Subjects -> MINES AND MINING INDUSTRY (Total: 82 journals)
Showing 1 - 42 of 42 Journals sorted by number of followers
Stainless Steel World     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Applied Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Metamorphic Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Mineralogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Geology and Mining Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Human Resources in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clay Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Minerals Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Lithos     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Minerals, Metallurgy, and Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Natural Resources Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Mining Engineering and Mineral Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Mine Water and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Mining and Mineral Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Mining Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Resources Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Earth Science : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Mining, Reclamation and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Coal Geology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Physics and Chemistry of Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Convention & Event Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mineralium Deposita     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Lithology and Mineral Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Coal Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Ghana Mining Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geology of Ore Deposits     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rocks & Minerals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Geochemistry and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Mining Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Geomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BHM Berg- und Hüttenmännische Monatshefte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Technology : Transactions of the Institutions of Mining and Metallurgy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Extractive Industries and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Coal Preparation and Utilization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mineralogy and Petrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Mining Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie - Abhandlungen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Mining Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Materials Research and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gems & Gemology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Analytical and Numerical Methods in Mining Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista del Instituto de Investigación de la Facultad de Ingeniería Geológica, Minera, Metalurgica y Geográfica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Central South University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mineralogical Magazine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CIM Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Natural Resources & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration     Hybrid Journal  
Podzemni Radovi     Open Access  
Rudarsko-geološko-naftni Zbornik     Open Access  
Journal of Mining Institute     Open Access  
International Journal of Mining and Geo-Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of China Coal Society     Open Access  
Réalités industrielles     Full-text available via subscription  
Mineral Economics     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals     Open Access  
Gold Bulletin     Hybrid Journal  
Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Mineral Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.285
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2191-2203 - ISSN (Online) 2191-2211
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Local perspectives on the adverse environmental effects and reclamation of
           illegally mined degraded landscapes in North-western Ghana

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      Abstract: Abstract In Ghana, there is a consensus that all the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) degraded landscapes should be restored to ecologically functionable limits after the small-scale mining ban. Restoration of the mined degraded landscapes will replenish lost ecosystems and contribute to the socio-ecological wellbeing of the nearby communities. Despite the government’s effort to reclaim these degraded landscapes, the cost and resources involved make the agenda a forlorn hope. Yet, few studies have explored the local communities’ perspectives towards reclaiming the galamsey degraded landscapes. This study investigates the perspectives of the local dwellers concerning the environmental consequences, roles, and commitment towards reclaiming the galamsey degraded landscapes. A concurrent cross-sectional mixed methods design was employed in administering 342 household questionnaires across 14 communities, which was supported with key informant interviews. Results reveal that the majority of the dwellers of the galamsey communities showed little regard for the environmental destruction caused by the galamsey operations — reduction in quantity and quality of water resources (63.2%), compromised ambient air (60.8%), destruction of ancestral homes and sacred groves (57%), and modification of the entire landscape (54.4%). In light of these findings, we posit that the local communities’ dwellers have limited knowledge of the value of the environment and future consequences of the destruction caused by the mining activities. This calls for thorough environmental education and sensitization in artisanal and small-scale mining communities.
      PubDate: 2022-08-11
       
  • SQUIDs for magnetic and electromagnetic methods in mineral exploration

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      Abstract: Abstract Research on quantum sensors for the detection of magnetic fields (quantum magnetometers) is one of the fast-moving areas of Quantum Technologies. Since there exist expectations about their use in geophysics, this work will provide a brief overview on the various developing quantum technologies and their individual state of the art for implementing quantum magnetometers. As one example, the developments on superconducting quantum interference devices, so-called SQUIDs as a specific implementation of a quantum magnetometer, are presented. In the course of this, SQUID instrument implementations and associated demonstrations and case studies will be presented. An airborne vector magnetometer with ultra-low noise ( \(<10 \mathrm{fT}/\sqrt{\mathrm{Hz}}\) ) and high dynamic range of \(>32 \mathrm{bit}\) will be introduced which has the prospect to be applied for the magnetic method in parallel with electromagnetic methods such as passive audio-frequency magnetics or semi-airborne methods using active transmitters such as elongated grounded dipole sources. The according signals are separated in the frequency domain. A second implementation is an airborne full tensor gradiometer instrument will be discussed which has shown already a number of successful case studies and which turned into commercial operation in the past years. Besides the airborne instrument, a very successful implementation of quantum magnetometers is the SQUID-based receiver for the ground-based transient electromagnetic method. Today it is a mature technology which has been in commercial use for more than a decade and has led to a number of discoveries of conductive ore bodies. One case study will be presented which demonstrates the performance of this instrument. Finally, future prospects of using quantum magnetometers, including SQUIDs and new optically pumped magnetometers, in geophysical exploration will be discussed. Particular applications for both sensor types will be introduced.
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
       
  • Required and desired: breakthroughs for future-proofing mineral and metal
           extraction

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      Abstract: Abstract The global industrial mining sector is, like other sectors, undergoing an unprecedented transformation pushed by global sustainability and climate challenges. The need to increase productivity and efficiency of mineral extraction along with increasing pressure from a wide range of stakeholders to decarbonise the industry and make mining practices more sustainable, accountable, and socially acceptable are driving the adoption of automation and digitalisation technologies as well as the electrification of equipment and the implementation of more sustainable energy solutions for the industry. Automation and digitalisation are changing the way minerals and metals are extracted and provide important tools for designing and implementing the mine of the future: a digitally integrated, autonomous mine where no humans need to be put in harm’s way and in which the connected systems are able to reduce the ever-increasing complexity to such an extent that improved decision-making can be realised in real time. Mining as an industry still has a way to go to reach the potential of automation and digitalisation on the one hand, and alternative drive systems and sustainable power generation on the other. This paper will give an overview of empirically derived leading technologies underlying the current transformation and will place them in the context of the data-information-value-chain that can provide a more systematic approach to describe the various technologies and, in particular, their interrelationships. This can support a better understanding of assessing the overall technological maturity of an operation, especially with respect to their evolution from automation of equipment towards autonomous systems. There is no reason to doubt that, from a technology perspective, the digitally connected, autonomous, and carbon-free mine have the potential to become a reality. Breakthrough effects can be expected to come not from any single technology but rather from successfully developing, implementing, and integrating the full suite of (available) automation and digitalisation technologies across entire mining operations and moving towards digitally integrated, autonomous systems considering the process and its interrelations holistically (Clausen et al. 2020b). However, in order to get there, mining companies need to consider not only the technological aspects of this transformation. For successfully responding to the changing landscape of stakeholder expectations and future-proofing the industry requires, the authors argue that mining companies need to adopt a mind-set of the human-centred climate smart mine (Clausen and Sörensen 2021). In addition, mining companies need to reconsider their role in the economic, social, and environmental ecosystem they are embedded in so they can break through traditions that keep them from successfully positioning themselves as builders of social value.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • Reserve-dependent capital efficiency, cross-sector competition, and
           mineral security considerations in mineral industry transition

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      Abstract: Abstract This study pinpoints three current factors that could be momentous in a possible transition to marine mining, namely reserve-dependent capital efficiency (accessibility and grade-dependent output per unit capital), cross-sector competition (competition between two separate mining sectors), and asymmetric mineral security considerations (e.g., the resource owner(s) and government(s) tied to a sector desires production for profit and security reasons). Moreover, four conceptual optimization problems are explored to specify the potential roles of said factors in a possible transition. The first problem considers a principal agent, who make decisions on behalf of resource owner(s), government(s) and producer(s), and invests and extracts to maximize the net present value of extraction from onshore and offshore reserves while facing reserve-independent capital efficiency. The second problem considers the same as the first, except here, the principal meets reserve-dependent capital efficiency. The third problem considers two principals, each representing resource owner(s), government(s), and producer(s) tied to a sector, who invest and extract to maximize the net present value of extraction from the respective reserves subject to the decisions of the other principal. Finally, the last problem considers a duopoly setting in which the marine principal values both financial gain and mineral security. The results illustrate that reserve-dependent capital efficiency, cross-sector competition, and mineral security considerations can, in different ways, drive a possible transition to marine mining. Possible counter effective factors are highlighted and discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Modeling the linkage between coal mining and ecological footprint in South
           Africa: does technological innovation matter'

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      Abstract: Abstract The environmental sustainability challenges posed by coal mining as a critical revenue and energy source for South Africa have been sparsely explored in the literature. Therefore, the current study examines the role of technological innovation (TI) in the coal mining (CM)-ecological footprint (EF) nexus in South Africa from1981 to 2017. Results from FMOLS, DOLS, and CCR establish that CM contributes significantly to environmental degeneration in South Africa. Furthermore, the findings reveal that while TI has a separate positive influence on environmental sustainability, the interaction between CM and TI leads to a declining EF. This implies that TI mitigates the negative impact of CM on the environment. Hence, it is concluded that coal production in the country should be embedded in environment-sustaining technological process.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Implications of new hyperspectral satellites for raw materials exploration

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      Abstract: Abstract Hyperspectral remote sensing already is important in geoscientific research in the fields of geology, soil, exploration and mining. New hyperspectral satellite systems are already in operation (e.g. PRISMA and DESIS; Caporusso et al. 2020; Alonso et al. (Sensors 19(20):4471–4515, 2019)) and more systems are planned e.g. the European Copernicus Next Generation Hyperspectral Satellite CHIME (Nieke and Rast 2018). The German system EnMAP was successfully launched into space on 1st of April 2022 (DLR 2022). The potential of hyperspectral airborne and satellite borne data for mining-related applications is discussed. Investigated are the information contents of hyperspectral data for exploration target recognition and their dependency on spatial resolutions of different sensor platforms. Airborne data offer high spatial resolution of 2.5 m with limited areal data acquisition, whereas hyperspectral spaceborne sensors guaranty nearly worldwide data availability with the same spectral characteristics but medium spatial resolution (30 m). The aspects of high spectral resolution and high versus medium spatial resolution targeted mineral mapping is investigated. The methodological concept includes processing aspects, standardized data availability for mineral mapping and mineralization targeting for operational application, to maintain/allow application of hyperspectral data even for non-remote sensing experts. Based on hyperspectral airborne data acquired in the Aggeneys region in South Africa, spaceborne hyperspectral data are simulated following the EnMAP specifications, and the concept for targeted mapping of surface alterations of a lead zinc deposit is discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • Metallogenic models as the key to successful exploration — a review
           and trends

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      Abstract: Abstract Metallogeny is the science of ore and mineral deposit formation in geological space and time. Metallogeny is interdisciplinary by nature, comprising elements of natural science disciplines such as planetology to solid state physics and chemistry, and volcanology. It is the experimental forefront of research and bold thinking, based on an ever-growing foundation of solid knowledge. Therefore, metallogeny is not a closed system of knowledge but a fast-growing assemblage of structured and unstructured information in perpetual flux. This paper intends to review its current state and trends. The latter may introduce speculation and fuzziness. Metallogeny has existed for over 100 years as a branch of Earth Science. From the discovery of plate tectonics (ca. 1950) to the end of the last century, metallogeny passed through a worldwide phase of formally published ‘metallogenetic’ maps. In the last decades, a rapidly growing number of scientists, digitization and splendid new tools fundamentally boosted research. More innovations may be expected by the growing use of an evolving systematic ‘Geodata Science’ for metallogenic research by an increasingly global human talent pool. Future requirements for metallic and mineral raw materials, especially the critical natural elements and compounds that are needed for the nascent carbon-free economy, already drive activities on stock markets and in the resource industry. State geological surveys, academia and private companies embrace the challenges. The new age requires intensified metallogenic backing. In this paper, principles of metallogeny are recalled concerning concepts and terms. A metallogenic classification of ore and mineral deposits is proposed, and the intimate relations of metallogenesis with geodynamics are sketched (ancient lid tectonics and modern plate tectonics). Metallogenic models assemble a great diversity of data that allow an ever better understanding of ore formation, foremost by illuminating the geological source-to-trap migration of ore metals, the petrogenetic and geodynamic–tectonic setting, the spatial architecture of ore deposits and the nature and precise timing of involved processes. Applied metallogeny allows companies to choose strategy and tactics for exploration investment and for planning the work. Based on comprehensive metallogenic knowledge, mineral system analysis (MSA) selects those elements of complex metallogenic models, which are detectable and can guide exploration in order to support applications such as mineral prospectivity mapping, mineral potential evaluation and targeting of detailed investigations. MSA founded on metallogenic models can be applied across whole continents, or at the scale of regional greenfield search, or in brownfields at district to camp scale. By delivering the fundamental keys for MSA, supported by unceasing innovative research, the stream of new metallogenic insights is essential for improving endowment estimates and for successful exploration.
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
       
  • História da mineração Brasileira (mining history of Brazil)

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      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Questions that board directors should be asking about emerging governance
           issues and risk: a practitioner’s view and implications for the
           extractive industries

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      Abstract: Abstract This article synthesises and highlights outcomes from a governance and risk forum that identified emerging risks for businesses and organisations. A governance framework is first presented followed by a discussion of recent developments in relation to elements of the framework as part of a mini-review of the literature. Emerging risks and opportunities around the changing nature of work, corporate culture, blockchain and cyber security were highlighted, with a particular emphasis on climate-related risks. Key questions to ask as a non-executive director or governance and risk committee members regarding these risks include could our sector or organisation be impacted by these emerging risks and opportunities' What could be the implications if these risks were to materialise and to what extent will our current business and operating model be impacted' How could our organisation be seizing the opportunity created by the pending changes in these areas' The findings and implications of the governance and risk issues are highlighted for the extractives sector and are especially important as the extractive sector faces challenges in its transformation. The study is novel as it highlights insights from the practitioner perspective of governance which is not captured in the literature. Recommended remedies for each risk are provided, and businesses are advised to undertake a focused review of non-financial risks, including corporate or organisational culture.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Simulation-based decision-making system for optimal mine production plan
           selection

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      Abstract: Abstract Price uncertainty is one of the major uncertainties in the life of mine (LOM) planning process which can have a decisive effect on the overall profitability. Today’s mine planning software tools provide block-sequencing optimisation for a given static price assumption that is then used as a basis of managerial decision-making process. This paper proposes a complementary approach to this by introducing a simulation-based decision-making tool that, with the help of simulation, seeks for the optimal mine plan when a managerially estimated price development with minimum and maximum boundaries is used as a data input for the given period. To demonstrate the approach, a realistic gold mine case study is presented with five alternative and technically feasible mine plans calculated in a static optimiser from a commercial mine planning software package. These mine planning scenarios are then subjected to price uncertainty in simulation with and without a price trend assumption to highlight the effect of price on the mine’s expected performance. Based on the results, we derive and demonstrate a simulation-based system that automates the matching of optimal mine plan with the managerial insight of long-term price development.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Mining and indigenous rights in Sweden: what is at stake and the role for
           legislation

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      Abstract: Abstract Mining and the permitting process for mineral projects in Sweden has been criticised as inadequately safeguarding the rights of Indigenous reindeer herding Sámi, who hold usufruct rights to more than half the country’s territory. There have been calls for Sweden to ratify the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention (ILO 169) and to change its Mineral Law. This paper evaluates the extent of protection of Sámi rights — and not only those engaged in reindeer herding — in Sweden’s minerals permitting process. It also considers the implications if changes were made to align this process with the Indigenous-rights framework. The paper demonstrates that reindeer herding Sámi are, broadly, treated similar to landowners in the mineral projects permitting process. However, there is discrimination when it comes to being able to have a share in the benefits of a project: impacted reindeer herders have no such option whereas landowners do. Also, the permitting processes do not consider social and cultural impacts, nor are there obligations for the state to be sufficiently involved in consultation processes. Addressing the identified shortcomings would require only small changes to the Mineral Law and/or to its application and would be possible with only limited impacts on mining because the sector is not a significant user of land whilst it creates large economic values. However, extending those changes (to give parity between landowners and Sámi rights holders) in other important economic sectors which use more extensive land areas, would entail a considerable transfer of resources and associated power. Furthermore, changing the Mineral Law specifically would mean little in terms of safeguarding the rights of the majority of Sami who do not engage in reindeer herding. This suggests that calls for changes to mineral-related legislation to resolve indigenous land right issues are mis-directed or at least insufficient, and that other type of legislative change is required, fundamentally including resolving how extensive and strong the Sámi’s rights to land should be.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Driving investments in ore beneficiation and scrap upgrading to meet an
           increased demand from the direct reduction-EAF route

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      Abstract: Abstract The pressure on the steel industry to reduce its carbon footprint has led to discussions to replace coke as the main reductant for iron ore and turn to natural gas, bio-syngas or hydrogen. Such a major transition from the blast furnace-basic oxygen furnace route, to the direct reduction-electric arc furnace route, for steel production would drastically increase the demand for both suitable iron ore pellets and high-quality scrap. The value for an EAF plant to reduce the SiO2 content in DRI by 2 percentage points and the dirt content of scrap by 0.3 percentage points Si was estimated by using the optimization and calculation tool RAWMATMIX®. Three plant types were studied: (i) an integrated plant using internal scrap, (ii) a plant using equal amounts of scrap and DRI and (iii) a plant using a smaller fraction of DRI in relation to the scrap amount. Also, the slag volume for each plant type was studied. Finally, the cost for upgrading was estimated based on using mainly heuristic values. A conservative estimation of the benefit of decreasing the silica content in DRI from 4 to 2% is 20 USD/t DRI or 15 USD/t DR pellets and a conservative figure for the benefit of decreasing the dirt in scrap by 0.3 percentage points Si is 9 USD/t scrap. An estimate on the costs for the necessary ore beneficiation is 2.5 USD/t pellet concentrate and for a scrap upgrade, it is 1-2 USD/t scrap.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Mining history of Brazil: a summary

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      Abstract: Abstract Mining is an activity that has had a considerable impact on the history of Brazil, whether from an economic, political, social, geographic, or demographic, artistic, and religious point of view. Its history is stamped by several phases starting in 1693 with gold discoveries in Minas Gerais, and diamond findings in 1729. This lasted almost 150 years for gold, and 140 years for diamond. With exhaustion of alluvial deposits in rivers and streams, the Portuguese expertise was over, being replaced by English and French companies who started gold extraction in veins and lodes. English presence started soon after 1824, when a decree gave them permission to work in Brazil. These operations have been constant until nowadays. During the ninteenth century, other minerals were produced, such as coal, lignite, peat, oil, and iron. In 1934, the first Mining Code was enacted during Vargas Era. The big jump in iron ore production happened only in 1942, when Companhia Vale do Rio Doce-CVRD was established as an outcome of Washington Agreements, signed by the USA, England, and Brazil. In current times, Brazil has reached the status of an intermediate economy close to G7, being an outstanding player in international minerals trade, together with other developing nations (South Africa, Chile, Peru, India, and Indonesia).
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Impact of metal mining on per capita family income in Peru

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      Abstract: Abstract The objective of the research was to measure the impact of metal mining production on per capita family income at the district level, during the period 2003 and 2019. For this purpose, the data from the United Nations report and the econometric methodology of difference in differences were used with and without spatial effects. The results without spatial effect show that the impact of mining on monthly per capita family income between 2003 and 2019 was 207.42 soles. However, considering the effects of spatial spillover, the total impact was 291.61 soles, which is decomposed into a direct and indirect impact of 189.77 soles and 101.84 soles, respectively. Likewise, the results suggest that there is a total impact of 77.25 soles on the per capita family income of the neighboring non-mining district. These results suggest that there is ample space for the design and implementation of public policies for the mining sector.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Determination of optimal production rate under price
           uncertainty—Sari Gunay gold mine, Iran

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      Abstract: Abstract Due to the long life, most mining projects face the risk of the parameters such as mineral price, grade, and cost. Uncertainty can lead to unfavorable results of the decisions made by managers and mining investors. Therefore, this paper aims to determine the Sari Gunay gold mine’s production planning, considering the certainty and uncertainty over the mineral price. Finally, the proposed planning will lead to the allocation of fixed or variable production rates throughout the mine life. These findings were assessed by Taylor and Zwiagin methods with 22 different scenarios in all conditions, including (a) price certainty and uncertainty such as daily price, 3- and 5-year average, Monte Carlo simulation, and binomial tree; (b) decreasing, increasing, and fixed production rates; and (c) mine life conditions. The scenarios evaluated under the price certainty conditions (scenarios 1 to 12) have lower NPV values than those under the price uncertainty conditions. This is because the price is fixed throughout the mine life. Due to historical price data and high fluctuations of estimated prices, this method’s NPV values fluctuate more than other scenarios evaluated by the Monte Carlo simulation. The binomial tree method scenarios have the lowest NPV value’s fluctuation because the fluctuation of the estimated prices is controlled, and the highest NPV values are related to this method. Out of the 22 scenarios, scenario 17 has the highest NPV value ($512,642,774). According to this scenario, the mine plan is determined, and the annual production rate is reduced to 3,241,977 tons in the first year and 270,165 tons in the last year with the Taylor life of 12 years.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • F.-W. Wellmer — a life as a raw materials expert at the crossroads of
           research, industry and politics

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      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s13563-022-00324-4
       
  • Trends in global mineral and metal criticality: the need for technological
           foresight

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      Abstract: Abstract Since the beginning of the third millennium, several trends, such as the rapid rise to global superpower status of China, with its 1.4 billion habitants; the transfer of large industrial production segments from West to East (Asia) and, more recently, of the growing political and trade tensions between the USA and China; the (re)birth of nationalisms, communitarianism and autocratic regimes; and minerals and metals industry–specific sustainability issues such as greenhouse gas emissions waste production and poor social acceptance of large-scale mining projects, are threatening the mineral and metal supplies of rich OECD countries that have depended on well-functioning free markets to supply their economies’ mineral and metal needs for the past few decades. These developments happen while demography, the growth of the global middle-class, urbanisation and, now, the need for a rapid transition to low-carbon energy production all concur to a further acceleration of the global demand for minerals and metals. This context leads governments and industries to pay much more attention to potential mineral supply/pricing issues, leading to the publication of mineral criticality studies, assessing the economic importance and supply risks related to specific minerals and metals, from the point of view of specific governments, economic sectors or industries. Some criticality assessments also propose future demand scenarios for selected minerals and metals, looking at the next decades, sometimes up to 2100. While these studies provide important information on current market conditions and issues, those looking at future supply and demand appear to insufficiently consider the probability of significant technology shifts that, if confirmed, would deeply impact on future demand scenarios. Three technology shifts that appear as highly probable (Li-metal batteries (including solid-state Li batteries); low/no neodymium-, praseodymium-, dysprosium- or terbium-containing permanent magnets; and composite matrix ceramics used in aircraft jet engines and gas turbines used for electricity and heat production) are highlighting the need to better integrate technology foresight in criticality assessments as such shifts are likely to have large impacts on the demand for some of the minerals and metals that are rated as highly critical in many studies (cobalt, dysprosium, graphite, neodymium, praseodymium, rhenium and tantalum), or for which demand scenarios are presented that may outstrip possible supply.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s13563-022-00323-5
       
  • A handbook of primary commodities in the global economy

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      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s13563-022-00326-2
       
  • The evolution of mining employment during the resource boom and bust cycle
           in Australia

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      Abstract: Abstract Mining employment in Australia can be cyclical and volatile. Since the gold rush in the 1850s, Australia has experienced two major mining booms. The first was in the 1970s and the second (i.e., the mineral boom) was in the mid-2000s and so it is important to have a discussion about trends in the Australian mining industry and about employment during mining cycles. This study employs Australian mining industry data to investigate sectoral labor mobility (moving from one industry to another) when the business cycles have changed. This research has used quarterly data from 1950q1 to 2018q4 for several industries such as mining, the building and construction industry, rental, hiring and real estate services, transport, postal and warehousing, agriculture, forestry and fishing, and manufacturing to conduct an empirical analysis. The findings of this study provide evidence that the sectoral shift of mining employment in Australia’s mineral and resource industry is highly correlated and dependent on the world economic circumstances. What happens in the world economies has an important bearing on how shocks are transmitted to the Australian mining industry and other sectors. The study also shows that displaced mining workers move around from one industry to another. In particular, the building and construction, agricultural, fishing and forestry, manufacturing, and real estate industries are found to be highly affected by the movement of labor.
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s13563-022-00320-8
       
  • How companies improve critical raw material circularity: 5 use cases

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      Abstract: Abstract This report showcases five examples of industries applying circular strategies for CRMs: (1) recycling of tungsten carbide scrap by H.C. Starck Tungsten, (2) recycling of battery cathode materials by SungEel Hitech, (3) recovery of rare earth elements from hard disk drives by Hitachi Group, (4) closed rhenium loops by Rolls-Royce, and (5) recovery of platinum group metals by Umicore. The adaptation of business models appears to be one of the biggest enablers of raw material circularity. Ideally, all involved stakeholders (including the manufacturers, the users, and the recyclers) have a common interest in, and are incentivized by retaining the material’s value, which stimulates transparent material flows and close cooperation. This is enabled by retained ownership and with long-term, well-defined relationships between the value chain actors. Such relationships can be enhanced by vertical integration, or by long-term contractual agreements. The benefits of implementing circularity provide a mandate for governmental intervention in stimulating circularity strategies, for example via regulations and subsidies, to overcome initial investment thresholds.
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s13563-022-00315-5
       
 
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