Subjects -> MINES AND MINING INDUSTRY (Total: 82 journals)
Showing 1 - 42 of 42 Journals sorted by number of followers
Stainless Steel World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Metamorphic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Mineralogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Geology and Mining Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Minerals Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Lithos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Minerals, Metallurgy, and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Natural Resources Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clay Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Mining Engineering and Mineral Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mine Water and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Mining Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Resources Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Earth Science : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Physics and Chemistry of Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineralium Deposita     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Convention & Event Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Coal Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Lithology and Mineral Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Geology of Ore Deposits     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Materials Research and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rocks & Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BHM Berg- und Hüttenmännische Monatshefte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Geochemistry and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Mining Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mining Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Extractive Industries and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Technology : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Geomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Preparation and Utilization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Central South University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Analytical and Numerical Methods in Mining Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gems & Gemology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mineralogical Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CIM Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration     Hybrid Journal  
Podzemni Radovi     Open Access  
Rudarsko-geološko-naftni Zbornik     Open Access  
Journal of Mining Institute     Open Access  
International Journal of Mining and Geo-Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of China Coal Society     Open Access  
Réalités industrielles     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista del Instituto de Investigación de la Facultad de Ingeniería Geológica, Minera, Metalurgica y Geográfica     Open Access  
Mineral Economics     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals     Open Access  
Gold Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Environmental Geochemistry and Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.884
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-2983 - ISSN (Online) 0269-4042
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Correction to: Distributing and assessing fluoride health risk in urban
           drinking water resources in Fars Province, Iran, using the geographical
           information system

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      Abstract: In the original publication of the article, the affiliation “Department of Environmental Engineering, Bushehr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Bushehr, Iran” was mistakenly included for the author “Marjan Ghanbarian”.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Nitrogen behavior during artificial groundwater recharge through ponds: A
           case study in Xiong’an New Area

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      Abstract: Abstract The Xiong’an New Area (XA) was established as a development hub in China. Excessive exploitation of groundwater has caused a series of environmental and geological problems, restricting further development of XA. The widely distributed ponds in this area have been targeted as convenient and efficient sites of artificial groundwater recharge. However, nitrogen accumulation in the shallow vadose zone associated with agricultural activities may pose environmental risks to groundwater during the recharge and infiltration process. Therefore, this study investigated the effects, transfer, and transformation of nitrogen during artificial groundwater recharge. The aeration zone is thick and the medium comprises fine particles, with total nitrogen and nitrate accumulation mainly in the shallow aeration zone. In indoor experiments, the nitrate removal rate reached 83.5% when organic carbon in the source water was increased by 10 mg/L. For Baigou diversion river water(BW) with slightly higher (14.46 mg/L) and lower (5.04 mg/L) nitrate contents, the nitrate content decreased by 26.0% (10.70 mg/L) and 26.8% (3.69 mg/L), respectively, after 150 days. When the water head was increased by 20 cm to increase the recharge rate, the time required for nitrate and ammonium to reach the maximum and equilibrium concentration was reduced by 50%. These findings indicate that nitrogen concentration in the source water, aeration zone media, and groundwater should be considered in pond replenishment. It is also necessary to control the concentration of organic carbon and the rate of recharge, which would provide guidance for other similar projects.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • O3 concentration and duration of exposure are factors influencing the
           environmental health risk of exercising in Rio Grande, Brazil

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      Abstract: Ozone (O3) represents a great threat to human health, contributing to respiratory diseases and premature mortality. This pollutant is often considered a critical pollutant in regions of southern Brazil. Exposure to this pollutant during vigorous physical activity should be the subject of thorough investigations due to the increased ventilation rate and altered breathing pattern present during vigorous physical activity that result in greater inhalation of O3. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the health risk of exposure to low, mean, and high concentrations of O3 during different durations of exercise in the city of Rio Grande (southern Brazil). Healthy young men (n = 45) performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and ventilation rate data were collected to predict total ventilation and pollutant inhalation during a 5 km running session. The O3 concentration in the city of Rio Grande was obtained from data reported by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS). The environmental health risk was calculated based on the potential intake dose. The lowest, mean, and highest concentrations of O3 detected during the monitoring period were 32.5, 64.9, and 115.2 µg/m3, respectively. In all evaluated scenarios, there was a toxicological risk (RQ > 1), except when exercising when the O3 concentration was lowest for the shortest length of time (p < 0.001). As the concentration of O3 and the duration of the exposure increase, the health risk is increased. Therefore, O3 concentration and duration of exposure are factors influencing the health risk of exercising. These findings are extremely relevant in cities that have high levels of O3, such as the city of Rio Grande. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Assessing oxidative stress resulting from environmental exposure to metals
           (Oids) in a middle Eastern population

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      Abstract: Concentrations of metals and metalloids derived mainly from anthropogenic activities have increased considerably in the environment. Metals might be associated with increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage, potentially related to several health outcomes. This study has recruited 200 adult participants, including 110 males and 90 females in Shiraz (Iran), to investigate the relationship between chronic exposure to metals and ROS damage by analyzing malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations, and has evaluated the associations between chronic metal exposure and ROS damage using regression analysis. Our findings showed participants are chronically exposed to elevate As, Ni, Hg, and Pb levels. The mean urinary concentrations of 8-OHdG and MDA were 3.8 ± 2.35 and 214 ± 134 µg/g creatinine, respectively. This study shows that most heavy metals are correlated with urinary ROS biomarkers (R ranges 0.19 to 0.64). In addition, regression analysis accounting for other confounding factors such as sex, age, smoking status, and teeth filling with amalgam highlights that Al, Cu, Si and Sn are associated with 8-OHdG concentrations, while an association between Cr and MDA and 8-OHdG is suggested. Smoking cigarettes and water-pipe is considered a significant contributory factor for both ROS biomarkers (MDA and 8-OHdG). Graphic abstract
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Bioavailability and health risk assessment of potentially toxic elements
           in popcorn kernel from sandy loam Ferric Luvisol amended with municipal
           solid waste compost

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      Abstract: Abstract Application of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) to marginal soil enhances crop growth but could also serve as source of pollutants into agroecosystem. There is scanty report on bioavailability of potentially toxic element (PTE) and the health risk of consuming popcorn kernel harvested from field fertilized with MSWC. Field trial was carried out in 2017–2019 to evaluate bioavailability of PTEs in kernel of popcorn harvested from field fertilized with MSWC. The trial was conducted at the experimental field of North-West University, Mafikeng campus South Africa. The treatments comprised three rates of MSWC including 0 t/ha (unamended, control), 4 t/ha and 8 t/ha arranged in randomized complete block design and replicated four times. One seed of popcorn was sown at 20 × 70 cm spacing per hole of 3 cm depth in a 6 × 4.2 m plot size. Growth and yield data were collected at maturity. Ears were harvested at maturity and the kernels were dried to 12% moisture content. Air-dried kernels (50 g) samples were collected and analyzed for essential mineral nutrient and some heavy metal(loid)s using ICP-MS. Measured concentrations of these heavy metal(loid)s were then used to calculate the health risk for adults and children. The results showed that uptake concentration was in the order K+ > HPO42− > Mg+2 > Ca2+ > Fe2+ > Cr6+ > Zn2+ > Mn2+  > Cu2+(mg/kg). Uptake concentration of metalloids: Al and Pd was significantly higher in the unamended. Bioavailability of PTE was highest in unamended plots. The average daily intake of the PTEs was within the recommended permissible level. The risk index value for oral pathway was < 1 for both adult and children population. Amending Ferric Luvisol with 80 t/ha MSWC enhanced popcorn growth and, concentration of accumulated PTEs in kernels at this rate, cannot pose health risk to both adult and children population.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Physiological equivalent temperature (PET) and non-accidental,
           cardiovascular and respiratory disease mortality in Ahvaz, Iran

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change may be associated with human morbidity and mortality through direct and indirect effects. Ahvaz is one of the hottest cities in the world. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) and non-accidental, cardiovascular and respiratory disease mortality in Ahvaz, Iran. Distributed Lag Non-linear Models (DLNM) combined with quasi-Poisson regression were used to investigate the effect of PET on death. The effect of time trend, air pollutants (NO2, SO2 and PM10), and weekdays were adjusted.The results showed that in cold stress [1st percentile of PET (2.7 °C) relative to 25th percentile (11.9 °C)] the risk of total respiratory mortality, respiratory mortality in men, and mortality in people under 65 year olds, significantly decreased in the cumulative lags of 0–2, 0–6 and 0–13; but the risk of respiratory mortality increased in the elderly and in the final lags. In contrast, heat stress [99th percentile of PET (44.9 °C) relative to 75th percentile (43.4 °C)] significantly increased the risk of total cardiovascular mortality (CVD), cardiovascular mortality in men, ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease mortality in lags 0 and 0–2. It seems that high PET values increase the risk of cardiovascular mortality, while low PET values increase respiratory mortality only among the elderly in Ahvaz.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Circulation weather types and hospital admissions for cardiovascular
           disease in Changchun, China

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      Abstract: Abstract Epidemiological studies have reported significant associations between weather situations and health. Cardiovascular disease is a serious chronic non-communicable disease which causes mortality and morbidity, bringing large economic burden to patients’ families. This study explored the relationship between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and weather conditions in Changchun, northeast China. The frequency distributions of 13 main circulation weather types (CWTs) were analyzed, and a comparison between air mass classification and hospital admissions was performed for various groups using an admission index (AI). The results indicated that women had a lower risk of CVD than men did. The risk of CVD for older people (aged ≥ 65 years) was lower than that for young people (aged < 65 years). Younger men had the highest risk. The risks of CVD were higher in all groups (i.e., men, women, older, and younger) under southwesterly (SW) and northerly (N) CWTs and were lowest under the anticyclone (A) CWT. The risk of CVD among men was higher than that for women under these CWTs. N type circulation is characterized by cold, dry weather and was most closely associated with an increased incidence of CVD. The most significant effect of N type circulation on AI was observed with a delay of 2 days. SW type circulation is characterized by humid, hot weather and was the CWT that was second most closely associated with an increased incidence of CVD, with a peak in AI on the day that SW type circulation occurred. The results of this study could be provided to local health authorities as scientific guidelines for controlling and preventing CVD in Changchun, China.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Solid–liquid partitioning and variation of palladium in rainfall
           runoff

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      Abstract: Abstract Palladium (Pd) is most widely used in the production of automotive catalytic converters that serve to reduce toxic emissions from motor vehicles. The aim of this study was to analyze the solid–liquid partitioning and dynamic variation of Pd in rainfall runoff. The results showed that the partition coefficients (K) of Pd ranged from 0.05 to 8.55. Transport via suspended particulate matter as the main carrier was the main form of Pd migration in rainfall runoff. Pd phase distribution exhibited complex dynamic variations. The variation in Pd could be roughly divided into three categories, namely the W, M and N types, and the semi-U type was also observed. Rainfall characteristics and microenvironmental factors had a profound effect on Pd phase distribution in the first flush runoff. Under the influence of multifactor coupling, the impact of water quality parameters such as pH, Eh and Cl− on Pd partitioning was significantly weakened.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Distribution, sources and risk assessment of PAHs in soil from the water
           level fluctuation zone of Xiangxi Bay, Three Gorges Reservoir

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      Abstract: Information on PAH distribution in the water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of Three Gorges Reservoir is limited. In this study, we investigated PAH distribution and sources and assessed PAH risks, over one annual water level fluctuation cycle (June 2017–June 2018) at four elevations spanning the WLFZ (145 m, 155 m, 165 m and 175 m) at seven locations in the water level fluctuation zone along Xiangxi River. The mean total PAH concentration in June 2018 (953 ng g−1) was significantly higher than in June 2017 (494 ng g−1), and the horizontal and vertical distributions of PAHs changed significantly. The changes in distribution patterns provided evidence for the cause of increased PAH levels, which were attributed to construction of the Xiangxi River Bridge. Thus, this study of PAH dynamics in the WLFZ soils of Xiangxi Bay also provided valuable information on the impact of bridge construction on WLFZ soils. The change in PAH levels among stations implicated sediment disturbance resulting from bridge construction as the major contributor to the increased PAH levels. Source characterization, based on the ratios of certain PAHs, indicates that PAHs are mainly from the combustion of petroleum fuels, biomass and coal. These ratios indicated that the proportion of PAHs from fuel combustion increased from 2017 to 2018, implicating the heavy equipment used during bridge construction as another source of the increased PAH levels. The incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) model was used to assess the health risk of the PAHs and the range among all age groups (10–5–10–4) indicates a potential health risk. The mean effects range-median quotient (M-ERM-Q) was used to assess the ecological risk of PAHs and the range (0.1–0.5) indicates low to medium risk. The increase in PAH levels from 2017 to 2018 increased the risk to public health and the environment. The results of this investigation provide a reference for ecological restoration of the WLFZ and support development of effective policies for environmental and public health. Further, the results provide information on the impact of bridge construction on WLFZ soils and identify research needed to more fully understand PAH dynamics in WLFZ soils. Graphic abstract
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Cadmium (Cd) and Lead (Pb) topsoil levels and incidence of childhood
           leukemias

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      Abstract: Abstract There are few well-established risk factors for childhood leukemias. While the frequency of childhood leukemias might be partially attributable to some diseases (accounting for a small fraction of cases) or ionizing radiation, the role of heavy metals has not been assessed. The objective of our study was to assess the potential association between levels of cadmium (Cd) and lead (PB) in soil and childhood leukemias incidence. We conducted a population-based case–control study of childhood leukaemia in Spain, covering 2897 incident cases gathered from the Spanish Registry of Childhood Tumours and including 14 Spanish Regions with a total population of 5,307,433 children (period 1996–2015). Cd and Pb bioavailable levels at every children’s home address were estimated using data from the Geochemical Atlas of Spain. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs); we included as covariates: sex, rurality, employment rate and socioeconomic status. Metal levels were analysed according to two definitions: as continuous variable assuming linearity and as categorical variables to explore a potentially nonlinear association (quantiles). Increases in both Cd and Pb topsoil levels were associated with increased probability of childhood leukemias incidence. The results for the models with the continuous variables showed that a unit increase on the topsoil level was associated with an OR of 1.11 for Cd (95%CI 1.00–1.24) and an OR of 1.10 for Pb (95%CI 0.99–1.21). Our study may point towards a possible link between residential Cd and Pb topsoil levels and the probability of childhood leukemias incidence. Residing in a location with the highest concentrations of these heavy metals compared to those locations with the lowest could increase the risk around a 20%, for both Cd and Pb.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Seed nutripriming with zinc is an apt tool to alleviate malnutrition

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      Abstract: Abstract More than 2 billion people worldwide suffer from micronutrient malnutrition, sometimes known as hidden hunger. Zn malnutrition affects around a third of the world's population. The physicochemical features of soil, which limit the availability of Zn to plants, cause Zn deficiency. The eating habits of certain populations are more depended on Zn-deficient staple foods. Due to the high expense and certain interventions such as diet diversification, zinc supplementation and food fortification cannot be achieved in disadvantaged populations. Biofortification is the most practical technique for alleviating Zn malnutrition. Seed priming with nutrients is a promising biofortification approach for edible crops. Seed nutripriming with zinc is a cost-effective and environmentally benign approach of biofortification. Seeds can be nutriprimed with Zn using a variety of methods such as Zn fertilisers, Zn chelated compounds and Zn nanoparticles. Nutripriming with nanoparticles is gaining popularity these days due to its numerous advantages and vast biofortification potential. Seeds enriched with Zn also aid plant performance in Zn-deficient soil. Zn an essential trace element can regulate physiological, biochemical and molecular processes of plant cells and thus can enhance germination, growth, yield and bioavailable Zn in edible crops. Moreover, zinc emerges as an important element of choice for the management of COVID-19 symptoms.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Nitro- and oxy-PAHs in grassland soils from decade-long sampling in
           central Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract Long-term exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their nitrated (NPAHs) and oxygenated (OPAHs) derivatives can cause adverse health effects due to their carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and oxidative potential. The distribution of PAH derivatives in the terrestrial environment has hardly been studied, although several PAH derivatives are ubiquitous in air and long-lived in soil and water. We report the multi-annual variations in the concentrations of NPAHs, OPAHs and PAHs in soils sampled at a semi-urban (Mokrá, Czech Republic) and a regional background site (Košetice, Czech Republic) in central Europe. The concentrations of the Σ18NPAHs and the Σ11+2OPAHs and O-heterocycles were 0.31 ± 0.23 ng g−1 and 4.03 ± 3.03 ng g−1, respectively, in Košetice, while slightly higher concentrations of 0.54 ± 0.45 ng g−1 and 5.91 ± 0.45 ng g−1, respectively, were found in soil from Mokrá. Among the 5 NPAHs found in the soils, 1-nitropyrene and less so 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene were most abundant. The OPAHs were more evenly distributed. The ratios of the PAH derivatives to their parent PAHs in Košetice indicate that they were long-range transported to the background site. Our results show that several NPAHs and OPAHs are abundant in soil and that gas-particle partitioning is a major factor influencing the concentration of several semi-volatile NPAHs and OPAHs in the soils. Complete understanding of the long-term variations of NPAH and OPAH concentrations in soil is limited by the lack of kinetic data describing their formation and degradation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Metagenomics-based antibiotic resistance genes diversity and prevalence
           risk revealed by pathogenic bacterial host in Taihu Lake, China

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      Abstract: Abstract In recent decades, antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have been regarded as emerging pollutants. In Taihu Lake, as a typical representative of freshwater system in China, the ARGs occurrence and abundance was of great importance for ecological risk control and public health protection. In this research, high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics technique were used to investigate the seasonal ARGs profile in overlying water and sediment at typical area of Taihu Lake. Besides, taxonomy pattern of ARGs host bacteria and potential pathogens were identified. The results showed that 33 ARG subtypes and 11 ARG types were detected in research area, among which bacitracin, multidrug and sulfonamides resistance gene were with the highest abundance. The relative abundance of ARGs in overlying water and sediment ranged from 1.68 to 661.05 ppm and from 1.93 to 49.47 ppm, respectively. ARG host (18 bacteria genus) were identified and annotated, among which Clostridium botulinum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia were pathogenic bacteria. The pathogens were mostly detected at Xukou Bay in spring and fall, which might be caused by the inlet water from aquaculture area of Yangcheng Lake. Pseudomonas was the most abundant ARGs host (ant2ib, baca, bl2d_oxa2,mexb, mexf, mexw and oprn), which may facilitate the propagation of ARGs in freshwater system.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in indoor dusts from industrial factories,
           offices, and houses in northern Vietnam: Contamination characteristics and
           human exposure

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      Abstract: Abstract Information about the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in indoor dusts from various industrial sectors in Southeast Asia is still scarce. In this study, concentrations and congener-specific profiles of PBDEs were determined in indoor dusts from industrial factories, offices, and houses in northern Vietnam. Levels of Σ8PBDEs were higher in the office dusts (median 270; range 230–300 ng/g) and factory dusts (170; 89–510 ng/g) than in the house dusts (61; 25–140 ng/g). BDE-209 was the most dominant congener, accounting for 27–98% (average 62%) of Σ8PBDEs, suggesting the abundance of products treated with deca-BDE mixtures. Residential, commercial, and industrial activities in the studied locations of this survey were not significant sources of PBDEs as compared to those of informal waste processing activities in Vietnam. Relatively low PBDE concentrations detected in our dust samples partially reflect effectiveness of the global PBDE phase-out. Human exposure and health risk associated with dust-bound PBDEs were estimated, indicating acceptable levels of risk (i.e., neurobehavioral effects). The contributions of workplace dusts in total daily intake doses of PBDEs via dust ingestion were more important for local workers in informal recycling areas than factory workers and general population, raising the need of appropriate labor protection measures.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • A 2D CSIA-based math method to quantify degradation rate by C–H bond
           breaking

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      Abstract: Abstract Compound-specific isotope analysis has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for the assessment of in situ pollutant degradation. Enrichment factor, an essential and prerequisite parameter, could be determined under simulated control laboratory in advance. However, different microbial community composition and substrate availability may significantly affect the accuracy of simulated enrichment factor. Here, a modified mathematic method of two dimensional is proposed to quantify the extent of pollutant degradation involving the break of carbon and hydrogen bond. In this new model, the laboratory cultures used to determine carbon or hydrogen enrichment factors in advance could be canceled and the key point to assess the extent of biodegradation is only determining the value of Λri (dual C–H isotope slope calculated with a self-modified model) in the field investigation. As a new and convenient method, this math model greatly facilitates the investigation of pollutant degradation extent under field conditions. Two approaches are applied to evaluate the proposed model. With our model, the estimated results based on C isotope are consistent with those measured values, while those based on H isotope are unsatisfactory. This can be attributed to the differences in accuracy of C–H isotope determinations. Overall, enrichment factors and biodegradation rates calculated with the proposed model are comparable with those measured figures.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Chromium speciation, mobility, and Cr(VI) retention–release processes in
           ultramafic rocks and Fe–Ni lateritic deposits of Greece

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      Abstract: Abstract Water contamination by geogenic hexavalent chromium is an emerging issue in areas developed on ultramafic rocks and their weathering products. In this study, samples of serpentinites, soil, and laterites were collected and analyzed for the levels of Cr species, distribution into phases of different mobility, mineralogy, Cr oxidation capacity, and leaching of Cr(VI). Total chromium (2176–21,929 mg kg−1) was mainly found in Cr spinels (~ 50% wt as Cr2O3) and Fe (hydr)oxides (2.5% wt). Total Cr(VI) contents (0.49–11.5 mg kg−1) increased from the serpentinites to the soil and lateritic deposit, i.e., during the advanced stages of weathering, which were accompanied by increased Cr mobility. Batch experiments of 500-h duration showed that Cr(VI) released in water at rates of 0.25–1.20 nM h–1. Rates were higher in water of pH 5.7 rather than pH 8.5, because more Cr(VI) was formed during the experimental period. Asbolane-type Mn oxides and Mn-bearing crystalline Fe oxides were responsible for Cr(III) oxidation. Most of the generated Cr(VI) (52–79% of total Cr(VI)) remained solid-bound by adsorption and/or precipitation processes. Because all samples had a self-capacity to oxidize Cr(III), it seems that retention processes will ultimately define the extent of geogenic Cr(VI) contamination of aquatic systems.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Effects of combined soil amendments on Cd accumulation, translocation and
           food safety in rice: a field study in southern China

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      Abstract: Abstract Excessive Cd content and high Cd/Zn ratio in rice grains threaten human health. To study the reduction effects of combined soil amendments on Cd content and Cd/Zn ratio in rice planting in soils with different Cd contamination levels, we conducted field trials in three regions of Hunan province, China. Six field treatments were designed in each study area, including control (CK), lime alone (L), lime combined with sepiolite (LS), phosphate fertilizer (LP), organic fertilizer (LO) and phosphate fertilizer + organic fertilizer (LPO). The application of the combined amendments reduced the Cd content in rice grains to less than the Food Health Standard of China (0.2 mg/kg) and the Cd/Zn ratio to less than the safety threshold of 0.015. The average reduction rates of grain Cd content under the combined treatments among the three regions increased with the increase in Cd content in the soil. Meanwhile, the amendments also decreased the soil available Cd and Zn concentration significantly. The LO had the highest efficiency on decreasing Cd content in rice grains among these amendments, which is ranged from 44.6% to 52.8% in the three regions compared with CK. Similarly, high reduction rates of Cd/Zn ratio were found in the LO treatment, with an average value of 57.3% among the three regions. The grain Cd contents and Cd/Zn ratios were significantly correlated with the soil available Cd concentrations, plant uptake factor and the straw to rice grain translocation factor (TFgs) (P < 0.05). The results indicated that the combined soil amendments, especially lime combined with organic fertilizer, would be an effective way to control Cd content in rice.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Influence of the products of biomass combustion processes on air quality
           and cancer risk assessment in rural environmental (Spain)

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      Abstract: Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with atmospheric particles represent a significant risk to human health. This issue is even more relevant in environments where biomass combustion processes are considered as the major potential emission sources, such as the rural ecosystem. This study aimed to assess the levels of PM10-bound PAHs in several rural locations, their distribution along a year and how weather variables could influence them. Also, we focused on the emission sources and the comparison of the PAH mixtures to assess similitude among the sampling points. PM10-bound PAHs levels were monitored at three rural locations (north, center, and south) of Spain between April 2017 and February 2018. The study revealed that there were substantial differences regarding the levels of ΣPAHs, being higher in the central zone (IS; 65.4 mg/m3), then in the south (VA; 35.8 ng/m3) and finally in the north (NA; 20.9 ng/m3). IS and VA showed a similar distribution of emission sources, and temperature and wind speed seemed to influence negatively over the levels of PAHs likely. At both locations, PAH levels ran parallel throughout the year, with maximum levels during cold seasons and a greater presence of high molecular weight PAHs; however, the levels of PAHs and the most representative PAHs differed. On the other hand, NA was characterized for having another distribution of emission sources, which determined other representative PAHs, higher levels during spring, and a similar presence of high/medium/low molecular weight. Finally, the levels of ambient air PAHs represented an acceptable risk to people.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Contamination level, source identification and health risk evaluation of
           potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in groundwater of an industrial city in
           eastern India

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      Abstract: Abstract The present investigation explores the spatial and seasonal variations in potentially toxic element (PTEs) concentrations and contamination level assessment of groundwater samples in and around the Asansol industrial city, eastern India. The representative samples of groundwater from 24 different locations were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), total hardness (TH) and PTEs, e.g., Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn, Fe and Cr for pre-monsoon and post-monsoon. The pH level of examined groundwater samples is under the desirable limit with few exceptions (S5, S11 and S16 in pre-monsoon and S12 in post-monsoon). The recorded values for Pb, Cd, Fe and Cr in many sampling stations found higher than the prescribed limits of Indian standards (IS 10500: 2012) in both the seasons. The mean contamination factor (Cf) for PTEs in the groundwater is in the order of Cr > Fe > Cd > Pb > Cu > Zn and Fe > Cr > Cd > Pb > Cu > Zn, with mean contamination index (Cd) value of 2.83 and 2.72 in pre-monsoon and post-monsoon season, respectively, indicating moderate level of contamination in the examined area. Geospatial depiction of HPI values shows high level of contamination during pre-monsoon (58.3% sampling sites) and post-monsoon (45.8% sampling sites) in majority of sampling sites. Further, application of multivariate statistical analysis ascertains that the PTEs in groundwater are majorly derived from anthropogenic activities such as opencast mining, thermal power plants, iron and steel industries, sponge iron and other metallurgical industries, and leachate from urban and industrial wastes along with limited contribution from geogenic and lithogenic sources. The health risk assessment demonstrates that the non-carcinogenic risk (due to PTEs) in adults is in the sequence of Cr > Cd > Pb > Fe > Cu > Zn, while for children the order is Cr > Pb > Cd > Fe > Cu > Zn for both the seasons. The results also reveal higher chance of occurrence of carcinogenic risk due to Cr (ILCR > 1.0E-04) for children and adults in both the seasons.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Health risks of PM2.5-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and
           heavy metals (PPAH&HM) during the replacement of central heating with
           urban natural gas in Tianjin, China

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      Abstract: Abstract To investigate the health effects of fine particulate matter (≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter; PM2.5)-bound heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) before and after the implementation of the Urban Natural Gas Heating Project (UNGHP), the lifetime cancer risks, hazard quotients (HQs) of heavy metals and PAHs were calculated. Seven kinds of heavy metals (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni and Se) and 12 kinds of PAHs including acenaphthylene (ANY), acenaphthene (ANA), fluoranthene (FLT), pyrene (PYR), chrysene (CHR), benz[a]anthracene (BaA), benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbF), benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DBA), benzo[ghi]perylene (BPE) and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (IPY) were analyzed and used for the health risk assessments. It was found that HQ of Mn fell from 1.09 in the coal-burning period to 0.72 in the gas-burning period in the suburban area. And lifetime cancer risks of PAHs fell from 35.7 × 10–6 in the coal-burning period to 17.22 × 10–6 in the gas-burning period in the urban area. It could be concluded that, during the gas-burning period, downward trends were observed for the lifetime cancer risks and HQs of most kinds of heavy metals and PAHs in all regions of Tianjin compared to those during the coal-burning period. The UNGHP was effective, and we should also take other measures to control the pollution.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
 
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