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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 107 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Animal Diseases     Open Access  
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Animal Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access  
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access  
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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European Journal of Wildlife Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.733
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1439-0574 - ISSN (Online) 1612-4642
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Extent of introgressive hybridization in the Hermann’s tortoise (Testudo
           hermanni hermanni) from the south of France

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      Abstract: Abstract The Western subspecies of Hermann’s tortoise (Testudo hermanni hermanni: WT) is threatened by habitat loss, fragmentation, wildfires, illegal harvesting, and likely hybridization with Testudo hermanni boettgeri (ET), a subspecies introduced from Eastern Europe. To assess the prevalence of this hybridization, we used microsatellite markers and simulations to investigate the genetic status of 565 individuals of the Var district (France) in contrast to the genetic signature of 121 individuals sampled in the Balkans. The genetic differentiation between WT and ET indicated 18% of tortoises in the Var were hybrids between WT and ET (i.e. F1, F2, and F3). Although hybridization increases the genetic diversity within the genetically impoverished WT population, hybridization could also threaten WT genetic integrity. Identifying and removing all hybridized individuals (especially beyond F1) is logistically unfeasible. Instead, conservation actions should reinforce communication and education, notably towards pet owners, to limit further hybridization. Moreover, accurate genetic identification of captives is essential to programs that involve translocating individuals to fragile populations (e.g. those severely impacted by bush fires). Further studies should assess the extent that WT/ET hybridization is detrimental or beneficial to populations facing rapid global changes in the context of depressed genetic diversity.
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
       
  • Spatial and temporal variations in interspecific interaction: impact of a
           recreational landscape

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      Abstract: Abstract Anthropogenic activities, such as outdoor recreation, have the potential to change complex interactions between wildlife and livestock, with further consequences for the management of both animals, the environment, and disease transmission. We present the interaction amongst wildlife, livestock, and outdoor recreationists as a three-way interaction. Little is known about how recreational activities alter the interaction between herbivores in areas extensively used for recreational purposes. We investigate how hiking activity affects spatio-temporal co-occurrence between domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and red deer (Cervus elaphus). We used camera traps to capture the spatio-temporal distribution of red deer and sheep and used the distance from the hiking path as a proxy of hiking activity. We used generalized linear models to investigate the spatial distribution of sheep and deer. We analysed the activity patterns of sheep and deer and then calculated their coefficients of temporal overlap for each camera trap location. We compared these coefficients in relation to the distance from the hiking path. Finally, we used a generalized linear mixed-model to investigate which factors influence the spatio-temporal succession between deer and sheep. We do not find that sheep and red deer spatially avoid each other. The coefficient of temporal overlap varied with distance from the hiking trail, with stronger temporal co-occurrence at greater distances from the hiking trail. Red deer were more likely to be detected further from the path during the day, which increased the temporal overlap with sheep in these areas. This suggests that hiking pressure influences spatio-temporal interactions between sheep and deer, leading to greater temporal overlap in areas further from the hiking path due to red deer spatial avoidance of hikers. This impact of recreationists on the wildlife and livestock interaction can have consequences for the animals’ welfare, the vegetation they graze, their management, and disease transmission.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Compensating freshwater habitat loss—duck productivity and food
           resources in man-made wetlands

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      Abstract: The number of wetlands in Europe decreased by more than 60% by the 1990s compared with the beginning of the twentieth century. Man-made wetlands may be an effective way to compensate for the loss and degradation of freshwater ecosystems. This loss impacts the populations of declining duck species, partly due to a lack of suitable breeding opportunities. In this study, we evaluated duck productivity and invertebrate abundance in 13 man-made Finnish wetlands that were created for waterbirds. Our findings revealed that man-made wetlands have higher duck production than average natural boreal lakes. High invertebrate levels were a key factor that positively correlated with duck pair density, brood density, duckling density of the common teal (Anas crecca), and duck density during the post-breeding period. Our results suggest that man-made wetlands are a useful tool for increasing duck productivity. For upholding this status in the long term, appropriate management should involve maintaining sufficient invertebrate levels.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
       
  • Correction to: Conflicts between large carnivores and local pastoralists
           around Niokolo Koba National Park, Senegal

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      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Edge effect in rodent populations at the border between agricultural
           landscapes and forests

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      Abstract: Biodiversity is often highest at ecotones. However, edge effects vary among species and the spatial extent has rarely been quantified. Rodents form an important part of the food chain and thus are keystones of the ecosystem. We measured the species richness and abundance of rodents at ecotones between forests and three types of open agricultural biotopes (grasslands, rapeseed fields, and cereal fields) along perpendicular transects. The species richness and relative abundance of rodents were highest at the forest/grassland ecotone where the densities of the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollis) and the striped field mouse (A. agrarius) were highest. The highest density of the forest-dwelling bank vole (Myodes glareolus) was recorded next to grasslands; however, the abundance of this species increased towards the forest interior. The positive edge effect of ecotones on species richness and total abundance did not exceed 10 m. Our results suggest that maintaining narrow grasslands at the margins of crop fields would strengthen rodent communities at ecotones as well as in adjacent forests.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Human-elephant conflict in West Bengal, India: present status and
           mitigation measures

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      Abstract: An attempt has been made to analyze the temporal and spatial patterns of human-elephant conflict (HEC) and mitigation measures adopted in West Bengal, a thickly populated and agrarian state of India. West Bengal supports only 2% elephant population of India but contributes to the highest human casualties due to HEC. A total of 726 human deaths, 1233 human injuries, 51,542.027 ha areas of crop loss, 34,446 hut damage, and 136 unnatural elephant deaths were reported in West Bengal during April 2010 to March 2019 due to direct HEC. Electrocution was the leading cause of unnatural elephant deaths, followed by train accidents and poaching. South Bengal witnessed maximum crop raiding by elephants. About INR 59.09 crores were compensated by the government to the victims of wild elephant depredation during the same period. Both human and elephant population is increasing and resulting in higher HEC. Natural elephant habitats become fragmented and even degraded due to rapid urbanization and human intervention. Increasing HECs not only cause a negative impact on the agro-based and forest-based household economy of rural people living in conflict prone areas of almost thirteen districts of the state, but also pose a major threat to elephant conservation. Apart from traditional short-term elephant driving practices, several long-term cost-effective and innovative mitigation measures should also be taken involving local communities and other stakeholders for proper management of natural elephant habitat, restoration of elephant corridors, protection of elephants, reduction of HEC, and sustainable development in the state of West Bengal.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
       
  • Roadkill mortality decreases after road inauguration

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      Abstract: Abstract The main factors affecting specific road casualty rates are related to life-history traits, road features, and landscape variables. After road inauguration, roadkill rate and spatial and temporal patterns can change substantially due to changes in traffic intensity, avoidance behaviour or local population decline. Despite the Canary Islands constituting a biodiversity hotspot, Canarian ecosystems are highly threatened because of the high human density, and studies on anthropogenic sources of mortality of wildlife are scarce. Here, we counted roadkills during two annual cycles after the inauguration of an 8.8-km-road section on Tenerife, the largest and most densely populated island of the Canaries. We counted 694 roadkills belonging to a minimum of 19 species of birds and six species of introduced mammals. Seasonal variation was apparent during both annual cycles, particularly for birds, being the majority of victims concentrated in May and June. Although traffic intensity increased since road inauguration, the number of roadkills decreased significantly in the second annual cycle. The reduction in road mortality in the second cycle could be related to some non-mutually exclusive factors such as population decline, road avoidance, or weather conditions. As road networks of the Canary Islands are still increasing, further studies quantifying road mortality impacts on Canarian ecosystems and threatened species are urgently needed to guarantee the management and conservation of its fragile wildlife.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Habitat characteristics of European bison (Bison bonasus) in Ukraine

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      Abstract: Abstract Beginning in the 1960s, restoration of the European bison (Bison bonasus) in Ukraine has resulted in seven herds with approximately 350 total individuals currently. For the first time, we describe characteristics of habitats used by these seven European bison herds located in forest, forest-steppe, and mountain zones of Ukraine. During the growing season across all ecological zones and herds, we observed variation in bison use of woodland and open habitats associated with temporal variation in landscape scale habitat characteristics. During winter across all ecological zones and herds, variation in habitat use declined dramatically with supplementary feeding that incentivized sedentary association with woodlands. Our descriptive field observations are intended to improve understanding of European bison landscape ecology and serve as a basis for additional quantitative investigations.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Livestock displace European mouflon from optimal foraging sites

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      Abstract: Abstract The conflict between free-ranging livestock and wildlife is a serious conservation concern across rural communities worldwide. Livestock may affect wild herbivores via direct competition for resources due to spatial and diet overlap or via behavioural interference. It is imperative that we disentangle the effects of livestock on wildlife behaviour to obtain an empirical basis able to stir management and conservation decisions. Here, we studied the effect of livestock presence on the habitat selection in a free-ranging European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon) population in Sardinia, where the species is under strict protection. We collected spatial data on mouflon and livestock during two consecutive years to investigate whether the mouflon selection of key feeding grassland sites was negatively impacted by the livestock presence. We found that mouflon preferably selected grassland, and its selection significantly increased when grass was of better quality (greener). We showed that livestock presence led to the displacement of mouflon from such preferred feeding sites, an effect clearly exacerbated by livestock proximity. We indeed found that the selection of grassland by mouflon dropped significantly when the distance between livestock and mouflon was below ~ 650 m, providing a useful management threshold indication. Livestock presence in close proximity displaced mouflon to sub-optimal habitat, and its effects may have negative impact on the population dynamic of this species which is already characterized by low female productivity within harsh Mediterranean environment. Our results give clear management indications aimed at better managing livestock grazing within natural areas to ultimately improve wildlife conservation.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • One tool in the box: the role of hunters in mitigating the damages
           associated to abundant wildlife

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      Abstract: Abstract Many game species are prey species and evolved to cope with significant mortality by natural predators. In the absence of predation or hunting, these game populations will be limited by resource depletion or disease. Both situations may fall within the overabundance definition. We review drivers of game species overabundance, considering if recreational hunting can effectively manage this challenge. We show examples of overabundance management in European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), deer (red deer Cervus elaphus and white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) or its relative, the feral pig. We also consider available alternatives for managing overabundant wildlife such as habitat management, predator restoration, pathogen introductions, professional culling, immunocontraception, and poisoning. Most alternatives can be included in integrated wildlife management strategies but are unsuitable alone for large-scale overabundance control. We conclude that, when available, it is advisable to use recreational hunting as one tool in the box. Recreational hunting will perform best as a means of population control within integrated wildlife management strategies, combining hunting with habitat management. To maintain the contribution of recreational hunting for managing overabundance, hunters need to survey demographics of game populations to adequately plan harvest quotas. They should continue developing their commitment with biodiversity conservation, monitoring programs, and animal/public health. Agencies could set acceptable targets and facilitate hunting, educating the public about recreational hunting as socio-ecological service. Hunting and conservation should go hand in hand, with special caution regarding native endangered species that locally become pests needing sustainable management including adaptive hunting.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
       
  • Harvest bag composition differs among hunting methods for wild boar in
           Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract Hunting method was recorded for a total of 7725 wild boar harvested in Sweden during the hunting years 2009/10 to 2017/18. Still hunting was most common and accounted for 53.0% of the harvested animals, whereas drive hunts and hunting for protection of crops accounted for 22.4% and 19.7%, respectively. In still hunting, significantly fewer adult females were harvested compared with expected numbers from a random harvest, whereas the opposite pattern occurred for all other methods. The proportion of wild boars harvested in still hunting decreased as the total harvest increased.
      PubDate: 2022-04-09
       
  • Habitat selection and density of common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) in
           Northern Italy: effects of land use cover and landscape configuration

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      Abstract: Abstract Knowing the ecology of game species is important to define sustainable hunting pressure and to plan management actions aimed to maintain viable populations. Common pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is one of the main gamebird species in Europe and North America, despite its native range extending from the Caucasus to Eastern China. This research aimed to define the environmental variables shaping the spatial distribution of male pheasants and to estimate their breeding density in an agroecosystem of northern Italy. During the breeding season, 2015, we carried out 372 point counts with unlimited distances, randomly placed following a stratified sampling survey design. The habitat requirements of the pheasant were evaluated following a presence vs. availability approach, using environmental variables related to land use cover and landscape configuration. We built generalized linear models with a binary distribution, selecting variables following an information-theoretic approach. Densities were estimated through both conventional and multiple-covariate distance sampling. We estimated a density of 1.45 males/km2, with 4.26 males/km2 in suitable areas and 0.91 males/km2 in unsuitable ones. We found pheasants in areas with meadows and tree plantations, which were used to find food and refuges from predators and bad weather conditions. Similarly, woodlands have a positive effect on species occurrence, whereas arable lands were avoided, specifically maize and paddy fields. We found little evidence that landscape configuration affects pheasant occurrence. We found pheasants to be negatively affected by the length of edges between woodlands and arable lands, whereas edges between woodlands and grasslands seem to be beneficial for the species. These findings could help landscape and wildlife managers to plan habitat improvement actions useful to maintain self-sustaining populations of this species, by increasing cover of woodlands, meadows, and tree plantations.
      PubDate: 2022-04-05
       
  • Patterns of visitation of the Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth (Choloepus
           didactylus) at Amazonian mineral licks

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      Abstract: Abstract Mineral licks are essential to many species of mammals and birds in the Amazon rainforest, including the Linnaeus’s two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus). While sloths have been recorded at mineral licks, visitation of the two-toed sloth at mineral licks has not been described in detail. We used camera traps to observe sloth visitation at 53 mineral lick sites and generalized linear mixed-effects model to evaluate patterns in visitation. We recorded a visitation rate of 29.39 visits per 100 camera nights, with a peak activity time of 22.00 h. Our model results suggest that sloth visitation at mineral licks may be related to differential habitat selection based in part on elevation, slope, and distance from rivers and streams. This study describes the largest dataset on sloth visitation at mineral licks to date, provides key natural history information on this cryptic mammal, and contributes to our understanding of the ecological importance of mineral licks.
      PubDate: 2022-03-22
       
  • Live decoys: an old but effective tool for attracting, capturing, and
           studying free-living passerines

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      Abstract: Abstract Passerines are elusive animals, and their capture generally requires considerable fieldwork. This study describes the capture and sampling of free-living birds from two of the most illegally trafficked Brazilian wild passerine species, namely the red-crested cardinal (Paroaria coronata) and green-winged saltator (Saltator similis). The study is part of the planning process for a rehabilitation and release program for confiscated conspecifics of both species. A total of 290 free-living wild passerines were captured, and most of them were sampled, banded, and immediately released at the same site. Blood, feces, and oropharyngeal swabs were collected for subsequent health analysis and blood drops were stored on FTA cards for genetic assessments. Conspecific live decoys played an important role in the trapping process, especially those with a high-ranking for dueling behavior and vocal performance. Most of the green-winged saltators that promptly engage in combat were caught with netted trapdoors. However, red-crested cardinals are shy, cautious, open-area passerines that seldom perch on unknown objects. These were mostly captured in loop snares after they perched on tree branches used as triggers. Although mist netting was more difficult to install and captured the most non-target species, it was the fastest technique and also provided comparable numbers of captures for both target species. Despite being an old and well-established practice, detailed information on the use of live decoys for capturing free-living passerines is scarce.
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
       
  • Usutu virus in blackbirds (Turdus merula) with clinical signs, a case
           study from northern Italy

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      Abstract: Abstract Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne virus belonging to the family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus. Natural transmission cycle of USUV involves mosquitoes and birds, so humans and other mammals are considered incidental hosts. In this study, USUV infection was diagnosed in all wild blackbirds, collected from July to September 2018 in a wildlife recovery center in the province of Bologna, in the Emilia-Romagna region, northern Italy. All blackbirds showed neurological clinical signs, such as overturning, pedaling, and incoordination. Moreover, the subjects died shortly after arriving at the hospitalization center. Virological investigations were performed by real-time PCR on frozen samples of the spleen, kidney, myocardium, and brain for the detection of Usutu (USUV) and West Nile (WNV) viruses. The small and large intestine were used as a matrix for the detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). All 56 subjects with neurological clinical signs were positive for USUV, only one subject (1.8%) tested positive for WNV, and no subject was positive for NDV. The most represented age class was class 1 J (58.9%), followed by class 3 (25.0%), and lastly from class 4 (16.1%). Most of the blackbirds before dying were in good (51.8%) and fair (39.3%) nutritional status, while only five subjects (8.9%) were cachectic. The USUV genomes detected in the blackbirds of this study fall within the sub-clade already called EU2 that has been detected since 2009 in the Emilia-Romagna region. Neurological clinical signs in USUV-affected blackbirds are still widely discussed and there are few works in the literature. Although our results require further studies, we believe them to be useful for understanding the clinical signs of Usutu virus in blackbirds, helping to increase the knowledge of this zoonotic agent in wild species and to understand its effect on the ecosystem. The goal of this study was to report—in the context of the regional passive surveillance program—the detection of USUV RNA in its most important amplifying host, the common blackbird, when showing clinical signs before death.
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
       
  • Feather stable isotopes (δ2Hf and δ13Cf) identify the Sub-Saharan
           wintering grounds of turtle doves from Europe

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      Abstract: Abstract Conservation of migratory birds requires knowledge of breeding and nonbreeding ranges and the connections between them. European turtle doves (Streptopelia turtur) are Palearctic-African long-distance migrants with wintering areas in the Sub-Saharan belt that are classed as vulnerable due to strong population declines. However, detailed non-breeding locations of individuals from different migratory flyways are unknown. To identify wintering regions of turtle doves, we measured stable isotopes of feathers grown on the wintering grounds and used a dual-isotope (hydrogen (δ2Hf) and carbon (δ13Cf)) probabilistic assignment to analyse origins of individuals migrating through the western and central/eastern flyways. The most probable wintering areas for turtle dove samples from both flyways were in the western and central Sub-Sahara. However, we found differences in δ2Hf and δ13Cf values between turtle doves following different migratory routes (western vs central/eastern flyway). This result suggests a higher likelihood of origins in the central Sub-Sahara for central and eastern migrants, while turtle doves using the western flyway originated primarily in the western Sub-Sahara, highlighting the importance of both regions for the future conservation of turtle doves from European breeding populations. The establishment of migratory connectivity of populations requires sampling from birds from the European as well as Asian continent; however, we provide important results that can be used to test hypotheses regarding population declines resulting from factors experienced over the full annual cycle for some populations.
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
       
  • Elements and antioxidants in wild boar from northwestern Russia

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      Abstract: Abstract To evaluate the nutritional status and the environmental exposure to toxic elements of the wild boar Sus scrofa L. (n = 20) from northwestern (NW) Russia, we determined the contents of the essential (Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, and Zn) and toxic (Cd and Pb) elements in the muscle, kidney, and liver. A second aim was to study the interactions between these elements and several antioxidants, namely, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, and the contents of glutathione (GSH), retinol, and α-tocopherol. A third aim was to assess whether the meat and offal of the wild boar are suitable for consumption or unsuitable due to the level of toxic elements. According to reference values of elements reported for domestic pigs, the wild boar from NW Russia was deficient in most of the essential elements (Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn) but had optimal values of Fe and Mg. The concentrations of Cd and Pb were lower than the values reported for pigs and wild boars living in heavily polluted areas. The correlations between antioxidants and elements could indicate that mineral balance in the body is regulated by antioxidants, among which the SOD activity, GSH, and retinol levels are the most sensitive parameters. Our assessment indicates that consumption of wild boar meat and liver, either rarely (4 times a year) or regularly (monthly), does not pose a health risk to adults and children, although wild boar kidney is not suitable for consumption.
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
       
  • Functionality of two canopy bridge designs: successful trials for the
           endangered black lion tamarin and other arboreal species

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      Abstract: Abstract Canopy bridges are crossing structures specific to mitigate the impact of roads on arboreal animals. Long-term monitoring of such infrastructures together with the analysis of design preferences has never been done in South America. To avoid the roadkills of a threatened primate species, the black lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus), in Guareí, São Paulo, Brazil, we installed two designs of canopy bridges: a wood pole bridge and a rope bridge. We aimed to (1) evaluate the functionality (number of species and events) of both designs, (2) test the design preference of each species, and (3) determine if there were seasonal differences in the use of canopy bridges. We monitored the canopy bridges continuously since their installation with camera traps during 3 years. We recorded nine mammal and one lizard species crossing on the canopy bridges as well as 13 bird species using them as perches. Overall, the probability of crossing was higher on the wood pole bridge and the number of crossings, considering both designs, was higher during the dry season. One lizard and seven mammal species used the wood pole bridge, including the black lion tamarin, and six mammal species used the rope bridge. Four out of five species tested, including the black lion tamarin, preferred the wood pole bridge. While replications of this experimental design are necessary to obtain a more robust evaluation of the effectiveness of these canopy bridges, our study suggests that wood pole bridges might be an effective tool to reduce roadkills of the endangered black lion tamarin and possibly other arboreal species.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
       
  • A seasonal multi-level trophic approach for bat habitat suitability
           assessments in peri-urban deciduous forests

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      Abstract: Abstract Although deciduous forests are usually associated with high levels of arthropod availability, bats seem to adjust their phenological requirements also as a response to other ecological and environmental conditions. In order to assess the potential influence of these conditions on bat activity phenological patterns, a peri-urban deciduous forest was selected as representative Mediterranean habitat, dominated by sweet chestnut trees (Castanea sativa L.) and English oaks (Quercus robur L.). Data on bat activity, arthropod biomass, primary production, and weather conditions were collected with a fortnightly periodicity, between March and October. To conduct the dataset analyses, we considered three different bats phenological periods. Our approach suggests that bat activity, food resource availability, and primary production are interdependent throughout the bat phenological periods. Moreover, in order to understand the potential multi-factor relationships for each specific phenological period, a generalized linear mixed effect model was applied. The results suggest that bat activity in deciduous forests was influenced by different drivers’ during each phenological period. The bat activity in the post-hibernation season was mainly influenced by wind speed, air temperature, and humidity. In the breeding season arthropod biomass, wind speed and temperature were the most significant variables to explain bat activity. Primary production was the only variable with statistical influence on bat activity in the pre-hibernation season. This integrative approach represents a step forward in evaluating seasonal habitat suitability for bats, which can be used in the future to guide the deciduous forest management for conservation purposes.
      PubDate: 2022-03-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01560-3
       
  • Spatio-temporal overlap of leopard and prey species in the foothills of
           Shiwalik, Himalaya

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding the interspecific interactions (spatial and temporal) between predators and their prey species is important to understanding the prey preferences for conservation and management decisions. However, due to large predators’ wide-ranging, nocturnal, and cryptic behaviour, it is often difficult to assess their interactions with prey species. Therefore, we determined the spatial and temporal interactions of leopard (Panthera pardus) with potential prey species in Kalesar National Park (KNP) using camera traps from January 2020 to April 2020. KNP is situated in the foothills of the Shiwalik mountain range of Himalaya, North India. We used encounter rates and activity patterns to understand the spatial and temporal overlap between leopards and prey species. We used composite scores to predict the potential prey preferences using the photo-capture data. A total sampling effort of 1150 trap nights documented 92 photo-captures of leopards with a detection rate of 17.3 leopards per 100/trap nights. Leopards exhibited bimodal peaks and were active throughout the day and night but showed more diurnal activity. Leopards had the highest temporal overlap with chital (Axis axis) and wild boar (Sus scrofa) and the highest spatial overlap with wild boar, peafowl (Pavo cristatus), and sambar (Rusa unicolor). Due to their high composite scores, wild boar, sambar, peafowl, and chital were predicted the most preferred prey species for leopards. Our results suggest that effective management of preferred prey species in the area is required to ensure the conservation of the leopard population.
      PubDate: 2022-03-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s10344-022-01568-9
       
 
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