A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 128 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Ecological Restoration
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.36
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1543-4060 - ISSN (Online) 1543-4079
Published by U of Wisconsin Press Homepage  [10 journals]
  • Restitching the Suburban Fringe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This project aims to reshape insect-human relationships through design intervention in a suburban neighborhood, encouraging better coexistence between humans and two taxa of interest, Photuris sp. (fireflies) and Chauliognathus sp. (soldier beetles). Fireflies are a culturally important species easily recognized by the average person due to their nighttime aesthetic presence (Figure 1). However, few people recognize or value soldier beetles (Alford 2019) and can be fearful or dismissive of these beneficial insects. The project aims to leverage the charismatic power of our impressions of the firefly to bring greater awareness of other beetle species and engage the public in broader insect conservation ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fireflies as Gateway Bugs to Restitch the Suburban Fringe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Fireflies are glow-in-the-dark, charismatic mini-fauna belonging to the beetle family Lampyridae. Encompassing over 2200 species sprinkled across the globe, their dazzling night-time displays have enchanted human beings for millennia. They share some kinship with the soldier beetles (family Cantharidae), a group of primarily day-flying, conspicuous insects whose adults feed on pollen, nectar, and other plant-feeding insects. In recent years, measurable declines among many insect groups have been attributed to the disappearance of suitable habitat where all insect life stages can thrive.Using fireflies as a gateway bug, the proposed two-part restoration design focuses on creating habitat for these beetles across a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Matter of Life and Decay: Promoting Insect Habitat in Cemeteries through
           Use of Deadwood Pavilions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Many humans are distanced from the natural world in everyday life. Urban and suburban environments sanitize and erase natural processes like decomposition, removing deadwood, and decomposing plant material from the landscape as a typical maintenance practice. While these actions are understood to be pleasing to people and create space commonly perceived to be cared for, clean, and safe, these actions are detrimental to non-human dwellers of the landscape.Examples of these dwellers are the carpenter bee and carpenter ant, two species that rely on the process of decomposing wood for survival. The two species inhabit the wood, carving chambers and galleries for nesting (Figure 1). Through this process, the wood is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Deadwood in a Cemetery: Designing to Resurrect Members of the Insect World

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Restoration ecology is an expanding activity, now even with the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration upon us. As the value of sustainable habitats and their ecological services become better understood, more communities and more levels of government are adding restoration initiatives. We honor this design study for expanding the restoration world into atypical landscapes, the vast areas which are used for cemeteries. Certainly, some cemeteries have been planting wildflower meadows as part of the landscape scheme, but the proposal by Tamulonis has enlarged the universe of possibilities.By introducing deadwood as the focus of the design rather than installing living plants or seeds as the primary landscape ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Conserving Forest Habitat for Wildlife: Providing Context to a Landscape
           Design that Engages the Public in Nonnative Insect Management

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Biological invasions are considered major drivers of environmental change (Vitousek et al. 1996). The intentional or unintentional establishment and spread of nonnative species in regions outside of their native range threatens native biodiversity and ecosystems (Boyd et al. 2013, Liebhold et al. 1995, Wilcove et al. 1998). Over the last 150 years, forests in the United States have accumulated nonnative insects at a rate of approximately 2.5 species per year (Lovett et al. 2016), among which wood-boring insects such as Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (emerald ash borer, hereafter EAB) are causing substantial ecological and economic impacts (Aukema et al. 2011, Hauer and Peterson 2017, Klooster et al. 2014). Since EAB ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Redesigning Farm Margins and Highway Edges as Butterfly Corridors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This proposal to develop butterfly corridors is a response to an investigation of two butterfly species in western Massachusetts—the charismatic species, Danaus plexippus (Monarch butterfly), and the introduced species Pieris rapae (cabbage white). The project research explores the human impact on both butterfly populations in the agricultural landscape of the Connecticut River Valley, particularly along highway edges and farmlands, and proposes a series of layered and responsive roadside buffer plantings that redefine the region as a butterfly supportive landscape.The chemical landscape of the Connecticut River Valley is tied to its agricultural economy. Many farmers use pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids, to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • West Indies Blend: Re-Shading New England's Tobacco Valley to Control
           Aphids

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This project begins with aphids—their life cycle, their relationship to plants, how they feed, their role in agriculture, and the abiotic factors that affect them—such as winds and temperatures. Aphid diversity is vast, and their appetites are too; the tobacco aphid Myzus persicae subsp. nicotianae (tobacco aphid), a descendant of Myzus persicae (green peach aphid), feeds on over 400 different herbaceous host species (Tingey and Andaloro 1983). The aphid's search for a food source is unpredictable and erratic and dictated by only the winds that carry it. Its populations swell with summer heat and die with the fall season. Although aphids can colonize host plants in enormous numbers, in many cases the threat they ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tobacco Pest Considerations are Important to Incorporate in Farm-Scape
           Design

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The proposed design by Diem and Wirth reimagining the layout of a cigar wrapper tobacco farm is attractive and provides a resting place in close proximity to the field for workers. Tobacco production can require a significant amount of hand labor, so providing an environment that allows workers to rest near fields is a strength of this concept. The authors have devoted significant thought to the design of the farm-scape, but as conceived, it is not likely to result in lower pest populations nor reduce the need for external pest management input. It may, in fact, result in greater pest pressure and an increased need for pesticide applications. When considering changes to the production environment for cigar wrapper ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Redesign of a Commercial Cranberry Bog to Promote Bombus Mutualism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The existing Bombus (bumblebee) and human relationship is heavily tilted toward the human, where agroindustrial use of the pollinator ignores its importance in the greater ecosystem and the full life cycle needs of the species. This project reconsiders the Bombus/human relationship and proposes a mutualistic interspecies design for a cranberry bog in southeastern Massachusetts, where through the provision of nesting and foraging habitat the needs of native Bombus populations (e.g., Bombus impatiens and Bombus pensylvanicus) are supported year-round, and cranberry crops are pollinated with less need for commercial pollination inputs.The project investigated the unique rearing processes of commercial bumblebees as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Building the Bog for Bees and Berries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Up to two-thirds of crop species benefit from pollination by insects. While the domesticated and highly managed honey bee (Apis mellifera) is widely used throughout agriculture, native, wild insects provide pollination services on par to that of the honey bee (Garibaldi et al. 2013). The importance of native, wild pollinators for crops presents a dilemma: agroecosystems are often inhospitable to these insects yet crop production and yield depends on the services they provide. Commercial honey bee and bumble bee colonies can be temporarily added to agroecosystems at a cost to growers. However, wild pollinators need high quality habitat that persists throughout their lifecycle within and near farms. Cranberry ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Abstracts

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: To develop the following abstracts, the editorial staff searches more than 100 scientific journals, professional and organizational newsletters, conference proceedings, and other resources for information relevant to ecological restoration practice and research. Please send suggested abstract sources to the editorial staff (ERjournal@sebs.rutgers.edu).Shifts in Forest Species Composition and Abundance Under Climate Change Scenarios in Southern Carpathian Romanian Temperate Forests. 2021. García-Duro, J. (National Institute for Research and Development in Forestry "Marin Drăcea", Romania, juan.garcia.duro@icas.ro), A. Ciceu, S. Chivulescu, O. Badea, M.A. Tanase and C. Aponte. Forests 12:1434. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Death and Life of Ash: Landscape Tactics to Adapt to Invasive Species

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This project was developed in response to the impacts of the Agrilus planipennis (Emerald Ash Borer, hereafter EAB), an invasive species threatening North American forests. The emerald ash borer is a wood-boring beetle indigenous to Asia. Since its accidental introduction, EAB has spread and devastated Fraxinus spp. (ash) populations across the United States. Changing human behaviors have created new anthropogenic pathways for pest dispersal. For example, EAB spreads through human-assisted movement of material like firewood. EAB lays eggs in ash crevices, which hatch into larva that tunnel through the tree's bark and feed on the vascular tissue of the tree, cutting off nutrient transport (USDA 2009).In ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Durability and Longevity of Tympanuchus pallidicinctus (Lesser
           Prairie-Chicken) Fence Tags in Kansas and Colorado

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@sebs.rutgers.edu).Grouse species worldwide are declining due to habitat loss and degradation, climate change, and anthropogenic disturbance (Storch 2007). Anthropogenic development, such as roads, energy infrastructure (e.g., powerlines, oil wells, wind turbines), and fences have well documented negative effects on grouse population behaviors and demographics ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Designing for Insects and People: Let's Face the Music and Dance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Our living world keeps changing. Countless reports have documented that the number of insects in many parts of the world is falling rapidly. The music of their calls that fills the nights is diminishing. Insects play vital roles in the structure of nature and have long been a subject of restoration ecology research and practice. Insects are also critical to the functioning of human needs. "Beneficial insects" is a wide category of species from pollinators to parasitoids, decomposers, and seed dispersers. Insects, of course, also are a major food source for thousands of vertebrates who structure all the economy of nature and are of enormous cultural interest to us.This special issue of our journal honors the work of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fostering Insect-Human Relationships through Design

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: The ecological world is dense with invisible connections, a web of interspecific interactions barely comprehensible to humankind. We don't always have the time for slow and careful observation, nor do we have many of the physiological tools to witness these relationships. When we walk in a forest, we are oblivious to the mating pheromones released by moths or the electric fields around flowers that can be sensed by bees. To reveal these relationships is to open a window into a surreal and magical world. I had one of these experiences while watching a Zoom lecture by Dr. Doug Tallamy just before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. He described host plant relationships—the dependence of a specific insect, often a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Nature of Oaks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: As a restoration ecologist and environmental historian with a long-time interest in the use of acorns and management of oaks, I approach new books on oaks with a somewhat skeptical eye. Douglas Tallamy's latest book "The Nature of Oaks" was a delightful surprise. This is a book anyone involved in restoration or management of a property with oaks will find of interest. Even if you don't work with oaks, the complex ecosystems in oak leaf litter, on branches and leaves, and in cracks in bark will offer new insights into the complex interrelationships with which you might be dealing and should consider.The book follows the oak year, month by month, with insight into the often unseen insects, worms, nematodes, and fungi ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Variability in Sagebrush Cover due to Method of Determination and its
           Implications for Habitat Restoration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Artemisia L. [Asteraceae] (sagebrush) is one of the most common shrubs in North America (Meyer 2008) and is a vital habitat component for many at-risk grassland species including the Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter sage grouse). Throughout most of their range, sage grouse are associated with A. tridentata Nuttall (big sagebrush). However, in Canada where big sagebrush does not occur, sage grouse occupy areas dominated by A. cana Pursh (silver sagebrush) (Aldridge 2000). Silver sagebrush provides much less cover per plant, is shorter, occurs at much lower densities than big sagebrush (Aldridge 1998, McArthur and Stevens 2004), and its distribution is naturally patchy (Jones et al. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Using Online Surveys and Landscape Preferences to Enhance Nearshore
           Restoration

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Ecological restoration necessitates the integration of the social sciences (Bennett et al. 2017, Robinson et al. 2019, Niemiec et al. 2021). The social sciences include both classic (e.g., human geography, anthropology, and psychology) and applied (e.g., communication, education, and law) fields that can describe, predict, theorize, and understand a diverse array of social phenomena (e.g., governance), social processes (e.g., decision making), and individual attributes (e.g., preferences) (Bennett et al. 2017). The social sciences can help integrate and understand pertinent human dimensions of a particular restoration project, challenge, or context (Bennett et al. 2017, Biedenweg et al. 2021). For example, the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Rise of Non-Native Invasive Plants in Wooded Natural Areas in
           Southwestern Ohio

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: During the years 1834 to 1844 Thomas G. Lea conducted a botanical survey in the Cincinnati, Ohio area and built up an herbarium (Lea 1849). A century later, Dr. E. Lucy Braun conducted a follow up botanical survey in the Cincinnati area to determine how the vegetation had changed during the intervening years (Braun 1934). In her book, The Woody Plants of Ohio, Braun provided additional information about the distribution of woody plants found in this area (Braun 1961). During the past several years, we have been conducting another botanical survey in ten wooded natural areas in the Cincinnati area. Most of the marvelous natural areas surveyed by Thomas Lea are gone, victims of human development, but a few highly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Use of a Restored Prairie/Wetland Complex in Ohio by Thamnophis sirtalis
           (Eastern Garter Snake) and Small Mammals during the First Five Years

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Grasslands around the world have greatly decreased due to anthropogenic modifications and activities, including those in North America (Henwood 2010, Carbutt et al. 2017). The loss of grasslands and prairies has had consequences for associated wildlife (Cagle 2008, Henwood 2010). Restoration of such habitats is one approach to address this habitat loss and to improve habitat for associated wildlife.We report on the use of a restored prairie/wetland complex, the Granville Schools Land Lab (GSLL), by Thamnophis sirtalis (Eastern garter snake) and small mammals (Peromyscus spp., Blarina brevicauda, Microtus pennsylvanicus) during the first five years of monitoring after establishment. The loss of grassland and prairie ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.107.249
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-