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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 107 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Animal Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access  
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  

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European Journal of Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.733
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1439-0574 - ISSN (Online) 1612-4642
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Genetic analysis of hog deer (Axis porcinus) in Victoria, Australia, and
           its applications to invasive species and game management

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      Abstract: Abstract Hog deer were introduced to Australia in the 1860s, where they have spread across the Gippsland region of Victoria. Due to its status as an introduced species and an important game animal within Victoria, management of the species is complex. Given this complexity, genetic studies can provide important information regarding population structure and diversity which can assist in controlling problematic populations of hog deer, while also ensuring viable game stock in sites managed as game reserves. The aim of this study was to investigate the population genetic structure and diversity of the Victorian hog deer 150 years after introduction using short tandem repeats (STRs). Hog deer samples were collected across 15 sites of differing management regimes in the Gippsland region of Victoria and genotyped for 13 polymorphic STR loci. Up to four distinct genetic clusters were identified across the sites sampled, suggesting that despite low observed genetic diversity, population structure is present across their range. It was also possible to detect evidence of recent translocations among populations. This study suggests that the presence of distinct genetic clusters may enable management of separate genetic units, considering invasive species and game management objectives.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
       
  • A questionnaire-based investigation to explore the social and legal
           implications derived from the use of camera traps for wildlife monitoring
           and conservation

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      Abstract: Abstract Camera traps are non-invasive monitoring tools largely used to detect species presence or population dynamics. The use of camera traps for wildlife conservation purposes raises questions about privacy invasion when images of people are taken. Throughout the use of an online questionnaire survey, we assessed the degree of knowledge about social and legal implications derived from the deployment of camera traps. Our results revealed a consistent gap in term of knowledge about legal implications derived by the use of camera traps among respondents. Most of those who were aware of such legislation did not take specific actions to prevent legal consequences, probably to reduce the risk of theft or vandalism. Most respondents declared that images of people were unintentionally collected. Some of them stated that images which may violate privacy issues or showed nefarious activities were stored for internal processing or reported to local authorities. Our research thus confirmed that privacy invasion is a widely poorly treated issue in the wildlife conservation dimension. Furthermore, despite camera traps being used to improve conservation efforts, the detection of individuals engaged in private or illegal activities poses further complications in terms of pursuance of legal actions when an individual is identified by these images. So, appropriate guidelines for images analysis need to be designed, and subsequently followed. Lastly, adopting effective methods to protect cameras from the risk of theft and/or vandalism is of primary concern.
      PubDate: 2022-06-04
       
  • Establishing haematological and biochemical reference intervals for
           free-ranging Scottish golden eagle nestlings (Aquila chrysaetos)

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      Abstract: Abstract Health assessment of individuals is an important aspect of monitoring endangered wildlife populations. Haematological and biochemical values are a common health assessment tool, and whilst reference values are well established for domestic species, they are often not available for wild animal species. This study established 31 haematological and biochemical reference intervals for golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nestlings in Scotland, in order to improve the understanding of the species’ health and support conservation efforts. Reference intervals were created from 47 nestlings (ages 2–7.5 weeks old) across 37 nests, to date, the largest sample of wild individuals of this species and age cohort sampled for these purposes. Upper reference intervals for concentrations of lymphocytes, total protein, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, and monocytes, calculated in this study, are higher than those found for adult raptors and the interval span is higher than that observed in adult raptors for concentrations of AST, albumin, eosinophil, LDH, and monocyte count. Statistically significant positive correlations were found with age and concentrations of haemoglobin, lymphocytes, serum pH, and creatine kinase, and significant negative correlations with age for concentrations of thrombocytes, heterophils, total protein, globulin, and lactate dehydrogenase. Packed cell volume was significantly higher for females than males, and concentration of calcium and eosinophils were higher for individuals in good body condition than those in moderate body condition. The reference intervals produced by this study will be of important use to the veterinary and conservation management communities and will aid the long-term monitoring of the Scottish golden eagle population health.
      PubDate: 2022-06-02
       
  • Herbivore damage to sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) in the Czech
           Republic

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      Abstract: Abstract The numbers of large wild herbivores are rising in the Czech Republic, leading to increased grazing pressure on agricultural crops, including the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), which is highly sensitive to grazing. In this study, we aim to estimate the amount of damage to sunflower crops in the Czech Republic, experimentally evaluate the effects of grazing on sunflower development and yield and their response to given types of damage, and propose a procedure for quantifying damage caused to sunflower crops. Our results indicate that most sunflowers damaged below the cotyledon at any stage of growth died or failed to yield achenes, while those damaged above the cotyledon were better able to regenerate and produce some form of harvest. In most cases, plants damaged at 11 cm height (growth stage BBCH 10–12) were able to increase growth intensity, replace damaged tissue and make up for any loss. In later growth stages, this ability progressively decreased. Plants damaged at 15 cm (BBCH 14–16), for example, produced just 14% of achievable production. On the other hand, we observed a 10% yield increase in undamaged plants when competitive neighbours were removed. Overall, we estimate total damage to sunflower achene production caused by herbivores in the Czech Republic at 16%.
      PubDate: 2022-05-30
       
  • Correction to: Does the American mink displace the European polecat' a
           need for more research on interspecific competition between invasive and
           native species

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      PubDate: 2022-05-28
       
  • Do telemetry harnesses affect giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)
           behavior and welfare'

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      Abstract: Abstract Telemetry provides researchers with invaluable data and has contributed to the progress of animal ecology and behavioral studies. However, the impact of biotelemetry devices on animal behavior and welfare has been evaluated in a few species. The telemetry device (GPS or VHF) is attached to a harness made especially for giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) due to its particular anatomy, and this is the best way to access the scheduled spatiotemporal data of the species’ movement. We evaluated the adverse effects of biotelemetry devices on giant anteaters’ behavior and welfare. Behavioral analysis on giant anteaters in captivity (n = 3) was conducted by observing them with and without the GPS-harness. We also include data on GPS-harness dysfunction and animal injuries observed from free-ranging tagged animals (n=74). The GPS-harness influenced the behavior distributions frequency, but no new or atypical act was verified. Free-ranging individuals detached the harness twice, five removed the front part of the harness, and three had skin injuries . This is the first study to document telemetry device effects on giant anteaters. To date, severe adverse effects of harness-attached GPS tracking devices were not reported for this species. Our data supports the continued use of this method for monitoring free-ranging or captive giant anteaters. However, we recommend and stress the importance of continued research that helps improve telemetry and monitoring techniques.
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
       
  • Correction to: Compensating freshwater habitat loss—duck productivity
           and food resources in man‑made wetlands

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      PubDate: 2022-05-25
       
  • Eurasian otter Lutra lutra diet mirrors the decline of native fish
           assemblages in a semi-arid catchment (River Segura, SE Spain)

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      Abstract: Abstract In semi-arid environments, the effects of irregularly distributed rainfall, flow regulation and water inter-basin transfer enhance the spread of non-native fish to the detriment of native communities. In the River Segura, since the 1980s the number of non-native fish species has progressively increased, also because of the building of water transfer facility connecting the rivers Segura and Tajo. With the aim of highlighting how man-driven changes in the diversity of fish communities affect the diet of top-predators, we compared Eurasian otter Lutra lutra diet in the span of 20 years, i.e. 1997–98 vs. 2016–19. As habitat quality affects the condition of Andalusian barbel Luciobarbus sclateri, the most widespread native fish, we also compared the size of preyed barbels to point out whether human activities may have lowered their profitability to otters. Fish and introduced red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii formed the bulk of otter diet in both study periods. In 2016–19 the contribution of non-native species to otter diet increased significantly, both for crayfish and fish, which included ten non-native species. Otter feeding habits faithfully mirrored the variation in the composition of the fish community and confirmed the importance of crayfish as alternative-to-fish prey in the Iberian Peninsula. The average length of preyed barbels was significantly lower in the second study period, consistently with a decline in barbel profitability for otters.
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
       
  • Extent of introgressive hybridization in the Hermann’s tortoise (Testudo
           hermanni hermanni) from the south of France

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      Abstract: Abstract The Western subspecies of Hermann’s tortoise (Testudo hermanni hermanni: WT) is threatened by habitat loss, fragmentation, wildfires, illegal harvesting, and likely hybridization with Testudo hermanni boettgeri (ET), a subspecies introduced from Eastern Europe. To assess the prevalence of this hybridization, we used microsatellite markers and simulations to investigate the genetic status of 565 individuals of the Var district (France) in contrast to the genetic signature of 121 individuals sampled in the Balkans. The genetic differentiation between WT and ET indicated 18% of tortoises in the Var were hybrids between WT and ET (i.e. F1, F2, and F3). Although hybridization increases the genetic diversity within the genetically impoverished WT population, hybridization could also threaten WT genetic integrity. Identifying and removing all hybridized individuals (especially beyond F1) is logistically unfeasible. Instead, conservation actions should reinforce communication and education, notably towards pet owners, to limit further hybridization. Moreover, accurate genetic identification of captives is essential to programs that involve translocating individuals to fragile populations (e.g. those severely impacted by bush fires). Further studies should assess the extent that WT/ET hybridization is detrimental or beneficial to populations facing rapid global changes in the context of depressed genetic diversity.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
       
  • Spatial and temporal variations in interspecific interaction: impact of a
           recreational landscape

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      Abstract: Abstract Anthropogenic activities, such as outdoor recreation, have the potential to change complex interactions between wildlife and livestock, with further consequences for the management of both animals, the environment, and disease transmission. We present the interaction amongst wildlife, livestock, and outdoor recreationists as a three-way interaction. Little is known about how recreational activities alter the interaction between herbivores in areas extensively used for recreational purposes. We investigate how hiking activity affects spatio-temporal co-occurrence between domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and red deer (Cervus elaphus). We used camera traps to capture the spatio-temporal distribution of red deer and sheep and used the distance from the hiking path as a proxy of hiking activity. We used generalized linear models to investigate the spatial distribution of sheep and deer. We analysed the activity patterns of sheep and deer and then calculated their coefficients of temporal overlap for each camera trap location. We compared these coefficients in relation to the distance from the hiking path. Finally, we used a generalized linear mixed-model to investigate which factors influence the spatio-temporal succession between deer and sheep. We do not find that sheep and red deer spatially avoid each other. The coefficient of temporal overlap varied with distance from the hiking trail, with stronger temporal co-occurrence at greater distances from the hiking trail. Red deer were more likely to be detected further from the path during the day, which increased the temporal overlap with sheep in these areas. This suggests that hiking pressure influences spatio-temporal interactions between sheep and deer, leading to greater temporal overlap in areas further from the hiking path due to red deer spatial avoidance of hikers. This impact of recreationists on the wildlife and livestock interaction can have consequences for the animals’ welfare, the vegetation they graze, their management, and disease transmission.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Compensating freshwater habitat loss—duck productivity and food
           resources in man-made wetlands

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      Abstract: Abstract The number of wetlands in Europe decreased by more than 60% by the 1990s compared with the beginning of the twentieth century. Man-made wetlands may be an effective way to compensate for the loss and degradation of freshwater ecosystems. This loss impacts the populations of declining duck species, partly due to a lack of suitable breeding opportunities. In this study, we evaluated duck productivity and invertebrate abundance in 13 man-made Finnish wetlands that were created for waterbirds. Our findings revealed that man-made wetlands have higher duck production than average natural boreal lakes. High invertebrate levels were a key factor that positively correlated with duck pair density, brood density, duckling density of the common teal (Anas crecca), and duck density during the post-breeding period. Our results suggest that man-made wetlands are a useful tool for increasing duck productivity. For upholding this status in the long term, appropriate management should involve maintaining sufficient invertebrate levels.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
       
  • Correction to: Conflicts between large carnivores and local pastoralists
           around Niokolo Koba National Park, Senegal

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      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Edge effect in rodent populations at the border between agricultural
           landscapes and forests

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      Abstract: Abstract Biodiversity is often highest at ecotones. However, edge effects vary among species and the spatial extent has rarely been quantified. Rodents form an important part of the food chain and thus are keystones of the ecosystem. We measured the species richness and abundance of rodents at ecotones between forests and three types of open agricultural biotopes (grasslands, rapeseed fields, and cereal fields) along perpendicular transects. The species richness and relative abundance of rodents were highest at the forest/grassland ecotone where the densities of the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) and the striped field mouse (A. agrarius) were highest. The highest density of the forest-dwelling bank vole (Myodes glareolus) was recorded next to grasslands; however, the abundance of this species increased towards the forest interior. The positive edge effect of ecotones on species richness and total abundance did not exceed 10 m. Our results suggest that maintaining narrow grasslands at the margins of crop fields would strengthen rodent communities at ecotones as well as in adjacent forests.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Human-elephant conflict in West Bengal, India: present status and
           mitigation measures

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      Abstract: Abstract An attempt has been made to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of human-elephant conflict (HEC) and mitigation measures adopted in West Bengal, a thickly populated and agrarian state of India. West Bengal supports only 2% elephant population of India but contributes to the highest human casualties due to HEC. A total of 726 human deaths, 1233 human injuries, 51,542.027 ha areas of crop loss, 34,446 hut damage, and 136 unnatural elephant deaths were reported in West Bengal during April 2010 to March 2019 due to direct HEC. Electrocution was the leading cause of unnatural elephant deaths, followed by train accidents and poaching. South Bengal witnessed maximum crop raiding by elephants. About INR 59.09 crores were compensated by the government to the victims of wild elephant depredation during the same period. Both human and elephant population is increasing and resulting in higher HEC. Natural elephant habitats become fragmented and even degraded due to rapid urbanization and human intervention. Increasing HECs not only cause a negative impact on the agro-based and forest-based household economy of rural people living in conflict prone areas of almost thirteen districts of the state, but also pose a major threat to elephant conservation. Apart from traditional short-term elephant driving practices, several long-term cost-effective and innovative mitigation measures should also be taken involving local communities and other stakeholders for proper management of natural elephant habitat, restoration of elephant corridors, protection of elephants, reduction of HEC, and sustainable development in the state of West Bengal.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Roadkill mortality decreases after road inauguration

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      Abstract: Abstract The main factors affecting specific road casualty rates are related to life-history traits, road features, and landscape variables. After road inauguration, roadkill rate and spatial and temporal patterns can change substantially due to changes in traffic intensity, avoidance behaviour or local population decline. Despite the Canary Islands constituting a biodiversity hotspot, Canarian ecosystems are highly threatened because of the high human density, and studies on anthropogenic sources of mortality of wildlife are scarce. Here, we counted roadkills during two annual cycles after the inauguration of an 8.8-km-road section on Tenerife, the largest and most densely populated island of the Canaries. We counted 694 roadkills belonging to a minimum of 19 species of birds and six species of introduced mammals. Seasonal variation was apparent during both annual cycles, particularly for birds, being the majority of victims concentrated in May and June. Although traffic intensity increased since road inauguration, the number of roadkills decreased significantly in the second annual cycle. The reduction in road mortality in the second cycle could be related to some non-mutually exclusive factors such as population decline, road avoidance, or weather conditions. As road networks of the Canary Islands are still increasing, further studies quantifying road mortality impacts on Canarian ecosystems and threatened species are urgently needed to guarantee the management and conservation of its fragile wildlife.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Habitat characteristics of European bison (Bison bonasus) in Ukraine

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      Abstract: Abstract Beginning in the 1960s, restoration of the European bison (Bison bonasus) in Ukraine has resulted in seven herds with approximately 350 total individuals currently. For the first time, we describe characteristics of habitats used by these seven European bison herds located in forest, forest-steppe, and mountain zones of Ukraine. During the growing season across all ecological zones and herds, we observed variation in bison use of woodland and open habitats associated with temporal variation in landscape scale habitat characteristics. During winter across all ecological zones and herds, variation in habitat use declined dramatically with supplementary feeding that incentivized sedentary association with woodlands. Our descriptive field observations are intended to improve understanding of European bison landscape ecology and serve as a basis for additional quantitative investigations.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Livestock displace European mouflon from optimal foraging sites

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      Abstract: Abstract The conflict between free-ranging livestock and wildlife is a serious conservation concern across rural communities worldwide. Livestock may affect wild herbivores via direct competition for resources due to spatial and diet overlap or via behavioural interference. It is imperative that we disentangle the effects of livestock on wildlife behaviour to obtain an empirical basis able to stir management and conservation decisions. Here, we studied the effect of livestock presence on the habitat selection in a free-ranging European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon) population in Sardinia, where the species is under strict protection. We collected spatial data on mouflon and livestock during two consecutive years to investigate whether the mouflon selection of key feeding grassland sites was negatively impacted by the livestock presence. We found that mouflon preferably selected grassland, and its selection significantly increased when grass was of better quality (greener). We showed that livestock presence led to the displacement of mouflon from such preferred feeding sites, an effect clearly exacerbated by livestock proximity. We indeed found that the selection of grassland by mouflon dropped significantly when the distance between livestock and mouflon was below ~ 650 m, providing a useful management threshold indication. Livestock presence in close proximity displaced mouflon to sub-optimal habitat, and its effects may have negative impact on the population dynamic of this species which is already characterized by low female productivity within harsh Mediterranean environment. Our results give clear management indications aimed at better managing livestock grazing within natural areas to ultimately improve wildlife conservation.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • One tool in the box: the role of hunters in mitigating the damages
           associated to abundant wildlife

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      Abstract: Abstract Many game species are prey species and evolved to cope with significant mortality by natural predators. In the absence of predation or hunting, these game populations will be limited by resource depletion or disease. Both situations may fall within the overabundance definition. We review drivers of game species overabundance, considering if recreational hunting can effectively manage this challenge. We show examples of overabundance management in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), deer (red deer Cervus elaphus and white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) or its relative, the feral pig. We also consider available alternatives for managing overabundant wildlife such as habitat management, predator restoration, pathogen introductions, professional culling, immunocontraception, and poisoning. Most alternatives can be included in integrated wildlife management strategies but are unsuitable alone for large-scale overabundance control. We conclude that, when available, it is advisable to use recreational hunting as one tool in the box. Recreational hunting will perform best as a means of population control within integrated wildlife management strategies, combining hunting with habitat management. To maintain the contribution of recreational hunting for managing overabundance, hunters need to survey demographics of game populations to adequately plan harvest quotas. They should continue developing their commitment with biodiversity conservation, monitoring programs, and animal/public health. Agencies could set acceptable targets and facilitate hunting, educating the public about recreational hunting as socio-ecological service. Hunting and conservation should go hand in hand, with special caution regarding native endangered species that locally become pests needing sustainable management including adaptive hunting.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01578-7
       
  • Harvest bag composition differs among hunting methods for wild boar in
           Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract Hunting method was recorded for a total of 7725 wild boar harvested in Sweden during the hunting years 2009/10 to 2017/18. Still hunting was most common and accounted for 53.0% of the harvested animals, whereas drive hunts and hunting for protection of crops accounted for 22.4% and 19.7%, respectively. In still hunting, significantly fewer adult females were harvested compared with expected numbers from a random harvest, whereas the opposite pattern occurred for all other methods. The proportion of wild boars harvested in still hunting decreased as the total harvest increased.
      PubDate: 2022-04-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01576-9
       
  • Habitat selection and density of common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) in
           Northern Italy: effects of land use cover and landscape configuration

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      Abstract: Abstract Knowing the ecology of game species is important to define sustainable hunting pressure and to plan management actions aimed to maintain viable populations. Common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is one of the main gamebird species in Europe and North America, despite its native range extending from the Caucasus to Eastern China. This research aimed to define the environmental variables shaping the spatial distribution of male pheasants and to estimate their breeding density in an agroecosystem of northern Italy. During the breeding season, 2015, we carried out 372 point counts with unlimited distances, randomly placed following a stratified sampling survey design. The habitat requirements of the pheasant were evaluated following a presence vs. availability approach, using environmental variables related to land use cover and landscape configuration. We built generalized linear models with a binary distribution, selecting variables following an information-theoretic approach. Densities were estimated through both conventional and multiple-covariate distance sampling. We estimated a density of 1.45 males/km2, with 4.26 males/km2 in suitable areas and 0.91 males/km2 in unsuitable ones. We found pheasants in areas with meadows and tree plantations, which were used to find food and refuges from predators and bad weather conditions. Similarly, woodlands have a positive effect on species occurrence, whereas arable lands were avoided, specifically maize and paddy fields. We found little evidence that landscape configuration affects pheasant occurrence. We found pheasants to be negatively affected by the length of edges between woodlands and arable lands, whereas edges between woodlands and grasslands seem to be beneficial for the species. These findings could help landscape and wildlife managers to plan habitat improvement actions useful to maintain self-sustaining populations of this species, by increasing cover of woodlands, meadows, and tree plantations.
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01575-w
       
 
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