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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 107 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Animal Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access  
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
European Journal of Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.733
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1439-0574 - ISSN (Online) 1612-4642
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Salt-lick use in Malaysian tropical rainforests reveals behavioral
           differences by food habit in medium and large-sized mammals

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      Abstract: Abstract The food habits and behavior of medium and large-sized mammals that visited natural salt-licks in a tropical rainforest of Belum-Temengor Forest Complex, Peninsular Malaysia, were analyzed to understand the purpose of their salt-lick visits. The study was conducted at the wet-type salt-licks, where the animals drink clear water, thus the ingestion of clay particles needed for detoxification of plant secondary compounds, one of the possible purposes of salt-lick visits, seemed very low. Ten herbivorous, seven omnivorous, and four carnivorous species were recorded at the salt-licks. 95.3% of all video capture records of animals at the salt-licks were of herbivores, while the records of omnivores and carnivores were only 3.5% and 1.2%, respectively. These results indicated that herbivores visited studied salt-licks much more frequently than other food-habit species. The herbivores also tended to stay longer at the salt-licks than omnivores and carnivores. In addition, water-drinking behaviors were recorded significantly more frequently in herbivores (73% of video captures) than in omnivores (28%) and carnivores (0%). The carnivores showed only resting, passing, and hunting behaviors. The results suggest that the studied salt-licks were mainly used by herbivores and some omnivores, possibly to supplement minerals and/or alleviate gastrointestinal problems by drinking salt-lick water.
      PubDate: 2022-08-11
       
  • Genetic traces of dispersal and admixture in red deer (Cervus elaphus)
           populations from the Carpathian Basin

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      Abstract: Abstract After the last glacial, the Carpathian Basin was repopulated from either eastward or northward colonisation routes for various species; one of these was the emblematic member of the European megafauna, the red deer, Cervus elaphus. We analysed 303 red deer individuals from the middle of the region, in seven Hungarian game reserves, at ten microsatellite loci (C01, C229, T26, T108, T123, T156, T172, T193, T501, T507), to investigate the genetic diversity of these subpopulations. We discovered high levels of genetic diversity of red deer subpopulations; allelic richness values ranging 4.99–7.01, observed heterozygosity 0.729–0.800, polymorphic information content 0.722–0.806, and Shannon’s information index 1.668–2.064. Multi-locus analyses indicated population admixtures of various degrees that corresponded to geographical location, and complex genetic structures were shown by clustering. Populations in the south-western and the north-eastern parts of the region formed two highly separated groups, and the red deer from populations in between them were highly admixed (in western Pannonia/Transdanubia, where the Danube flows into the Carpathian Basin). This pattern corresponds to the distribution of mitochondrial as well as Y-chromosome lineages. Assignment tests showed that a large fraction of individuals (29.4%) are found outside of their population of origin, indicating that the dispersal of red deer is rather common, which could be expected considering the life course of the species.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Severe feather deformation in greater white-fronted goose (Anser alb.
           albifrons) goslings during hot summer period on Kolguev Island 2016

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      Abstract: Abstract In summer 2016, we observed premature feather malformation among goslings of greater white-fronted goose (Anser alb. albifrons), between 7 and 10 weeks of age on family gathering areas on Kolguev Island, Russia, the most important breeding island in the Western Palearctic. Rarely reported in wild birds, to our knowledge, this phenomenon has not been recorded in wild geese of this species, despite continuous ringing and marking of thousands of wild geese across Northern Europe and Arctic Siberia. This feather malformations were documented in 36 unfledged goslings showing weak feather basis, deformed or unevenly grown wing feathers or even dead feather buds. Approximately about one-third of all chicks were affected. Feather malformations like this, causing flightless chicks as a result, have never been noticed in any other of our 12 study years since 2006. The lesion was characterised by soft feather buds, weak or incomplete wing feathers and lack of feather development. No other abnormalities were observed in the goslings, so goslings did not differ in weight or body sizes. Affected fledglings never became airworthy and were killed in large numbers by predators or at latest perished during the Arctic winter.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Molecular surveillance revealed no SARS-CoV-2 spillovers to raccoons
           (Procyon lotor) in four German federal states

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      Abstract: Abstract Raccoons (Procyon lotor), which are closely related to the family Mustelidae, might be susceptible to natural infection by SARS-CoV-2. This assumption is based on experimental evidence that confirmed the vulnerability of farmed fur-carnivore species, including Procyon lotor to SARS-CoV-2. To date, there are no reports of natural SARS-CoV-2 infections of raccoons in Germany. Here, we use RT-PCR to analyze 820 samples from raccoons hunted in Germany with a focus on 4 German federal states (Saxony-Anhalt, Thuringia, Hesse, North Rhine-Westphalia). Lung tissues were homogenized and processed for RNA extraction and RT-qPCR for detecting SARS-CoV-2 was performed. No viral RNA was detected in any samples (0/820). Next, we compared raccoons and human ACE-2 residues that are known to serve for binding with SARS-CoV-2 receptor binding domain (RBD). Interestingly, we found only 60% identity on amino acid level, which may have contributed to the absence of SARS-CoV-2 infections in raccoons. In conclusion, the chance of raccoons being intermediate reservoir hosts for SARS-CoV-2 seems to be very low.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Presence of spraint at bridges as an effective monitoring tool to assess
           current Eurasian fish otter distribution in Austria

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      Abstract: Abstract Monitoring carnivore populations requires sensitive and trustworthy assessment methods to make reasonable and effective management decisions. The Eurasian fish otter Lutra lutra experienced a dramatic population decline throughout Europe during the twentieth century but is currently recovering in both distribution range and population size. In Austria, most assessments on otter distribution have applied a modified version of the so-called “British” or “standard” method utilizing point-wise surveys for otter spraints at predefined monitoring bridges. In this study, we synthesize several recent statewide assessments to compile the current otter distribution in Austria and evaluate the efficiency and sensitivity of the “monitoring bridge” approach in comparison to the “standard” method. The otter shows an almost comprehensive distribution throughout eastern and central Austria, while more western areas (Tyrol and Vorarlberg) are only partially inhabited, likely due to a still ongoing westward expansion. Furthermore, the bridge monitoring method utilizing presence/absence information on otter spraints reveals itself to be a time- and cost- effective monitoring tool with a tolerable loss of sensitivity for large-scale otter distribution assessments. Count data of spraints seem to be prone to observer bias or environmental influences like weather or flooding events making them less suitable for quantitative analyses.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Apparent survival, reproduction, and population growth estimation of a
           Kentish plover population in the Canary Islands

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      Abstract: Abstract The increase of the tourism and urbanization of vast areas of dunes and beaches has been accompanied by an increase in the level of disturbances to many shorebirds, especially on those species which depend on such habitats to breed. The European Kentish plover (Charadrius alexandrinus) population is declining, also in the Canarian archipelago, one of the most important touristic destinations worldwide. Using data from an intense monitoring program on Lanzarote Island and the nearby La Graciosa islet (hereafter, both referred as Lanzarote), we aimed to (1) estimate the breeding output and survival and (2) use these parameter estimates to build a population model to assess the long-term growth rate of the population and evaluate, accordingly, its conservation status. Our studied population presents a relatively high breeding success although, thereafter, the first-year apparent survival is low. Even though adult apparent survival rates are reasonably high, these seem insufficient to compensate for the low survival rates of the first-year birds. In this sense, we found a negative growth rate according to a population model estimating an annual loss equivalent to 20% (95% confidence interval: 6–35%). Local studies to account for the effects of human disturbance caused by tourist industry on survival, breeding rates, and demography are required to develop precise conservation actions for the Kentish plover population in Lanzarote.
      PubDate: 2022-07-20
       
  • Response of a mesocarnivore community to a new food resource: recognition,
           exploitation, and interspecific competition

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      Abstract: Abstract Mammalian carnivores with generalist feeding behaviour should trace and exploit new and predictable food resources quicker and more easily than more specialised species. On the other hand, if the new food resource is spatially and temporally predictable, interference or exploitation competition should arise among members of the carnivore guild, with the expectation that smaller species will not use the food resource or will change their foraging behaviour to avoid conflict with larger species. Here, we studied the response to a new food resource of a mammalian mesocarnivore community in south-western Iberian Peninsula. We installed artificial feeding points supplied with a novel food source and tracked them by camera trapping to investigate whether (1) the new artificial food resource was visited, recognised and exploited by the mesocarnivore guild species; (2) how frequently they used the food; and (3) in case of co-occurrence, if dominant species excluded or reduced the feeding options of subordinates. All target species except the badger recognised and exploited the novel food. More generalist species trended to visit feeding points more frequently and spent more time feeding than less generalist species, even though significant differences were not achieved in all cases. When co-occurring at the same feeding point, the arrival of larger species reduced either the visitation rates, feeding probability or time spent feeding of smaller species. Moreover, some smaller species showed a shift in their normal activity pattern at the feeding points when a larger competitor started to use the food source. Overall, we conclude that active avoidance combined with temporal segregation may help reduce agonistic interactions among competitors for shared resources.
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
  • Evaluation of a combined and portable light-ultrasound device with which
           to deter red deer

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      Abstract: Abstract Human–wildlife conflicts are a growing problem in Northern Hemisphere where wild ungulates are one of the taxonomic groups most frequently involved. To mitigate these conflicts, it is essential to develop preventive actions able to avoid encounters between wildlife and human (activities). We here employed photo-trapping to evaluate the behaviour of red deer (Cervus elaphus) when confronted with dissuasive portable deterrents that function on the basis of changing patterns of light and ultrasound. This was done by following a before/after experimental design, with two phases: (i) a test phase, with active deterrents, and (ii) a control phase, without deterrents. When deterrents were activated they achieved a 48.96% reduction in the frequency of use by red deer (up to 66.64% when it was assessed on a thinner Sect. 10 m wide from the line of deterrents) and produced a reduction of 67.71% in the frequency of deterrent-line crossings. However, a habituation effect was detected since the use by red deer of the treatment area increased as time since treatment. These results indicate that these portable devices are effective as regards dissuading deer, mainly on short time scales. The deterrents tested here could be suitable for use at focal points for short periods or in combination with other methods to improve their effectiveness in vulnerability points. This device could potentially be used to mitigate conflicts caused by wildlife species and in response to relevant and timely situations, such as vehicle collisions and damage to crops, among others.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Galactosylgalactosylxylosylprotein 3-beta-glucuronosyltransferase—a
           potent biomarker for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elephants

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      Abstract: In Asian countries, there is high occurrence of tuberculosis (TB) among captive wild elephants due to close association with humans and other domestic livestock. The present study envisages on utilization of serological, molecular, and proteomic diagnostic assays for tuberculosis diagnosis. The usage of urine as a biological sample for the identification of biomarkers for tuberculosis forms the prime focus of the study. Seroprevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in elephants in Kerala were found to be 37.2% (n = 86) using Chembio DPP VetTB assay and nine (10.46%) were positive for acid fast bacilli using trunk wash sediment smear. On comparison with DPP VetTB assay, acid fast staining shows low sensitivity of 28.13%, specificity 100%, kappa statistics value of 0.329. The presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was confirmed in trunk wash using PCR targeting gene IS6110, at 245 bp amplicon size and 25 seropositive elephants (78.2%) were confirmed positive. Custom sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate obtained were Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The urine of six TB confirmed elephants and six healthy elephants were selected for proteomic analysis. The protein in urine was precipitated, quantified, and subjected to SDS-PAGE, enzymatic digestion, and HRLCMS analysis. Mass spectrometry data analysis revealed 49 proteins identified in TB-infected group, 68 proteins identified in control group and Galactosylgalactosylxylosylprotein 3-beta-glucuronosyltransferase was the protein exclusively present in TB-infected group. Galactosylgalactosylxylosylprotein 3-beta-glucuronosyltransferase plays a major role in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis. This is the first report of the presence of galactosylgalactosylxylosylprotein 3-beta-glucuronosyltransferase protein in urine of elephant. Graphical abstract
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • Recovery of an isolated badger (Meles meles) population in The Netherlands

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      Abstract: Abstract South of the town of Hilversum, The Netherlands, remained a small isolated population of badgers in 1983. Improved protection and, possibly, a few reintroductions made this population grow steadily in the following four decades. The number of occupied main setts grew from a only 5 setts in the 1980s to 137 in 2021 and the number of badgers from a dozen to 500. The proportion of occupied main setts where badgers reproduced, increased significantly (P < 0.05) from circa 30% in the earlier years to 45% in later years. The observed litter size based on emerged cubs was 2.26 without a change over time. The average density-related apparent mortality was 14–26%, depending on underlying assumptions. The estimated size of territories, based on dispersion distances, was 50–150 hectares. The observed number of badgers per main sett tended to increase (P < 0.10) from circa 2.7 during the first decade to circa 3.7 in the end. The increase of the total number of badgers in the region was, however, mainly associated with a proportional increase of the area where badgers and their setts can be found nowadays. This expansion continues until the present day, albeit at a diminishing pace.
      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Radiographic pelvimetry in free-ranging Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx
           carpathicus) from Switzerland

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      Abstract: Abstract The observation of pelvic anomalies in two Eurasian lynx (subspecies Lynx lynx carpathicus) from a population reintroduced to Switzerland raised the question of the frequency of such anomalies, but no anatomical reference values were available for comparison. This study aimed at providing baseline data on the pelvic morphology of Carpathian lynx from Switzerland, and at detecting potential pelvic anomalies. Measurements of 10 pelvic parameters were performed on the radiographs of 56 lynx taken from 1997–2015. Two ratios (vertical diameter/acetabula; sagittal diameter/transversal diameter) and two areas (pelvic outlet and inlet) were calculated to describe pelvic shape. The results showed that the Eurasian lynx has a mesatipellic pelvis, with a pelvic length corresponding to approximatively 20% of the body length. We found growth-related pelvis size differences among age classes and evidence of sexual dimorphism in adults: two parameters reflecting pelvic width were larger in females, likely to meet the physiological requirements of parturition. By contrast, pelvis length, conjugata vera, diagonal conjugata, sagittal diameter, and tendentially also vertical diameter, were larger in males, in agreement with their larger body size. Outliers were found in five individuals but apparently without clinical significance. Extreme values were likely due to inter-individual differences and the limited sample size rather than to possible congenital or developmental pathological morphology of the pelvic cavity. We present baseline data of the pelvic morphology, including growth and sexual dimorphism, which may be useful for health monitoring and for determination of age and sex in skeletal remains of Carpathian lynx.
      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Hunting bag statistics to assess the onset of the pre-nuptial migration
           — the case study of the song thrush in the central Mediterranean

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      Abstract: Abstract The Birds Directive (2009/147/EC) states that migratory game birds are not hunted “during their return to their rearing grounds”. It follows that for each huntable species, Member States shall assess the 10-day period (TDP) in which the pre-nuptial migration starts. For birds wintering in Europe, the onset of northward movements cannot be easily defined. In wintering areas, individuals with different migration patterns may coexist, and some migrants may fly northward while a relevant fraction of the population remains stationary. In this regard, one challenging case is represented by the song thrush Turdus philomelos, a short-distance migrant passerine intensively hunted across southern Europe. We used hunting bag data (n = 839,027) gathered in Liguria (NW Italy) during 6 consecutive hunting seasons (2006/2007–2011/2012) to test whether the second TDP of January actually corresponds to the beginning of northward movements, as previously determined based on ringing-recovery data. The spatial and temporal variation of hunting bag data was coherent with the migration pattern already described and confirmed the onset of return movements in early January. The analysis of hunting bag seasonality suggests that the increase in January harvesting is not due to wintering displacements induced by cold spells, but to regular movements that are predictable in time and direction, typical of migrating birds. Our analysis proves that hunting statistics, when collected with standardised protocols and checked to avoid bias due to variations in hunting efforts, can be used to describe the phenology of migration.
      PubDate: 2022-06-29
       
  • Genetic analysis of hog deer (Axis porcinus) in Victoria, Australia, and
           its applications to invasive species and game management

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      Abstract: Abstract Hog deer were introduced to Australia in the 1860s, where they have spread across the Gippsland region of Victoria. Due to its status as an introduced species and an important game animal within Victoria, management of the species is complex. Given this complexity, genetic studies can provide important information regarding population structure and diversity which can assist in controlling problematic populations of hog deer, while also ensuring viable game stock in sites managed as game reserves. The aim of this study was to investigate the population genetic structure and diversity of the Victorian hog deer 150 years after introduction using short tandem repeats (STRs). Hog deer samples were collected across 15 sites of differing management regimes in the Gippsland region of Victoria and genotyped for 13 polymorphic STR loci. Up to four distinct genetic clusters were identified across the sites sampled, suggesting that despite low observed genetic diversity, population structure is present across their range. It was also possible to detect evidence of recent translocations among populations. This study suggests that the presence of distinct genetic clusters may enable management of separate genetic units, considering invasive species and game management objectives.
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
       
  • A questionnaire-based investigation to explore the social and legal
           implications derived from the use of camera traps for wildlife monitoring
           and conservation

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      Abstract: Abstract Camera traps are non-invasive monitoring tools largely used to detect species presence or population dynamics. The use of camera traps for wildlife conservation purposes raises questions about privacy invasion when images of people are taken. Throughout the use of an online questionnaire survey, we assessed the degree of knowledge about social and legal implications derived from the deployment of camera traps. Our results revealed a consistent gap in term of knowledge about legal implications derived by the use of camera traps among respondents. Most of those who were aware of such legislation did not take specific actions to prevent legal consequences, probably to reduce the risk of theft or vandalism. Most respondents declared that images of people were unintentionally collected. Some of them stated that images which may violate privacy issues or showed nefarious activities were stored for internal processing or reported to local authorities. Our research thus confirmed that privacy invasion is a widely poorly treated issue in the wildlife conservation dimension. Furthermore, despite camera traps being used to improve conservation efforts, the detection of individuals engaged in private or illegal activities poses further complications in terms of pursuance of legal actions when an individual is identified by these images. So, appropriate guidelines for images analysis need to be designed, and subsequently followed. Lastly, adopting effective methods to protect cameras from the risk of theft and/or vandalism is of primary concern.
      PubDate: 2022-06-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01593-8
       
  • Establishing haematological and biochemical reference intervals for
           free-ranging Scottish golden eagle nestlings (Aquila chrysaetos)

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      Abstract: Abstract Health assessment of individuals is an important aspect of monitoring endangered wildlife populations. Haematological and biochemical values are a common health assessment tool, and whilst reference values are well established for domestic species, they are often not available for wild animal species. This study established 31 haematological and biochemical reference intervals for golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nestlings in Scotland, in order to improve the understanding of the species’ health and support conservation efforts. Reference intervals were created from 47 nestlings (ages 2–7.5 weeks old) across 37 nests, to date, the largest sample of wild individuals of this species and age cohort sampled for these purposes. Upper reference intervals for concentrations of lymphocytes, total protein, cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, and monocytes, calculated in this study, are higher than those found for adult raptors and the interval span is higher than that observed in adult raptors for concentrations of AST, albumin, eosinophil, LDH, and monocyte count. Statistically significant positive correlations were found with age and concentrations of haemoglobin, lymphocytes, serum pH, and creatine kinase, and significant negative correlations with age for concentrations of thrombocytes, heterophils, total protein, globulin, and lactate dehydrogenase. Packed cell volume was significantly higher for females than males, and concentration of calcium and eosinophils were higher for individuals in good body condition than those in moderate body condition. The reference intervals produced by this study will be of important use to the veterinary and conservation management communities and will aid the long-term monitoring of the Scottish golden eagle population health.
      PubDate: 2022-06-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01586-7
       
  • Herbivore damage to sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) in the Czech
           Republic

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      Abstract: Abstract The numbers of large wild herbivores are rising in the Czech Republic, leading to increased grazing pressure on agricultural crops, including the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), which is highly sensitive to grazing. In this study, we aim to estimate the amount of damage to sunflower crops in the Czech Republic, experimentally evaluate the effects of grazing on sunflower development and yield and their response to given types of damage, and propose a procedure for quantifying damage caused to sunflower crops. Our results indicate that most sunflowers damaged below the cotyledon at any stage of growth died or failed to yield achenes, while those damaged above the cotyledon were better able to regenerate and produce some form of harvest. In most cases, plants damaged at 11 cm height (growth stage BBCH 10–12) were able to increase growth intensity, replace damaged tissue and make up for any loss. In later growth stages, this ability progressively decreased. Plants damaged at 15 cm (BBCH 14–16), for example, produced just 14% of achievable production. On the other hand, we observed a 10% yield increase in undamaged plants when competitive neighbours were removed. Overall, we estimate total damage to sunflower achene production caused by herbivores in the Czech Republic at 16%.
      PubDate: 2022-05-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01589-4
       
  • Correction to: Does the American mink displace the European polecat' a
           need for more research on interspecific competition between invasive and
           native species

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      PubDate: 2022-05-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01590-x
       
  • Do telemetry harnesses affect giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla)
           behavior and welfare'

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      Abstract: Abstract Telemetry provides researchers with invaluable data and has contributed to the progress of animal ecology and behavioral studies. However, the impact of biotelemetry devices on animal behavior and welfare has been evaluated in a few species. The telemetry device (GPS or VHF) is attached to a harness made especially for giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) due to its particular anatomy, and this is the best way to access the scheduled spatiotemporal data of the species’ movement. We evaluated the adverse effects of biotelemetry devices on giant anteaters’ behavior and welfare. Behavioral analysis on giant anteaters in captivity (n = 3) was conducted by observing them with and without the GPS-harness. We also include data on GPS-harness dysfunction and animal injuries observed from free-ranging tagged animals (n=74). The GPS-harness influenced the behavior distributions frequency, but no new or atypical act was verified. Free-ranging individuals detached the harness twice, five removed the front part of the harness, and three had skin injuries . This is the first study to document telemetry device effects on giant anteaters. To date, severe adverse effects of harness-attached GPS tracking devices were not reported for this species. Our data supports the continued use of this method for monitoring free-ranging or captive giant anteaters. However, we recommend and stress the importance of continued research that helps improve telemetry and monitoring techniques.
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01587-6
       
  • Correction to: Compensating freshwater habitat loss—duck productivity
           and food resources in man‑made wetlands

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      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01591-w
       
  • Eurasian otter Lutra lutra diet mirrors the decline of native fish
           assemblages in a semi-arid catchment (River Segura, SE Spain)

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      Abstract: Abstract In semi-arid environments, the effects of irregularly distributed rainfall, flow regulation and water inter-basin transfer enhance the spread of non-native fish to the detriment of native communities. In the River Segura, since the 1980s the number of non-native fish species has progressively increased, also because of the building of water transfer facility connecting the rivers Segura and Tajo. With the aim of highlighting how man-driven changes in the diversity of fish communities affect the diet of top-predators, we compared Eurasian otter Lutra lutra diet in the span of 20 years, i.e. 1997–98 vs. 2016–19. As habitat quality affects the condition of Andalusian barbel Luciobarbus sclateri, the most widespread native fish, we also compared the size of preyed barbels to point out whether human activities may have lowered their profitability to otters. Fish and introduced red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii formed the bulk of otter diet in both study periods. In 2016–19 the contribution of non-native species to otter diet increased significantly, both for crayfish and fish, which included ten non-native species. Otter feeding habits faithfully mirrored the variation in the composition of the fish community and confirmed the importance of crayfish as alternative-to-fish prey in the Iberian Peninsula. The average length of preyed barbels was significantly lower in the second study period, consistently with a decline in barbel profitability for otters.
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01588-5
       
 
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