, environmentalists, sportspeople and tourists. The preliminary results identified an important public paths network in Andalusia, approximately 160,000 km. The legal study found that there are laws regulating use, although local authorities do not monitor compliance or provide solutions to enhance management. The sociological study determined the attribution of environmental, cultural and economic value to public paths, but also the existence of conflicts between rural and urban populations. Given that this is ongoing research, only state of the art and some preliminary albeit sufficiently consistent results are presented. The results could help to guide public policy and governance of public paths. Public paths promote rural development and a green/sustainable economy. The research results and conclusions are original.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Lime in Cuenca (Ecuador): from patrimonial to matrilineal

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      Authors: María del Cisne Aguirre Ullauri , Christian Hernán Contreras-Escandón
      Abstract: Through the case of Blanca Sinchi, the following analysis presents valuation criteria that have resulted in the invisibility of social actors and cultural patrimony (cultural heritage) elements, and some contradictions in their acknowledgment process. In addition, the paper explains how architecture, among other historic assets, has made women and their contributions invisible. Bibliographic analysis and semi-structured interviews were carried out to theorize about the thermodynamic system of lime to propose a matri-lineal system category and expand the understanding of the participation of women in the receipt, management and transmission of what is called patrimony. In heritage places, such as Cuenca (Ecuador), cultural richness extends from the Historic Center to the rest of the territory and its actors. However, there are intrinsic elements, such as unknown, but fundamental, oral or family traditions associated with the role of women. The case of Blanca Sinchi and lime is evidence of this, as it shows the typical scenario affected by gender and by disparate power dynamics that do not consider desirable attributes (authenticity, integrity, identity, bequest, option, existence, among others) in the conservation of architectural patrimony. A deep redefinition process, or even a change in the valuation system, is needed. Also, the history behind built heritage items must be explored to find the contributions made by women. Proposing a matri-lineal system category to expand the understanding of the participation of women in the receipt, management and transmission of what is called patrimony, allows redefining and rewriting local and global history, acknowledging the role of women. In this way, the proposal questions not only the hegemony of the term “cultural patrimony” pigeonholed in paternal legacy but also the term “cultural heritage” as a synonym and framework that, while expanding material values, it does not effectively include, at least for Ibero-Romance language territories, the broad set of tangible and intangible values, as well as the know-how and skills of artisans.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0168
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Nightlife in historical sites: between lights and shadows (visions and
           challenges)

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      Authors: Lina Nageb Fewella
      Abstract: The paper aims to describe the positive and negative effects of night lights in historical sites, as well as the most salient challenges faced by the visitors of these sites and determine ways to address them. The study aims to suggest several light-and-shadow approaches and designs to enhance the experience of visiting historical sites. This study identifies problems of nightlife in historical sites with an online international questionnaire to determine the preferences and difficulties faced by visitors of historical sites during day and night. After that Egypt was determined as a sample case of a developing country; its archaeological sites need to be improved. The main problems of historical Egyptian sites were investigated and approaches in developing historical sites with interactive lighting design were presented after an online questionnaire to the Egyptian society. The paper shows that archaeological sites need some development, especially in their technological and lighting aspects, to overcome visitors’ low night-time interest in archaeological sites. Research has found certain limitations in the effects of constructing artificial illumination. The study provides modern sustainable solution for some light challenges in historical sites with approaches and solutions to solve it. The results of that research could be applied in developing countries, but with larger specific studies to the historical urban locations according to the politics of the country. The paper includes sustainable approaches in developing historical sites with technological lighting design required to enhance historical sites at night-time and make visits more interactive and interesting. This paper presents an identified need of historical sites visitors’ to study applying modern approaches in enhancing urban historical sites.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0144
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Sustainability of historic rural settlements based on participatory
           conservation approach: Kemer Village in Turkey

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      Authors: Simay Cansu Ekici , Özgün Özçakır , Ayşe Güliz Bilgin Altinöz
      Abstract: This paper aims to address the issue of the conservation and management of rural cultural heritage, with the aim being to gain an understanding of current problems and needs through a participatory approach, in recognition of the uniqueness of the relationship between nature, humankind and the built environment as an area of study. To this end, a comprehensive case study – Kemer Village in Turkey – focusing on the social sustainability and participatory approaches for the sustainable development of rural settlements is given. Accordingly, possible conservation, management and sustainability strategies are put forward considering the priorities and perspectives of different stakeholders. This paper approaches the subject of rural heritage conservation and management from a social sustainability standpoint, involving an on-site investigation to understand the physical and social context of Kemer Village in Turkey, which has links to different periods in history, and contains significant examples of vernacular architecture and that has maintained its cultural characteristics. Tools and criteria for participatory planning approach were applied ensuring the involvement of the local community and stakeholders. The findings of the present study reveal rural settlements to be important factors in the cultural heritage conservation and indicate the importance of prescient management and the adoption of a sustainable development model. Achieving the desired level of sustainability in historical villages through conservation of the built environment with the involvement of the local community is possible, as can be seen in the case of Kemer Village in Turkey, where the villagers and the local authorities worked in cooperation to ensure the preservation of the village's integrity. This study will describe possible long-term strategies and actions aimed at involving the local community in the sustainable conservation of the rural cultural heritage while also embracing change. It is important that the concept of sustainability is realized with participatory planning methods. In addition to that, rural heritage and social sustainability together incorporate a widespread but rarely considered set of issues addressing local needs in conservation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2021-0087
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Destruction, heritage and memory: post-conflict memorialisation for
           recovery and reconciliation

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      Authors: Zeynep Ece Atabay , Alessandra Macedonio , Tarek Teba , Zeynep Unal
      Abstract: The destruction of armed confrontations – ranging from chronic armed conflicts to full-scale wars – leads to enormous loss of human lives and causes wide-scale devastation. They also leave deep and lasting traumas in the minds of those whose lives are torn apart because of a conflict. Memorialisation of conflict-affected sites plays an invaluable part in post-trauma recovery and can contribute to the reconciliation of different groups involved in a conflict as these sites are representatives of communities' collective memory, identity and a source of unity and resilience. This paper aims to investigate post-trauma recovery and reconciliation processes through the phenomena of memorialisation. It aims to answer how and if the memorialisation of sites of pain can contribute to the recovery and reconciliation of affected communities and serve as examples for other people around the world. The documentation of such processes and the lessons learnt can offer valuable information for conducting similar exercises in other settings ravaged by a conflict. To achieve this, a review of literature on trauma, memory, memorialisation and difficult heritage was conducted, while the memorialisation processes from different cases such as Hiroshima and Nagasaki (1939–1945), Beirut (1975–1990) and Sarajevo's Vijecnica and Mostar Bridge (1992–1995) were analysed. It was identified that the potential of memorialisation for post-trauma recovery and reconciliation is vast. However, if these processes can “heal” or “hurt” depend largely on who the stakeholders are; how the site and events are interpreted and presented; how pre/post-conflict relationships and dynamics are harnessed; how symbolic meanings (old and new) are [re]interpreted; the spatial-temporal nature of the site and those interacting with it; and the intended and perceived messages. Altogether, memorialisation of conflict-affected sites is a political and continuous process that should take into consideration all those directly and indirectly involved, the dynamics between them and all the symbolic meanings acquired and attributed to the site. The study critically explores frameworks of memorialisation and their impact on both the built environment and communities. It contributes to the wider discussion of difficult heritage memorialisation and approaches to reflect on sites and cities emerging from crises such as conflict.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0103
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Motivations as predictors of religious tourism: the Muslim pilgrimage to
           the city of Mecca

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      Authors: Tahani Hassan , Mauricio Carvache-Franco , Wilmer Carvache-Franco , Orly Carvache-Franco
      Abstract: Religious tourism is one of the oldest and fastest-growing segments. This study analyzes religious tourism through the pilgrimage of Muslims to the holy city of Mecca and has the following objectives: (1) establish the motivational dimensions of religious tourism; (2) identify the motivational dimensions that predict the satisfaction of religious tourism and (3) determine the motivational dimensions that predict return, recommend and say positive things about religious tourism applied to the pilgrimage to a sacred city. The sample consisted of Muslim pilgrims who had visited Mecca. The sample was collected in Bahrain, a country located on the Persian Gulf, where most of its population is Muslim. A total of 380 valid questionnaires were obtained online. For the data analysis, factorial analysis and the multiple regression method enter were performed. The results show that religious motivations are more important when visiting a sacred city than secular ones. Three motivational dimensions were found: religious, social and cultural and shopping. The three dimensions found have a significant relationship with satisfaction and loyalty. Likewise, it was found that the religious motivational dimension is the factor that most predicts satisfaction and loyalty in the behavior of religious visits to a sacred city. The main limitation of the present study was the temporality in which the sample was taken because the demand may vary at another time of the year and therefore vary its results. The authors of the study recommend that holy cities increase the religious motivations of these travelers by periodically researching their needs and organizing services to suit their desired spiritual experience. Also, to improve the social and cultural part, travel agencies and tourist companies to Mecca should promote social and cultural motivation among travelers in an appropriate way by providing service packages that involve visits to cultural and social sites such as museums and cultural centers. This research will serve as a management guide for public institutions and private companies to develop more efficient planning in religious destinations and sacred cities. This study is the first to analyze the construct of motivations in the pilgrimage to the city of Mecca, to then establish what the main motivations are that predict satisfaction and loyalty in a religious city. Thus, its results provide important information for tourist destination managers and tourism service providers.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2022-0005
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Craft culture revival through a sustainable approach of integrating
           tourism with craft promotion: case study of Puri, Odisha

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      Authors: Anisa Azharunnisa , Sumana Gupta , Sudha Panda
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to create optimally located Facilitation Centers on this tourist circuit, evaluated through network analysis, thus creating an effective linkage between tourism and economic activities of the craftsmen who are the custodians of the cultural heritage of Puri. The craft villages lying in and around this tourist circuit are surveyed to establish socio-economic condition of artisans, significance of the craft and spatial distribution of craft villages and the willingness of artisans to travel closer to the transport spine. Network analysis is used to assess the suitability of Facilitation Center location using travel time and distance as parameters. Finally, the sustainability of the Facilitation Centers is evaluated using a cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The Facilitation Centers can be spatially developed at the strategic locations to expand tourist market. This will help in leveraging the economic benefits of tourism to a marginalized rural artisan community by creating a sustainable model. The focus on festival can help to protect local cultural traditions, develop tourism and promote the economic, social and cultural developments of the destination. Dispersal strategies adopted aim to increase visitors' satisfaction with the product and thus entice them to stay longer in the destination.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0120
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Toward cultural significance awareness in HIS: a data model approach

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      Authors: Pierre Jouan , Pierre Hallot
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to address the challenging issue of developing a quantitative approach for the representation of cultural significance data in heritage information systems (HIS). The authors propose to provide experts in the field with a dedicated framework to structure and integrate targeted data about historical objects' significance in such environments. This research seeks the identification of key indicators which allow to better inform decision-makers about cultural significance. Identified concepts are formalized in a data structure through conceptual data modeling, taking advantage on unified modeling language (HIS). The design science research (DSR) method is implemented to facilitate the development of the data model. This paper proposes a practical solution for the formalization of data related to the significance of objects in HIS. The authors end up with a data model which enables multiple knowledge representations through data analysis and information retrieval. The framework proposed in this article supports a more sustainable vision of heritage preservation as the framework enhances the involvement of all stakeholders in the conservation and management of historical sites. The data model supports explicit communications of the significance of historical objects and strengthens the synergy between the stakeholders involved in different phases of the conservation process.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A holistic conservation and development approach for Gaziantep Rumkale
           archaeological site

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      Authors: M. Serhat Yenice , Emine Yagmur
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to determine the scope and content for a holistic conservation and development strategies in the case of Gaziantep Rumkale. This approach seeks an answer to the question of “How can Rumkale archaeological heritage be preserved with their original values and passed on to future generations'” The materials of the paper are based on field research and written and visual resource. The paper has been handled with a four-step method setup. The first stage is to examine the spatial and functional background of Rumkale and its immediate surroundings based on the historical development process. The second stage is to evaluate the upper- and lower-scale planning experiences of the heritage site. The third stage of the research methodology is strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis. The fourth stage is the creation of cultural heritage conservation-development strategies that define strategies for the protection and development of archaeological heritage in the context of sustainability. The paper emphasizes the development of a holistic perspective that theoretically deals with the archaeological heritage sites of Rumkale together with the surrounding rural areas. In this context, the paper suggests ecological, spatial, socio-cultural, economic and institutional protection development strategies for the Rumkale archaeological site together with the surrounding rural areas for their delivery to future generations. Although the area has an important cultural heritage value for different religions and cultures, it has not been subject to sufficient scientific research. The paper develops a holistic approach by considering Rumkale and its surroundings together.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0146
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Traditional Mossi housing–case studies in Baasneere (Burkina Faso)

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      Authors: María Lidón de Miguel , Lidia García-Soriano , Camilla Mileto , Fernando Vegas López-Manzanares
      Abstract: The common language behind vernacular architecture only seems to be maintained in societies that preserve a traditional way of life. Changes in these societies can threaten their cultural heritage, while research may be a tool for its conservation and enhancement. In this paper, the habitat of a Mossi community is therefore studied as a first stage in analysing the possibilities of its maintenance. After a previous study, data collection from a stay in Baasneere (Burkina Faso) and the analysis of 32 traditional residential units were completed. The research showed some common features which, when compared against the bibliography reviewed, could be defined as characteristic of the traditional architecture of this culture. The home for a family unit consisted in an enclosure formed by the grouping of adobe constructions around a courtyard. As the family grew so did the compound, in a relationship directly linking the scales of architecture and the levels of kinship. The main daily activities took place in the courtyards while the individual interior spaces were understood as private shelters. Other typologies such as granaries, kitchens, warehouses and sheds were also analysed. Some features of Mossi architecture already described in the existing bibliography were verified in the Baasneere case studies, showing that this tradition is still preserved. With a multidisciplinary approach, the house was examined not so much from the perspective of construction, but of its cultural configuration.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0149
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Integrated management of heritage sites: scale development and validation

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      Authors: A. Vinodan , S. Meera
      Abstract: The study explores the possibility of developing a valid scale for integrated management of heritage sites to bring a holistic approach to heritage properties' conservation practices. The study followed the exploratory sequential method. An in-depth interview was adopted for exploring indicators, and a questionnaire survey was administered for descriptive analysis. Cultural resources conservation strategies have been analyzed from a tourist, local communities and stakeholder's perspective with local-specific indicators. The study indicates that a multi-dimensional approach that integrates tourists, local communities and other stakeholders-based indicators can be developed at the destination level for the integrated management of heritage properties. Tourist-centric, local community-specific and stakeholder-oriented approaches could act as catalysts for more pragmatic conservation practices in the local areas based on the site-specific indicators. The study is limited to lesser-known heritage sites located in the southern provincial states of India. The technical conservation strategies on the structure and architecture are not part of the study. Theoretical implications on the study of this kind can contribute to the literature as it throws light on future studies seeking local-centric conservation and management practices of heritage sites hitherto less explored in the domain of conservation science. The scale provides insight into the appropriate form of intervention that the local communities, tourists and other stakeholders can do at the heritage sites, hence the possibility of garnering the attention of other discipline strivings towards the conservation of heritage sites and to apply along with other relevant variables. It is expected that the study might expedite the knowledge accumulation in conservation science. The scale can be used in a similar context for the integrated management of heritage sites. The study can assist the policymakers and planners in seeking the support of stakeholders, local communities and tourists for the implementation of heritage conservation and management programs. Such a local-centric management strategy promoting responsible consumption and production could contribute to SDG 12. Further, the study can also contribute towards SDG 11.4, which calls for strengthening the effort to protect and safeguard cultural and natural heritage. This scale can be a tool for destination management organizations (DMOs) to understand the level of intervention of local communities, tourists and other stakeholders at the heritage site. The integrated management approach of heritage conservation immensely helps the lesser-known heritage sites the world over as such structures are out of the focal point of government funding and other conservation efforts. The synergy of the integrated approach could protect lesser-known unfunded heritage sites, and thereby, the cultural reflections of the community concerned can be made available for future visitors’ consumption. The study attempted to understand the conservation approaches for lesser-known heritage sites with the support of both demand and supply-side stakeholders. Such a collaborative approach is the first of this kind in the conservation of heritage sites in India.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0158
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The perception of UNESCO World Heritage Sites' managers about concepts and
           elements of cultural sustainability in tourism

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      Authors: Rafael Almeida de Oliveira , Renata Maria Abrantes Baracho , Lorenzo Cantoni
      Abstract: The research aims to identify the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Site (WHS) managers' perception of cultural sustainability concepts and elements in tourism. A literature review was carried out to identify the main speeches and characteristic elements of cultural sustainability present in the academic field, and then a quantitative survey was carried out with 60 managers of UNESCO WHSs to evaluate their perception of the theme. The results show that managers believe that the concept of cultural sustainability is much more closely linked to the social dimension of sustainability than to the economic and environmental dimensions. Thus, elements such as the preservation of tangible and intangible assets, the participation of society in the management of heritage, the democratization of access, the guarantee of the appreciation of culture and its preservation for future generations are basic elements for cultural sustainability. Finally, although they believe that understanding the concept of cultural sustainability is fundamental to their activities, they still lack knowledge of how to measure cultural sustainability in their spaces. Although the theme of sustainability has several published studies, most of the work focuses only on studies of its social, economic and environmental dimensions. The debates on the role of culture in sustainability are still incipient, and understanding the managers' perception of the topic enables the creation of more effective strategies that guarantee cultural sustainability in heritage by tourism.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Documenting cultural heritage in an INSPIRE-based 3D GIS for risk and
           vulnerability analysis

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Elisabetta Colucci , Francesca Matrone , Francesca Noardo , Vanessa Assumma , Giulia Datola , Federica Appiotti , Marta Bottero , Filiberto Chiabrando , Patrizia Lombardi , Massimo Migliorini , Enrico Rinaldi , Antonia Spanò , Andrea Lingua
      Abstract: The study, within the Increasing Resilience of Cultural Heritage (ResCult) project, aims to support civil protection to prevent, lessen and mitigate disasters impacts on cultural heritage using a unique standardised-3D geographical information system (GIS), including both heritage and risk and hazard information. A top-down approach, starting from existing standards (an INSPIRE extension integrated with other parts from the standardised and shared structure), was completed with a bottom-up integration according to current requirements for disaster prevention procedures and risk analyses. The results were validated and tested in case studies (differentiated concerning the hazard and type of protected heritage) and refined during user forums. Besides the ensuing reusable database structure, the filling with case studies data underlined the tough challenges and allowed proposing a sample of workflows and possible guidelines. The interfaces are provided to use the obtained knowledge base. The increasing number of natural disasters could severely damage the cultural heritage, causing permanent damage to movable and immovable assets and tangible and intangible heritage. The study provides an original tool properly relating the (spatial) information regarding cultural heritage and the risk factors in a unique archive as a standard-based European tool to cope with these frequent losses, preventing risk.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Forest conservation by the indigenous Baduy community in the form of
           customary law

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      Authors: Donna Asteria , Putri Alvernia , Berliana Nur Kholila , Sabarina Isma Husein , Farha Widya Asrofani
      Abstract: The Baduy tribe has its own uniqueness and values regarding the forest; it manages the forest using customary law to keep it sustainable. This research aims to describe the position of customary law used by the Baduy tribe to conserve forest areas. This research is a qualitative research conducted in September 2019 and 2020 at Baduy. The data were collected through a literature study and in-depth interviews with informants related to the Baduy tribe. The collected data included documentation and interview transcripts that were translated into English. Data analysis was conducted in a descriptive manner, equipped with related evidence. The Baduy community holds firm to its customs and culture called pikukuh. The Baduy community applies the concept of sustainable forest management in that local communities are directly involved in forest management activities to improve welfare and implement sustainable forests. The implication of this research is that it is beneficial for forest conservation based on customary law, using the conservation approach of the Baduy tribe as a local community in protecting the sustainability of forest resources and their sustainability for the next generation. This study contributes as a guide for the government to formulate policies that will include local communities into conservation programs and government policies. It may apply to a study of coordination with related institutions such as the Ministry of Environment and Forestry in implementing forest conservation. This study uses primary data from the Baduy tribe, which has unique local traditional values regarding the territory and the important role of the forest. The originality of the findings from the excavation of each activity was based on the procedures and beliefs regulated in customary law regarding forest management. Preservation of traditional knowledge in customary law has contributed to the urgency of sustainable forest conservation and biodiversity conservation, which is part of the traditional knowledge of the Baduy tribe.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0171
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A review of ontologies for augmented reality cultural heritage
           applications

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      Authors: Apostolos Vlachos , Maria Perifanou , Anastasios A. Economides
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to review ontologies and data models currently in use for augmented reality (AR) applications, in the cultural heritage (CH) domain, specifically in an urban environment. The aim is to see the current trends in ontologies and data models used and investigate their applications in real world scenarios. Some special cases of applications or ontologies are also discussed, as being interesting enough to merit special consideration. A search using Google Scholar, Scopus, ScienceDirect and IEEE Xplore was done in order to find articles that describe ontologies and data models in AR CH applications. The authors identified the articles that analyze the use of ontologies and/or data models, as well as articles that were deemed to be of special interest. This review found that CIDOC-CRM is the most popular ontology closely followed by Historical Context Ontology (HiCO). Also, a combination of current ontologies seems to be the most complete way to fully describe a CH object or site. A layered ontology model is suggested, which can be expanded according to the specific project. This study provides an overview of ontologies and data models for AR CH applications in urban environments. There are several ontologies currently in use in the CH domain, with none having been universally adopted, while new ontologies or extensions to existing ones are being created, in the attempt to fully describe a CH object or site. Also, this study suggests a combination of popular ontologies in a multi-layer model.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0110
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Past, present and future challenges for Australia's indigenous heritage
           management national policy

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      Authors: Hilary du Cros
      Abstract: Australia appears to be encountering a crisis in the protection of certain heritage places, despite its strong reputation in heritage conservation built up since the 1970s. Consequently, this paper examines changes to national cultural heritage management policy over the last few decades to understand more about this crisis. Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage) was selected as the key focus. This paper applies a cultural heritage management framework tested first in Hong Kong to measure Australian paradigm change over 45 years. It found the 1990s shift away from the provision of independent technical advice on national heritage policy has had a major impact. This shift is based on a change in ethos away from the earlier Whitlam/National Estate broader vision of heritage responsibilities towards a narrower more conservative one at the national level. Also, it found that studies and policymaking should allow for Indigenous voices. More Indigenous input in heritage policy formulation at all levels of government would further decolonise Indigenous heritage governance to deal justly with Indigenous Australians and their heritage. Resources did not allow for comparative studies of the non-Indigenous (historic) and natural heritage as part of the current study. The study also included a consultation paper and an online conference presentation that have raised questions about the efficacy of current national policy on Indigenous places, on which a national conversation is urgently needed. The recent review of the National Heritage Strategy by the Australian Commonwealth Government based some of its proposed options on those listed in the consultation paper to initiate this conversation in a limited way. One finding is that attention to heritage policy and protection must be ongoing at all levels of government and inclusive of First People's human rights, particularly those concerning their heritage. In regard to Australia, most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander respondents in this study would like to see targeted funding return for more than just iconic Indigenous places and for the creation of a more independent heritage body that allows them more self-determination in the care of their heritage. The paper's value is that it investigates the Australian Heritage Commission's impact in the development of Australian cultural heritage management and associated national policy. Also, it provides insights for other postcolonial or New World settler societies dealing with the same issues or any decision-makers considering establishing a national independent body to oversee heritage protection and policymaking.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0079
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Not all deities were transformed in Igboland: a cultural history
           of the Api-Opi deity

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      Authors: Mathias Chukwudi Isiani , Stanley Jachike Onyemechalu , Somtochukwu C. Osinem , Sopuluchukwu Amarachukwu Dimelu , Ngozika Anthonia Obi-Ani
      Abstract: This study examines the cultural history of the Api-Opi deity in Opi, Nsukka, Enugu State of Nigeria. The study sets out to examine the re-emergence of youthful worshippers of Api-Opi, despite the penetration of Christianity in the area. The study employed ethnographic observation and field visits to the shrine of Api-Opi in Opi community of Enugu State, Nigeria. In addition, this study uncovers new information drawn from semi-structured interview questions undertaken in the study area between March and October of 2019. Against certain claims on the impact of Christianity on Africa's traditional religions, the study found that the Api-Opi deity has withstood these post-colonial changes, growing its followership, particularly amongst the youths. It demonstrated the resilience of Igbo Traditional Worship System even in the midst of culture clash and religious iconoclasm advanced by Christianity in Igboland, Nigeria. Evidence from this study helps debunk the notions of Eurocentric scholars who say African traditional religions are fetish, barbaric or primitive. It also shows how indigenous communities have protected and preserved their religious heritage despite the wave of modernization and other eternal influences. The study contributes to the increasing conversations about the role of traditional religion in the cultural resilience/revitalization of indigenous communities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-02-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0132
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • From mine industries to a place of culture, tourism, research and higher
           education: case study of the great mine Serbariu

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      Authors: Sara Pau , Giulia Contu , Vincenzo Rundeddu
      Abstract: This study aims to explore how closed factories could be transformed and provide a path for sustainable development for a territory. The authors focus on the case of the Great Mine Serbariu, located in Carbonia (Sardinia), which used to be the largest coal mine in Italy between 1939 and 1964. The authors adopt a qualitative research design based on an exploratory single-case study, drawing on interviews with the main stakeholders, on a survey conducted among 5,158 visitors, and on administrative documentation of the City Council. The analysis of the Great Mine Serbariu case showed that the regeneration of an exhausted mine serves a model of sustainable development, especially for the redevelopment of other urban and industrial degraded areas. The Great mine Serbariu was restored and turned into a place of culture, tourism, research and higher education, with the Italian Cultural Centre of Coal Mining (ICCCM) establishing its headquarters in the heart of the former mine. It attracted almost 220,000 visitors, generating both domestic and international tourist flows and making an industrial heritage a real resource for the area. This article advances the authors’ understanding of how closed industries could become an instrument for sustainable development on the social, economic, touristic and cultural levels. This study would help local governments with examples to enhance the historical resources to create a new identity that led to a sustainable development of an urban landscape, and to create networks with other comparable museums all over Europe to better exploit the touristic and cultural potential.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ancient routes, new gateways: a systematic literature review of
           China's cultural route heritage

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Ke Zhang , Almudena González del Valle-Brena , Ignacio Ramos Riera , Jingli Zhao
      Abstract: The study aims to understand how cultural route heritage is conceptualized and managed in China by systematically reviewing the research literature on Chinese cultural route heritage (CRH). The study intends to inspire further discussion on the theoretical and practical development of cultural routes since the development is still at a liminal stage in China. A total of 253 research articles related to Chinese cultural rote heritage from major Chinese and English research databases China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Web of Science (WOS) and Scopus have been comprehensively identified and reviewed for the purpose of the study. Four major themes of research on Chinese CRH have been identified: conceptual evaluation, list of the routes and characteristics of the routes, conservation and utilization. The results revealed that China has very rich resources in CRH, many of which were formed a long time ago, which exist across vast geographic regions and have assumed multiple functions and undergone dynamic reciprocal exchanges among diverse cultures and ethnicities. The paper summarizes some major obstacles faced by CRH in China and proposes a strategic model to address the need for a more sustainable development of CRH in the Chinese context. The paper offers a comprehensive overview of CRH in China and discusses practical issues in management and development of heritage great in size, number and complexity.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ecotourism motivations and segmentation in a Fauna Production Reserve in
           Ecuador

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      Authors: Mauricio Carvache-Franco , Wilmer Carvache-Franco , Orly Carvache-Franco , José Borja-Morán
      Abstract: In recent years, tourists have been progressively increasing their interest in the natural environment and its enjoyment. The objective of this study was: (1) identify the underlying variables or motivational dimensions in ecotourism; and (2) analyze the demand segmentation in ecotourism. The empirical analysis was carried out in “Puntilla de Santa Elena” Fauna Production Reserve in Ecuador. The sample consisted of 369 surveys obtained in situ. For the data analysis, a factor analysis and a nonhierarchical K-media segmentation were performed. The results show six motivational dimensions in ecotourism: “Self-development and Interpersonal relationships,” “Building personal relationships,” “Escape and ego-defensive function,” “Marine nature,” “Terrestrial nature” and “Rewards.” Also, according to their motivations, three segments of ecotourists emerged: “Reward and escape,” “Marine nature” and “Multiple motives.” The limitation is the temporality with which the study was carried out. Another limitation was the number of the samples used. As future lines of research, it is proposed to investigate the offer related to ecotourism products and services adapted to the demand segments found. Among the practical implications, operators and companies linked to the tourism sector can plan more efficient strategies, adapted to the specific needs of each segment to improve the satisfaction of tourists and the intentions of returning to the destination, providing greater benefit to the tourists, to the sustainable development of the destination and the community. The findings of this research can help public institutions and private companies to improve the tourism supply, create sustainable plans and potentially develop more efficient marketing planning. Protected areas will benefit from information about demand. The communities will be able to elaborate products according to the motivations and found segments. Administrators will be able to create sustainable management plans for ecotourism. As ecotourism grows, it is vital to understand the ecotourists' motivations and segmentation to improve each segment service offering. This study presents original results of the motivations and segmentation of the demand for ecotourism based on a reserve area for the production of coastal marine fauna. To obtain valid results, a study was carried out in Ecuador, this being a country with a great variety of flora and fauna ideal for ecotourism.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Heritage futures: A conversation
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Cornelius Holtorf , Annalisa Bolin
      Abstract: This article explores the concept of “heritage futures”, the role of heritage in managing relations between present and future societies. It assesses how thinking strategically about the future changes, complicates and contextualises practices of heritage. What might an attention to the future bring to work in heritage, and simultaneously, what challenges—both practical and ethical—arise' This article takes the form of a conversation about the nature of heritage futures and how such a project may be implemented in both heritage practice and field research in heritage studies. The two authors are heritage scholars who integrate heritage futures questions into their research in different ways, and their conversation uncovers potentialities and difficulties in the heritage futures project. The discussion covers the particular ethical issues that arise when the dimension of time is added to heritage research and practice, including questions of continuism, presentism and specificity. The conversation argues for the importance of considering the future in heritage studies and heritage practice and that this forms a key part of understanding how heritage may be part of building a sustainable present and future. The future is an under-examined concept within heritage studies, even as heritage is often framed as something to be preserved “for future generations”. But what impact might it have on heritage practice to really consider what this means, beyond the platitude' This article suggests that heritage scholars and practitioners direct their attention to this often-neglected facet of heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2021-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Stakeholders' consciousness of cultural heritage and the reconciliation of
           different needs for sustainable development

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      Authors: Selena Aureli , Mara Del Baldo
      Abstract: The paper aims to investigate the approach and tools adopted by an Italian city, included amongst the UNESCO World Heritage sites (WHS), to involve different stakeholders in the protection and valorisation of its historical centre to achieve the goals of sustainable development. The paper focusses on the role of local authorities as the key actors that should engage different city users to jointly achieve heritage conservation and socio-economic development. Data were collected, thanks to the researchers' direct participation in a project launched by the municipality of Urbino, which involved several local stakeholders and lasted about a year. Participant observation allowed the authors to collect informal interviews, join collective discussions and reflect on the direct observation of the activities undertaken. The case study analysed suggests how participatory governance may be effective in fostering responsible principles in “asset usage” by any type of city users and how citizens actively co-design and co-implement initiatives of heritage revitalisation when engaged in cultural heritage (CH) policies. The paper addresses a long-standing problem that has never been solved: how to enhance the consciousness of the CH amongst stakeholders and reconcile their different and conflicting needs in the historical urban environment in the process of revitalisation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0156
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Guest editorial: Vernacular architecture: sustainability and risks

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      Authors: Camilla Mileto , Fernando Vegas López-Manzanares , María Lidón de Miguel , Alicia Hueto Escobar
      Abstract: Guest editorial: Vernacular architecture: sustainability and risks
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2022-193
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Smart, hybrid and context-aware POI mobile recommender system in tourism
           in Oman

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      Authors: Fatemehalsadat Afsahhosseini , Yaseen Al-Mulla
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the knowledge gap and future opportunities for developing mobile recommender system in tourism sector that lead to comfortable, targeted and attractive tourism. A recommender system improves the traditional classification algorithms and has incorporated many advanced machine learning algorithms. Design of this application followed a smart, hybrid and context-aware recommender system, which includes various recommender systems. With the recommender system's help, useful management for time and budget is obtained for tourists, since they usually have financial and time constraints for selecting the point of interests (POIs) and so more purposeful trip planned with decreased traffic and air pollution. The finding of this research showed that the inclusion of additional information about the item, user, circumstances, objects or conditions and the environment could significantly impact recommendation quality and information and communications technology has become one part of the tourism value chain. The application consists of (1) registration: with/without social media accounts, (2) user information: country, gender, age and his/her specific interests, (3) context data: available time, alert, price, spend time, weather, location, transportation. The study’s social implications include connecting the app and registration through social media to a more social relationship, with its textual reviews, or user review as user-generated content for increasing accuracy. The originality of this research work lies on introducing a new content- and knowledge-based algorithm for POI recommendations. An “Alert” context emphasizing on safety, supplies and essential infrastructure is considered as a novel context for this application.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0148
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Woodworking marking tool structuration based on craft traditions

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      Authors: Ilze Gūtmane , Silvija Kukle , Inga Zotova , Artūrs Ķīsis
      Abstract: Based on profound information lacking in compiled information materials, the risks of losing knowledge related to the values of traditional woodworking processes are increasing. The purpose of this article is to collect and structure diverse marking tool data into a comprehensive, understandable and clear design schematic view, which serves as a basis for the accumulation and preservation of diverse marking objects and shows woodworking marking tool relation in the group and subgroup levels. A method for marking tools structuring and analysis are described, including breaking down a set of objects into groups of marking objects, and assigning one or more attributes to the parcelled objects by arranging them into hierarchic levels. Research is based on marking tools used by carpenters, joiners and woodcarvers mainly in the Baltic region. Collected data, object analyses and comparison within-group and subgroup levels are based on written and visual sources, museum and museum funds visits, and participation in the local craftsmen events. The created structure is expandable in group and subgroup levels. The most comprehensive way for object structuring is chosen as a base to reveal a diversity of the objects. Structure schemes of woodworking marking tools are important in scientific, educative and cultural levels based on their wide range and use. Aggregated information of the woodworking tools serves as a base for existing tool studies and improvement, new tool and wood product creation as well as complements the structure of the upcoming woodworking hand tool database and book.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0066
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Assessing the macro and micro elements of the Akbarieh World Heritage
           Garden using participant observer method in a continuous/stop-motion

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      Authors: Mohammad Reza Khalilnezhad , Dak Kopec
      Abstract: This study aims to assess each of the seven segments of the Akbarieh Garden as the World Heritage Cultural Landscape. First, we wanted to identify the macro elements that dominated one's perception within each area. Then, we wanted to identify the micro elements that support the vista in its entirety. To acquire data, we used a Participant Observer (PO) method as part of a Continuous/Stop-Motion (CSM) procedure. The identification of macro elements came from retrospective recollections derived from the continuous walk method—the stop-walk method allowed for the identification of micro elements. The data gained from this method is then used to understand how one interprets and responds to large—multi-segmented sites such as the Akbarieh Garden. The results of this study show the Continuous/Stop-Motion method yielded predictable results with macro elements and elements of interest being easily recalled. However, the use of photographing for the stop-walk method revealed a similar focus on the macro element. We had hypothesized that the micro elements would be the elements of fascination and discovered when the person remained in the area to photograph scenes of interest. However, the PO photographed the macro elements. It wasn't until the post photo analysis that the PO identified some of the micro elements would be the elements of fascination and discovered when the person remained in the area to photograph scenes of interest. However, the PO photographed the macro elements. It wasn't until the post photo analysis that the PO identified some of the micro elements. The post photo discoveries suggest that real-time experience of micro elements is undervalued. There is no general discussion on this topic yet amongst professionals. The initiative of the Participant Observer (PO) method as a tool for perception the historic gardens and landscapes identified that gap and its related necessity to provide guidance. As is true for exploratory studies, these results provide a foundation for further study. The use of the Continuous/Stop-Motion method was ideal for this study.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2021-0090
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Investigating the constraints for managing the protection of historic
           buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia: a DEMATEL modelling approach

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      Authors: Mahmoud Sodangi , Zaheer Abbas Kazmi
      Abstract: The paper is aimed at identifying, analysing and prioritizing the critical constraints affecting efficient management of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia. Thematic content analysis and expert-based evaluation approaches were used to identify and evaluate the constraints. The DEMATEL technique was deployed to define the interrelationship complexities between the constraints and evaluate the impact of these interrelationships to ascertain the influential constraints. The results identify “lack of clearly defined roles for the multiple government agencies” as the most influential constraint for managing historic sites and buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia. The contextual interrelationship between the constraints is due to the experts' perceptions, which may be biased due to their proficiencies and professional backgrounds. Since the evidence on which the findings of this paper are established is predominantly from experiences related to historic sites and buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia, the results of this paper may not be entirely applicable elsewhere. The paper provides invaluable methodology that can support practitioners and policymakers to establish sustainable strategies that can enhance the management and protection of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia. This study noticeably contributes to knowledge by providing comprehensive understanding of the major impediments to the successful management of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia, which can assist in mitigating the potential impacts of these constraints and to advocate for the achievement of efficient management and protection of the historic sites and buildings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2021-0140
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Multicriteria decision-making to support preventive maintenance of built
           heritage in the historic center of Sobral, Brazil

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      Authors: Luiz Carlos Magalhães Olimpio , Vanessa Ribeiro Campos , Esequiel Fernandes Teixeira Mesquita
      Abstract: The study aims to identify and evaluate relevant criteria in the proposal and support of public administration policies for preventive maintenance comprised in a conservation approach to built heritage and aligned with local sustainable development of the historic center of the city of Sobral, in Brazil. A novel multicriteria decision model adopting the Bayesian best-worst method is presented and its application and results are described. Though a systematic procedure, criteria were selected in order to protect the tangible and intangible values of cultural heritage, as well as its sustainable development. Then experts evaluate these criteria through an elicitation instrument. The results show that for the decision problem over preventive maintenance, social contribution and historical record of built heritage are more important than its structural vulnerability, while architecture is less relevant. Due to the low restrictions, the subcriterion related to this property has the least influence. The weights can assist in the characterization of measures and policies for the protection of the built cultural heritage. The use of a novel decision-making method in cultural heritage is an important initiative, given the frequent use of simple and inefficient methods. The identified and weighted criteria are important data to characterize the scenario and the topic. The results contribute to protection and development of the built heritage, encouraging the implementation of preventive conservation in the historic center, conferring to the public administration valuable information to support and propose initiatives.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2021-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Malacca's “Straits Chinese traditional courtyard eclectic style
           shophouses”: facades' architectural design elements through place
           identity

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      Authors: Akram Zwain , Azizi Bahauddin
      Abstract: The traditional courtyard shophouses modifications, alterations and deterioration over the years have become a source of concern to major stakeholders. In George Town World Heritage Site Malaysia, studies have shown that the worst hit among its various shophouses are the Straits Chinese traditional courtyard eclectic style shophouses. This paper investigates the traditional courtyard shophouses concerning the role of architectural formation design components, and how this can sustain the place identity of the Straits Chinese typology. The methodological approach regards the collection of data and analysis of 30 face-to-face interviews and the observation of Lots number 3, 5 and 7, located along Lorong Ikan, George Town World Heritage Site. It was found that these Lots express the place identity of the Straits Chinese, and its major exterior architecture components to be observed are the column head (Chi Tou) capital, parapet wall, bressummer beam and ionic column, and gable and gable ends. This paper is limited to the role of architectural formation design components. Future research is needed to expand the scope of participant elements via a quantitative approach. This will enhance the validation of findings from this paper. It is recommended the use of the proposed checklist to enhance the sustainability of the architectural components regarding the place identity of these styles of shophouses, which provides salutary lessons on how to preserve the heritage buildings. Also, major stakeholders with leading evidence from relevant government agencies should ensure the preservation of these cultural and heritage buildings for the next generation. This paper found that the family beliefs and social impact were the components that express the place identity of the Straits Chinese. This paper demonstrates that the role of architectural formation design components regarding place identity of Straits Chinese traditional courtyard eclectic style shophouses cannot be over-emphasised.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The effect of the Mongol invasion on the townscape of Iranian cities

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      Authors: Mohammad Hasan Khademzade , Shahaboddin Tasdiqi , Zoheir Mottaki , Akram Hosseini
      Abstract: The Mongol invasion caused widespread destruction in many cities; this research studies the destruction course of cities after the Mongol invasion and their reconstruction during the reform period, the change that it brought to the cityscapes of Iranian cities and the difference between the urbanscape of the cities that flourished or were re-established after these destructions with the cities prior to them. The method of research used is historical interpretation/analysis. The historical texts of pre-Mongolian Persia and texts from the Ilkhanid era are studied, references to the shapes and appearances of Iranian cityscapes are classified, and with the help of contemporary interpretations and existing physical evidence, the urbanscape of these two periods are redrawn and compared to each other. The selection of scenic meadows to build the city, the presence of many gardens in the urban patterns and the construction of satellite towns around large cities have been the effects of the Mongol tradition of (Yurt) tent-dwelling on Iranian cities during the reforms. The declining population and the massive migration of artists together with the rethinking of the rulers made the existence of dense cities with multi-storey houses less likely. The tradition of pre-designing the city and buildings and designing open and right-angled pathways continued after the Mongol invasion. The prevailing belief is that during the Mongol era, only the destruction of cities took place and the Mongols did not create any cities and had no influence on urban development. This research aims to challenge that.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2021-0134
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Exploring participatory heritage governance after the EU Faro Convention

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      Authors: Laia Colomer
      Abstract: This paper aims to analyse the key Faro notions of “heritage community” and “democratic participation” as defined in the Faro Convention, and how they challenge core notions of authority and expertise in the discipline and professional practice of cultural heritage. This paper examines notions of “heritage community” and “democratic participation” as they are framed in the Faro Convention, and it briefly introduces two cases (Finland and Marseille) to explore their application. It then focusses on the implications of these two notions for heritage administration (expertise) in terms of citizen agency, co-creation of knowledge and forms of decision-making processes. The Faro Convention favours an innovative approach to social, politic and economic problems using cultural heritage. To accomplish this, it empowers citizens as actors in developing heritage-based approaches. This model transforms heritage into a means for achieving socioeconomic goals and attributes to the public the ability to undertake heritage initiatives, leaving the administration and expert bodies as mediators in this process. To bring about this shift, Faro institutes the notion of “heritage communities” and fosters participative governance. However, how heritage communities practise participation may follow different paths and result in different experiences due to local and national political circumstances. The Faro Convention opens up a window by framing cultural heritage within the realm of social and democratic instrumentality, above and beyond the heritage per se. But it also poses some questions regarding the rationale of heritage management (authority in governability), at least as understood traditionally under official heritage management discourses.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Sustainable regeneration strategies for the historical city centers of
           Iran using SWOT and QSPM models

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      Authors: Arman Mirzakhani , Mateu Turró , Mostafa Behzadfar
      Abstract: The main objectives of the current study are to assess the existing situation of historical city centers in Iran and to offer prioritized appropriate regeneration strategies for their sustainable development. The study is based on a questionnaire-based survey in four historical city centers of Iran: Kashan, Naeen, Ardakan and Yazd. The required data have been collected using multiple tools including questionnaires and interviews with local residents and officials in the aforementioned case studies. Using the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) technique, a set of appropriate strategies for the sustainable regeneration of these valuable fabrics has been proposed and the best of them have been prioritized employing quantitative strategic planning matrix (QSPM) matrix. The results show that the current situation in all the case studies is not in line with sustainability and cultural heritage protection. Their multiple problems are mostly associated with their weaknesses, whilst their strengths, including a considerable potential as a tourism attraction, are scarcely exploited. The experts and residents surveyed for this research have provided basic information to establish the conservative strategies that should take priority when preparing the urban regeneration process of these areas. Since most of the adopted regeneration strategies in Iran are not supported by empirical studies, the current study largely fulfills this shortcoming by setting up a proper diagnosis of historical city centers in Iran and proposes the most appropriate regeneration strategies based on the findings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Heritage potential's mobilisation: challenges and development prospects
           the case of Guelma in Algeria

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      Authors: Mouna Zerti , Bouba Lezzar Benrachi
      Abstract: The region of Guelma, located in the northeast of Algeria, is characterised by its important natural and cultural heritage. This heritage is ignored and abandoned, which leads to its degradation and even its disappearance. Thus, it is imperative to seek to know and understand the reasons for this situation. This study aims to reveal the constraints of heritage promotion and its staging through its insertion in the development process. A hypothetical–deductive approach based on a qualitative method using surveys was carried out on the knowledge of the heritage of Guelma by the actors concerned. The laws and classification procedures were interpreted to identify the heritage's stakes to ensure sustainable local development through tourism. The results show the lack of recognition of the natural and cultural heritage by the region's population, the cumbersome, long and complex classification procedure. The weakness of the offer in terms of tourist infrastructures constitutes a handicap to the valorisation of the heritage and prevents the enhancement and development of tourism. Systematically, heritage does not contribute to the local and territorial development of the Guelma region. The article underlines the importance of raising awareness among the various heritage stakeholders and actors, and first, the population, of the value of their natural and cultural heritage to make it profitable and a driving force for local and territorial development.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2020-0161
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Heritage making and interpretation in postcolonial Harbin: contemporary
           urban memory of the Russian-built Harbin Railway Station and beyond

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      Authors: Wenzhuo Zhang
      Abstract: This paper critically analyses the urban memory and heritage interpretation of postcolonial Harbin, a city in China that was founded by the Russians in 1898. It investigates the role and making of Russian colonial heritage in contemporary Harbin with a detailed case study of the Harbin Railway Station Research methods include archival analysis, observation and semi-structured interview. In-depth interviews were conducted with local people, architect/urban planners and officials. Local people of different generations with different backgrounds have different interpretations of the recently made colonial heritage of the Harbin Railway Station. The urban memory of Harbin has been consistently re-forming with both nostalgia and amnesia. Younger generations tend to regard the colonial heritage as their own heritage and a symbol of Harbin's cultural character without considering much about its related colonial history. In today's Harbin, colonial heritage as the “colonial past presencing” is more about a feel of the Europeanised space rather than the actual historical events of the period, and colonial heritage making becomes a tool for urban development and revitalisation at the institutional level. However, due to the paradigm shift in China's urban development, Harbin is facing new challenges in dealing with its colonial heritage. Harbin is an under-researched case in terms of urban heritage studies. This paper offers a new entry point for understanding the westernisation and colonial heritage making in the contemporary China more deeply and thoroughly and helps to see the trend of China's urban development more clearly.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0151
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Uncovering the impediments to successful built heritage management using
           stakeholder analysis

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      Authors: Asma Bashir , Vikas Sawhney
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand various organizational and operational impediments to successful built heritage management at a regional level from the perspective of stakeholder theory. An exploratory study was conducted in Jammu city of India wherein total of 16 interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were done with officials (N = 6), organization members (N = 7), local organization heads (N = 3) and 30 local residents. Thematic analysis and stakeholder analysis were used to identify themes and examine the relationships between stakeholders. Six themes were derived from thematic analysis. The results from stakeholder attribute analysis and studying stakeholder interactions show that lack of trust, skewed power relation and lack of communication among stakeholders are some of the factors that hinder successful heritage management at the Mubarak Mandi heritage complex. The study emphasizes the dimension of “authenticity” be added to existing discourse of heritage management in India ensuring commoditization does not override authenticity and integrity of heritage site. The results of this study are useful in understanding challenges of heritage management in India at regional level. Using stakeholder analysis the study adds a managerial perspective to the existing heritage management discourse in India by providing empirical insights into developing stakeholder collaboration.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Measuring the performance of expert-based evaluation method (EBEM) used
           for listing and grading heritage buildings: the case of Panaji city

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      Authors: Rohit Ramakrishna Nadkarni , Bimal Puthuvayi
      Abstract: The identification (listing) and classification (grading) of urban heritage buildings for conservation is a challenging task for urban planners and conservation architects. Most of the world's cities depend on the expert-based evaluation method (EBEM) for listing and grading heritage buildings. The Panaji city in India provided a unique opportunity to assess the performance of the EBEM as two independent agencies carried out the heritage listing and grading process. Considering the case of Panaji, this research aims to measure the performance of EBEM used for listing and grading heritage buildings and identify the issues associated with the existing methodology. This research presents a comparative analysis of the building listed and graded by the two agencies. The buildings that both agencies graded were identified and analysed using a confusion matrix. The grading classification was tested for accuracy, precision, sensitivity and F-score. The result shows a low accuracy and F-score, which reflects the level of buildings misclassified. The misclassification is the product of the lack of standardisation of methodology and the subjectivity level involved in the EBEM. Heritage listing and grading is a time-consuming process, and no city has the time and resource to conduct studies to check the accuracy. The cities in India and across the world, which follow a similar EBEM process, should consider this study's finding and revisit their methodology and develop a more reliable methodology for listing and grading heritage buildings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Rehabilitation project of Quang Tri Old Citadel in Vietnam: integrated
           analytical approach from material characterization to architectural
           heritage valorization

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      Authors: Cecilia Carlorosi , Chiara Giosuè , Van Anh Le Ngoc , Alessandra Mobili , Thi Nguyen Vu Trong , Phung Nguyen Huu Long , Fausto Pugnaloni , Francesca Tittarelli
      Abstract: This paper presents the outcomes of the international project “Protecting Landscape Heritage: a requalification project as an instrument for the re-birth of Quang Tri Old Citadel in Vietnam”, achieved with scientific cooperation between the Università Politecnica delle Marche (Italy) and Hue University of Sciences (Vietnam) funded by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation and Ministry of Science and Technology of Vietnam. The research focuses on the Quang Tri Citadel, founded in 1809 and now in an advanced state of degradation. For the purpose of rehabilitation, the wide multidisciplinary project first examined the historical context of the military model, the architectural aspects of the structure, the characterization of the existing materials, the degradation levels of different parts, and, finally, a proposal of the suggested interventions. The original structure and geometry were extrapolated and studied. Building materials were produced with nearby raw materials. Firing temperatures of bricks ranged from 800 to 1,000 °C, hydraulic lime was supposed the binder of the mortar with a calcination temperature lower than 1,000 °C. Damage assessment was provided and after these analyses a requalification project was proposed so the cultural heritage can play a role for the future in the dialog between different cultures. The requalification project achieved by an integrated analytical approach defines aspects in relation to the restoration of the structures, enabling compliance with the geometry, techniques, building materials used in the original construction and allowing its guardianship and management to align with the historical context of the architectural heritage.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0028
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Heritage-led urban regeneration: the case of “El-Shalalat
           District”, Alexandria

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      Authors: Mona M. Abdelhamid , Amira Hassan El Hakeh , Mohamed M. Elfakharany
      Abstract: The paper aims to clarify threats facing heritage management in developing countries. It investigates the challenges facing the application of the historic urban landscape approach (HUL) in the city of Alexandria in Egypt, where heritage is trapped between unplanned developments from one side and deterioration from another side. This paper uses SWOT analysis regarding the heritage management approach of the historic site. Site observation, documentary reviews, an online questionnaire (due to the COVID situation) and some interviews with park visitors and shopkeepers have been adopted to capture the changes in the site management, specifically capturing the current status of the site. The paper presented an empirical study covering the evolution of heritage management practices. It suggests that building and maintaining the synergy between the government, the private sector and the public is essential for the sustainability of urban development in the city of Alexandria. It also asserts that heritage is a major catalyst of urban regeneration in the city. This paper highlights major threats facing Alexandrian heritage. However, it lacks generalizability. It suggests inclusive urban conservation strategies that are based on the HUL approach that would revitalize the historic core and assist in preserving both its tangible and intangible heritage. These strategies can help decision makers to develop more sustainable approaches in managing city heritage and achieving sustainable development of the city core. The paper presents a social implication through involving stakeholders in the sustainable revitalization project of Al-Shalalat district located in the city center of Alexandria. The paper presents an empirical study that fulfills an identified need for adopting more sustainable strategies in heritage management in Alexandria.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2021-0098
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Valuing traffic emissions' effect on historic buildings: environmental
           assessment to promote historic buildings’ sustainability

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      Authors: Azadeh Sagheb , Alrashydah Esra’a , Vafaeihosseini Ehsan
      Abstract: With increased populations and movement of people worldwide, traffic emissions will lead to an increase in carbon dioxide emissions, which is one of the greenhouse gases. This will increase outdoor air pollution and other environmental risks that will impact people's health and livelihood, crops, as well as the built environment such as architecture, buildings and other structures. Few studies have been devoted to addressing the effect of air pollution on historic buildings. However, there is no specific study on the impact of traffic-related emissions. A thorough analysis has been conducted in selecting eight historic districts (HDs) among all of 31 located within the city of San Antonio. Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator (MOVES) software has been utilized to process the data collected from the average annual daily traffic (AADT) and vehicle operational speeds and evaluate the amounts of emissions for each HD. MOVES outcomes showed that HDs are under the threat of deterioration caused by traffic emissions. Therefore, transportation and environmental planners need to implement sustainable solutions to reduce the impact of CO2 emissions on HDs and, ultimately, historic buildings. This study will help policymakers plan a better course of action for the future conditions associated with the increased traffic volumes. It is also beneficial for the developers, preservationists, architects and all other stakeholders willing to preserve the history of a country.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Search for identity in the process of new architectural design in changing
           historical city Centre of Setif, Algeria

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      Authors: Mechiche Rania , Zeghlache Hamza
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the involvement of the concept of city identity in the design process of urban densification and outline how can today's urban projects be able to reinforce the delicate balance between conservation, development management and sustainability objectives. Based on case study approach, this paper focus on “Park Mall and Four Point Hotel” project, located in the historic city centre of Setif (Algeria) and takes the procedure of designing as its conceptual framework. Following this, it explores genesis document of the project and assesses architect's choices attributed to six elements of architectural language. These elements are apprehended regarding their relevance, which depends on whether the new building is or not compatible/integrated with the existing environment, and how far does it reinvent the modern vision. The paper provides empirical insight about how the concept of identity is used during the design process of densification project. It argues that this latter consists on a dynamic process shaped by cultural, socioeconomic and institutional specificities applying local/global design precedents, multifunctionality concept and novel features in a tourism-oriented mindset and to still maintain and improve the specific identity of the city centre, thus becoming an active way to reconcile conservation, sustainability and development management objectives. This paper raises discussion on how the concept of city identity could renew the field of heritage conservation and development management. Therefore, it fulfils an identified need to study how can urban projects reconcile conservation, development management and sustainability objectives.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0143
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A conceptual framework for auditing the physical integrity of historical
           districts: case studies of Kerman and Shiraz Bazaars in Iran

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      Authors: Pantea Hakimian , Azadeh Lak
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual framework for defining the notion of “physical integration” regarding the Iranian bazaar as the main component in the structure of traditional Iranian cities. Applying this conceptual framework to the historical bazaars in the cities of Kerman and Shiraz, this study seeks to pave the way for restoring the physical integrity of such historical districts. The research was conducted in two phases. First, there was a review of the theoretical background of physical integration followed by the analysis of the corresponding qualitative contents and the validation of the proposed conceptual framework as confirmed by 15 local experts. The second phase tested the validated framework in two case studies based on maps, historical documents and field observations. The findings show that the physical integration of historical bazaars can be undertaken in morphological, visual-aesthetic and functional aspects. The proposed conceptual framework is capable of dealing with the different aspects of physical integration in historical districts on a meso-scale. The theoretical implications of this study concerning the physical integration of traditional bazaars address urban design, urban planning and multi-disciplinary historical geography. The study also has practical implications for the integration of bazaars in historical urban regeneration projects via design guidelines. This study emphasizes the importance of physical integration as a multi-dimensional concept, facilitating it to deal with the physical quality and the characteristics of historical districts, particularly bazaars. It also highlights the role of the Iranian bazaar as a unifying structure in the historical districts.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Cultural heritage management and the effect of corruption in Nigeria:
           hampering sustainable development via cultural heritage destruction

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      Authors: Terngu Sylvanus Nomishan , Paul-Kolade Tubi , Dimas Solomon Gubam
      Abstract: The aim of this research is to discuss the effect of corruption on conventional management of cultural heritage (CH) resources in Nigeria. It identifies the means by which the effect can be curtailed to bring about proper management system in the CH sector and pave the way for economic/sustainable development through cultural tourism in the country. The research draws from both exploratory and comparative approaches. It took a study of selected locations and museums in the six geopolitical zones of the country, with a review of literatures on cultural heritage management (CHM). It also gives summarized information on the present overall effect of corruption in the CH sector of Nigeria. The research reveals that there are some levels of mismanagement and destruction of CH resources in the country. This is manifested in acts of museum theft, illicit trafficking, unlawful possession and general mishandling of CH, as well as the deterioration of facilities in the sector. The research gathered that the problem came as a result of wrongful appointment of none heritage experts as heads of heritage-related institutions and agencies. It also results from lack of required attention by the government and other relevant stakeholders (such as community leaders/members, academics and law enforcement agencies, inter alia) toward CH preservation, protection, management and promotion for sustainable development. The research recommends that the government and other CH stakeholders (mentioned above) should make efforts to address the issues discussed, so as to improve the management of CH in the country for sustainable development. Prior to this research, there has been no publication addressing the effect of corruption on CHM in this context and location. The article makes recommendations that call for action and also set grounds for future discourse.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0175
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Creativity, spirituality and society: a study in preservation of Ikenga
           and Ọfọ sculptures in contemporary Igbo society

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      Authors: Mathias Chukwudi Isiani , Ngozika Anthonia Obi-Ani , Chikelue Chris Akabuike , Stanley Jachike Onyemechalu , Sochima P. Okafor , Sopuluchukwu Amarachukwu Dimelu
      Abstract: The overall aim of this research is to interpret Ikenga and Ofo creativity as it is revered in Igbo societies. Igbo creativity, especially interpreted through material culture, suffers the threat of extinction resulting from the forces of modernity. Forces of modernisation, which appear in the personae of Christianity, education, urbanisation and industrialisation, denigrated indigenous creativity, brandishing them as devious, fetish and primitive. Ironically, in most cases, the drivers of such narratives keep these “fetish” items in their museums and will give a lot to preserve them. This study centred mostly on several communities in the Nsukka area of Igboland, Nigeria. It relied on both primary and secondary sources of historical enquiry. This qualitative research discussed the nuances of the subject matter as it relates to Igbo cosmos. These approaches involved visiting the study area and conducting personal interviews. Archaeologists do often rely on material culture to study, periodise and date past human societies. In this study, it is found that material culture, an expression of indigenous creativity, best interprets how society survived or related with their environment. This paper examined two Igbo sculpted artefacts – Ikenga and Ofo – while unearthing the intricacies in Igbo cosmology as regards creativity, spirituality and society. The shapes, motifs, patterns and designs depict an imaginary history, the intellectualism of the past and even the present. This serves as an objective alternative to the twisted colonial narrative on Igbo material culture and consequently contribute to ongoing efforts to preserve, protect and promote cultural heritage resources in this part of the world.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0178
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Flamenco experience in Córdoba, Spain: estimating tourist profiles by
           multilayer perceptron's artificial neural networks

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      Authors: Lucía García-García , Miguel Ángel Solano-Sanchez , Guzmán A. Muñoz-Fernández , Salvador Moral-Cuadra
      Abstract: This research aims to demonstrate the possible link between the sociodemographic profile of visitors motivated by the visit to flamenco shows and the city of Córdoba (Spain), and the preferences and sensations regarding these experiences. The methodology used (multilayer perceptron) is based on the development of an artificial neural network. The results show that the variables age and educational level are determining factors in the profile of the visitor. Also, as the level of income increases, so does the interest in flamenco, a fact that can be useful to determine the target audience for this type of shows. Flamenco is an art that originated in the Andalusian region that arouses the interest of the visitor due to its music, way of singing and dance. Flamenco is a popular art that excites and awakens the senses of those who attend this dance, song and guitar show. Its recognition as Intangible Heritage of Humanity by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) since 2010, makes it a tourist product that motivates visitors to travel to the city of Córdoba (Spain), being also one of flamenco's places of origin. Córdoba has this art in its tourist offer so that the identity of the city has two aspects: patrimonial and immaterial, among the flamenco highlighted.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0109
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The cultural landscape of coffee in Tolima, Colombia: heritage assessment,
           sustainability and management

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      Authors: César Augusto Velandia Silva , Mark C. Diab
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to determine the basis for a management agenda for the Tolima Coffee Cultural Landscape (CCLT) in Colombia. To this end, a delimitation model has been developed. However, the approach taken to institute the agenda of the CCLT, as a comprehensive academic and policy-based theme, is based on the formulation of a social agenda that supports its construction. A theoretical framework is proposed that addresses the sociocultural complexities of the Tolima cultural landscape. This is based on an ethnohistorical approach that elucidates the development of this landscape as a collective construction of pre-Hispanic origin. Therefore, this investigation has been perceived through the theoretical and conceptual framework of the cultural landscape concept and the unique historical and cultural phenomenon that help to define all landscapes. More specifically, the authors have demonstrated the close links that exist between nature and culture, requiring increasingly accurate methods in order to adapt the landscape definition to the specific Latin American context, rather than adhering to the institutional framework proposed by UNESCO. The assessment methods currently in use support the interpretation of a set of qualitative and quantitative attributes inherent to the Tolima region. However, additional methods still remain similar to those of the Coffee Cultural Landscape of Colombia (CCLC) that has already been inscribed on UNESCO's World Heritage List. The CCLC is considered to be a representative landscape—or “type” landscape—that “mirrors” the CCLT. Taken as a whole, this theoretical construction combined with the official designation allows local communities to understand the spatial phenomena of the CCLT. This will have the effect of enabling communities at all levels, from local government to landholders and farmers, to authorize its existence and allow for its continuing development and governance. The additional approval for further academic research, combined with the totality of these elements, also has the added effect of empowering communities, their economic future and their cultural interests. The management agenda that the authors are proposing may form the beginning of regional policy initiatives that reflect a positive strategy for highlighting the value of cultural heritage, thereby ensuring the protection of cultural properties and landscapes and allowing for a more sustainable environment and livelihood for its occupants.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Energy and historic buildings: toward evidence-based policy reform

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      Authors: Erica Avrami , Jennifer L. Most , Anna Gasha , Shreya M. Ghoshal
      Abstract: This research informs the intersection of climate and heritage policy development by examining the history of US energy policy as it relates to historic buildings, emerging policy tools to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and the implications of a changing legislative landscape on historic buildings through the case of New York City. This study employs a multi-method approach, including a review of US energy codes; discourse analysis of government records, energy studies, and reports related to historic buildings and energy; select research into energy-related heritage policy at the municipal level; and geospatial and statistical methods to analyze policy implications in the case study of New York City. Historic buildings have long been afforded exemptions from energy code compliance in the US, and these waivers are widespread. Contemporary operating energy and greenhouse gas data, as well as energy justice findings about whom these waivers privilege, challenge these exemptions and signal a need for significant policy reform in light of climate change. This study questions longstanding rhetoric about historic buildings being inherently green and supports the need for more evidence-based research to undergird heritage policy reform that is equitable and climate-responsive.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0112
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Evaluation of vernacular housing on sustainability – a case study of
           weaving settlements of Kushanpuri, Kuisiria and Bhatli village in Bargarh
           district of Odisha, India

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      Authors: Sudha Panda , Soumyendu Shankar Ray
      Abstract: The research aims to explore the wisdom, knowledge and practices in vernacular housing settlements with their sustainability underpinnings as tools for modelling rural affordable housing in tropical regions. The study is based on a weaving settlement in Bargarh district of Odisha, which is globally acclaimed for its Ikkat style of weaving. A hierarchical framework of sustainability resting on the three pillars of ecological, economical and environmental dimensions is derived from existing theoretical research. This framework of 22 indicators is subsequently assigned to assess the sustainability of the vernacular weavers' settlement through quantitative evaluation. A qualitative assessment through observation and deduction also verifies the result. Since the vernacular weavers settlement performs very well on the sustainability scorecard, the paper suggests that its best practices can be incorporated while designing affordable housing so that social, cultural and heritage values are retained and a climate conscious, energy-efficient sustainable approach is ensured. The recommendations from the assessment has many lessons while framing policies for rural affordable housing as it cannot have one size that fits all settlement typology irrespective of the occupational, climatic and social needs. The sustainable design and planning principles embedded in this vernacular settlement offers a valuable blueprint to re-imagine the affordable housing in rural areas which can be myopic if it does not take into account the occupational needs and life style of craftsmen dwellers.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2020-0036
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Perception of students and their households regarding the community role
           in urban heritage conservation in Saudi Arabia

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      Authors: Mohammed A.M. Alhefnawi , Umar Lawal Dano , Mohamad Jalal Istanbouli
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to assess the perceptions of Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University's students and their household members about cultural heritage conservation in selected cities of Saudi Arabia. Cultural heritage conservation is increasingly important for sustainable tourism management, especially in Saudi Arabia that sets out to promote international tourism. However, a lack of awareness of heritage values among the local community could hinder the conservation efforts. A structured questionnaire (n = 168) was employed for data collection and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The finding of the t-test analysis indicates significant statistical relationship between occupation and community involvement (P (T ≤ t) one-tail = 0.0047 and two-tail = 0.0093, p 
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Industrial heritage: towards a sustainable adaptive reuse of wheat milling
           heritage buildings in Jordan

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      Authors: Monther Jamhawi , Shatha Mubaideen , Basem Mahamid
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a framework for the adaptive re-use of wheat milling buildings setting in modern urban contexts in Jordan. This paper also aims to highlight the industrial heritage with a focus on wheat milling buildings, which date back to the beginning of the 20th century, as they document and represent significant aspects of the socio-cultural history of Jordan. The approach to this statement will be through a theoretical investigation into the notion of industrial heritage, a historical overview of wheat milling in Jordan, as well as a case study analysis to support the theoretical framework following a value-based approach for the case of Baboor Al-Qisar. Baboor Al-Qisar is a wheat milling structure that the Department of Antiquities (DoA) is willing to adaptively reuse as an industrial museum that tells the local narrative of wheat milling and points out the non-physical values associated with the building’s original use. The paper introduces a framework for wheat milling buildings incorporation within the modern urban context as industrial heritage museums or socio-cultural facilities. The findings offer a reflection on approaching similar case studies as a tool for their conservation, management and promotion to create new tourist destinations as a form of sustainable urban regeneration. This research bridges the gap between practice and theory in terms of adaptive reuse strategies within the Jordanian local context. No similar studies have been done on wheat milling structures from the 20th century in the country with local community engagement as an integral part that is carried out within the functionality and future use of the site.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2020-0170
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The potential of defensive architectural heritage as a resource for
           proposing cultural itineraries

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      Authors: Jonathan Ruiz-Jaramillo , Luis José García-Pulido , Laura Montiel-Vega , Carmen M. Muñoz-Gonzalez , María Dolores Joyanes-Diaz
      Abstract: Heritage landmarks and historical values often coexist with places and regions of remarkable environmental and landscape wealth. This article studies their capacity to generate global understanding of their territory through the creation of cultural routes. The proposed methodology is verified through the study of the defensive features of the ancient Nasrid Kingdom, the last Islamic territory in the Iberian Peninsula from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century, which shaped the Spanish region known as the Kingdom of Granada until the nineteenth century. To assist in the proposal of new routes, a precise collection of physical data (topography, landmarks, resources, population centres …), existing public paths and protected natural sites was carried out. Those cultural routes relevant to the area of study were also selected and mapped through GIS. A set of indicators prioritised through an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) have evaluated the proposed itineraries. The methodology enables the integral evaluation of parameters such as natural heritage, existing paths networks, defensive architectural heritage (watchtowers), existing cultural routes or proximity to basic services. The methodology's application allows an index to be obtained that quantifies the global implications of these parameters in the design of new itineraries. This leads to the development of a network with its own narrative that provides a historical, environmental and cultural meaning. Watchtowers in this region have previously been studied as isolated and locally relevant architectural features. This work studies them from an overall perspective, considering each tower as a piece of a complex defensive and territorial system. Cultural routes arise from this joint interpretation as tools to restore and highlight the interrelationship between architectural heritage and territory and people.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2021-0007
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Culture, conflict and armed non-state actors: cultural heritage protection
           in a changing operating environment

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      Authors: Mark Dunkley
      Abstract: This paper examines the implications, for States Parties, of the 1954 Convention safeguarding regime in the context of contemporary non-international armed conflict and ANSAs, with a general focus on the Middle East and in situ cultural property. As the nature of conflict changes and armed forces become further engaged in supporting peacekeeping operations and deliver training to host nation security forces, and human security becomes an increasingly important function of military operations, the protection of cultural heritage (as an expression of a people's identity) becomes a significant contribution to individual operations. International obligations to States Parties for the in situ protection of cultural heritage, under both International Humanitarian Law and HC54, become an ever increasing important responsibility for armed forces to help deliver. While NATO is increasingly focussed on the defence of western states parties from threats posed by the Russian Federation, and observing a commercially and military assertive China, a recent report issued by the Pentagon noted that the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is regrouping in Iraq faster than in Syria and could regain territory in six to twelve months in the absence of sustained military pressure. Preservation in situ is used by heritage professionals to refer to the protection of a cultural heritage asset in its original location while the in situ protection of cultural property is a cornerstone topic of the 1954 Hague Convention Special Protection category. The Convention was drafted with international armed conflict in mind but the initial signatories to the Convention had sufficient foresight to consider non-international armed conflict and its potential effect on in situ cultural property by parties to the conflict, including Armed Non-State Actors (ANSA) UN Security Council Resolution 2449 (December 2018) recognized the negative impact of the presence, violent extremist ideology and actions on stability in Syria and the region of both Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and the Al-Nusrah Front (ANF). This includes not only the devastating humanitarian impact on civilian populations but also the unlawful destruction of cultural heritage. ANSAs comprise individuals and groups that are wholly or partly independent of State governments and which threaten or use violence to achieve their goals, such as Islamic State. As such, the military operating environment has changed since 1954.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The cultural landscape of the Bhagirathi-Hooghly riverfront in Kolkata,
           India: studies on its built and natural heritage

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      Authors: Suchandra Bardhan , Souporni Paul
      Abstract: The paper introduces a lesser-known cultural landscape along the sacred Bhagirathi-Hooghly river in the Indian city of Kolkata, with particular reference to its built and natural heritage. The narratives cover the cultural and ecological qualities of the unique “ghat-scape” (riverfront pavilions with steps descending into the river) and their contemporary urban challenges. It also explores the suitability of the Historic Cultural Landscape (HCL) tools, or their adapted versions, in managing this exceptional landscape. The paper is structured under six discrete sections covering the inventory and assessment, interpretation and evaluation and possible roadmap for the ecological restoration of the riverfront cultural landscape. Primary and secondary studies were conducted to understand the related challenges and opportunities. The authors then examined the application of the HCL tools based on a conceptual framework and identified the alternative approaches suitable for its restoration. Finally, a successfully restored ghat environ is taken as a model and reviewed against the most potent approach in addressing the eco-cultural criticalities. The paper argues in favour of a paradigm shift from riverfront “development” to riverfront “restoration” with particular emphasis on the ghat-architecture. Three eco-cultural restoration alternatives were derived out of the HCL principles. A practical case study found that a community-led approach positively influences restorative actions, cultural heritage management and long-term sustainability. The HCL tools comprising planning, regulatory systems, financial designs and community engagement have been explored for the first time in the context of the unique riverfront “ghatscape” of Kolkata. An under-discussed topic, it has been brought to the centre stage to gain new insights into the Indian cultural landscape heritage. An HCL-based new approach in their management came forth through a review of a successful case study.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The Giotto's Bell Tower at Firenze (Italy): foundation assessment

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      Authors: Massimo Coli , Marco Tanganelli , Michele Baldi , Stefania Viti
      Abstract: The paper is aimed at assessing the safety of the Giotto's Bell Tower, with special attention to its foundation system, i.e. the foundation works and soil. The tower, well known all over the world, has a squared plan, with sides of 14.45 m each, and a total height equal to 84.7 m. The structural response of the tower is assessed with reference to the gravitational load and to the expected seismic action, quantified according to the seismic hazard of the site and the foundation soil. A simplified analysis has been performed to check the safety level of the tower to seismic actions. Special attention has been paid to quantify the horizontal actions representing the seismic loads. Such quantification, indeed, has been made both through the elastic spectrum of the tower and by performing a site response analysis on the foundation soil, represented as a one-dimensional stratification of soil layers, described on the basis of experimental investigations. After defining the loading actions, a simplified assessment of the foundation safety has been made by considering the action over foundation, the geotechnical data and the safety factor. The findings of the paper concern the assessment of the safety of the tower's foundation system. A lot of experimental data on the foundation soil, provided by various geological investigations, have been provided and used for the assessment. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the materials used for the structure have been collected and shown in the paper. The paper collects a lot of technical information regarding the Giotto's Bell Tower, both regarding its foundation soil and the constituting materials. On the basis of the collected information, a structural analysis has been made to assess the seismic safety of the tower, and the results of such assessment are provided and discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2021-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Open defecation near a world heritage site: causes and implication for
           sustainable tourism and heritage management

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      Authors: Justice Mensah , Benjamin Yaw Tachie , Harriet M.D. Potakey
      Abstract: The sixth of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has access to improved sanitation as one of its targets. Sanitation is important not only for environmental quality and public health but also for the outstanding universal value (OUV) of heritage monument sites and tourism promotion. The study examined the causes of open defecation (OD) in the neighbourhood of a World Heritage (WH) site in Ghana and the implications of the practice for sustainable tourism and heritage management. The study used the qualitative approach. Data were gathered from purposively targeted respondents (an Environmental Health Officer, Heritage Managers, a Tourism Expert, Hoteliers, Zoomlion Staff, Open Defecators, Community Opinion Leaders and Ordinary Community Residents) and analysed using the thematic approach. It became evident that the causes of OD were: the lack of toilet facilities in many houses in the community, filthy and foul-smelling public latrines, poor attitude and heritage culture, mental and income poverty, inadequate sensitisation and a poor law enforcement regime. OD threatened the sustainability of heritage tourism and its associated livelihoods, as well as public health. In addition, it impaired the authenticity and integrity of the heritage monument, culminating in a detraction from the OUV of the heritage property. In collaboration with the local, national and international stakeholders, the managers of the heritage monument should design and implement a comprehensive environmentally friendly plan. The plan should consider demarcating the boundaries of the heritage asset, monitoring the protected area, enforcing sanitation laws and mounting intensive sanitation education campaigns. It should also consider providing a decent toilet in the vicinity of the monument for the transit population, facilitate the provision of a toilet in every house through the community-led total sanitation approach, installing digital cameras at vantage points in the buffer zone of the castle to capture open defecators and punishing offenders severely to deter others from engaging in the ignoble practice of OD. The authors argue that sanitation at heritage sites in developing countries merits further discussion within the WH network to promote sustainable heritage conservation management and tourism.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-11-2020-0164
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The repowering of vertical axis water mills preserving their cultural
           heritage: techno-economic analysis with water wheels and Turgo turbines

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Emanuele Quaranta , Toni Pujol , Maria Carmela Grano
      Abstract: The paper presents a techno-economic analysis of the electromechanical equipment of traditional vertical axis water mills (VAWMs) to help investors, mill owners and engineers to preliminary estimate related benefits and costs of a VAWM repowering. Two sustainable repowering solutions were examined with the additional aim to preserve the original status and aesthetics of a VAWM: the use of a vertical axis water wheel (VAWW) and a vertical axis impulse turbine. The analysis was applied to a database of 714 VAWMs in Basilicata (Italy), with known head and flow. Expeditious equations were proposed for both solutions to determine: (1) a suitable diameter as a function of the flow rate; (2) the costs of the electromechanical equipment; (3) achievable power. The common operating hydraulic range of a VAWM (head and flow) was also identified. Reality checks on the obtained results are shown, in particular by examining two Spanish case studies and the available literature. The power generated by the impulse turbine (Turgo type) is twice that of a VAWW, but it is one order of magnitude more expensive. Therefore, the impulse turbine should be used for higher power requirements (>3 kW), or when the electricity is delivered to the grid, maximizing the long-term profit. Since there is not enough evidence about the achievable performance and cost of a VAWM repowering, this work provides expeditious tools for their evaluation.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-03-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Awareness of preservation of historic buildings and sites in Ghana: the
           case of residents in Kumasi

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      Authors: Kwadwo Twumasi-Ampofo , Rexford Assasie Oppong , Victor K. Quagraine
      Abstract: This study focuses on historic buildings and site preservation (HBSP), which forms part of cultural heritage amidst rampant demolishing and seeming neglect of such heritage in Ghana. The purpose of this study is to assess public awareness of the importance of HBSP in Kumasi. The study combines qualitative and quantitative research methods. Primary data were collected through questionnaires and interviews based on a purposive sampling technique. Respondents were residents of Kumasi. The study revealed that awareness of the importance of HBSP is dependent on the demographic variables. The young generation below 30 years seems more aware of the importance of HBSP. The study is limited by the fact that respondents were not willing to reveal income levels. Laws governing cultural heritage, including HBSP at the MMDAs, was not studied in detail and could be an area for further research. This study brings out the need to be aware of the importance of HBSP and train staff to enforce laws governing HBSP in six metropolitan, municipal and district assemblies (MMDAs) as part of Ghana's urban regeneration. This study further raises awareness among residents for sustainable architectural heritage preservation in Ghana. The concept of HBSP is not popular in Ghana. This academic paper apparently assesses the level of awareness of the importance of HBSP among residents in Kumasi with an aim to identify and train staff of MMDAs on laws governing HBSP.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2020-0094
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Guided heritage walks as a tool for inclusive heritage education: case
           study of New Delhi

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      Authors: Ekta Chauhan , Sanjana Anand
      Abstract: This paper studies the role of heritage walks and tours in promoting inclusive education. It assesses if these walks are an effective method of exhibiting culture and facilitating inclusive heritage learning. The purpose of this paper is to attempt to establish that walks can play an imperative role in creating greater sensitivity towards heritage and conservation. The study uses a case study approach using mixed methods. Participants for qualitative interviews were chosen using purposive sampling and six interview schedules were sent to walk leaders. Walk participant data were collected through participant observation and standardised survey with randomly selected participants of the case walks. Surveys were sent to participants electronically. Heritage walks play a crucial role in not only imparting knowledge about history and heritage but also as a tool for learning other crucial skills, competencies, values, attitudes, etc. This paper attempts to highlight that walks are an effective and inclusive way to shed light on the alternative and forgotten stories. As an educational tool these walks can not only encourage the development of historical knowledge and appreciation but also assist in the development of competency to “de-construct” mainstream “grand narratives”, questioning and learning about the forgotten. This paper has limited itself to the study of select cases in New Delhi. Since the study has followed a case study design, it does not produce a largely generalizable result, but rather examines and understands the dynamics of particular walks and produces insights that may well be applicable in other contexts. Whilst this paper makes an attempt to understand the changes in perception and attitudes, it does not study behavioural changes. In the long run, walks allow for meaningful citizen engagement with tangible heritage such as monuments as well as intangible heritage such as practices and festivals. This allows for appreciation for the value of heritage resources and leads to a demand for better conservation and preservation from the authorities. In a few cases, local citizens themselves lead heritage management and development activities in a bid to promote their local culture. This paper has shown that heritage walks can be helpful tools in giving “forgotten” voices and stories recognition in contemporary society. As heritage walks have recently gained popularity, there has been very limited research in the field especially linking heritage walks to heritage education. This is especially true for India. Even a city like New Delhi, which boasts of a robust heritage and is one of the tourism hubs of the country, heritage walks have been a very recent phenomenon. This research aims to address this lacuna in academic research and contribute meaningfully to the field of heritage education and conservation by studying how heritage walks support and promote inclusive heritage education.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0120
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The effect of fervid attachment to religious rites on tourism: evidence
           from the Holy Week in Southern Italy

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Andrea Sestino , Giovanni Pino , Gianluigi Guido
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is aimed to examine natives' Fervid Attachment to religious rites, as a part of cultural heritage, in its extrinsic (sense of belonging, rituality) and intrinsic (intimate bond, emotionality) characteristics, by shedding light on how leveraging on these characteristics could be emphasized to promote sustainable local development. Based on the principles of an ethnographic research approach based on observational methods, this paper analyzes the rites of Holy Week in Taranto, a city located in the Southern Italy, by capturing individuals' behavior according the concept of Fervid Attachment. Results show that tourism destinations preserving their traditions and religious rites as part of their cultural heritage can satisfy tourists' spirituality needs and, by promoting the interaction with the local population (natives) in terms of relationship between them and tourists, supporting local communities' development. Moreover their Fervid Attachment in terms of sense of belonging, rituality, intimate bond and emotionality could be empathized to promote sustainable local development. Our results provide suggestions on how local policymakers and tourism marketers could leverage natives' attachment to religious rites to boost religious tourism. This paper shows from a new perspective based on the concept of natives' Fervid Attachment how local people are relevant in promoting a tourism destination.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2021-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The development of legal framework for the management of World Heritage
           Sites in Oman: a case study on Bahla Oasis

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      Authors: Mohamed Ali Mohamed Khalil , Eman Hanye Mohamed Nasr
      Abstract: The study aims to analyze the development of Omani heritage legislation against the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (WHC), 1972 and WHC Operational Guidelines (WHC-OGs) to predict the possible effects of the recent developments on the management of the World Heritage Site in Oman. This study discusses the development of the heritage protection legislation in Sultanate of Oman since 1970; it analyses the Omani Cultural Heritage Law 35/2019 against the recommendations of the UNESCO WHC as well as the requirements of the World Heritage Operational Guidelines. Moreover, the research investigates the possible effects of the recent heritage legislation developments on the management of Bahla Fort and Oasis in Oman, which is the first Omani World Heritage Site and the only site with special management regulations. The paper outlines the effects of both the Omani Cultural Heritage Law 35/2019 and the Special Management Regulations 81/2019 on the implementation of the Bahla Management Plan. Additionally, the research establishes how the customization of heritage legislation as a special heritage management regulation facilitates the implementation of national legislation to solve specific local problems. The study establishes the significance of developing comprehensive legislation to protect and manage the rich Omani cultural heritage and World Heritage Sites in alignment with the WHC and the WHC-OGs.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2020-0106
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Balancing sustainable development and cultural heritage preservation:
           luxury burial legacies in Singapore

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      Authors: David Ocón
      Abstract: The paper aims to provide up-to-date analysis on how a country like Singapore, with a rich tangible and intangible cultural heritage associated with burial customs, approaches heritage preservation while ensuring modernisation and sustainable growth. The paper is an exploratory analysis of the association between cultural heritage preservation, particularly the one associated with elaborate burials, and the need for modernisation in Singapore. It mainly uses desk research tools, fieldwork and interviews with death services providers to build a set of conclusions. It employs a historical review approach and uses comparative analyses with other countries in the Asian region to substantiate the arguments. The paper provides insights about how, since its independence, Singapore has switched to pragmatic models of growth and development which imply maximising the limited space available, often at the cost of precious cultural heritage. The rapid development has had a significant impact on the country's burial customs and legacies, particularly on elaborate graves and tombs, which traditionally use a considerable amount of space. The analysis concludes that Singapore is in the constant challenge of exploring alternative ways of handling death and its ramifications. This paper presents a new outlook on the relationship between the preservation of the tangible and intangible cultural heritage associated with death practices and a sustainable approach to modernisation in the context of Singapore.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-20
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0116
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Integrated techniques for the structural assessment of cultural heritage
           masonry buildings: application to Palazzo Cocchi-Serristori in Florence

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      Authors: Vieri Cardinali , Marta Castellini , Maria Teresa Cristofaro , Giorgio Lacanna , Massimo Coli , Mario De Stefano , Marco Tanganelli
      Abstract: This paper aims to contribute to the discussion of the experimental campaigns on Cultural Heritage buildings. By adopting integrated procedures it is possible to limit the invasiveness of the destructive techniques leading to reliable results. The purpose is the proper definition of the structural system, which represents the starting point of the following analysis's phases, not treated in this work. A methodology based on normative references and acknowledged non-destructive and partial destructive strategies has been conceived. The latter aims to an accurate comprehension of the structural information. An integrated approach for the structural assessment of cultural heritage buildings is presented. The methodology defines an interdisciplinary procedure based on normative references, non-destructive and minor-destructive techniques. A funnel-shaped workflow is developed to characterize the structural system of the buildings. The non-destructive campaigns are widely extended. Then, in-depth analysis concerning partial demolitions and minor-destructive tests are performed. The dynamic identification of the building is executed to detect its global response. The final validation of the assumed mechanical values is obtained by comparing the experimental modes coming from the ambient vibrations and the analytical modes of the structural modelling. This research belongs to the Protocol signed between the Municipality of Florence and Department of Earth's Science and Department of Architecture of the University of Florence for the seismic vulnerability assessment of relevant and strategic buildings. The descripted methodology is targeted for monuments and special buildings where the use of destructive techniques is not possible or unrecommended. Social implications are related to the conservation of Heritage buildings. The latter deals with: (1) risk assessment of the targeted buildings towards different hazard sources (e.g. earthquakes, floods); (2) knowledge path developed through non-invasive diagnostic campaigns oriented to the conservation of the manufact. Furthermore, the paper encourages towards the recognition of non-destructive techniques and ambient vibration tests for the achievement of higher knowledge levels. This paper defines a funnel-shaped procedure defining hierarchical roles between the different available strategies. The originality of this contribution is firstly related to the methodological flowchart. It is targeted to limit the invasive tests and consequently achieving accurate levels of knowledge. Secondly, some novelty can be found in the adoption of improvement parameters from a regional database adopting a Bayesian approach.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0024
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Ecocultural networks as grounds for spatial planning. A psychosocial
           approach applied to coastal development

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      Authors: Miguel Ángel Gandarillas , Michael K. McCall
      Abstract: This work critiques the situation of the ecological and cultural heritage in many coastal territories and analyses how current land planning methodologies are responding to it. The study builds a new integrated approach founded on ecocultural values and local knowledge as resources for an effective territorial planning and sustainable development. The proposed framework was developed through: (1) analysing coastal planning needs and problems in European coastal areas; (2) identifying ecocultural values, including local knowledge, in such areas; (3) selecting best approaches and tools in spatial planning; (4) applying the selected planning approaches to use ecocultural values as resources for spatial planning and sustainable development; and (5) validating the final methodology. A dynamic approach for maritime-land planning was developed projecting coastal waters and river basins as strategic drivers for sustainable development, based on the natural capacity of water to shape and integrate the ecological and cultural territory. A participatory governance planning methodology supports the new articulations of space based on ecocultural value chains and networks as synergistic vectors, focusing on local knowledge as psychosocial capital for a collective mapping of cultural, historical, social, economic and ecological values into ecocultural littoral plans. The results show the potentials of combining new approaches applying cultural and ecological heritage into an effective strategy of integration between society and territory as a powerful driver for effective sustainable planning and development.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2021-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Rural revitalization: sustainable strategy for the development of cultural
           landscape of traditional villages through optimized IPA approach

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      Authors: Qunsong Zhang , Eunyoung Kim , Cuixia Yang , Fucun Cao
      Abstract: The main purpose of this study is to provide a decision-making basis for the development of a sustainability strategy by importance-performance analysis (IPA) methods. However, traditional and modified IPA methods do not accurately reveal the impact of the various dimensions of sustainable development (SD) on cultural landscape (CL). Based on the structural equation model (SEM), four main dimensions of SD were identified from the available data. This paper conducted an optimized IPA by building three SEMs based on importance, performance and the importance of four dimensions. This paper proposes the use of exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and SEM to develop the CL characteristic index evaluation model to determine the load of each indicator of importance and performance, and the SD-based measurement model to further determine the weight of the sustainability of each indicator in importance and performance. Afterwards, proposed sustainable strategies to the corresponding index were obtained. This study offers useful insights into the actual operation and theoretical aspects of the IPA method. This study offers useful insights into the actual operation and theoretical aspects of the IPA method. This can solve the incongruous and uncertainty problem in the sustainable planning strategy, and the case study proves the feasibility of the IPA method combined with the influence of the structural equation. The research is conducive to acceptance by local people with regard to their preferences in the perspective of sustainable development. It provides a basis for the future use of the IPA method in a comprehensive way based on an administrative angle. The case study proves the feasibility of the IPA method combined with the influence of the structural equation. This provides a basis for the future use of the IPA method in a comprehensive way based on an administrative angle.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0130
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Sustainability of the Palestinian historic village of Battir

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      Authors: Lana Kudumovic
      Abstract: This paper aims to assess the proper built heritage preservation and management as important steps toward sustainability for the case of village Battir. In particular, the historic village core and its surroundings were elaborated. Battir is a Palestinian village located to the south of Jerusalem, famous for landscape terraces traditionally used in their authentic form since the Roman time. Because of its outstanding universal values, Battir was inscribed on the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage list (WHL) in 2014. To present the potentials of Battir to become a sustainable asset, the results of the Sustainable Plan have been used in this paper. Among the proposed strategies of the Plan methodology for the historic core conservation was emphasized. Referring to the same methodology, key findings about the current state of conservation are elaborated as well as proposals for the village core enhancements. As a result of an on-site survey, the Plan outlines several strategies, which are summarized in this paper. Within each strategy, the role and benefits for the inhabitants are evaluated along with the overview of the proposed interventions for the historic tissue preservation. Challenges of the village's heritage preservation have been elaborated under the comprehensive Sustainable Plan that was initiated, prepared and lead by International Peace and Cooperation Center (IPCC). Here, sustainability refers to the better managing of available natural and cultural resources and features, while at the same time, creating new socio-economic opportunities for inhabitants.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Handmade OK please: key criteria for purchasing craft items by Indian
           consumers

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      Authors: Ajay Kumar Koli
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the key criteria from the perspective of handmade, authenticity and sustainability for purchasing craft items by Indian consumers. An exploratory qualitative research was conducted on the buying behaviour of Assamese muga mekhela chador (MMC). Data were collected using purposive sampling and video-recorded focus group discussions (FGDs). Output transcripts were content-analysed using the R package RQDI. Indian consumers largely define crafts as handmade. Results indicate the crucial role of craft design and price. Craft authenticity, craft knowledge and social identity evolved as the key criteria for buying crafts. State intervention in craft certification is demanded. Indian craft consumers lack awareness about sustainable consumption. India is home to millions of craftspeople and craft buyers. Most of the earlier craft studies focused on the problems of craft production in India. This study contributes to the consumption literature, from the standpoints of authenticity and sustainability, which are often limited to Western consumers. Understanding its own domestic craft market will help Indian policymakers and organisations to reduce export dependency and to tap potential local craft demand.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0063
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 closures on the Megalithic Temples of Malta UNESCO
           world heritage site

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      Authors: Josef Caruana , Elaine Debono , Katya Stroud , MariaElena Zammit
      Abstract: This study will determine the impact COVID-19 closures had on the Megalithic Temples of Malta. The physical, economic, social and conservation impacts will be discussed. This study relies mainly on field observations of the effects managerial and state decisions had on the sites. A timeline from February to July 2020 will outline all major events and changes caused by the COVID-19 pandemic happening in Malta and specifically within Heritage Malta sites. The pandemic impacted the sites under study economically, and socially, whilst the impact on the sites attributed to visitors and other agents of deterioration were variable. These findings affected the way sites reopened to the public with restrictions and additional safety measures. This article highlights the effect the pandemic had on archaeological sites in Central Mediterranean islands which are heavily reliant on tourism. It also highlights the important role such open-air sites have within the local community.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0173
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • concepts and practice of indigenous cultural heritage management in the
           Igbo cultural area of south-eastern Nigeria

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      Authors: Stanley Jachike Onyemechalu , J. Kelechi Ugwuanyi
      Abstract: This study explored an alternative understanding of heritage through the lens of the Igbo cultural group in Nigeria. It used the Igbo concept of “Ihe Nketa” or “Oke” to examine the complex relationship between indigeneity, attachment and sustainability in the context of heritage management and conservation. A qualitative approach was used, and ethnographic methods of data collection that include interviews and focus-group discussions (FGD) applied. The interview participants included village chiefs and the elderly (men and women), and the FGD comprised village elders (men and women) and youths. The interview guide contained demographic questions to determine age and occupation, followed by interactive open-ended questions stemming from the study's objectives. The interviews were conducted in the language most preferred by the respondents such as the Igbo language, Nigerian Pidgin English and the English language. The evidence generated was thematically analysed in a descriptive and interpretive manner. The study found that while the Igbo understanding of heritage have related meaning with the definitions offered by the United Nations, their approach to heritage conservation takes a different turn through the concepts of “Ihe Nketa” or “Oke,” which recognises the ephemerality of tangible heritage resources with particular focus on the preservation of intangible heritage–knowledge over objects. The Igbo approach describes the framework for the acquisition, use and transfer of heritage resources in the Igbo society. This study contributes to the understanding of the concept of heritage through the lens of the Igbo of Nigeria. Against the centralised national management approach to heritage, this paper argues that achieving sustainable heritage management in a multi-ethnic country like Nigeria requires the recognition of the principles that conserve(d) and manage(d) heritage among the indigenous/local peoples.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0177
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Religious tolerance, cultural, local wisdom and reliability in the Great
           Mosque building of Mataram Kotagede Yogyakarta

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      Authors: Agung Sedayu , Achmad Gat Gautama , Sukmayati Rahmah , Arief Rakhman Setiono
      Abstract: This study assesses the level of user importance to the building components of the Great Mosque of Mataram Kotagede Yogyakarta. The building components are the excellence and reliability of the mosque as a cultural and religious heritage in Indonesia. This research uses the qualitative and quantitative method. The qualitative method was conducted with contextual and conceptual studies on the comparative history of the Great Mosque of Mataram Kotagede. The quantitative method collected respondent perceptions using questionnaire. The results generate ten building components that the highest important component is the aesthetics appearance of the building, while the least important component is the tomb area. Other components consist of the ornaments and building elements, outdoor circulation, indoor circulation, landscapes and parks, the wall surrounding the mosque and its area, mosque furniture, ablution facilities and lavatories, and access from the mosque area to surrounding areas. The conservation maintains the sustainability of the physical and non-physical aspects of the mosque building. The physical aspects include aesthetics and reliability of building, while the non-physical aspects consist of historical values, heritage, symbols, socio-culture, local wisdom and religious tolerance.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2020-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Assessment of passive design strategies in traditional houses of Sabzevar,
           Iran

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      Authors: Jafar Taheri , Talie Tohidi Moghadam , Sorayya Taheri , Mohadeseh Kafiyan Safari , Fereshteh Eslami
      Abstract: This paper aims to address Passive Design Strategies (PDSs) in the traditional houses of Sabzevar and to assess the adaptation level of these strategies to the climate of the region. Identifying the Sabzevar climate, five samples of traditional houses have been chosen to be analyzed via two stages. In stage one, the efficiency of each strategy is weighted through qualitative analysis, and in stage two, the houses are simulated in EnergyPlus 9.3.0 to quantitatively evaluate their heating and cooling performances. The obtained results from the energy performance analysis of the case studies indicate that the houses present diverse energy performances in different seasons. Those buildings with PDSs for both cold-arid and hot-arid climates, however, are more adaptable cases to the climate of the region. The results of this study are expected to provide a basis of materials and methods for the climatic assessment of the traditional buildings, specifically traditional houses and will open new doors to future studies about the integration of these potential PDSs with the new technological developments and climate considerations as well as protecting the conservation policies of these buildings by means of optimizing and improving their energy performance and implementing effective retrofit scenarios.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0145
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Developing a maintenance-focussed conservation model: an Australian
           overview

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      Authors: Arturo Cruz , Vaughan Coffey , Tommy H.T. Chan , Miljenka Perovic
      Abstract: This paper presents a conceptual design process for developing a maintenance-focused heritage conservation model. Currently, there are several intervention approaches that can be applied in conservation from reconstruction, restoration and repairs to a “do-nothing” approach. This paper examines whether a maintenance solution is more than just an option or a necessity. The aim of the paper is to study the challenges and opportunities when putting more emphasis on the maintenance approach in conservation. This research was conducted in an Australian context, where many major buildings were constructed from the 19th and 20th centuries and are now categorised as “modern heritage”. three case studies were undertaken to inform this paper and others. In addition, 17 global heritage conservation experts were interviewed, and their responses were analysed. Also, comparative field observations and archival records were examined and used to develop the initial framework model. Finally, using focus group discussions amongst 7 experts, the framework was reviewed and formally validated in order to ensure the development of a useful model for use in devising an effective maintenance management plan and monitoring conditions in heritage buildings. This paper supports others in a series that have already been accepted by this journal, focussing the research on heritage building conservation being conducted in Australia, the homeland of the Burra Charter. The other papers are entitled (1) model for the maintenance-focused heritage building conservation and (2) engineering in heritage conservation. The paper examines contemporary issues in heritage building maintenance and conservation in Australia and focusses specifically on the lack of focus on maintenance as a conservation intervention for heritage buildings.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2021-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Revitalizing the historical center of Al-Najaf city in Iraq: learning from
           the British conservation experiences

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      Authors: Sabeeh Lafta Farhan , Venus Suleiman Akef , Zuhair Nasar
      Abstract: The objective of this paper is mainly to contribute to and activate, the process of saving and preserving the rich tangible and intangible heritage embraced in the historic center of Al-Najaf city. This was possible through examining the existing historic urban and architectural structures of the city, unveiling the major issues that are threatening both its traditional cultural and architectural identity, and finally analyzing similar examples that proved to be successful in addressing similar problems in order to derive possible strategies for saving, preserving and revitalizing the historical center of Al-Najaf Old City. This paper addresses the major problems of heritage preservation in Al-Najaf City (750 AD), which is one of the historical and most sacred religious centers especially for Shia Muslims around the world. Despite its importance, the rich cultural and architectural heritage of the city is dramatically neglected and seriously threatened to be lost. Preservation in Al-Najaf City is proposed as a sustainable development strategy. Top-down and bottom-up strategies are proposed not only for preserving the historic architectural and urban characteristics of the city but also for reviving its social and cultural activities and traditions. The major issues addressed in this paper include the fragmentation and decentralization of the cohesive traditional urban fabric, the disruption of the spatial organization, the deformation of the traditional architectural characteristics of the city and its skyline, the discontinuity of facades' patterns, the destruction and demolition of historical buildings, the transformation of land use, and the regression of traditional social and cultural activities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-01-2020-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • “Tree against hunger”: potential of enset-based culinary tourism for
           sustainable development in rural Ethiopia

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      Authors: Tamagn Urgo Woyesa , Satinder Kumar
      Abstract: This is a conceptual study to analyze the potential of enset-based culinary tourism for sustainable rural development and to obtain a place as a niche tourism market in South-Western Ethiopia. It assumed enset agro-biodiversity as the effect of ages of environment, genetic resources and cultural interaction as a distinctive regional image. This an exploratory paper based on an in-depth interview, field observation and content analysis of documents. By means of in-depth interviews, the researchers managed to gather extended information from community elders and experts in culture and tourism offices selected based on a snowball technique. Besides, it has gone through systematic reviews of about 180 empirical and conceptual articles, books and conference papers with a critical reading of the content, identification of categories, examination and interpretation of ideas, to supplement the in-depth-interview. The thematic analysis applied to identify various ideas, concepts, categories and relationships to produce themes presented under discussion and results. The study found enset-based culinary tourism not only improve the local economy and regional image, but also it would enhance conservation of traditional farming system, biodiversity, food heritages, genetic varieties and livestock. It also identified 18 enset food varieties compatible with the principle of balanced diets. Finally, the study advised rural development planners to consider enset-based culinary tourism so that it would revive lost food traditions and consumption patterns, enhance the regional heritage and destination branding. The research is a conceptual study that lacked empirical investigation concerning the livelihood impact, gender implication and actual tourist data. Therefore, future research needs to focus on the aforementioned limitations. This study addressed SW Ethiopia, which is the primary center of Ensete ventricosum, and argued that enset-based culinary tourism would help to build regional image and obtain a place as a niche rural tourism destination. It would also contribute to the conservation of food heritages, environmentally sustainable farming system, soil conservation, crop diversities and livestock population in addition to producing tourist experience. Moreover, it would encourage the revival of traditional consumption, reinvent lost food traditions and identities. It was hoped that rural tourism would eventually improve the livelihood and enhance the capability of resilience. It is also expected to maintain the traditional social-economic structure based on the enset farm while fostering cultural development. To the knowledge of the researchers there is no previous work on enset based-culinary tourism in Ethiopia and probably there is no published culinary tourism paper elsewhere.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2020-0102
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Inhabiting war craters examining geostatistical modeling within landscape
           heritage recovery in Aleppo

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      Authors: Doaa Salaheldin Ismail Elsayed
      Abstract: Aleppo city in Syria has witnessed severe bombardment since the 2011 war affecting its landscape heritage, causing explicit geomorphological changes with anthropogenic qualities. The research aims to log observations on the patterns of bombardment craters. It investigates their key role in guiding post-war recovery plans. Currently, the interpretation of war scars is not considered in the reconstruction plans proposed by local administrations and here lies the importance of the research. The study investigates the geomorphological transformations along the southern citadel perimeter in old Aleppo. Currently, digital tools facilitated data prediction in conflict areas. The research employs an empirical method for inhabiting war craters based on both qualitative and quantitative approaches. The former utilizes satellite images to define the geographical changes of landscape heritage. The latter applies geostatistical data analysis, validation, interpolation and simulation for multi-temporal Google Earth maps. The study exploits Surfer 13 software to localize and measure the preserved craters. The research employs the generated models in a landscape design proposal examining the method's applicability. Finally, it offers a methodological toolkit guiding post-war landscape recovery toward the interpretation of conflict geography. The paper enables a practical understanding of the contemporaneity of landscape heritage recovery as an action between sustainable development and conservation. The paper integrates the conflict geographies to the people's commemoration of places and events. The article offers an insight into the rehabilitation of war landscapes focusing on land craters, exploiting geostatistical data prediction methods.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0132
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Grading of architectural heritage using AHP and TOPSIS methods: a case of
           Odishan Temple, India

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      Authors: Partha Sarathi Mishra , Soumi Muhuri
      Abstract: Ranking and grading of architectural heritage (AH) are common for the conservation process. Decision-makers are often intuitively made decisions for the selection of the AH. However, on many occasions, these decisions are not transparent and sometimes focused only on a few aspects of the AH. A transparent and robust methodology must be adopted to select and manage AH for the present and future generations. Selecting the list of parameters that are affecting the AH, and assessing their significance can strengthen the holistic assessment. From the literature, parameters and dimensions are identified for the evaluation of AH and its application for Odishan temple architecture (OTA). For minimizing biasedness associated with assessment, the research considered the opinion of experts, researchers and various stakeholders. For objective decision-making, the Delphi, the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and the technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solutions (TOPSIS) methods were adopted. Later, by observing the dimension-wise ranks and comparing the obtained grading of OTA with the existing state of protection, it was found that some temples, though having higher values with distinct dimension, lack significantly in other dimensions. However, for unbiased evaluation, all the possible dimensions should be considered. This methodology will also be useful for other decision-making processes concerning the same. This research is limited to the OTA. However, this methodology can be adopted by changing the definitions of the parameters according to the contextual needs. This methodology may be helpful for the further policy-making process for the conservation and management of such AH. To date, OTA is not graded through such a methodology. Also, limited studies are found in similar line worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2020-0096
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Tracking sustainable development goals – a case study of Pakistan

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      Authors: Anam Javeed , Muhammad Yar Khan , Mobashar Rehman , Asif Khurshid
      Abstract: The aim of this study is to gather and analyse the information regarding the level of awareness and commitment of the public as well as the organizations of Pakistan pertaining to sustainable development goals (SDGs). A sample of 500 respondents in total including employs and general public is selected for their opinion regarding SDGs. The data was collected by personal administration of questionnaires in organizations and general public. The data has been collected from federal and provincial capitals of Pakistan. The data has been analysed using Smart PLS and the hypothesized relationships have been tested using regression analysis. The level of awareness as well as level of commitment towards the fulfilment of SDGs varies across the cities of Pakistan according to the business volume and their affiliation with the United Nations. This study has been conducted in Pakistan only however a cross-country implementation of the framework and comparison would have yielded more in-depth facts. This study provides the policy makers with the ground-level data regarding the awareness and commitment of Pakistani organizations and public towards SDG fulfilment. A glance towards the attitudes of the people towards the subject could also be seen through this study. It could be further utilized and referred by other researchers for comparison with their own studies regarding SDGs. This a comprehensive study conducted at federal and provincial level of Pakistan which has yielded ground realities towards the implementation of SDGs. The results could be used for policy making and planning at national level.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0052
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Engineering in heritage conservation

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      Authors: Arturo Cruz , Vaughan Coffey , Tommy H.T. Chan , Miljenka Perovic
      Abstract: This paper aims to set out the role of engineers in heritage conservation and investigates and evaluates the proposed available tools, technology and innovations that are currently available in the civil engineering sector that can be applied in heritage conservation. As society has become more aware of the grandeur of heritage spaces and structures, there is increasing pressure to preserve historic buildings. But, it is the economic cost of maintaining this important heritage legacy that has become the prime consideration of every state in Australia. Dedicated intelligent monitoring systems supplementing the traditional building inspections will enable the involved and interested stakeholders to carry out not only timely reactive response, but also to plan the maintenance of such buildings in a more vigilant and systematic manner. This will, in future, help to prevent further degradation of heritage buildings, which is very costly, often difficult and sometimes impossible to address if neglected. Savings in time and resources can be achieved, but only if a building's pathological monitoring and inspection results are on hand for use to guide major decisions to be made on how to best prevent further decay, or to save an important historical structure or building fabric. The emergence of technological tools will enable the realization of a maintenance-focused conservation model. However, aside from the cost, these tools are still experimental in nature. These technologies are yet to be applied within the conservation industry with hopes of creating an easier and economically effective systematic method of heritage conservation. The paper discusses the emerging tools and technologies in easing the monitoring aspect of a maintenance-focused conservation model.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-30
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0129
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Enhancing fieldwork learning experiences for the architectural
           conservation curriculum

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      Authors: Dimitris Theodossopoulos , Edwar Calderon
      Abstract: Fieldwork in architectural conservation education is a proven practice to develop skills in documenting current conditions and start methodological engagements with a site's architectural and historical values. It is a vehicle to generate intensive learning experiences in comprehensive degrees or short courses. Review of the practice within conservation education is not extensive and the purpose of this paper is to reflect on enhancing pedagogy further. This reflection was triggered by a major case study, a workshop to generate UG teaching capacity for an Architecture school in Colombia. This led to mapping the fieldwork spectrum, reviewing the authors' experiences (PG courses and external workshops) and activities planned in other MSc programmes. Fieldwork is often seen as skills training, so enhancement is explored through the affiliate geography and architecture UG curricula. The Colombia workshop provoked strong engagement among students and tutors, and their commitment to make heritage meaningful to their projects is a measure of this pedagogy's success. Fieldwork around a site's essence, beyond skills development can induce conservation students into critical enquiries by motivating them to develop personalised contexts and enhance engagement with the unexpected through inversion of linear learning processes. Setting up site exercises early on PG programmes can encourage curiosity in exploring historic environments and contextualise surveying methods. Student reaction to these ideas has still to be tested by designing new activities. The educational methods of this implementation need deeper analysis, beyond the paper's scope. The paper maps the academic value of fieldwork in conservation education, investigating enhancement and cross-fertilisation from architecture and geography.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2020-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Urbanization in Saudi Arabia and sustainability challenges of cities and
           heritage sites: heuristical insights

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      Authors: Ali Alqahtany , Sreejith Aravindakshan
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the trajectories of the urbanization process in Saudi Arabia in its regional context from the unification of the country by King Abdul Aziz Al Saud in 1932 to the present time, and the urbanization impact on the status and management of cultural heritage in the Kingdom. Our study design integrated a well-articulated theoretical frame of sustainability to gain a heuristical understanding of urbanization in Saudi Arabia, and its link to cultural heritage. The methodological approach was mixed in nature involving (1) literature search and review, (2) analysis of public documents and databases, (3) analysis of photographs and (4) expert interviews. One of the most obvious findings reached in this study is that there is considerable trade-off between heritage site conservation, population and economic demand for increased urbanization. Hence, with increasing urbanization pressures, the value of the heritage site may be rethought based on Saudi Arabia's economic and cultural conservation perspectives. Since our data are mostly of textual narrative in origin, precise predictions were difficult or impossible for many reasons such as non-linearity, and non-equilibrium dynamics, context and scale dependence as well as the historical exigency of urbanization. However, the same theoretical framework can be applied to appropriate longitudinal/ time series data for predictive analyses, which can be taken up as a future research agenda. This paper analyzes the urbanization process and sustainability challenges of cultural heritage sites employing a mixed methodological approach, embedded in a holistic theoretical framework of sustainability.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-07-2020-0108
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Adaptive mechanisms in a continuing landscape: assessing biocultural
           diversity as a form of resilience

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      Authors: Elisa Palazzo , Douglas K. Bardsley
      Abstract: This paper investigates the adaptive capacity expressed by an agricultural region in response to changing conditions as a mean to address the future of cultural landscapes in a time of extreme uncertainty. Through the conceptual framework of biocultural diversity, the work assesses regimes shifts and persistence as a dialectic between natural and anthropogenic components of the landscape. Specifically, the mechanisms of progressive landscape adaptation are explored by using an integrated method to align manifestations of biological and cultural diversity. Through a multidimensional approach applied to spatial analysis, the study determines a relationship between the footprint of past and modern landscape regimes and contemporary rural management practices in McLaren Vale, South Australia. The biological and cultural diversity patterns along riparian corridors, or “biocultural corridors” are indicators of past and current adaptive capacity, which are able to convey novel trajectories of sustainable management in the landscape system. Understanding the positive feedback loops between nature and human interactions as represented by their interrelationships in the landscape can inform planning decisions for sustainable agricultural development and enable effective regional long-term trajectories of resilience.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0139
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The public–private–people partnership (P4) for cultural
           heritage management purposes

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Cristina Boniotti
      Abstract: In light of the difficulties the governments typically face in conserving and managing their rich public cultural heritage, which often lingers in a condition of neglect, this study aims to identify a set of additional tools capable of providing adequate financial resources as well as skills. The general research methodology adopted is of a qualitative, rather than a quantitative, nature. In fact, the resulting considerations are mainly the consequence of a first broad theoretical examination, aimed at analyzing the different management models a public entity may adopt, and an applicable verification, aimed at describing some case histories selected by means of interviews. The study develops a preliminary reflection on possible sector-specific models for public-built cultural heritage management that have not been well defined yet, especially so in reference to one of the institutional options, namely, the adoption of public–private–people agreements. Indeed, in addition to establishing the ties needed to link public institutions with the business sector, some strong involvement of society as a whole is advised to foster the implementation of projects and expedite the solution of shared problems. At a local level, for instance, private stakeholder participation must be encouraged, with special attention to the latter's cultural closeness to the territory involved. This research identifies some tools suitable for adoption in the cultural heritage field, which would serve as perfect examples of community involvement and commitment, and some useful case studies resulting from the Italian context.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0186
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Surviving the aftermaths of natural disasters: the earthen vessels of
           Kerala, India

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      Authors: Devaki Vadakepat Menon , Vanaja Menon Vadakepat
      Abstract: Since 2018, the two floods and droughts that struck Kerala's economy have threatened the state's sustainable earthen vessel production. Current studies allocate focus to the pottery industry's techno-social impacts and ethnography of the potter community; hence, there is a gap in understanding consumers, who are responsible for environmentally conscious behaviors, and their switch from earthen vessels to other materials adaptable to modern kitchens. This study aims to bridge gaps in understanding the reasons behind their demand shift and the challenges of earthenware consumption and production after the disasters. This quantitative research explored the perceptions of pottery producers and consumers in Kerala. The sample for the primary survey comprised 590 randomly selected consumers and one master artisan from each of Kerala's total of 44 registered pottery communities. Unpublished records provided the secondary data on production and sales. An upward shift in the demand for earthen vessels after natural calamities is observed. Quality, availability and adaptability are consumer concerns. The Markov chain analysis predicts that future consumption of earthen vessels depends on improved marketing mix strategies. After natural disasters, persistent demand exists for earthen vessels, but sustainable production is challenged due to the deteriorating quality and shortage of clay along with the consequent increase in procurement costs of raw materials. As the earthen vessel industry was affected by disasters very recently, this study contributes an immediate exploration of its sustainable production and consumption challenges.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2020-0093
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Model for the maintenance-focussed heritage building conservation

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      Authors: Arturo Cruz , Vaughan Coffey , Tommy H.T. Chan , Miljenka Perovic
      Abstract: This paper presents and illustrates the model of a maintenance-focussed conservation plan developed in the thesis. It proposes a framework which puts more emphasis on maintenance in conservation than reconstruction, restorations, repairs or even a “do-nothing” approach. The research was conducted in an Australian context, where many major buildings are categorised as being “modern heritage”. However, the main problem with modern heritage is that although it has become more celebrated within the architectural historical sector, maintenance is still only in the background of most facility management (FM) operations, and its critical importance has yet to become accepted as a potential solution to greatly facilitate the proper preservation of the nation's architectural legacy. Challenges and barriers to this approach were evaluated, whilst opportunities were identified to improve a failing current situation that has resulted in the loss of many existing heritage structures. The paper makes a strong case in order to highlight the necessity of embedding a maintenance approach in preserving the historical fabric of buildings in the heritage conservation sector. This research examines the key strategies for a maintenance-focussed conservation system. The paper tackles experiences and issues in Australia about a lack of focus on maintenance as a conservation intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0127
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Stakeholder preference mapping: the case for built heritage of Georgetown,
           Malaysia

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      Authors: Eric C.W. Lou , Angela Lee , Yoke Mui Lim
      Abstract: While there is an established body of literature that discusses the importance of stakeholder management, and also the need for involvement of all stakeholders so that all values of a heritage site can be captured in a heritage management plan, the concepts are not generally developed in ways that make them useful in practice. This research seeks to bring greater clarity to the practice of stakeholder engagement in built heritage, so that organisations can manage their stakeholders in ways that meet their strategic goals. This study proposes a novel method to identify stakeholders, a stakeholder preference mapping approach, which will depict their influence on decisions based on a of power-interest scale. This research posits a stakeholder preference mapping approach. Virtual Stakeholder Groups (VSG) were identified and stakeholder's significance impacts were measured using the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 to determine in-depth consideration of each stakeholder's power and interest against differing stages of a heritage project. Participants were convened through a 5-day workshop, consisting of 20 Malaysian and 19 international participants (80% academics and 20% Malaysian civil servants). The Multi-Attribute Decision Analysis (MADA) technique was then used to demonstrate how stakeholder identification and analysis can be used to help heritage teams meet their mandates. The research identified eight virtual VSG (Extremist, Expert, Economic, Social, Governance and Tourists) and their scale of power-interest influence at different stages of the heritage management process. The findings reveal varying levels of engagement from each of the different groups of stakeholders at each work stage – with Stage 5 (Construction) being the least engaged. It is anticipated that through stakeholder preference mapping, heritage teams can increase the robustness of their strategies by identifying and effectively managing the important concepts; heritage teams can effectively manage the interface between the many (often competing) demands of differing stakeholders. Using Georgetown as a case study, the research team were able to delineate the interaction and interplay between the various stakeholders in the complex decision-making processes for a UNESCO heritage site. Applying the RIBA 2013 Plan of Work as a framework to the heritage management process enables a formalised mapping approach to the process.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-08-2020-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The adaptive reuse potential of underused heritage gaols in Australia: a
           case study of Richmond Gaol, Tasmania

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      Authors: Waled Shehata , Craig Langston , Marja Sarvimäki , Ranka Novak Camozzi
      Abstract: Many heritage-listed gaols in Australia have become obsolete in terms of their original function and were decommissioned decades ago. As a default management practice, decommissioned gaols are usually transformed into museums which are mostly empty and underused without considering other viable alternatives. This research challenges this mainstream thinking and demonstrates that among the entire stock of heritage-listed gaols in Australia, even the least ranked gaol in terms of its potential for reuse can be turned into a thriving and vibrant new function. Hypothetically, if the least ranked Australian heritage-listed gaol in terms of its potential for reuse is in fact “reusable”, then the remaining heritage gaols have more chance of being successfully reused to accommodate a vibrant new function. To be able to test this hypothesis, first, the Adaptive Reuse Potential (ARP) model is applied to rank Australia's decommissioned heritage gaols which are spatially and structurally sound to accommodate new uses. Second, an architectural design concept was designed to adaptively reuse the lowest scored gaol (Richmond Gaol) to a boutique hotel. The conceptual design proposal was then assessed by three local heritage architecture firms to validate its applicability and viability. The research showed that Richmond Gaol can be reused successfully to at least one function, and accordingly, the whole stock of heritage gaols can be expected to also be reused to more sustainable purposes. The research identifies several considerations for the reuse of heritage gaols in Australia: the careful intervention to their significant fabric; maintaining sufficient evidence of the gaol's original components, the importance of the new use being compatible to the gaol's morphology to ensure minimum alterations or demolitions in the significant fabric of the site; and evaluating the new use and its components to achieve financial viability. Due to the continuing closure of Tasmania's state borders amid the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the researchers were not able to travel to Tasmania to conduct a site visit and to run the in-depth interviews with the architects in person. Most of the data of the current status of the site, its current layout, museum elements, historical data and photos were provided by Heritage Authorities in Tasmania and the Tasmanian State Library and Archive Service. Supplementary information and photos were acquired in March 2020 from visitors of the gaol who uploaded their trip images to Google maps or to their travel blogs. Topographical data of the site was gathered from Topographic Base-map of Land Information System Richmond Tasmania (2020). Due to travel restrictions, in-depth interviews with the local architects were done virtually, or over the phone in one case. Challenges discussed in this research encourage creating nationally designed support programs to better vitalise and help preserve Australia's carceral heritage. This research utilises architectural design in an empirical research paradigm.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-09-2020-0142
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Improvement of the cultural heritage perception potential model by the
           usage of eye-tracking technology

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      Authors: Huriye Armağan Doğan
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to develop and present the methodology of the model which can predict the perception and assessment of cultural heritage by the point of view of the non-experts through analysing the façades of buildings for adaptive re-use and sustainable development strategy. This paper focuses on the improvement and validation of the original cultural heritage perception potential model (CHPP) by adding new indicators which can be used as a part of the model. The method adopted includes the explanation of the older (original) model and its limitations. The assessment process follows the Integrated Cultural Heritage Management Approach to identify the new indicators which can be implemented on understanding the cultural heritage from the user/observer perspective, furthermore, for the sustainability of the environment. The results demonstrate that the perception of the society regarding the perception of the built heritage can be affected by various indicators. When the indicators are well identified, it is possible to predict the potential of the buildings to be perceived as cultural heritage or not. The knowledge which is gained by the proposed model can assist the sustainability and continuity of both heritage objects and the environment by helping the adaptive re-use process and strategies. No similar prior studies on the perception of cultural heritage as an approach to adaptive re-use strategies have been carried out. Furthermore, the usage of eye-tracking technology in the field of cultural heritage is rare. Therefore, it is hoped that the experiments performed in this study and the model which is created can lead and guide further research.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0174
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Toward developing a sustainable regeneration framework for urban
           industrial heritage

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      Authors: Parsa Arbab , Gelareh Alborzi
      Abstract: Regeneration of industrial heritage aims to display the patrimony assets by launching measures to convert them into cultural spaces associated with sustainable initiatives for satisfying environmental, social and economic demands in the city. The adaptive transformation and reusing process of industrial heritage constitutes a crucial cultural objective and consequently must be identified in a way that simultaneously integrates preservation with conversion and conservation with refurbishment. Hence, this paper explores to develop a framework for the sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities. By reviewing the current literature, research and experiences on urban industrial heritage, including existing approaches, frameworks, and case studies, this study brings a theoretical and conceptual approach to sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage, which is a fundamental start point for conducting further research and performing practical projects. Three key phases of the Initiation as decision context, including understand the characteristics and assess the significance, the Planning as decision problem, including study the feasibility, develop a policy, and prepare a proposed reuse plan, and the Execution as decision output, including implement the plan, monitor the results and review the plan should be considered regarding the sustainable regeneration of urban industrial heritage. The suggested framework considers sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities as a decision-making process, which requires defining the decision context, analyzing the decision problem, and finally, results in the decision output. Accordingly, it seems to help bridge the gap between various discourses and planning perspectives and make all stakeholders' involvement easier, more effective and efficient regarding the sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0059
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Rescuing industrial memory: the industrial heritage of Isla Teja sixty
           years after the natural disaster

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      Authors: Virginia Arnet
      Abstract: This paper explores tools and methodologies associated with the recovery of industrial areas from a territorial and urban perspective. This study describes the theoretical foundations of a specific industrial reality, using the city of Valdivia as a case study. Intermediate cities are resilient urban areas that support the changes derived from deindustrialization. Here, we present the contextualization of a contemporary recovery tool in Valdivia. First, industrial and geographical antecedents are described. Then, essential aspects of memory, territory and society are defined. Finally, challenges and opportunities derived from the contextual approach of the proposed recovery model are discussed. Three thematic lines were used to design the proposed heritage recovery model: memory, territory and society. The recovery of industrial memory, a programmatic reconstruction that includes a contemporary and environmentally sensitive utilization of the territory, and the restoration of the lost connection between the city and the territory, proved to be essential in this task. This proactive research allowed an in-depth analysis of the addressed topic and the exhaustive design of a tool for heritage recovery, following the provisions of the regional legislation. However, the authors acknowledge that the contextualization of the contextualization of the project actual project may limit the project execution. This paper explores the development of a new tool for the evaluation, intervention, and preservation of the industrial heritage of intermediate cities, as an alternative to the traditional methods of intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-04-2020-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Collections, local interactions, conservation and tourism aspects of
           monastic heritage sites in the Lake Tana region of Ethiopia: the case of
           Mandeba Medahinealem Monastery

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      Authors: Abraham Genet , Marshet Kebede
      Abstract: Along with the varied values of heritages which are rationale for their safeguarding, sustainable conservation and tourism development have become central agendas in the field of heritage management in contemporary world. This study attempts to elaborate such interconnected issues at Mandeba Monastery, emphasizing not only cultural heritages but also mutually reflecting on natural features which are integral part of the monastery. Interviewing and systematic observation alongside secondary sources were used to generate data which were analyzed thematically. Being a site for incredible collections, Mandeba maintained a tradition of not only heritage conservation and benevolent communal interaction but also of ecological sustainability. The rich collections together with its spectacular location on the shore of Lake Tana enable Mandeba to have highly noticeable tourism potentials. However, Mandeba encounters such challenges as inadequate museum, safety and security problems, lack of sufficient budget, professional, parasitic animal damages, weak promotion and lack of tourist facilities which hamper both conservation and tourism development on the site, which need to be tackled for the overall improvement of the monastery. This research is original, presenting the ground knowledge and practice regarding the relationship between heritage conservation on the one hand, and local livelihood, environmental management and tourism sustainability on the other hand, with regard to the immovable cultural/religious heritage site of Mandeba Medahinealem Monastery.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-02-2020-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Stakeholder participation in Lopburi Old Town conservation master plan

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      Authors: Tritsana Sorat , Nug-Rob Rawangkarn , Wee Rawang , Kanang Kantamaturapoj
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the meaningful public participation in activities relating to the master plan development and, at the same time, propose some recommendations for improvement. The study was carried out with in-depth interviews of 35 key-informants selected from various stakeholder groups involving in public participation activities. The evaluation frameworks for meaningful participation were developed from various scholars. The evaluation showed that the public hearings partially met the criteria of information provision and representativeness. However, there are rooms for improvement on participation in decision-making process, social learning and influence over policy decision-making. Therefore, this study proposes two recommendations. First, more flexible form of public participation is needed to enable discussions among various groups of stakeholders. Second, the organizer should communicate with stakeholders about how their opinions influence the final master plan in order to create sense of belonging among community members. This research developed the evaluation framework for public participation in old town conservation master plan in developing country.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-10-2020-0150
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Sociodemographic aspects and their relationship with motivations,
           satisfaction and loyalty in ecotourism: a study in Costa Rica

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      Authors: Mauricio Carvache-Franco , Orly Carvache-Franco , Ana Gabriela Víquez-Paniagua , Wilmer Carvache-Franco , Allan Perez-Orozco
      Abstract: The objectives of this study were to (a) analyze the relationship between sociodemographic aspects and motivations in ecotourism and (b) identify the relationship between sociodemographic aspects and satisfaction and loyalty variables. The research was carried out in the Arenal National Park and the Caño Negro National Wildlife Refuge in Costa Rica, an ecologically important ecotourism destination. The sample consisted of 310 surveys obtained in situ. For data analysis, factor analysis and the multiple regression method were used. The results show that younger tourists tend to be more motivated by self-development, whereas older tourists and lower-income tourists are more motivated toward strengthening interpersonal relationships with family and friends. In contrast, tourists with lower education levels are highly motivated by novelty, feel more satisfied with the visit and are more willing to recommend and say positive things about the destination. Besides, repeat visitors are most likely to return. The present study was limited by the timing in which it was carried out. Among the future lines of research, studies that address the relationship between sociodemographic variables in the different ecotourism segments should be conducted. Regarding the practical implications, this study helps companies related to tourism to pay attention to the sociodemographic characteristics of tourists to design activities and services according to their motivations, satisfaction and loyalty. For younger tourists who are motivated by self-development, activities and services related to learning about nature can be planned to encourage their personal growth, new abilities and individual skills. Regarding elderly and lower-income tourists, who are motivated to be with family and friends, recreational activities to improve family and friendship relationships can be promoted. These findings will serve to plan attractions and services in protected areas, benefiting the destinations and the communities sustainably. One of the contributions of this study is to find a negative relationship between the level of education and other variables such as satisfaction, intentions to recommend and intentions to say positive things about the destination. This research also identified a negative relationship between age and the self-development motivational dimension, a positive relationship between age and being with family and friends dimension, a negative relationship between income and being with family and friends dimension and a negative relationship between the number of visits and the novelty dimension.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-12-2020-0184
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Tents: a paradigm of lightness and sustainability in vernacular
           architecture and in Frei Otto's work

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      Authors: Juan María Songel
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to explore the relationship between vernacular architecture and Frei Otto's work, searching for shared principles and specific singularities, and testing whether lightness and sustainability can be identified as a common goal. The study is focused on tents and yurts, as archetypal examples of traditional architecture, and membrane structures and gridshells, as two types of light structures developed by Frei Otto. A comparative analysis of their behavior, form, elements, types, materials and strength has been carried out. The survey carried out shows that Frei Otto's innovative tents and gridshells were not based on form imitation of vernacular architecture, but rather on a thorough understanding of physical form-generating processes, driving specific materials to optimal form, like his experiments with soap film models to generate tensioned minimal surfaces or his experiments with hanging chain net models to generate compressive antifunicular lattice shells. This paper highlights how Frei Otto's endeavor to get the maximum with the minimum, to achieve a lot from a little, is also a key target of lightness and sustainability, and an essential feature of vernacular architecture.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2021-0097
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Vernacular and World Heritage Impact Assessment: the case study of Patmos

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      Authors: Letizia Dipasquale , Lucia Montoni , Alessia Montacchini , Saverio Mecca
      Abstract: This article aims to raising awareness on the potential of the application of the Heritage Impact Assessment (HIA) methodology – developed by ICOMOS in 2011 – with a focus on UNESCO World Heritage sites that are characterized by a widespread presence of vernacular architecture, one of the most vulnerable and fragile typologies of heritage. Starting from a theoretical introduction about the recognition of vernacular heritage into the international non-governmental panorama, and the dynamics that are mostly affecting it, the present contribution focuses on the case study of the Chora of Patmos (Greece), a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1999. The research has been carried out as follows: (1) comparative analysis of selected literature for the theoretical part; (2) field research; (3) interdisciplinary research for understanding the features of the site and assessing potential risks; (4) project design and assessments of the potential impacts. The pivotal application of the HIA method on the case study of Patmos highlighted the importance of the methodology as an essential tool for facilitating management and safeguarding WH sites from possible threats due to development projects on vernacular architecture. The originality of the research presented here lies in the connection between three different topics: vernacular architecture, Heritage Impact Assessment and Sustainable World Heritage Management. In fact, its goal is to bring cultural heritage management and sustainable development closer together, by emphasizing that HIA should not be used as a tool to hinder development, but as a practice for shaping and evaluating projects that might alter or compromise the integrity and authenticity of WH sites in a sustainable and balanced way.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0105
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Transformation and resilience processes in mountain oases at the High
           Atlas (Morocco) – the case of Aït Mrau, Mgoun Valley

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      Authors: Jorge Asencio Juncal , José Manuel López-Osorio , Carlos Rosa-Jiménez
      Abstract: This study aims to present the uniqueness of the mountain oasis at the High Atlas (Morocco) and is part of a more extensive study about the landscape, the architecture and the tourist development in the Mgoun Valley. Several natural and anthropogenic factors, such as new environmental conditions and socio-cultural realities, are testing the balance of the system and its adaptive capacity. A sustainable use of water, a key element of the oasis and source of life in the region, and an optimal management of farmland will allow this culture to be perpetuated. The study of the values of this territory and its transformation vectors constitute a first step for valuing this ecosystem and being able to establish management and conservation policies. The research is based on the fieldwork carried out over six campaigns, between September 2011 and January 2020, when interviews to the local population and graphic and photographic records of the Aït Mrau oasis were carried out. The work started from the literature review and the study of the origin of the settlement, analyzing the transformation processes, both in the cultivated plots and in the built habitat, where the urban evolution of the settlements and the characteristics of the architecture have been analyzed. The study has revealed the existence of social, environmental and economic imbalances that affect the status of the oasis, the landscape and the architecture of the study area. The research has characterized the habitat and has identified those elements that must be preserved to guarantee the permanence of the heritage values in a way that the future development of the region was not conditioned. The research delves into the study of a case that is paradigmatic in the context of the Moroccan High Atlas, since it shows the dynamics of transformation of a region directly affected by the climate change and by the abandonment of the traditional habitats.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0104
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Earthen architectural heritage in the international context: values,
           threats, conservation principles and strategies

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      Authors: Camilla Mileto , Fernando Vegas López-Manzanares
      Abstract: This research aims to highlight the values, principles and recommendations for conservation in order to establish valid strategies for the conservation of earthen built heritage. This is done following a methodology which uses indirect (bibliography) and direct (case study) sources systematically analysed from different perspectives: the values of Earth as a material and of architectural and vernacular heritage; the heritage conservation principles found in international documents; and the analysis of over 3,000 case studies from which good practices in earthen architecture conservation are extracted. Earthen built architectural heritage is found widely in all parts of the world, in archaeological sites and monumental and vernacular architecture, which research centres and researchers are increasingly studying and cataloguing. However, despite its richness and historic and cultural values, as well as its many merits in environmental sustainability, sociocultural and socio-economic terms, the value of this heritage has not been fully recognized in fields with major repercussions in conservation. Finally, these data are cross-referenced to establish the broadest possible strategies to guarantee all aspects to be taken into account in the conservation of earthen built architectural heritage. The text provides an overview of the different methodologies in order to extract specific strategies applicable to the conservation of this heritage, both locally and globally.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0115
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Assessment of vulnerability and site adaptive capacity to the risk of
           climate change: the case of Tchogha Zanbil World Heritage earthen site in
           Iran

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      Authors: Masoud Nakhaei Ashtari , Mariana Correia
      Abstract: The aim of this research is to evaluate the vulnerability of earthen heritage when facing climate change, by focusing on Tchogha Zanbil site as a case study – an outstanding example of an earthen site that recurrently faces extreme climatic events. Moreover, the adaptive capacity of traditional knowledge and ancient systems is also evaluated, in order to contribute for future climate change adaptation planning. The vulnerability of cultural heritage to climate change was considered as the degree to which an identified cultural heritage value was susceptible to, or would be adversely affected by, the effects of climate change, including climate variability and extreme temperatures. In order to establish a vulnerability assessment, this paper will assess different definitions regarding vulnerability, exposure and sensitivity, crossing it with indicators of physical parameters, in order to propose an adaptive capacity for the site, based on ancient traditional knowledge. Nonetheless, the entailed research helped establish a framework that contributes to outline the vulnerability and the potential for adaptive capacity of World Heritage properties, especially earthen sites located in regions exposed to rising climate change impact. The research faced some limitations regarding access to data and to site visits, due to COVID-19 restrictions that were in place. This research presents a methodological assessment of climate change risk in Tchogha Zanbil, a World Heritage earthen site in Iran, representative of a property highly exposed to risk and vulnerability.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-06-2021-0108
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • The Roman fish tanks of the Western Mediterranean basin as potential
           scenarios for research on sea-level changes

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      Authors: Francisco Javier Caballero-Rubio , María José Viñals , Santiago Tormo-Esteve
      Abstract: This paper analyses Roman fish tanks, which have functional elements that could be used to research on palaeo-sea-levels. Thus, the conditions of 37 installations in the Western Mediterranean basin are reviewed to identify those that have the best environmental and constructive conditions to be analyzed. The methodology was largely based on the review of existing scientific bibliography dealing with sea-level variations from studies on historical constructions, existing historical documentation on Roman fish tanks on the Mediterranean coast, as well as the fieldwork carried out in fish tanks on the Mediterranean coasts. The Roman coastal fish tanks located in the shoreline of the Western Mediterranean Sea have turned out to be an excellent indicator of sea-level changes. Nevertheless, current coastal retreat, erosion and storm surges are posing significant threats to their preservation, and they could be considered as a heritage at risk of disappearance. Moreover, variations in the tectonic behaviour of the different coastal sectors make it challenging to select these facilities as an indicator of the sea level. The analysis of Late Holocene sea-level changes and palaeoenvironments from archaeological and biological evidences, although not without difficulties, is very convenient because it provides very precise data that cannot be obtained with other absolute dating methods. This approach is increasingly gaining popularity with researchers and is very innovative in its method of combining the results of several scientific disciplines.
      Citation: Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JCHMSD-05-2021-0096
      Issue No: Vol. 12 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development

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