Subjects -> MINES AND MINING INDUSTRY (Total: 82 journals)
Showing 1 - 42 of 42 Journals sorted by number of followers
Stainless Steel World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Metamorphic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Mineralogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Geology and Mining Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clay Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Minerals Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Lithos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Minerals, Metallurgy, and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Natural Resources Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Mining Engineering and Mineral Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Mine Water and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Mining Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Resources Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Earth Science : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Coal Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Physics and Chemistry of Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Convention & Event Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineralium Deposita     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Lithology and Mineral Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Coal Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geology of Ore Deposits     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rocks & Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Geochemistry and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BHM Berg- und Hüttenmännische Monatshefte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Technology : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Extractive Industries and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Preparation and Utilization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Mining Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Materials Research and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gems & Gemology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Analytical and Numerical Methods in Mining Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Instituto de Investigación de la Facultad de Ingeniería Geológica, Minera, Metalurgica y Geográfica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Central South University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mineralogical Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CIM Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration     Hybrid Journal  
Podzemni Radovi     Open Access  
Rudarsko-geološko-naftni Zbornik     Open Access  
Journal of Mining Institute     Open Access  
International Journal of Mining and Geo-Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of China Coal Society     Open Access  
Réalités industrielles     Full-text available via subscription  
Mineral Economics     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals     Open Access  
Gold Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Mine Water and the Environment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.608
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1616-1068 - ISSN (Online) 1025-9112
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Mine Water and the Environment

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      PubDate: 2022-08-16
       
  • Mobility of Be, Bi, F, Ga, Ge and W in Surface Water and the Water Quality
           Impact on Epilithic Diatoms Downstream of the Historical Yxsjöberg Mine
           Site, Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract There is a potential risk that the geochemical cycles of several critical metals will be affected when mining of these metals increases to meet the demand of green technology. The geochemistry of Be, Bi, Ga, Ge, and W, herewith called CM5, is lacking, yet is necessary to ensure responsible mine waste and water management. Beryllium, Bi, and W are all considered immobile, but in previous studies of skarn tailings in Yxsjöberg, Sweden, all three elements were mobilized. The tailings are enriched in CM5, together with pyrrhotite, calcite, and fluorite. The mobility and environmental impact of CM5 and F in surface waters downstream of the Yxsjöberg mine site, Sweden, were studied using monthly water samples from seven locations and analysis of diatoms at five of these locations. Bismuth, Ge, and W were present at low concentrations, transported in the particulate phase, and likely settled in the sediments hundreds of meters from the tailings. Beryllium and F were present at high concentrations and dominantly transported in the dissolved phase. At these pH conditions (5.6), Be should form insoluble hydroxides; however, elevated concentrations of dissolved Be were observed more than 5 km from the mine site. Diatoms downstream of the mine site were negatively affected by the mine drainage. The release of low quality neutral mine drainage will continue for hundreds of years if remediation actions are not undertaken since only a small portion of the tailings have weathered during 50–100 years of storage.
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
       
  • Enhancement of Sludge Sedimentation Properties in a Concentrated Acid Mine
           Drainage Using Nano- and Micro-magnetite Particles

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      Abstract: Abstract Conventional treatment of AMD involves neutralization with consequent precipitation of metals as hydroxides. In AMD with a high concentration of metals, the settling rate of the sludge/water interface is low. We investigated the use of nano- and micro-magnetite particles to assist the settling and thickening of floc particles. The magnetite was produced from ferrous sulphate crystals (melanterite, Fe2SO4·7H2O) obtained by leaching pyrite from a coal mine. AMD was obtained from the treatment plant at the same mine and the water was neutralized with Ca(OH)2 at pH 8.7 ± 0.1. Laboratory studies were conducted in 1 L test tubes with and without the addition of magnetite particles and a flocculant. Sedimentation curves (interface settling) were generated to evaluate the rate of sedimentation. For the studied effluent, the best option was 4 g L−1 of magnetite particles and 5 mg L−1 of high molecular weight anionic polyacrylamide. The magnetite particles were recovered magnetically from the sludge with ≈ 90% efficiency. Thus, the combined use of magnetite and a flocculant increased the sludge settling rate and, consequently, reduced the area needed for settling basins.
      PubDate: 2022-08-11
       
  • Water Inrush Modes Through a Thick Aquifuge Floor in a Deep Coal Mine and
           Appropriate Control Technology: A Case Study from Hebei, China

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      Abstract: Abstract Water inrush disasters caused by confined aquifers under high pressure below the mine floor are a major problem in China, restricting the safe and efficient mining of deep coal seams. We have classified the stress disturbance modes acting on the floor area in such mines into two types based on the water yield changes of a thick aquifuge floor in a deep longwall mine and the underground pressure behavior of deep longwall faces during water inrush events, and they are the dynamic load of the main roof instability from the far field of the longwall face and the static load of the abutment pressure from the near field, respectively. The water inrush modes include mining-induced cracks indirectly connected with the Ordovician limestone aquifer and through-going faults directly connected with the same aquifer. In order to control water inrush from thick aquifuge floor, grout was used to block off the cracks in the strata just above the Ordovician limestone on the site; decreasing the mining width also decreased the stress disturbance intensity caused by the dynamic and static loads; while presplitting the roof relieved the underground pressure and effectively weakened the dynamic load; and the confined water was drained to lower the water pressure and cut off the source of water flowing into the longwall face. Finally, the combined effectiveness of these control technologies was verified by micro-seismic monitoring, and further water inrush disasters were prevented through the thick aquifuge floor of a deep longwall mine in the Xing-dong coal mine in north China.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Natural Radioactivity and Metals in Pit Lakes in Sweden Analyzed by
           Principal Component and Cluster Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this work was to determine which parameters are sufficient to measure in order to describe the water quality of a pit lake and to identify patterns in the data among different kind of pit lakes. The data consisted of ambient dose equivalent rate, elemental and radionuclide concentration, pH, and specific conductance in surface water and sediment samples collected from different types of mines. Data were tested for normality and log-normality and used in principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The normality tests indicated that only 40K was normally distributed, while only the 234,238U isotopes were log-normally distributed. HCA performed on parameters measured in surface water provided clusters that in most cases separated the elements according to their chemical groups. However, when HCA was performed on pit lakes, the clustering seemed to indicate that surface water might not be the preferred sample to differentiate between different types of pit lakes. PCA of surface water data resulted in three components that explained 72% of the variance when pH, SC, concentration of the elements Mg, K, Ca, Cu, Zn, Sr, Pb, activity concentration of 234,238U and 210Po, and ambient dose equivalent rate were included. For surface sediment data, the PCA resulted in three components explaining 83% of the variance when the concentration of Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Rb, Sr, Y, Tl, activity concentration of 234Th, 226Ra, 210Pb, 232Th (series average), and 40K, and ambient dose equivalent rate were included.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Hydrogeochemical Characteristics and Formation Mechanisms of the
           Geothermal Water in the Qingdong Coal Mine, Northern Anhui Province, China
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The hydrogeochemistry of geothermal fluids provides insight into the occurrence, formation, and circulation of geothermal resources. We collected 13 geothermal water (> 34 °C) and 11 common groundwater samples (< 20 °C) from the Qingdong coal mine in China. The geothermal water samples had higher TDS, Ca2+, and SO42− contents, by 1.22-, 1.28-, and 1.25-fold, respectively. The hydrochemical facies of the geothermal water samples was 92% SO4·Cl–Ca.Mg and 8% SO4·Cl–Na, whereas the common groundwater samples was 73% SO4·Cl–Ca.Mg and 27% SO4·Cl–Na. Moreover, hydrogen and oxygen isotopic analysis revealed that atmospheric precipitation and water–rock interaction were the sources of the geothermal water. The chemical composition of the geothermal water is dominated by ion-exchange interactions and the dissolution of carbonates and silicates. Overall, geothermal water in the study area is characterized by optimal hydrodynamic conditions and more intense ion-exchange interactions than common groundwater. Moreover, the formation of geothermal water is controlled by hydrogeological and structural conditions, and by the infiltration of atmospheric precipitation, heating by deep circulation, and transportation by water-conducting faults (F11) to shallow coal strata. These results will facilitate the development of geothermal resources and the construction of green ecological mines, which will provide considerable economic and social benefits.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Removal of Molybdenum from Mining-Impacted Water by Sorption onto
           Manganese-Rich Sludge

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      Abstract: Abstract Molybdenum (Mo) concentrations in mining-impacted water can be orders of magnitude higher than health-based values for drinking water. Mo in oxidized mine waters is predominantly present as the oxyanion molybdate, which is problematic in mine water treatment because it is not removed by conventional alkaline addition treatment and requires separate Mo-specific methods. Mo removal by sorption to ferric precipitates is the typical treatment strategy. We investigated a sustainable alternative for a mine water with low-iron content and high manganese (Mn). We evaluate the potential for Mo removal by sorption onto Mn-rich sludge from a mine water treatment plant that uses lime to remove metals at pH 10. In laboratory sorption batch tests with an initial Mo concentration of 10 mg/L in a sodium chloride solution, over 90% of the Mo was removed onto the sludge at pH 6 and below (up to 34 mg Mo/g Mn). Sorption was sensitive to pH, with sharp decreases in sorption levels from pH 6 to 8. Sorption was also affected by the matrix composition of the mine water samples, apparently due to competitive sorption from other ions in the mine water. Use of site Mn for water treatment provides a more sustainable treatment approach; however, additional knowledge is required to understand the effects of site-specific complexities.
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
       
  • A Study of a Hypersaline, Heliothermic Lake that Formed in an
           Anthropogenic-Karst Sinkhole

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      Abstract: Abstract In Solotvino, in southwestern Ukraine (Transcarpathia), there is a large group of anthropogenic water reservoirs. Most of these developed in sinkholes formed by the flooding of salt mines and the activation of anthropogenic and karst processes. One reservoir, Solotvino No. 7, was the subject of detailed limnological (hydrographic and hydrochemical) studies. The reservoir has an area of 8493 m2, a maximum depth of 20.5 m, and holds Cl−–Na+ brines. The water in the near-surface layer is hyposaline (3–20 g/L), but periodically becomes mesosaline (20–50 g/L). Hypersaline waters with mineralization > 250 g/L are found below 3 m. The reservoir has three persistent distinct mixolimnion layers that clearly indicate their meromictic type: the surface layer, a chemocline (where the water chemistry changes), and a lower monimolimnion layer. The thermal properties of the reservoir deserve special attention. The water is heated during all seasons at the boundary between the chemocline and monimolimnion; the water temperature is 32 °C in winter and 54 °C in summer, despite the lack of volcanism. The water is heated by a physical phenomenon in the layer where the water density increases, which is a heliothermal process. Also noteworthy is that throughout the year, the oxygen profiles are positive and heterograde, with the water being up to 380% oxygen saturated.
      PubDate: 2022-07-09
       
  • Dry Covers Applied to Coal Tailings

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      Abstract: Abstract Covering coal mining tailings with layers of soil reduces the generation of acid mine drainage. These layers are designed to minimize water seepage and the flow of oxygen into tailing deposits. In Brazil, tailings from mineral coal processing are rich in pyrite, are often stored in piles, and are covered with layers of soil on the surface. This study provides results on the performance of four experimental soil cover models on tailings resulting from coal mining in southern Brazil. Pilot-scale physical models were constructed on-site, and the water balance of the covers, suction, volumetric moisture content, temperature in the tailings/cover layers, and quality of released effluent were measured. The covers designed with soil and bottom ash significantly reduced the volume of water seepage through the tailings and improved the quality of the generated effluents. Moreover, the results demonstrated that the performance of the cover depends on climate variations, and its behavior varies seasonally.
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • Performance of Semi-passive Systems for the Biological Treatment of
           High-As Acid Mine Drainage: Results from a Year of Monitoring at the
           Carnoulès Mine (Southern France)

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      Abstract: Abstract Two semi-passive treatment systems for iron (Fe) and arsenic (As) removal in AMD were installed and monitored in-situ for more than a year. These technologies were designed to treat the As-enriched AMD (≈ 1 g/L Fe(II) and 100 mg/L As(III)) of the ancient Carnoulès mine. The treatment was based on biological Fe and As oxidation by indigenous bacteria, and subsequent immobilization of As by ferric hydroxysulfates. Forced aeration and wood/pozzolana or plastic support were used for biofilm attachment. The system performance ranged from 86 to 98% for Fe oxidation, 30 to 60% for Fe removal, and 50 to 80% for As removal at a hydraulic retention time of 9 h. No significant difference were measured between the two biofilm supports. The wood/pozzolana support had a shorter delay for performance recovery after interruptions. Iron oxidation rates were similar to those obtained in the Carnoulès AMD stream and laboratory bioreactor, while As oxidation seemed to be enhanced. The sludge accumulated between 39 and 91 mg/g of As, mainly in the As(V) oxidation state; jarosite and amorphous ferric hydroxysulfate phases were the main Fe and As scavengers. Challenging environmental conditions during the long monitoring period confirm the robustness of the treatment units. The data will be useful in designing future full-scale treatment systems adapted to As-rich AMD.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • An Optimized Combination of Mine Water Control, Treatment, Utilization,
           and Reinjection for Environmentally Sustainable Mining: A Case Study

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper presents a case study of an optimized combination of mine water control, treatment, utilization and reinjection to achieve the zero discharge of mine water. Mine water has been considered a hazard and pollution source during underground mining, so most mining enterprises directly discharge mine water to the surface after simple treatment, resulting in a serious waste of water. Moreover, discharging a large amount of mine water can destroy the original groundwater balance and cause serious environmental problems, such as surface subsidence, water resource reduction and contamination, and adverse impacts on biodiversity. The Zhongguan iron mine is in the major groundwater source area of the Hundred Springs of Xingtai, which is an area with a high risk of potential subsidence. To optimize the balance between mining and groundwater resources, a series of engineering measures was adopted by the Zhongguan iron mine to realize mine water control, treatment, utilization, and reinjection. The installation of a closed grout curtain has greatly reduced the water yield of deep stopes in the mine; the effective sealing efficiency reaches 80%. Nanofiltration membrane separation was adopted to treat the highly mineralized mine water; the quality of the produced water meets China’s recommended class II groundwater standard. Low-grade heat energy from the mine water is collected and utilized through a water-source heat pump system. Finally, zero mine water discharge is realized through mine water reinjection. This research provides a beneficial reference for mines with similar geological and hydrogeological conditions to achieve environmentally sustainable mining.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Impact of Mining Activities on Groundwater Level, Hydrochemistry, and
           Aquifer Parameters in a Coalfield’s Overburden Aquifer

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      Abstract: Abstract Changes in groundwater level, hydrochemistry, and aquifer parameters were studied by following disturbances caused by tunnel excavation in a panel in the Ningtiaota coalfield, northwest China. Temporal changes of hydrochemical compositions were evaluated based on time-series hydrochemical data in three boreholes (J2, J13, and SK8). The time series of hydraulic conductivity and specific storage of aquifers were obtained using the water level response to Earth tides and long-term (from 2014 to 2019) hourly recorded water level data. The results showed that the concentrations of Ca2+, HCO3−, and TDS in groundwater in borehole J2 decreased sharply following underground tunnel excavation and recovered after six months. Back and forth changes also occurred in the hydrochemical types (HCO3–Ca → HCO3–Ca–Mg → HCO3–Ca). The excavation caused changes in hydraulic conductivity (about 2 order of magnitudes) and groundwater level (about 3.2 m), possibly by unclogging fractures. This in turn caused hydrochemical changes, such as silicate dissolution and calcite precipitation, possibly due to inflow of dilute water from neighboring aquifers. After the disturbance, the concentrations of Ca2+, HCO3−, and TDS in groundwater gradually recovered as the aquifer and groundwater levels both tended to recover, possibly due to the reclogging of fractures. This study on the coupled evolution of hydrological processes could enhance our understanding of the effects of mining on aquifer systems.
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00875-6
       
  • Revisiting the Hydraulics of the Aznalcóllar Mine Disaster

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      Abstract: Abstract The Aznalcóllar tailings pond failure (1998) is regarded as one of the severe ecological mine disasters ever reported. The spill of the mine tailings affected more than 60 km of the Agrio and Guadiamar rivers and caused major environmental damage. Despite the event being well-documented with more than 400 scientific publications, including two special issues and two reviews, several hydraulic uncertainties and inconsistencies remain. This paper conducts a state-of-the-art review of the most relevant hydraulic aspects of the mine disaster. It addresses the pond and fluid characteristics, the break type, the breaking time, the flow propagation, the volume potentially stored and subsequently spilled, area dimensions affected by the spill, and the morphological changes generated in the river and riverbanks caused by the spill, and later on by the restoration activities. Several discrepancies and plenty of controversial data have been unearthed that may affect general understanding of the event. In addition, new data is introduced and analysed applying photointerpretation and digital terrain analysis techniques, aiming to derive in essential hydraulic parameters. The most important findings are that the spill could have had a volume about 11.5 hm3, affecting about 86.7 km of river length, twice the most referenced values in the literature, and that applied restoration activities have substantially modified the hydro-sedimentary processes of the affected system. Additionally, a first video observation-based classification reveals that the fluid behaved more like a highly concentrated sediment-laden flow than like a mud flow.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Numerical Simulation of Inrush Water Spreading Through a Mine: A Case
           Study of the Beixinyao Mine, Shanxi Province, China

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      Abstract: Abstract Studies on risk assessment and prediction of inrush water in mines are available, but the evolution process of water inrush events is unclear, which makes it difficult to formulate control and rescue measures. In this paper, a novel numerical simulation approach has been developed to calculate and analyze the spreading process for water inrush in a coal mine in Shanxi Province, China. Possible inrush scenarios for the mine were created based on the water-filling conditions, inrush risk analysis, and the mining works. A spatial model for the mine was constructed, providing the preconditions for numerical modeling. Furthermore, a coupling model for the water flows in the roadway and the goaf was created based on pipe-flow and non-Darcian seepage theories. A numerical solution was then used to resolve the spreading processes for the inrush. The proposed approach was verified through a model experiment for the roadways and a CFD simulation of the goaf. The simulation results for the water inrush scenarios reveal the mine areas susceptible to inundation; these areas can be delineated at different times. The inundation area is related to the mine structure and is mainly controlled by the position of the localized high and low elevation points. The time for inundation is affected by the cumulative water inrush. This study provides a method for assessing the inundation risk of a mine in the event of water inrush disasters.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Dear Reader

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      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00880-9
       
  • The Future Direction of Pit Lakes: Part 2, Corporate and Regulatory
           Closure Needs to Improve Management

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      Abstract: Abstract Pit lakes may present significant risks to ecological and human receiving environments but can also provide beneficial end use opportunities. The understanding of many processes that influence the magnitude of these risks and opportunities remains limited, and even where our understanding is adequate, the application of that knowledge is not consistently applied. From initial planning to long-term closure, regulation and corporate management of pit lake closure can be improved to realise more sustainable pit lake legacies. In this two-part manuscript, we recommend focus areas for future research by academics (Part 1), and strategies to structurally improve the practice of pit lake closure for mining industry regulators, corporate sustainability officers, global practice leads, and site mine closure planners (Part 2). Here we identify barriers that often limit the understanding of pit lake processes and closure practices and suggest ways that corporate leaders, closure practitioners, and regulators can improve pit lake management. Recommended corporate changes include: conducting risk assessments at an early planning stage; funding pit lake research and trials; allowing data sharing and case study publication; avoiding the simplifying assumption of a fully mixed pit lake when making predictions; integrating climate change into pit lake predictions; improving the quality of technical reporting; generating industry guidance for pit lake rehabilitation; maximizing opportunities for subaqueous, in-pit disposal of mine wastes; creating a positive legacy through beneficial uses of pit lakes; and verifying predictions using long-term monitoring. Recommended regulatory advancements include: raising expectations of corporate pit lake closure planning and execution; acknowledging good pit lake closure examples; balancing the need to simulate long closure periods with expectations of model reliability; considering the value of pit lakes as future water resources during permitting; and requiring closure costing and bonding commensurate to closure risk.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00868-5
       
  • Stephen Hancock (1938–2022)

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      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00874-7
       
  • An Analog Model Study on Water–Sand Mixture Inrush Mechanisms During the
           Mining of Shallow Coal Seams

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      Abstract: Abstract Water–sand mixture inrushes into shallow underground workings have caused casualties and property loss. A coupled fluid–solid analog model was developed to simulate the water–sand mixture inrush processes during mining from fracture production and development, based on the hydrogeological conditions at the #22304 working face of the Shigetai coal mine in the Erdos coal basin of northeast China. The deformation characteristics of the overlying strata and water pressure variations within the water-flowing fractured zone were monitored and analyzed. The results show that the water–sand mixture inrush consists of three stages: development of cracks in the overlying strata, initiation of a water inrush channel, and evolution of the inrush channel. The stresses of the overlying strata, water pressures, and permeability characteristics of water and sand inrush pathways change within the three stages. These findings lay a solid foundation for predicting water–sand mixture inrushes in shallow coal mines.
      PubDate: 2022-05-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00870-x
       
  • Laboratory Simulation of Groundwater Along Uranium-Mining-Affected Flow
           Paths Near the Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

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      Abstract: Abstract Mining of volumetrically small, but relatively enriched (average 0.6% U3O8) breccia pipe uranium (BPU) deposits near the Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA has the potential to affect groundwater and springs in the area. Such deposits also contain base metal sulfides that can oxidize to generate acid mine drainage and release trace metals. In this study, sequential batch experiments were conducted to simulate the geochemistry of local shallow groundwater that contacts BPU ore and then moves downgradient through sedimentary strata. The experiments simulated shallow groundwater in a carbonate aquifer followed by contact with BPU ore. The experiments subsequently simulated contact with sedimentary rocks and changing oxygen availability. Concentrations of several contaminants of potential concern became substantially elevated in the waters exposed to BPU ore, including As, Co, Ni, U, and Zn, and to a lesser extent, Mo. Of these, Co, Mo, Ni, and U were minimally attenuated by downgradient processes, whereas Zn was partially attenuated. Sb and Tl concentrations were more moderately elevated but also generally minimally attenuated. Although the mixture of elements is particular to these BPU ore deposits, sulfide oxidation in the ore and carbonate buffering of pH by sedimentary rocks generates patterns of water chemistry common in acid mine drainage settings. Ultimately, downgradient concentrations of elements sourced from BPU ore will also be strongly influenced by non-geochemical factors such as the quantities of water contacting BPU materials, heterogeneity of materials along flow paths, and mixing with waters that have not contacted BPU materials.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00872-9
       
  • Correction to: A New Application of Solvent Extraction to Separate Copper
           from Extreme Acid Mine Drainage Producing Solutions for Electrochemical
           and Biological Recovery Processes

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      PubDate: 2022-04-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10230-022-00865-8
       
 
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