Subjects -> MINES AND MINING INDUSTRY (Total: 82 journals)
Showing 1 - 42 of 42 Journals sorted by number of followers
Stainless Steel World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Metamorphic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Mineralogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Geology and Mining Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Minerals Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Lithos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Minerals, Metallurgy, and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Natural Resources Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clay Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Mining Engineering and Mineral Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mine Water and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Mining Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Resources Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Earth Science : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Physics and Chemistry of Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineralium Deposita     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Convention & Event Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Coal Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Lithology and Mineral Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Geology of Ore Deposits     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Materials Research and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rocks & Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BHM Berg- und Hüttenmännische Monatshefte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Geochemistry and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Mining Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mining Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Extractive Industries and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Technology : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Preparation and Utilization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Central South University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Analytical and Numerical Methods in Mining Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gems & Gemology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mineralogical Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CIM Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration     Hybrid Journal  
Podzemni Radovi     Open Access  
Rudarsko-geološko-naftni Zbornik     Open Access  
Journal of Mining Institute     Open Access  
International Journal of Mining and Geo-Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of China Coal Society     Open Access  
Réalités industrielles     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista del Instituto de Investigación de la Facultad de Ingeniería Geológica, Minera, Metalurgica y Geográfica     Open Access  
Mineral Economics     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals     Open Access  
Gold Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report     Hybrid Journal  
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Journal Cover
Lithology and Mineral Resources
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.664
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1608-3229 - ISSN (Online) 0024-4902
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Material Composition, Provenances, and Geodynamic Settings of the
           Accumulation of Cretaceous Deposits in the West Sakhalin Terrane

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      Abstract: The results of studying the material composition of sandy rocks in Cretaceous deposits of the West Sakhalin Terrane are considered. Studies were carried out to reconstruct the paleogeodynamic environment of rock deposition in the terrane, as well as to determine the tectonic type and rock composition in the feeding sources (hereafter, provenances). Based on the mineral-geochemical parameters, sandstones in the terrane correspond to graywackes representing deposits of the petrogenic or first redeposition cycle (“first cycle”). Their detrital part includes products of the destruction of both basic–ultrabasic volcanic rocks and granite-metamorphic rocks. The deposits are characterized by a low degree of maturity of the clastic material formed mainly due to the mechanical destruction of rocks in provenances, weak lithodynamic processing of the material, and high rate of its burial. Paleogeodynamic interpretation of the obtained data was based on their comparison with the composition of ancient rocks and modern sediments accumulated in known geodynamic situations. The results obtained indicate that sediments were accumulated in the Cretaceous along the continent–ocean boundary in a basin associated with large-scale left-sided transform slips of the Izanagi Plate relative to the Eurasian continent. The provenance, which supplied the clastic material to this basin, combined the sialic land (granite-metamorphic and sedimentary rocks), a mature deeply dissected ensialic island arc, as well as fragments of the Sikhote-Alin accretion prisms formed with the participation of ophiolites.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Glauconite Deposits in Russia: Geological Position, Formation Conditions,
           and Development Perspectives

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      Abstract: The article is devoted to analysis of the glauconite resource base in Russia. The geotectonic and lithological-paleogeographic positions of deposits and large glauconite occurrences, and their formation conditions are considered. Based on the structural position, age, and spatial localization of deposits and occurrences, glauconite provinces are identified and the most promising areas for expanding the glauconite resource base in the Russian Federation are identified. Information on reserves in deposits, the degree of their development, and production volumes is given. An overview of the main producer countries and glauconite production volumes in the world is presented. The geological structure and quality of raw materials in the Karinsk glauconite deposit are described. In tectonic terms, the glauconite deposits and occurrences in Russia are confined to the central parts of plates and platforms, foredeeps, and orogenic belts. The majority of glauconite deposits and occurrences are found in the Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene (Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous in some cases) rocks. Predicted glauconite resources in the Russian Federation are more than 2.5 Gt. The most promising sites include the areas of western Siberia, as well as Moscow and Kirov districts in the European part of Russia.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Gray Silts of the Volga Reservoir Cascade: Main Features of Geochemistry

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      Abstract: The main geochemical characteristics of gray silts of the Volga Reservoir cascade are discussed. Together with sandy varieties, they occupy more than 60% of the total bottom area in some reservoirs. Gray silt samples were taken in the first half of June 2016 during an expedition from the Borok Port to the Astrakhan Port on the R/V Akademik Topchiev. It is shown that the content of Ni, Cr, Y, and Sr in gray silts increases from the Rybinsk Reservoir to the Kuibyshev Reservoir, and gradually decreases downstream. On the contrary, the Ba and Zn contents remain almost unchanged downstream the reservoir cascade. Values of a number of indicator ratios (Cr/Th, Th/Sc, and others) behave approximately the same way. In general, the content of trace elements in the studied gray silt samples is lower than in the Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS). Hence, the grain size composition of gray silts and the PAAS is most likely somewhat different because of certain diluting effect of the nonclay component. Gray silts sampled from the Kama River mouth opposite the Atabaevo Settlement (station 39) are characterized by a significantly lower (La/Yb)N value than other samples studied in this work, indicating a fundamentally different (probably, Uralian') source of the aluminosiliciclastic material in this sample.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Results of the U/Pb Dating of Detrital Zircons from Upper Cretaceous
           Deposits in the Novaya Sibir Island (New Siberian Islands, Anjou Island
           Group)

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      Abstract: The U–Pb (LA-ICP-MS) dating of detrital zircons from the Upper Cretaceous Derevyannye Gory Formation in the Novaya Sibir Island revealed that tuffites and tuffaceous sandstones contain zircons widely ranging in age from Archean to Upper Cretaceous. The weighted average age of the youngest zircon population is 88 ± 1.0 Ma, which constrains the lower age limit for sedimentation of the Derevyannye Gory Formation to the Coniacian. The clastic material was transported from the southwest and south to the north and northeast. The main source areas for the Upper Cretaceous sedimentary basin in the Novaya Sibir Island were the Upper Jurassic–Neocomian terrigenous sequences of the New Siberian–Chukotka fold area, lithotectonic complexes of the South Anyui suture, as well as the northern part of the Verkhoyansk–Kolyma fold area, and post-orogenic Aptian–Albian volcanic and plutonic rocks from the Lyakhov Islands and Svyatoi Nos Cape. Triassic terrigenous rocks of the northern Verkhoyansk region could serve as additional sources of clastics. It is also possible that the clastic material was partially supplied from the western Anjou Islands as a result of erosion of the Aptian–Lower Albian volcaniclastic–siliciclastic rocks. The Late Cretaceous zircon population is related to the Late Cretaceous explosive acid volcanism in the eastern Arctic region.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Carbonaceous Matter of Paleoproterozoic Ministromatolites in Karelia

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      Abstract: Two main morphotypes were studied in the Paleoproterozoic complex of Karelian ministromatolites: columnar active-branched and columnar unbranched. The composition and ultramicrostructures of these morphotypes were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopy. The dolomite and quartz compositions in all of the studied structures were studied. Accessory minerals, such as rutile, fluorapatite, hematite, and phlogopite, were identified. Syngenetic carbonaceous matter (CM) is found in stromatolite layers as repeated dispersion of rounded amorphous carbon clots less than 5 µm in size. Temperature of the metamorphic rock transformation was estimated based on the degree of CM ordering.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Stratigraphy and Depositional Conditions of the
           Tithonian(')–Berriasian Deposits in the Tonas River Region (Central
           Crimea)

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      Abstract: The composition and depositional environments of the Tithonian(')–Berriasian deposits in the Tonas River basin (Central Crimea) are considered. The paper describes the carbonate rock association represented by various types of limestones, breccias, calcareous clays, and marls. Microfacies types of rocks in thin sections are comparable with the standard microfacies formed on the slopes and foothill of carbonate basins. A fault-controlled distally steepened ramp model has been proposed to interpret this depositional environment. Microfacies types of the calcibreccia lithoclasts confirm the gravitational transport of debris from the inner parts of the ramp, thrombolite reefs included. Sections with similar succession are known in the Swiss Alps.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Riftogenesis in the Arctic: Processes, Evolution Trend, and Hydrocarbon
           Generation

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      Abstract: The article examines the regional patterns of rifting in the Arctic and assesses the impact of large (supra-regional) rift systems on the geological evolution of the region. Against the background of the description of main Arctic structures, the Atlantic–Arctic rift system (AARS) is described as a tectonotype of a large planetary geophorm that has evolved from continental rifting to spreading proper with the development of a full-fledged ocean. The main properties of this system are its development towards the North Pole, the longitudinal orientation of the rifts, their separation by latitudinal faults, and predominantly sinistral shear displacement of individual segments. We believe that such a structure reflects the influence of the rotational factor on distribution of lithospheric masses of the Earth. Their tendency to the equilibrium position relative to the rotation axis is implemented by movements towards the equator and along it. The outflow of masses to low latitudes makes possible the growth of the rift system, but does not contribute to its further development after reaching the Pole. This phenomenon is of general nature and determines the development of all longitudinal rift systems, which leads to their spatial convergence and attenuation of dynamics in the circumpolar space. Within the Arctic region, in addition to the Atlantic–Arctic system, areas of possible termination of the West Siberian, Okhotsk–Verkhoyansk, and East Pacific rift systems are considered. It is assumed that their evolution initiated the destruction of the continental lithosphere of the Arctic region and determined the subsequent transformations of its structure. Special attention is paid to the problems of the possible influence of rifting on the hydrocarbon generation due to serpentinization of hyperbasites, when the lithosphere is penetrated by faults to the upper mantle depths, as well as on the remobilization of gases as a result of the disturbance of both gas hydrate reservoirs and permafrost. It is shown that the greatest generation of methane is generally associated with the development of faults in the cold lithosphere and serpentinization of mantle rocks.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222020031
       
  • Distinctive Features of Two Genetic Types of Sulfide Ores in the Central
           Atlantic

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      Abstract: The results of long-term studies of the localization conditions, morphology, structure, mineral and chemical compositions of modern ocean sulfide ores, carbonate sediments, as well as ore- and metal-bearing sediments, at 13°–20° N Mid-Atlantic Ridge are summarized. This paper considers the features of sulfide ores formed in various geological and physicochemical environments: (1) on the bottom surface during the hydrothermal solution–seawater (“black smokers”) interaction; (2) under the bottom surface during the hydrothermal solution–biogenic carbonate sediment (hydrothermal-metasomatic ore) interaction. These ore types have some common features, and they are not always distinguished by researchers. A set of distinctive features is proposed to identify the hydrothermal-metasomatic ores that can be used in the search and prediction of sulfide ores in the ocean.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222020043
       
  • Peculiarities of Clay Mineral Formation in Sediments from the Hydrothermal
           System Center, Hole 858B, Juan de Fuca Ridge

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      Abstract: Clay minerals in Holocene–Pleistocene sediments from Hole 858B DSDP drilled at 20 m from the black smoker in the Dead Dog hydrothermal field, axial valley of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, were scrutinized for the first time by modeling the X-ray diffraction patterns in combination with the splitting of 060 reflection profiles into individual maximums. In the section of the sedimentary cover drilled to a depth of 38.6 mbsf, we can distinguish three sediment groups, with successive transformation of clay minerals reflecting a high temperature gradient. Terrigenous clay minerals (dioctahedral illite, mixed-layer smectite-illite, and trioctahedral chlorite) are preserved in the 1.97–7.2 mbsf interval. Terrigenous illite and chlorite were preserved and trioctahedral mixed-layer chlorite-smectite and corrensite were formed in the 7.2–16.7 mbsf interval. At 16.7–38 mbsf, all terrigenous clay minerals were transformed into a new assemblage of trioctahedral phases: corrensite minerals, mixed-layer talc-smectite, and chlorite. Chlorite alone was found at 38.4 mbsf. Structural transitions of clay minerals imply their formation at each stage by the dissolution and synthesis. Metalliferous sediments in the 0–1.97 mbsf interval comprise a mixture of partially altered terrigenous clay minerals and the indicator Fe-rich dioctahedral mixed-layer mica-smectite, which was formed from a hydrothermal fluid mixed with seawater. The composition of clay minerals in the 11.65–12.60 mbsf interval was transformed by high temperature of the hydrothermal fluid penetrating from the discharge channel of the hydrothermal convective system into the tectonic horizontal fracture of the sedimentary cover in the 10.41–11.65 mbsf interval.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222020067
       
  • Sedimentary Rocks in the Basement of the Alpha–Mendeleev Rise,
           Arctic Ocean

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      Abstract: The results of petrographic, petrogeochemical and isotopic studies of sedimentary rocks obtained from bedrock outcrops of the Alpha–Mendeleev Rise, Arctic Ocean, using manipulators of a submarine research vessel (SRV) of the Russian Ministry of Defense during two expeditions conducted in 2014 and 2016 are considered and discussed in the article. Three sequences are identified in the basement of this Rise. The lower sequence (O3–S2) is composed of pure dolomite rocks (hereafter, dolomites proper), as well as dolomites with the terrigenous and bioclastic admixture, limestones with the terrigenous and bioclastic admixture, and quartz sandstones. They were formed in the coastal and shallow shelf environments of the tropical sea associated with carbonate platforms adjacent to river discharge areas. The middle sequence (D2–D3) is composed of limestones with the terrigenous and bioclastic admixture, as well as quartz–feldspar sandstones, which originated in coastal and shallow environments of the tropical sea. The upper sequence (K1) is represented by the calcareous, clayey, and calcareous–clayey sandstones formed in shallow marine conditions. Maturity degree of the clastic material, which makes up sandstones of the three sequences, decreases from almost monomictic quartz arenites and sublitharenites of the lower sequence to subarkoses of the middle sequence and subarkoses, arkoses, litharenites, and wackes of the upper sequence. All sediments were accumulated in interacratonic sedimentary basins developed successively at passive margins of the Mendeleev microcontinent along with supercontinents Laurussia and Laurasia.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222020079
       
  • Facies Control of the Reservoir Distribution in Lower Devonian Deposits at
           the Eastern Edge of the Khoreiver Depression (Timan–Pechora
           Petroliferous Basin)

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      Abstract: The Lower Devonian interval in the northeastern Timan–Pechora petroliferous basin is composed of polygenic carbonate rocks. Various depositional environments governed the distribution of different type and quality reservoirs in these rocks. Sedimentation took place in vast tidal plains, shallow sublittoral zones, and carbonate shoals within them. The facies heterogeneity of carbonate rocks led to a different intensity of postsedimentary transformations reflected in the complex morphology of pore space and the consequent variable filtration-capacity characteristics of the Lower Devonian reservoir rocks governing the main productivity of the Lower Paleozoic Timan–Pechora petroliferous basin.
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490221060080
       
  • Lower Paleozoic Deposits in the Transition Zone between the Carbonate
           Platform and Black Shale Basin (Eastern Taimyr)

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      Abstract: Sedimentological features of the Upper Cambrian–Middle Ordovician rocks exposed in eastern Taimyr in the Faddey Gulf area are discussed. The studied sections belong to the transitional facies zone located between the carbonate platform (Siberian Platform continuation) in the south and a relatively deep-water basin in the north. The studied deposits compose a genetically coherent sequence formed in the distal zone of the siliciclastic–carbonate ramp at a depth exceeding the storm wave base. The lower (Upper Cambrian–lowermost Ordovician) part of the sequence is represented by limestones, dolomitized carbonate siltstones, and sandstones with shale layers. The upper (Lower–Middle Ordovician) part of the studied interval is dominated by shales with thin layers of carbonate siltstones. The carbonate detritus was sourced from a shallow-water shelf located south of the studied sections. The siliciclastic admixture in carbonate siltstones and sandstones was sourced from an island in the northern part of the modern Siberian Platform. The sandy material was transported by storm bottom currents; the fine-grained particles, by surface currents and winds as particulates and suspension clouds in the bottom water. Carbonate sandstones with the typical turbidite sedimentary structures, common in the lower part of the section, were deposited by turbidity currents initiated by storms. At that time, a prominent break likely existed in the ramp profile. The predominant NE orientation of flute casts indicates the alongslope (or along the trough axis) transport of material by bottom currents. The ramp topography was leveled in the second half of the Early Ordovician and in the Middle Ordovician.
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222010035
       
  • Mineralogical–Geochemical Features, Genesis, and Age of Refractory Clays
           in the Shulepovo Deposit (Ryazan Region, Central European Russia)

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      Abstract: The Shulepovo refractory clay deposit was discovered in the 1970s. It consists of subhorizontal kaolinite lenses located at different depths (1–20 m) in a clay–sand sequence tentatively assigned to the Neogene or, possibly, Late Pliocene ('). Application of the X-ray diffraction method coupled with the UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy established an almost monomineral composition of lenses, with a minimal (not more than 5%) content of quartz, as well as admixture of halloysite and mixed-layer smectite–vermiculite. Calculation of the Hinckley index (HI) for kaolinite revealed a high ordering degree, suggesting its mainly authigenic origin. The bulk chemical composition of kaolinite samples is close to that of pure kaolinite, with an insignificant (not more than 2%) Fe and Ti. Zonation in the chemical composition alteration was not detected within the lens. Studies of the host sand–clay sequence revealed that it can be assigned to the alluvial (channel and oxbow) facies. The formation model of kaolinite lenses in the Shulepovo deposit includes the following processes: major transformations of the terrigenous–clastic kaolinite in stagnant waters, its crystallization, and formation of the authigenic kaolinite due to the decomposition of the clastic aluminosilicate minerals in a chemically aggressive medium.
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222010047
       
  • Mud Volcanic Fluids of the Kerch–Taman Region: Geochemical
           Reconstructions and Regional Trends: Communication 2. Genesis of Mud
           Volcanic Gases and Regional Geochemical Trends

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      Abstract: The chemical and isotopic signatures of mud volcanic fluids were determined for 42 mud volcanoes of the Kerch–Taman region (Crimea–Caucasus district). The analysis of spatial geochemical trends of mud-volcanic waters and gases and estimates of formation temperatures using the Mg–Li geothermometer allowed us to attribute the mud volcanic fluids to sediments of the Maikop Formation, the thickness of which in the studied region varies from 1 to 5–6 km. It was shown that an increase of CO2 and \({\text{HCO}}_{3}^{ - }\) concentrations and values of δ18O in H2O and δ13C in CH4, as well as a decrease of Cl– concentrations and δ13C values in \({\text{HCO}}_{3}^{ - }\) and CO2 correlate with increasing thickness of the Maikop sediments in the central part of the Kerch–Taman region. At the periphery of this region, in the foothills of the Caucasus and Crimea orogens, this correlation is absent. Active tectonic processes in these areas provided contribution of additional “higher temperature” sources of water and gas to fluids in the mud volcanic systems. Using the Kerch–Taman region gases as an example, it was shown for the first time that the enrichment of mud volcanic fluids in isotopically heavy CO2 (δ13C CO2 to +22.8‰; δ13C HCO3 to +38.9‰) occurs within a narrow temperature range (40–80°C). At higher temperatures, the accumulation of isotopically heavy CO2 is ceased. These trends suggest that the high-δ13C CO2 is related to the hydrocarbon biodegradation. Using δ13C (in CH4 and CO2) and δ2H (in CH4) classification, it was shown that at least three methane sources could participate in the CH4 balance: microbial (primary), connected with “biodegradation” (secondary), and thermogenic. The content of “secondary” methane in some cases can reach almost 100%. In the studied mud volcanic gases, the isotopic composition of molecular nitrogen was determined for the first time. The δ15N values vary from –5.2 to –0.1‰ (δ15Nav = –2.3 ± 0.9‰, n = 35) and indicate a significant admixture of the non-atmospheric nitrogen. A negative correlation between values of δ15N in N2, δ13C in \({\text{HCO}}_{3}^{ - }\) , and the calculated fluid generation temperatures (t(Mg-Li)) make it possible to attribute the origin of this nitrogen to the transformation of organic matter during the maturation of sediments.
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222010059
       
  • Genetic Interpretation of the Textural–Structural Appearance of Early
           Permian Sylvinite Rocks in the Caspian Basin

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      Abstract: The paper presents the results of studying sylvinite rocks of the Lower Permian halogenic formation in the West and East Perelyub sites with perspectives for the commercial development of potassium salts in the Saratov region and in the Gremyachinsk potash deposit (Volgograd region, Russian Federation) by the textural–structural analysis methods to refine their formation conditions. A new method is proposed for studying the structural–textural features of sylvinites and sylvite–halite rocks. Typification of sylvinite structures and identification of the main genetic types of their texture are accomplished. Based on the literature data and the results of studying the core material, a scheme of the structure–texture classification is proposed for the chemogenic-sedimentary potassic rocks, including those subjected to postsedimentary transformations.
      PubDate: 2022-02-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490222010060
       
  • Mud Volcanic Fluids of the Kerch–Taman Region: Geochemical
           Reconstructions and Regional Trends. Communication 1: Geochemical Features
           and Genesis of Mud-Volcanic Waters

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      Abstract: The chemical and isotopic characteristics (δ18O and δ2H) of water from 42 mud volcanoes of the Kerch–Taman region (Crimean–Caucasus district) were analyzed. The formation temperatures of mud volcanic waters were estimated using the Mg-Li hydrochemical geothermometer (t(Mg-Li) = 40–134°C). It was revealed that dehydration waters released during the smectite–to-illite transformation play significant role in the total fluid balance of the mud volcanic systems (up to 80% of the total fluid volume). These waters are characterized by low Cl ion contents, δ18O from +13 to +17‰, and δ2H from –25 to –20‰ relative to VPDB, and high concentrations of \({\text{HCO}}_{3}^{ - }\) , B, Li, Ba and other trace elements. Correlations between the concentration of HCO3, B, δ18O, and t(Mg-Li) values were revealed.
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490221060043
       
  • Silicified Woods Consist with Malachite, Azurite, and Hematite in the
           Middle Eocene Çekerek Formation, Tokat—Turkey

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      Abstract: In the vicinity of Yücepinar Village of Zile district of Tokat province, there are silicified wood formations in agglomerate levels in the Çekerek formation Middle Eocene aged. These formations consist of well— preserved tree trunks of about 1.5 m in diameter or branches and trunk parts in mm—1 m length. Generally, they are open-brownish cream; in some places they demonstrate dark brown, green, and blue colors. According to XRD and FT-IR analysis results of the samples, it is determined that the silicified wood formations are composed of quartz, cristobalite, malachite, azurite, hematite, graphite, and goethite minerals. According to XRF and ICP-MS analyzes of silicified woods, the high iron content (Fe2O3 8.29–63.79%) in the samples causes red brown color while the increase in copper content (Cu >10 000 ppm) causes blue and green colors. As a result of the cabochon cuts made from the silicified wood samples to be used for jewellery, products which have rich color composition and silky brilliance, keep the polish well and with high-strength are obtained. Particularly because of its color compositions, it is separated from similar silicified wood samples on the Earth. As a result of the surface studies carried out in the study area, it was observed that the silicified wood formations did not propagate much. In order to determine the reserves of these formations, which are thought to have significant economic value, it is necessary to carry out a more detailed exploration activity with trenching and drilling in the region.
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S002449022106002X
       
  • Determination of Key Beds from the Cap Rocks of Oil Reservoirs Using a
           Novel Method, Case Study: The Gachsaran Formation, Southwest Iran

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      Abstract: The use of key beds in the cap rocks of the oil reservoirs is crucial. Lack of awareness of these key beds will have serious risks and damages. The Gachsaran oil field is located 220 km southwest of Ahwaz-Iran. The former caprock consists of six key beds (A, B, C, D, E, and F). At the time of writing this paper these key beds are being used during excavations and drilling to determine the site of casing points. What has made utilizing these key beds during excavations difficult however, is use of diamond drill bits which results in the shattering of excavated samples. As such, it has become challenging to learn more about these key beds through studying petrographic thin sections in microscopy. These key beds were observed during the investigation at the drill sites. Later, the excavated samples were studied in the Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) machine, using a semi-quantitative method to analyze the elemental differences in those key beds. In addition to the identification of various lithological and diagenetic properties of the caprock, this study leads to the introduction of four new key beds based on geochemical properties. Some of the most important differences within the formation include those between the caprock anhydrite and the non-caprock anhydrite, namely the presence of potassium and titanium and the absence of chlorine and sodium in the caprock section. The four new key beds introduced from this study using elemental differences were named as key beds-1, 2, 3, and 4.
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490221060055
       
  • Depositional Environments and Paleogeographic Evolution during the
           Formation of Upper Paleozoic Terrigenous Rocks in Taimyr

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      Abstract: Upper Paleozoic sections in Taimyr comprise genetic rock complexes of different zones: deep-water shelf; offshore transition zone; shoals, deltas, and beaches of open coasts; bars; shallow lagoons; coastal lagoons; swampy coastal alluvial plain; and drained (distal) alluvial plain. Peculiarities of their spatiotemporal relationships became the basis for compiling paleogeographic schemes of short geological time intervals corresponding to the regional transgressive and regressive maximums. Before the Artinskian (Early Permian), the “Yenisei Land” existed in the southwest, with river systems transporting the terrigenous material to a marine basin opening to the northeast. First signs of the “Kara Land” existence in the north are recorded in the Kungurian sections. In the Middle‒Late Permian, a single “Yenisei–Kara Land” was formed, and the eastern part of Taimyr became a giant lagoon of the “Verkhoyansk Sea.”
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490221060067
       
  • Fossil Coals (Gagates) from Pleistocene Sediments in Black Sea Terraces,
           Southeastern Crimea

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      Abstract: The marine Quaternary (Chaudian) terrace V in the outskirts of Sudak accommodates layers saturated with lenses and fragments of fossil coal scrutinized by the lithological, coal petrographical, and paleobotanical methods. The results show that this brown coal of the vitrinite composition can be defined as gagate (or jet), a variety of the humic coal formed mainly from the remnants of Araucariaceae or similar coniferous taxa. In terms of the microtexture and composition of plant remnants, this coal is similar to that in the basement bed of terrace V and was likely redeposited from sediments of the Callovian (Middle Jurassic) Kopsel Formation.
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S0024490221060079
       
 
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