Subjects -> MINES AND MINING INDUSTRY (Total: 82 journals)
Showing 1 - 42 of 42 Journals sorted by number of followers
Stainless Steel World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Metamorphic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Mineralogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Geology and Mining Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clay Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Minerals Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Lithos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Minerals, Metallurgy, and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Natural Resources Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Mining Engineering and Mineral Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Mine Water and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Mining Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Resources Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Earth Science : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Coal Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Physics and Chemistry of Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Convention & Event Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineralium Deposita     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Lithology and Mineral Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Coal Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geology of Ore Deposits     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rocks & Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Geochemistry and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BHM Berg- und Hüttenmännische Monatshefte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Technology : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Extractive Industries and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Preparation and Utilization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Mining Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Materials Research and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gems & Gemology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Analytical and Numerical Methods in Mining Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Instituto de Investigación de la Facultad de Ingeniería Geológica, Minera, Metalurgica y Geográfica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Central South University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mineralogical Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CIM Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration     Hybrid Journal  
Podzemni Radovi     Open Access  
Rudarsko-geološko-naftni Zbornik     Open Access  
Journal of Mining Institute     Open Access  
International Journal of Mining and Geo-Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of China Coal Society     Open Access  
Réalités industrielles     Full-text available via subscription  
Mineral Economics     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals     Open Access  
Gold Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Geology of Ore Deposits
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.54
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1555-6476 - ISSN (Online) 1075-7015
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Minerals and T–P parameters of the Evolution of the Lukkulaysvaara
           Gabbro–Norite Massif, North Karelia

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      Abstract: Gabbro–norites and gabbros from the Lukkulaisvaara layered ultramafic massif (Northern Karelia) was studied. The T–P parameters of its formation were determined from data on the compositions of the minerals making up these rocks. It is suggested that the Lukkulaisvaara massif was formed in three stages: the first, magmatic stage was associated with intrusion of a mafic melt and the onset of rock crystallization at temperatures above 1000–1200°C and pressure of ~10–13.5 kbar; autometasomatic reworking by fluids took place at the second, late magmatic stage; the third (hydrothermal) stage was associated with later processes. Temperatures below 800°C may reflect either the last stages of a magmatic process or a postmagmatic high-temperature hydrothermal stage.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Geochemical Characteristics and Tectonic Setting of the Ore-bearing
           Granite Conglomerate of the Western Qinglong Uranium Ore Field in the
           Shigaizi Region and its Relationship with Uranium Mineralization

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      Abstract: The Qinglong uranium ore field, including the Gangou and Panlingtou uranium deposits, is situated on the northern margin of the North China Craton (NCC). The Haifanggou Formation is a major uranium-bearing horizon in the ore field. We conducted petrographic, geochemical, electron probe, and high-resolution scanning electron microscope studies aimed at analyzing granite conglomerate samples of the Shigaizi ore-bearing horizon, which is located in the western Qinglong uranium ore field. We determined the geodynamic evolution and mineralization of the region by comparing the Gangou and Panlingtou uranium deposits. Geochemically, the granite conglomerate has a high silica content (62.53 wt %–74.70% wt %) and is rich in alkalis (4.41–7.98 wt %) and Al2O3 (7.62–17.58 wt %) but poor in MgO (0.35–3.01 wt %) and CaO (0.17–1.80 wt %). It exhibits a weak negative Eu anomaly (0.81–1.12), is enriched in LREEs, Rb, Th, U, and K and severely depleted in Nb, Ta, Ti, and P, indicating that it is similar to I-type granite and has the characteristics of adakitic rocks. The main uranium mineral is pitchblende, which is associated with pyrite, organic matter (soot), and calcite. The Shigaizi ore-bearing horizon displays many similarities with the Gangou and Panlingtou uranium deposits. Common features include the whole-rock compositions and mineral chemistry. Based on these results and the evolution of the northern NCC, we suggest that the granite conglomerate formed in an active continental margin environment and have a great prospecting potential. The lack of deep prospecting may be the main reason why the concealed large and thick orebodies remain undiscovered.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Mineral–Geochemical Features of Paleoproterozoic
           Gold–Copper–Sulfide, Noble Metal-Copper–Uranium, and
           Noble-Metal–Copper–Uranium–Vanadium Deposits and Ore Occurrences of
           Karelia

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      Abstract: Gold–copper–sulfide, noble-metal–copper–uranium and noble-metal–copper–uranium–vanadium mineralization in Paleoproterozoic structures of the Karelian Craton is associated with the evolution of the large regional Lapland–Onega rift structure in the Svecofennian. A characteristic feature of the deposits and ore occurrences that formed at the orogenic stage is the appearance of selenium minerals. On the territory of Karelia, ore objects of the separate Onega, Kumsinskaya, Pergubskaya, Severo-Vygozero, Lekhta and Elmozersko-Segozero structures were studied and materials on the ore mineralization of Paana-Kuolajarvi structure were generalized. The element concentrations in ores and near-ore metasomatites were determined by ICP-MS analysis, and the contents of individual elements was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Ore minerals were studied by scanning electron microscopy. It has been established that the ores of the studied deposits and ore occurrences are represented by a geochemical assemblage of elements, including Cu, Au, Ag, Pb, Mo, Pd, Pt, Co, Ni, U, Se, Bi, Te, As, V, REE, Ba, and Fe ( in various proportions). Vein-disseminated ore mineralization is accompanied by low-temperature metasomatites: alkaline (albitites, eisites), ferromagnesian, mica or beresites, confined to deformation zones in the host Paleoproterozoic sequences. Basalts, quartzite sandstones, and carbonate deposits of the Jatulian suprahorizon; carbonaceous, mafic, and ultramafic sequences of the Ludicovian suprahorizon, as well as gabbrodolerites intruding them, were subjected to alteration. The ore mineralization of noble-metal–copper–uranium–vanadium and noble-metal–copper–uranium deposits and occurrences (in which the noble metals are predominantly Au, Pd) is represented by copper sulfides and selenides, lead, silver, gold, palladium; less frequently, platinum, native gold; more rarely, bismuth, bismuth tellurides; as well as uraninite, vanadium micas, molybdenite, REE minerals, hematite, and goethite, which are typomorphic minerals of these deposits and occurrences. Among hydrothermal selenides, clausthalite, naumannite, fischesserite, palladseite, padmaite, sudovikite, bogdanovichite, paraguanahuatite, eukairite, umangite, klockmanite, timannite, tyrrelite, and cadmoselite have been established, as well as selenium-bearing sulfides (Se-malyshevite, weibullite, selenogalena, Se-bearing bornite, chalcocite, and molybdenite). Native selenium and selenates were found in oxidation zones. Typomorphic assemblages of Au–Cu sulfide deposits and occurrences in the more eroded central part of the Karelian Craton are represented by chalcopyrite, bornite, pyrite, galena, molybdenite, silver sulfides, gold, electrum, Se-bearing chalcocite, and hematite. Selenides are less common in these ores—among them clausthalite, naumannite, bogdanovichite, and fischesserite have been identified.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Main Features of the REE Metallogeny through Geological Time

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      Abstract: The distribution of rare earth element (REE) deposits and their resources through geological time has been analyzed. The analysis is based on data on 103 deposits distributed around the world with a resource estimate of at least 100  000 t of lanthanoid and yttrium oxides. The variability in the formation of significant REE accumulations through geological time is demonstrated by comparing supercontinent cycles based on the ore resources of different types and ages. In the Kenoran cycle, only one deposit was identified in which the REE resources quantitatively exceeded the specified limit: a modified paleoplacer with initially detrital U–REE mineralization. The placer type is also represented in the Amasian cycle, but by deposits with different ore specialization. Carbonatite, hypergene in carbonatites, syenite, and alkali-granitic types are represented by deposits in all other supercontinent cycles. Significant foidic-type deposits were formed in the Columbian, Rodinian, and Pangean cycles; subalkali-granitic type deposits were formed, in the Columbian and Rodinian cycles; and ion-adsorption orebodies are known only in the Amasian cycle. On the geological time scale, deposits of all types are distributed very unevenly. The maximum resources are estimated in deposits of the Rodinian cycle. The other cycles, not counting the extremely nonproductive Kenoran cycle, are 2–2.5 times inferior to the Rodinian cycle in this aspect. We have also analyzed the distribution in deposits of different types and ages of those light and heavy REE that are the most valuable on the world market. Deposits with a pronounced specialization in different groups of such REE have been identified. They occur in the sampling lists of deposits of all supercontinent cycles, except the Kenoran.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Genesis of Barite–Galena Ores at the Ushkatyn-III Deposit, Central
           Kazakhstan: Analysis of Geological, Mineralogical, and Isotopic (δ34S,
           δ13C, δ18O) Data

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      Abstract: — The Ushkatyn-III deposit is located in Central Kazakhstan, 300 km west of the city of Karaganda. The ore member consists of Upper Devonian carbonate rocks containing stratiform layers of hydrothermal–sedimentary iron–manganese and hydrothermal barite–lead ores. The study objects include barite–lead (barite–galena) ores localized within a reef limestone member. The major ore minerals are calcite, barite, and galena; characteristic minor minerals include quartz, hematite, sphalerite, pyrite, muscovite–phengite, chamosite, K-feldspar, albite, fluorite, dolomite, rhodochrosite, and siderite; and accessory minerals include native silver, rutile, ilmenite, chalcocite, acanthite, chalcopyrite, pyrargyrite, tetrahedrite, zircon, pyrophyllite, and apatite. Cerussite, pyromorphite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and malachite are identified as supergene minerals. Cerussite is one of the main minerals in the oxidation zone. Three major ore varieties are distinguished in terms of texture. They are related by layered–banded, pocketlike–net, and massive spotted mutual transitions. The ore structure is indicative of the fact that barite and galena were mostly deposited in open pores and fractures of incompletely lithified carbonate deposits. Based on δ34Sbarite = 10.9–15.3‰, the barite formation involved isotopically heavy sulfur of the sulfate ion dissolved in seawater, whereas the δ34Ssulfides (galena) values from –25.7 to –12.6‰ record 32S-enriched (light isotope) hydrogen sulfide generated in the course of bacterial sulfate reduction. A formation model is proposed for the Ushkatyn-III deposit. According to this model, its barite–galena, iron, and manganese ores were products of a single hydrothermal system that developed within a thick sedimentary sequence. Barite–galena ores formed near the seabed surface with the discharge of hydrothermal solutions in internal zones of the still-forming reef. The ore material was deposited in the area where the hydrothermal solutions carrying Ba, Pb, Zn, Fe, Mn, and other elements were mixed with near-surface waters filling pores and fractures inside the reef, characterized by bacterial reduction of seawater sulfate ion to hydrogen sulfide. Penetrating through the reef, the fluids lost most of the Ba and Pb, deposited as barite and galena, but retained Zn, Fe, and Mn in dissolved form. Subsequently, Fe and Mn were deposited as oxides: Fe, on the reef surface or at some distance from it, and Mn, at a considerable distance. Zn dispersed in the surrounding space without forming any orebodies.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Gold-Bearing Placer Assemblages in the East of the Siberian Platform:
           Origin and Prospects

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      Abstract: For the first time, based on a study of the typomorphic features of placer gold and its distribution patterns, the predicted gold potential of the east of the Siberian Platform is substantiated. The identified morphological and mineralogical–geochemical indicators in placer gold have made it possible to establish the genesis of placers (alluvial, aeolian, etc.) and predict the types of primary sources. Gold-bearing placers were formed from ore assemblages that do not form bed placers. This explains the noneconomic placers recommended for complex diamond, gold, and platinum mining. Detection of Witwatersrand-type gold-bearing conglomerates is problematic, since there are no geological prerequisites for their formation in a region. For the east of the Siberian Platform, the following assemblage types of primary gold sources have been identified: low-sulfidation gold–quartz, gold–iron–quartzite, gold–copper–porphyry, Precambrian gold–platinoid and gold–silver, gold–rare-metal, gold–sulfide–quartz of Mesozoic ore formation stages. All of these correspond to certain geological and structural positions, and their identification contributes to more correct selection of methods of prospecting for deposits. The predicted types of primary sources, except for gold–platinoid, are not associated with mafic magmatism. A new source of ore gold has been established in the ultramafic alkaline carbonatite complex of the Tomtor massif. Promising objects are Carlin-type gold–sulfide quartz ore occurrences, predicted in terrigenous carbonate sequences spatially confined to deep-seated faults, repeatedly rejuvenated in the Mesozoic–Cenozoic, as well as Cripple Creek–type gold–silver occurrences in the Vilyui and Udzha paleorifts, where andesite–dacite volcanism had occurred.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701522020027
       
  • Evaluation of the Radioecological Situation in the Elkon Uranium Ore
           District (Aldan Shield) by Field Radiometry Methods

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      Abstract: Radioecological studies were carried out using field radiometry methods in the Elkon uranium ore district, located on the northern margin of the Aldan Highlands in southern Yakutia. It is shown that in sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks of the district, the exposure dose rate of gamma radiation varies from 6 to 340 μR/h, depending on the concentrations of natural radionuclides (NRN). In the studied rocks, the partial contributions of NRN to the dose rate of gamma radiation depend on their genesis. According to the existing radiation hygienic standards, in terms of the effective specific activity of radionuclides (Aeff) the studied rocks correspond to several radiation safety categories (first, second, and third) for building materials. The unfavorable radioecological situation in the district, caused by numerous outcrops of granitoid rocks and metasomatic formations that generate an elevated natural radiation background (60–1100 μR/h), is complicated by significant volumes of radioactive rocks and ores stored on the exposed surface during underground exploratory mine workings. In Aeff (1046–19 658 Bq/kg), these dumps are mainly attributed to especially hazardous and hazardous categories of radioactive mineral raw materials. Unprotected storage of radioactive dumps has led to active hydrogen migration of uranium from them, to accumulate in aquatic plants, hydromorphic soils, and stream bottom sediments. As a result, in these natural formations, the specific activities of uranium (25 830–59 113 and 492 000 Bq/kg) correspond to levels characteristic of low- and medium-level solid radioactive waste. Currently, in the Elkon district, environmental protection problems remain extremely relevant due to the uncontrolled state of radioactive dumps.
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701522020039
       
  • Uranium-Bearing Volcanic Structures: Streltsovka (Russia), Xiangshan
           (China), and McDermitt (United States). A Comparative Analysis of the
           Petrology of Felsic Volcanics and the Composition of Near-Ore
           Metasomatites

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      Abstract: — This article provides a comparative analysis of data on the petrology of ore-bearing felsic volcanics and low-temperature near-ore metasomatites of the Streltsovka volcanic structure in Eastern Transbaikalia, the Xiangshan structure in Southern China, and the McDermitt structure in the Western United States. The ore-bearing structures are represented by relatively large resurgent (revived) calderas (Streltsovka and McDermitt) and the Xiangshan volcanic dome with several small calderas in its apical part. The leading geodynamic mechanism of the development and functioning of the magmatic ore systems of these volcanic structures is a crustal extension setting expressed by rifting, which took place during the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous in Eastern Transbaikalia; the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleocene in Southern China; and the Miocene, in the McDermitt caldera within the Yellowstone hotspot. Magmatic activity produced bimodal volcanic series of basites–felsic volcanics–basites, and the host rocks of uranium mineralization, as a rule, consist of metaluminous or moderately peraluminous high-K effusive and/or subvolcanic rock types corresponding to A2-type “anorogenic granites.” Rhyolites, rhyodacites, trachyrhyolites, extrusive syenites, quartz syenites, rhyolite dikes and domes of all three volcanic structures are enriched in fluorine and display a fairly high degree of fractionation. The leading types of near-ore metasomatic alteration are preore illitization and argillization, which are succeeded by synore albitization, carbonatization, chloritization, and fluoritization, followed by postore argillization. Ore field structures are defined by the presence of delimiting (ring) faults and the proportions of intracaldera fluid conduits; and ore deposit and orebody structure, by the combination of intrastratal steeply dipping and gently dipping fault. It is demonstrated that, despite different time frames and evolutionary profiles of the structure-forming processes, these volcanic structures display numerous similarities in the evolution of magmatic and hydrothermal processes, and this accounts for their definition as “typical” ore-bearing structures in the current IAEA classification of volcanic-related uranium deposits.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701522010056
       
  • Carbonate Groundwater—An Ore-Preserving Factor at Uranium Deposits of
           The Khiagda Ore Field (Republic of Buryatia)

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      Abstract: The article presents factual material substantiating the mixed supply regime of the ore-bearing aquifer at uranium deposits of the Khiagda ore field. There are two competing flows: infiltration of oxygen-containing meteoric waters and exfiltration of deep carbonate bicarbonate–magnesium groundwaters containing epigenetic reducing agents in the form of gases and dissolved organic matter of the petroleum series. Exfiltration prevails over infiltration. Carbonate groundwater containing epigenetic reducing agents forms a constantly acting reductive geochemical barrier that works as an ore-preserving factor.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S107570152201007X
       
  • Migration and Sorption of Uranium in Various Redox Conditions on the
           Example of Volcanic-Related Deposits in the Streltsovka Caldera, SE
           Transbaikalia

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      Abstract: The article discusses problems of migration, sorption, and redistribution of uranium in felsic volcanic rocks (ignimbrites) and volcanic glasses of different compositions from the Tulukuev and Novogodnee deposits, located at the upper structural level (the cover of volcano-sedimentary rocks) of the Streltsovka caldera, which hosts Russia’s largest Streltsovka uranium ore field (SOF). The research covers the entire sorption series of rocks and minerals: from abnormally high uranium contents in felsic volcanic rocks and volcanic glasses of the Novogodnee deposit, located in a reducing geochemical environment, to complete uranium removal from mineral concentrators in an oxidizing environment in the Tulukuevsky open pit deposit. The uranium distribution and variations in its content were studied using f-radiography in different zones of metasomatic aureoles, minerals, rock fragments, the matrix and fiamme of ignimbrites, elements of deformational alterations, including mineralized and open fractures of different morphology, as well as in cataclasis, microbrecciation, and veinlet zones, etc. Integrated geological-structural, mineralogical-geochemical, and petrophysical studies and hydrogeochemical and isotope-geochemical monitoring studies of fracture-vein and atmospheric waters have been conducted since 2000 and continue at present. It is shown that the Tulukuev and Novogodnee deposits are unique objects, which can be used for studying the conditions, migration paths, migration mechanisms, and accumulation of uranium in different structural settings under varying redox conditions. It was established that the most important mechanism of uranium retardation is sorption processes on permeable reaction barriers under reducing conditions, formed currently within hydraulically active faults, crosscutting blocks of oxidized rocks. At these natural physicochemical barriers, U(VI) is effectively retained and transformed into insoluble U(IV) form due to the reactivity of Fe–Mn oxyhydroxides, impregnated carbonaceous matter, and vital activity products of microorganisms (ferrihydrides). Comparing the sorption capacity of minerals with respect to uranium allowed us to develop a comparative series of minerals and mineral aggregates in descending order from amorphous Fe and Ti oxides to feldspar and quartz. The above studies can be used when substantiating the search, exploration, and mining of uranium ores at uranium-ore deposits and when considering possible sources of ore matter. The radiogeoecological aspect of surveys involved with substantiating the long-term isolation of radioactive materials and remediation of radionuclide-polluted areas and groundwater horizons is also crucial.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701522010068
       
  • Pyrrhotite–Nisbite–Breithauptite–Sulfoantimonide Micromineral
           Assemblage: a Product of High-Temperature Recrystallization of Ores at the
           Yuzhnoe Vein-Type Tin–Silver–Polymetallic Deposit, Sikhote-Alin,
           Russia

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      Abstract: Abstract—The paper presents the results of mineralogical studies of tin–silver–polymetallic ores localized at the deep level (500–700 m below the surface) of the Yuzhnoe Cenomanian deposit. On the deep southwestern flank of vein no. 4, indications of ore recrystallization have been revealed. Mineral segregations (inclusions) with sharp boundaries and myrmekite texture as fine intergrowths of pyrrhotite with nisbite (NiSb2) or breithauptite (NiSb) are found in recrystallized ores at the grain boundaries of nickel-bearing pyrrhotite and galena with abundantly disseminated Ag–Sb minerals. Less frequently, myrmekite-like segregations are pyrrhotite graphically intergrown with gudmundite or nonstoichiometric chemically variable Ag sulfoantimonide (phase X). Tiny grains of Ag-bearing chalcopyrite and stannite are frequently observed in pyrrhotite–sulfoantimonide intergrowths. The formation of myrmekite-like segregations is presumably associated with ore transformation in the fluid-thermal field of a Maastrichtian postore leucogranite intrusion. Local segregations of the mobilizate (mobile phase) formed as a metal-bearing sulfoantimonide melt during ore recrystallization at a temperature of ~600°C as a result of the redistribution and migration of trace elements to the contacts of mineral grains. Heterogenous distribution and variable chemical composition of micrographic segregations reflect immiscibility and differentiation of the formed metal-bearing sulfoantimonide melt during its liquidus evolution. The final avalanche-like quenching crystallization of melt inclusions was implemented below 300°C.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521070072
       
  • First Finding of Platinum Group Minerals at the Malmyzh Porphyry
           Gold–Copper Deposit, Khabarovsk Krai, Russia

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      Abstract: Abstract—This paper focuses on new data for palladium-bearing mineral phases in the ores of the Malmyzh porphyry gold–copper deposit situated approximately 220 km northeast of Khabarovsk in the Russian Far Eas. The Malmyzh area comprises the Early Cretaceous terrigenous sediments, which are intruded by the Albian to Cenomanian diorite and granodiorite stocks. The platinum group minerals (PGM), sopcheite, merenskyite, kotulskite, naldrettite, and arsenopalladinite, were identified during a detailed study of chalcopyrite veinlets at the Freedom site of the Malmyzh porphyry Cu–Au deposit. The relationship with other minerals indicates that these PGM are later than chalcopyrite.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521070035
       
  • Microstructural Patterns of Ophiolitic Chromitite of the Kraka Massif,
           South Urals. I. Banded Disseminated Ores

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      Abstract: The microstructure and composition of accessory chromian spinels from peridotite and ore-forming chromian spinels from disseminated ores in dunite near the boundary between the mantle and crustal ophiolite sequences are studied. Application of the method of backscattered electron diffraction (EBSD) demonstrated an existence of microtextural heterogeneity of individuals, expressed in a domain (subgrain) structure, which is caused by plastic deformation and recrystallization of mineral grains. It is shown that the formation and growth of new chromian spinel grains proceeded synkinematically in the solid state due to the segregation of aluminum and chromium in the composition of rock-forming silicates. It is concluded that the microstructural patterns of chromitite were formed under the influence of two simultaneous processes: (1) a decrease in the grain size via translational sliding and dynamic recrystallization and/or (2) the growth of recrystallized grains and their aggregation.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521080080
       
  • Sulfite Analogue of Alloriite from Sacrofano, Latium, Italy: Crystal
           Chemistry and Specific Features of Genesis

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      Abstract: The chemical composition, IR spectroscopic characteristics, and crystal structure of the cancrinite group mineral with an afghanite-type framework, in which the \({\text{SO}}_{3}^{{2 - }}\) sulfite group is the dominant extraframework anion, have been investigated. The studied mineral is hexagonal, and the space group is P-62c. The unit cell parameters are a = 12.895(2), c = 21.276(4) Å, and V = 3063.8(11) Å3. A narrow channel consisting of cancrinite cages hosts the chains …(Na0.84Ca0.16)–[(H2O)0.75Cl0.23□0.02]–(Na0.70□0.30)–[(H2O)0.75Cl0.23□0.02] … The remaining extraframework components occupy columns consisting of alternating liottite and cancrinite cages. In particular, the liottite cage contains sulfate and sulfite groups, with the latter dominating. The high content of \({\text{SO}}_{3}^{{2 - }}\) groups and the low content of \({\text{SO}}_{4}^{{2 - }}\) groups are confirmed by the IR spectroscopy data. The studied mineral is the \({\text{SO}}_{3}^{{2 - }}\) -dominant analogue of alloriite. The crystal chemical formula Na2.53K2Ca2.73(Si6Al6O24)(SO3)0.5[(SO3)0.47](OH)0.99Cl0.30⋅0.85H2O (Z = 4) obtained as a result of structure refinement is close to the empirical one. The mechanisms of genesis of multilayer minerals of the cancrinite group are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521080043
       
  • Ferrokësterite and Kësterite in Greisens Associated with
           Lithium–Fluorine Granites of the Russian Far East

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      Abstract: The typomorphic features and origin of the ferrokësterite and kësterite sulfostannates from Li–F granite-related greisen ore deposits of the Russian Far East are discussed. The composition of kësterite from the greisens at its type locality, the Këster deposit (Yakutia), is described. The parameters of the mineral correspond to the earlier descriptions. Special attention is given to the localization and composition of ferrokësterite found in the greisens (zwitters) of the Pravourmiyskoye deposit (the Amur River region). This ferrokësterite is characterized by a high Fe/(Fe + Zn) ratio in the range of 0.73–0.92 and deficiency in In, Ag, Cd, Bi, As, and Se impurities. Kësterite and ferrokësterite are associated with cassiterite, sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and arsenopyrite at the upper levels of greisen ore bodies, where they displace other sulfostannate minerals. A comparison between the kësterites and ferrokësterites from the Russian Far East and sulfostannates from the greisens associated with lithium–fluorine granites elsewhere around the world is made. It is proposed to consider kësterite and ferrokësterite as indicator minerals of large-scale rare-metal–tin minerageny. Ferrokësterite is a polymorphic modification of stannite. The boundary between kësterite and ferrokësterite is defined by a value of Fe/(Fe + Zn) of around 0.73. Ferrokësterite should be analyzed as a probable natural prototype of an optoelectronic material for solar cell manufacturing.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S107570152108002X
       
  • Volborthite Occurrence at the Alaid Volcano (Atlasov Island, Kuril
           Islands, Russia)

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      Abstract: Abstract—Yellow volborthite Cu2.95(V1.91P0.09)Σ2O7(OH)1.90·2H2O, and turquoise atacamite, Cu2[Cl0.98(OH)0.02]Σ1.00(OH)3 have been found incrusting fractures and the surfaces of lava blocks on the Northeast slope of the Alaid volcano (Atlasov island, Kuril Islands, Russia). The Raman spectrum of volborthite contains the following bands (with assignment) in the range 900–70 cm–1: 885 (ν1 VO4), 809 (ν3 VO4), 748 (ν3 VO4, libration mode of water, deformation mode of OH), 507 (ν4 VO4, ν1 CuO6), 471 (ν4 VO4, ν1 CuO6), 441 (ν4 VO4, ν2 CuO6), 345 (ν2 VO4), 257 (ν5 CuO6, ν2 VO4) and 241 (ν2 VO4) cm–1. Volborthite is likely a supergene mineral formed as a result of primary alteration of fumarole minerals. Euchlorine and shcherbinaite could be the Cu and V sources for volborthite, respectively. Conversely, the volborthite–atacamite paragenesis could have formed in the near-surface, relatively low-temperature fumarole zone—the so-called hot hypergenesis zone, due to the interaction of primary exhalative minerals with meteoric water under the influence of volcanic gas.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521070114
       
  • Rutile Enriched in Chalcophile Elements (Sb, Sn, Te), and Ti-rich
           Varieties of Tripuhyute and Cassiterite from Sublimates of Active
           Fumaroles at the Tolbachik Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

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      Abstract: Abstract—The paper contains data on rutile, tripuhyite, and unusual Ti-rich cassiterite found in sublimates of active fumaroles at the Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. In contrast to rutile from other geological environments, fumarolic rutile is enriched in minor chalcophile elements. It contains up to (wt %): 35 Sb2O5, 59 SnO2, 11.3 TeO3, 1.9 CuO, 0.4 ZnO, and 18 Fe2O3. Such high Ti and Cu contents in rutile have not been published before, while minor Te contents have been measured for the first time. Cassiterite containing 19–23 wt % TiO2 also is a new variety. Hexavalent tellurium is incorporated into the rutile structure together with trivalent iron according to the substitution scheme Te6+ + 2Fe3+ → 3Ti4+. In fumaroles of the Tolbachik volcano, isostructural rutile, tripuhyite, and cassiterite form a ternary system with several gaps. These minerals were formed at temperatures no lower than 350°C, most likely as a result of interaction between hot volcanic gas (a source for chalcophile elements) and basalt (a source for Ti).
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521070084
       
  • Compositional Evolution of REE- and Ti-Bearing Accessory Minerals in
           Metamorphic Schists of Atomfjella Series, Western Ny Friesland, Svalbard
           and Its Petrogenetic Significance

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      Abstract: Abstract—Accessory REE- and Ti-bearing minerals have been investigated in rocks of the northern part of the West Ny Friesland anticlinorium, Svalbard Archipelago. The anticlinorium is formed by Paleoproterozoic and Early Riphean metamorphic complexes overlain with an angular unconformity by Late Riphean–Early Paleozoic metasedimentary sequences of the ancient platform cover. Representative samples of metapelites with the assemblage Ms–Bt–Grt–Qz–Pl and calcic pelitic schists with additional calcite and clinozoisite were studied. Special attention was paid to the microstructure of accessory minerals aggregates and its rock-forming interpretation. Several accessory assemblages were delineated, corresponding to distinct “time slices” of the metamorphic history. The earlier assemblage consists of REE-bearing minerals: monazite-(Ce) and REE-rich clinozoisite and epidote overgrown on detrital (') allanite-(Ce). These minerals appeared before garnet porphyroblast nucleation (<530–540°C, <5.5–7.5 kbar) and at the initial stages of its growth. Clinozoisite rims on allanite-(Ce) grains were formed during the same time as evidenced by zoned crystals of clinozoisite with allanite cores, which is preserved as inclusions within garnet. In the late stages of porphyroblast growth, rutile stabilized and the Fe–Ti oxide assemblage with rutile and metastable ilmenite originated due to attainment of maximum temperature and pressure (670–690°С, 10–11 kbar). During the retrograde metamorphic stage at 450–470°C and 3–5 kbar, rutile and ilmenite were replaced by titanite associated with late chlorite. The conditions and mechanisms of phase reactions controlling accessory mineral formation are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521070047
       
  • Trace Element Composition of Archean Detrital Zircons from Jatulian
           Terrigenous Rocks of Fennoscandia

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      Abstract: Detrital zircons with an age of 3.65–3.87 Ga have been found earlier in Jatulian terrigenous rocks from the eastern Fennoscandian Shield, i.e., the Karelian and Kola regions (Kozhevnikov et al., 2010; Smol’kin et al., 2011, 2019), while rocks of this age are not reported in the inferior Sumian–Sariolian complexes and in the Archean basement. To establish the provenance area and composition of the sources, the first study of geochemical composition (rare-earth and trace elements) of detrital zircons from Jatulian red gravelstones of the Luchlompol’skaya Fm., Pechenga structure, quartzites of the Volomskaya syncline, and cement of conglomerates in the western Onega Trough, which are located at considerable distances from each other, has been carried out. The age of detrital zircon grains ranges mainly within 2.70–3.23 Ga. Some of the detrital zircon grains are of igneous type. Grains and outer envelopes of zonal grains having the youngest age (2.70–2.72 Ga) are referred to the metamorphic type. “Porous” zircon that underwent a fluid effect is also present. The main sources of igneous zircon grains were tonalite and trondhjemite gneisses and acid granulites, which are widespread in the vicinities of the studied structures and were revealed in the lower part of the Kola Superdeep Well (VSD-3), as well as gneisses and amphibolites of the Vodlozero block. The source of detrital zircon grains with an age of 3.65–3.87 Ga is the Siurua trondhjemite gneiss (northern Finland). Their erosion and transportation of zircons took place 2.2–2.1 Ga ago along the western margin of the Svecofennian–Pre-Labradorian Ocean that existed at the initial stage of the Columbia Supercontinent assemblage.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521080092
       
  • A New Solid Solution with Garnet Structure: Berzeliite–Schäferite
           Isomorphic Series from the Fumarole Exhalation of the Tolbachik Volcano,
           Kamchatka

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      Abstract: An extended isostructural solid solution (isomorphic series) between arsenate and vanadate of the garnet supergroup — berzeliite (NaCa2)Mg2(AsO4)3 and schäferite (NaCa2)Mg2(VO4)3 — was studied for the first time. The studied material is from sublimates of the Arsenatnaya fumarole, Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka. These minerals here form aggregates of yellow or orange transparent crystals (up to 1 mm in size). Anhydrite, forsterite, diopside, andradite, hayuin, potassium–sodium feldspars, hematite, magnesioferrite, spinel, barite, aphtitalite-like sulfates, minerals of the powellite–scheelite series, ludwigite, calcium chillerite, paraberzeliite, members of the series rhabdoborite–(V)–rhabdoborite–(W)–rhabdoborite–(Mo), apatite–swabite–pliniusite, tilasite–isokite, udinaite–arsenudinaite, and wagnerite–arsenovagnerite associate with the studied minerals. They were formed under the oxidizing conditions at temperatures not lower than 550°С. The composition of the tetrahedrally coordinated components in the schäferite–berzeliite isomorphic series in the Arsenatnaya fumarole continuously varies from (V2.54As0.48P0.04Si0.01) to (As2.77V0.22Si0.03P0.01). The XCa2+ + ZSi4+ = XNa+ + Z5+ heterovalent isomorphism scheme plays a subordinate role. The crystal structures of three samples (space group Ia–3d) with different As : V ratios were studied:       \({{{\text{(C}}{{{\text{a}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.15}}}}}{\text{N}}{{{\text{a}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.85}}}}}{\text{)}}}_{{\Sigma 3}}}{\text{(M}}{{{\text{g}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.0}}}}}{\text{)(}}{{{\text{V}}}_{{{\text{1}}{\text{.95}}}}}{\text{A}}{{{\text{s}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.90}}}}}{\text{S}}{{{\text{i}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.15}}}}}{{{\text{)}}}_{{{{\Sigma 3}}}}}{{{\text{O}}}_{{12}}},\,\,\,a = 12.39737(7)\,\,{\AA},\,\,\,R = 0.0210;\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,(1)\)       \({{{\text{(C}}{{{\text{a}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.00}}}}}{\text{N}}{{{\text{a}}}_{{{\text{1}}{\text{.00}}}}}{\text{)}}}_{{\Sigma 3}}}{\text{(M}}{{{\text{g}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.0}}}}}{\text{)(}}{{{\text{V}}}_{{{\text{1}}{\text{.90}}}}}{\text{A}}{{{\text{s}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.90}}}}}{\text{S}}{{{\text{i}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.20}}}}}{{{\text{)}}}_{{{{\Sigma 3}}}}}{{{\text{O}}}_{{12}}},\,\,\,a = 12.35366(10)\,\,{\AA},\,\,\,R = 0.0181;\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,(2)\)           \({{{\text{(C}}{{{\text{a}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.05}}}}}{\text{N}}{{{\text{a}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.95}}}}}{\text{)}}}_{{\Sigma 3}}}{\text{(M}}{{{\text{g}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.0}}}}}{\text{)(}}{{{\text{V}}}_{{{\text{2}}{\text{.35}}}}}{\text{A}}{{{\text{s}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.60}}}}}{\text{S}}{{{\text{i}}}_{{{\text{0}}{\text{.05}}}}}{{{\text{)}}}_{{{{\Sigma 3}}}}}{{{\text{O}}}_{{12}}},\,\,\,a = 12.36093(7)\,\,{\AA},\,\,\,R = 0.0251.\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,\,(3)\) The dimorphism of the garnet supergroup and alluodite group arsenates is discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1134/S1075701521080055
       
 
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