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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Animal Welfare     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Equine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Rangifer     Open Access  
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 12)

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People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2575-9078
Published by Purdue University Homepage  [13 journals]
  • “There’s a connection that is just beyond words”: A Qualitative
           Study of Therapy Dogs in a Child Trauma Assessment Center

    • Authors: Angela M. Moe
      Abstract: The utilization of animal-assisted interventions with trauma survivors is a growing field of practice and research. This study explored staff perceptions of the impact of therapy dogs in comprehensive neurodevelopmental assessments of children who have experienced significant maltreatment. Such victimization causes devastating and long-term consequences across physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral domains. Trauma assessments have been used as a means of understanding the impacts of maltreatment and in guiding treatment. Following a go-along qualitative approach, the study occurred over 16 months wherein experienced therapy dogs were incorporated into assessments of 323 children. Data were collected through field interviews and participant observation. Inductive analysis generated four primary themes: rapport, regulation, respite, and restoration. Rapport involved establishing camaraderie with children at the start of the assessments, helping provide a sense of safety within the clinical environment. Regulation occurred throughout the various components of the assessment, wherein the dogs provided emotional, cognitive, and physical comfort throughout testing. Respite outside of testing was provided via rest and play. Finally, the dogs helped restore emotional and physical balance for children at the end of assessments, aiding their transition back to daily activities. Overall, the therapy dogs contributed to the ease, efficiency, and quality of the trauma assessments.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2024 12:15:46 PST
       
  • Animal Assisted Play Therapy® for Childhood Animal Abuse Following
           Exposure to Family Violence: A Case Example

    • Authors: Katharine Wenocur et al.
      Abstract: Intentional harm to nonhuman animals in childhood often correlates with histories of witnessing, experiencing, or perpetrating violence. Without appropriate intervention, children and adolescents who abuse animals following exposure to family violence risk long-term behavioral health challenges. While some treatment models have been specifically designed to reduce the risk of future violence among children displaying this behavior, interventions involving nonhuman animals represent a novel approach and show promise in addressing behavioral challenges associated with this behavior. Framed through the lens of a clinical case study, this article presents the potential benefits of implementing Animal Assisted Play Therapy® to treat symptoms of trauma and attachment challenges when harm to animals has occurred.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2024 07:06:06 PST
       
  • Impact of Equine Interaction during Psychotherapy on Anxiety and
           Depression for Residential Treatment Program Patients Experiencing
           Substance Withdrawal

    • Authors: Molly M. Friend et al.
      Abstract: As incidences of substance use disorders (SUD) increase in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a need for more effective treatment approaches. Further, treatment approaches currently available struggle to retain patients during the period of substance withdrawal in early treatment due to patients’ withdrawal symptoms including increased feelings of anxiety and depression. Withdrawal symptoms have been linked to dysregulated cortisol concentrations present in this period. Psychotherapy incorporating equine interaction (PIE) has emerged in other populations as a treatment that decreases cortisol concentrations and improves treatment retention. The present study investigated the impact of 4 weeks of PIE on 10 (n = 10) withdrawing patients in a residential substance abuse treatment program. A survey instrument consisting of 17 questions tracking perceived anxiety and depression was given prior to the first week of PIE and at the end of the fourth week of PIE. On weeks 1 and 4 of PIE, heart rate and salivary cortisol measures were taken. Paired t-tests were performed to determine differences in survey responses and the mixed procedure was used to determine differences in heart rate and cortisol concentrations. The Spearman correlation was used to determine the association between survey responses and heart rate and cortisol measures. Significance was considered at P ≤ 0.05 and tendencies were reported at P ≤ 0.1. Significant improvements were seen in 24% of the survey questions analyzing nervousness (P = 0.01), control of worry (P = 0.05), trouble relaxing (P = 0.02), and irritability (P = 0.04), and tendencies toward improvements in another 17% of measures concerning control of one’s life (P = 0.10), worry (P = 0.10), and fear (P = 0.10). Patient heart rates were higher following the fourth week of PIE compared to the first week of PIE (P = 0.02), and no significant changes in cortisol concentrations were seen (P = 0.20). These results, in addition to therapist observations of limited activity levels in the first week of treatment, indicate potential increased activity and participation through the 4 weeks of PIE. This improvement is in addition to improvements in survey responses associated with severity of depression and anxiety during the withdrawal period, indicating PIE’s effectiveness in SUD treatment.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Feb 2024 09:10:56 PST
       
  • “Here, Kitty, Kitty.” Community Perceptions of Free-Roaming Cats: A
           Northern Canadian Case Study

    • Authors: Annie Booth et al.
      Abstract: Free-roaming domestic cats (Felis catus) create controversy, due to their tendency to invade neighbors’ gardens, hunt wildlife, and create disturbances. Municipal governments are often under pressure to address concerns regarding free-roaming cats. As approximately 28% of the 8.8 million cats owned in Canada free-roam (are allowed outside unsupervised and unconstrained), understanding owner rationales for letting the cat out is important for officials tasked with addressing public concerns. In 2019, we studied attitudes toward cats within a north-central British Columbia, Canada, city. The rationales cat owners use to justify free-roaming, as well as their perceptions about the risks and benefits of this decision are discussed. While a majority of non–cat owners (and former owners) were concerned about free-roaming cats, current cat owners were not. While our research suggests that many cat owners are conflicted about letting their cats out, those so doing are committed despite recognizing the risks to their cat, wildlife, and relationships with their neighbors. This suggests that education is likely ineffective. Our research suggests that owners are unlikely to be motivated by poorly enforced bylaws or conservation concerns. Instead, outreach that focuses upon the risk to free-roaming cats might be more persuasive. In conjunction with the survey, we also conducted a limited field trial of the BirdsbeSafe cat collars to determine their effectiveness in limiting predation on birds. While a small sample was obtained, our results demonstrate that the collars do limit bird predation by owned cats.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Feb 2024 09:10:49 PST
       
  • Pets in Practice: A Practical Guide to the Introduction of Dogs to Mental
           Health Work Settings Derived from the Direct Experiences of Staff

    • Authors: Tatiana (Tia Urgasova et al.
      Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the introduction of dogs in mental health workplace settings: specifically, exploring staff perspectives on the acceptability of dogs in mental health teams; the impact of the dogs on themselves directly, their patients, and their team; and the challenges of implementing dogs in mental health settings. This qualitative study design used semi-structured interviews. Twelve participants were interviewed; six from a Crisis Assessment and Treatment team, five from a Recovery College team, and one from the Inpatient and Outreach Psychiatric Service. Interviews were transcribed and six key themes were identified: facilitating staff well-being, improving workplace morale, facilitating communication, impact on dog owner, environmental challenges, and improving perceptions of dogs. These findings informed Pets in Practice—A Practical Guide for Dogs in Healthcare.This study demonstrates the benefits of a dog for staff well-being and working practices in mental health settings. Furthermore, it provides a practical guide to implementing such an intervention and managing the practical challenges of having a dog in a work environment. A policy relating to visiting animals that refers to points raised in the practical guide is recommended for health care settings implementing this intervention.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Feb 2024 08:40:52 PST
       
  • Proposal of a Private Caretaker-Completed Questionnaire to Assess the
           Suitability of Domestic Cats for Animal-Assisted Interventions

    • Authors: Alina Simona Rusu et al.
      Abstract: The objective of this study was to develop a caretaker-completed questionnaire entitled “Cats’ Behavioral Suitability for Animal-Assisted Interventions” (CatSAAI), covering two categories of items associated with seven feline personality factors. These feline personality factors were previously identified and validated by Mikkola et al. (2021) on a large sample of domestic cat guardians. The aim of the CatSAAI questionnaire is to facilitate the interpretation of the behavioral suitability or unsuitability of each individual cat for inclusion in feline-assisted interventions, while considering the prevention of stress and risks in AAI settings for both people and animals. The tool was proposed by an international team of experts in animal behavior and AAI practitioners within the Erasmus+ Project “Animals for People,” which involves partners from Poland, Switzerland, Norway, and Romania. The process of the elaboration of the CatSAAI questionnaire included three steps: (1) grouping of the items identified by Mikkola et al. (2021) in two categories: suitability and unsuitability of cats for AAI; (2) analysis (psychometric and correlational analyses) of the responses of initially collected data from 51 private cat caretakers from six countries, and (3) elimination of several items based on statistical outcomes and expert validation and elaboration of the final form of the survey. The final version of the suitability category contains 28 items belonging to the feline personality factors: activity/playfulness (14 items), sociability toward humans (13 items), and sociability toward cats (1 item), while the unsuitability category consists of 16 items belonging to the following feline personality factors: aggression toward humans (10), fearfulness (3), excessive grooming (2), and activity/playfulness (1).
      PubDate: Mon, 05 Feb 2024 13:00:52 PST
       
  • Feasibility Study of an Equine-Assisted Learning Intervention for Children
           with Disabilities

    • Authors: Laura Hopson et al.
      Abstract: Interest in equine-assisted learning (EAL) has grown rapidly among behavioral health professionals. The available research on the effects of EAL are limited, sparse, and mostly exploratory in nature. In this feasibility study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an EAL intervention, the Just Ask Yourself to Care (JAYC) program, for youth with disabilities. The eight-week JAYC curriculum is psycho-educational, strength-based, and resiliency-focused. We hypothesized that participation in the JAYC program would lead to improvement in social skills, empathy, and self-confidence.

      Children with disabilities (n = 25) at two sites participated in a feasibility study of implementation and evaluation procedures. Before and after completing the curriculum, children completed two measures, the Self-Efficacy Scale and the Basic Empathy Scale. Parents of participants completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Program facilitators completed a fidelity checklist of activities completed during each session. All surveys were self-administered.

      The findings demonstrated the feasibility of implementing the JAYC program with fidelity and evaluating the program using the SDQ surveys with parents. The analysis of SDQ data indicates promising trends, although changes were not statistically significant. Specifically, parents reported small improvements in conduct problems, peer problems, prosocial behavior, and internalizing symptoms. In the case of prosocial behavior, scores improved to be consistent with normative scores from a national sample. Children’s scores on the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire indicated statistically significant improvement in self-efficacy.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2023 08:30:45 PST
       
  • It’s Not Paradise for the Dogs and Shelter Workers: Dog Welfare and
           Occupational Stress in Animal Shelters in Hawaii

    • Authors: Lynn Morrison
      Abstract: Dog welfare and occupational stress of animal shelter workers at two sites on Hawaii Island were examined. The east side had higher euthanasia rates than the west side. The two sites are in locales that differ culturally and economically. The goal of this study is to (1) elucidate how dog culture differs at the two sites and how those differences affect the health of dogs, and (2) assess the stress levels of shelter workers who must simultaneously care for the dogs while often having to euthanize them. Interviews and cortisol were obtained from the shelter workers and cortisol was obtained from the shelter dogs. Cortisol is a stress hormone that can be measured in human and dog hair. The shelter workers and dogs in the east side of the island’s high-euthanasia shelter had significantly higher cortisol rates than their counterparts in the west side’s lower euthanasia shelter (t = 6.051, df = 13, p = 0.001 for the shelter workers and t = 2.412, df = 42, p = 0.010 for the dogs). Traditional and contemporary attitudes toward dogs as commodities to be kept as guard dogs or for hunting do not include spaying/neutering, resulting in unsustainably high numbers of discarded dogs entering shelters. Shelter employees care for animals that they are then forced to euthanize, referred to as the “caring-killing paradox.” Shelter workers consequently withstand the worst of negative public perceptions of the high euthanasia rate for what is in actuality a community problem. I suggest that differing cultures of attitudes toward dogs negatively affect the health and welfare of both shelter employees and dogs. Decreasing the dog overpopulation through spaying/neutering and a cultural shift in the attitude toward dogs would improve the health and well-being of the dogs and the shelter workers.
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Nov 2023 13:15:38 PST
       
  • Service Dogs: A Scoping Review of Interdisciplinary Research

    • Authors: K. Lynn Pierce et al.
      Abstract: Despite a long history of service dogs (SDs) being paired with human partners as a systematic intervention and increasing numbers of and roles for SDs, there remains a lack of empirical knowledge and professional guidance regarding the implementation of SDs into treatment plans for individuals with disabilities. The purpose of this scoping review was to review the peer-reviewed literature specific to SDs and their handlers, to identify successful search term strategies, and to determine in what disciplines research is being conducted. Terminology used in referring to service dogs continues to be a challenge. Through a series of preliminary searches, search terms and search methodologies were established and 259 articles published from 1958 through 2019 were identified, reviewed, and coded. Identified articles were further categorized into those describing knowledge and context, management and health care, handler and team elements, and a combination of these factors. Because many of the identified articles focused specifically on guide dogs and teams, articles were further coded and grouped on SD type (e.g., guide dog, hearing dog, autism support dog, etc.). Much of the current literature focuses on history, legal and policy discussions, and the health and management of service dogs. Relatively few articles (24) have been published specifically on service dog teams and handler support, and all of those identified were specific to guide dogs. Gaps in research were identified, including areas such as cross-discipline research, diverse disability demographics of handlers, types of service dogs, and the mental state of SDs themselves. While the literature is expanding on the topic of SDs (over half of the articles were published in the past 6 years of the search time frame), continued research is needed, particularly in the area of SD handler experiences and guidelines for service providers.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Sep 2023 08:00:42 PDT
       
  • Who Is the Good Boy/Girl' Perspectives of French Handlers in AAI on
           the Selection of Their Dogs

    • Authors: Alice Mignot et al.
      Abstract: Animal-assisted interventions (AAI) are well implemented in various health care settings; however, there is little data on the characteristics of the mediation dogs and their selection, which can influence the well-being of both the dogs and the beneficiaries. This study aims to gain a better understanding of the characteristics of French mediation dogs and the context in which they are selected to guide future research working on behavioral criteria for mediation dogs and help provide a basis for better selection of dogs in the field. To this end, we interviewed 111 French handlers in AAI, who work with at least one dog, through an online questionnaire about their professional backgrounds, the characteristics of their mediation dogs, and their views of the favorable and prohibitive criteria for a mediation dog. We also examined handlers’ representations of the context of selection of their mediation dog(s). Our data highlighted that (1) mediation dogs do not represent a homogeneous category regarding the age they started to work in AAI, their current ages, their certifications, and their breeds; and that (2) this may be related to the fact that the process of selecting mediation dogs includes the variability of the therapeutic settings as well as the professional backgrounds of the handlers and their personal affinities for a type of dog. There was also variability in handlers’ representations of the favorable and prohibitive criteria for the mediation dogs but with a convergence toward a sociable dog with self-control. The selection of mediation dogs in France requires an individual choice that considers each human–dog team in their relationship and in the context of their work.
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Aug 2023 10:35:44 PDT
       
  • Impact of COVID-19 on Service Dog Organizations

    • Authors: Danny Benbassat et al.
      Abstract: The 2019 coronavirus pandemic led to federal, state, and local measures that paralyzed businesses across the nation. Among them were behavioral and mental health nonprofit organizations. The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of the pandemic on nonprofit programs that train and place service dogs with veterans/service members. Six service dog managers completed eight reflection probe questionnaires and participated in three focus groups. This study found that facility shutdown, businesses shutdown, and social distancing resulted in a training bottleneck for both canines and humans. These primary challenges created secondary and tertiary challenges that mirror and lend support to themes found in other studies, namely funding, welfare, and space. In addition to these challenges, managers found opportunities in the face of adversity, namely partnerships, flexibility, and innovation. This study also adds 45 specific opportunities as a practical guide for animal-assisted activities managers. The authors hope that this guide will introduce innovative solutions to improve normal operations and help mitigate the consequences of future crises.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Aug 2023 08:50:37 PDT
       
  • The COVID Whirlwind on the Veterinary World: End-of-life Care and
           Euthanasia During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Authors: Elizabeth Chalmers et al.
      Abstract: Veterinary providers experience job-specific psychological stress from their dual role in both providing medical care to pets and supporting pet-owner clients through end-of-life care and the euthanasia process, contributing to compassion fatigue and burnout in the field. COVID-19 has impacted the provision of veterinary care and affected communication between providers and pet owners. This qualitative study explores the experiences of veterinary providers who provided end-of- life care and performed euthanasia during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants for this qualitative study were recruited and interviewed using criterion sampling from four veterinary practices in the northeastern United States. Inductive thematic analysis was used to interpret the data collected. Significant findings include: veterinary staff are overwhelmed by the spike in animal care due to increased pet ownership during COVID-19, changes in provision of care have created additional stressors in veterinary medicine, veterinary providers feel “emotionally distanced” from their clients, and veterinary providers recognize a need for increased mental health support in the field.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jul 2023 09:50:37 PDT
       
  • Dog Guardians’ Subjective Well-Being During Times of Stress and Crisis:
           A Diary Study of Affect During COVID-19

    • Authors: Lori S. Hoy et al.
      Abstract: The impacts of companion animals on human well-being have been receiving increased media and research attention, especially in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. Previously, there have been calls for research to consider the major components of subjective well-being separately and for research designs to include assessments over time. In line with this suggestion, the purpose of this study was to gain a more comprehensive understanding of how being a dog guardian can impact affect and contribute to the overall assessment of subjective well-being. This study used a seven-day diary design to capture 31 dog guardians’ day-to- day feelings and thoughts during the UK’s first COVID-19 lockdown—an example of a time of considerable stress and crisis. Closed-ended questions examined the impact of dog behavior, feelings toward dogs, participation in dog-related activities, and guardians’ subjective well-being, while open-ended prompts were used to explore guardians’ positive and negative affect. Results suggest that dog guardianship impacted subjective well-being during this time of stress and crisis. Findings indicate that dogs’ behavior, feelings toward dogs, and participation in dog-related activities impacted the overall day-to- day subjective well-being of guardians. Additionally, six themes emerged related to positive and negative affect: amusement, joy, calm, frustration, worry, and guilt. These positive and negative affect findings help to explain some of the previous inconsistencies in pet effect–related research confirming that companion animals do impact subjective well-being. However, the effect is not always positive or consistent, and may be transient. In times of stress and crisis, companion animal guardians can face unique circumstances and could benefit from preparation, guidance, and clear communication about caring for their companion animals.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Jun 2023 07:10:53 PDT
       
  • When Therapy Dogs Provide Virtual Comfort: Exploring University
           Students’ Insights and Perspectives

    • Authors: Christine Yvette Tardif-Williams et al.
      Abstract: With the proliferation of canine-assisted interventions and the emphasis placed on the impact of these sessions in bolstering the well-being of visitors to sessions, especially university students, it can be easy to overlook just how participating in one of these sessions is experienced by participants. Capturing participants’ experiences is important as this holds the potential to inform program design and delivery and elucidate mechanisms within the intervention that were found to be especially efficacious. Forging new empirical terrain, this study explored the insights and perceptions of 469 undergraduate students who participated in a virtual canine-assisted stress-reduction intervention at a mid-size western Canadian university. Participants were randomly assigned to synchronous or asynchronous and dog or no-dog conditions and were asked to share their views of their experience by rating statements and responding to open-ended prompts. Thematic content analysis of findings revealed that a virtual canine-assisted intervention was well received by participants. Participants in the synchronous condition with a dog reported more favorable well-being benefits, as compared with participants in the asynchronous condition with a dog and with participants in both the synchronous and asynchronous conditions without a dog. Implications of these findings hold relevance for supporting geographically remote students and students for whom attending virtual sessions is the only option given barriers preventing them from in-person attendance. Correspondingly, considerations of the role of the handler and of animal welfare are presented.
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2023 06:50:35 PDT
       
  • Emotional Depictions of Dogs and Cats in Interactions with Humans in
           Picture Books

    • Authors: Juri Nakagawa et al.
      Abstract: This study quantitatively analyzed the depiction of dogs’ and cats’ emotions in picture books and discussed the effects on children’s recognition of real dog and cat emotions. The stories depicted many basic emotional depictions of interest, joy, and surprise in dogs and cats, whereas the humans in the stories showed more varied, complicated emotions. Interest was most often caused by familiar humans in dogs, and by objects in cats. Joy was most often caused by familiar humans in dogs and cats, which would lead child readers to recognize that dogs and cats are friendly toward humans. There were depictions of dogs and cats being provoked to anger and disgust by human behaviors, which could affect children’s recognition of inappropriate behaviors toward real dogs and cats. Threatening behaviors toward humans were performed by feral dogs, not household dogs, which would cause children to underestimate the potential danger of bite accidents by household dogs. The nature and domestication process of dogs and cats and the images held by the authors of the books are reflected in the depictions of emotions. Picture books are expected to contribute to establishing better human-animal interactions.
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2023 06:31:33 PDT
       
  • Effects of Equine Interaction on Mutual Autonomic Nervous System Responses
           and Interoception in a Learning Program for Older Adults

    • Authors: Ann L. Baldwin et al.
      Abstract: Equine-assisted learning (EAL) may improve the health of older adults, but scientific data are sparse. This study investigated whether people aged 55 and older show increased heart rate variability (HRV) during EAL and awareness of bodily sensations that are overall pleasant. Subjects (n = 24) participated in mindful grooming during which they slowed their breathing and brushed a horse while noticing sensations in their body and watching the horse’s reactions. The subject’s and horse’s HRV were recorded simultaneously before, during, and after mindful grooming. For control, the same subjects performed mindful grooming with a plush simulation horse. During exit interviews, participants described their sensations. Words and gestures were categorized as positive, neutral, or negative. During mindful grooming, human heart rate and HRV (standard deviation of interbeat interval, SDRR) increased compared to baseline (paired t-test, t = –4.228, p < 0.001; t = –3.814, p = 0.001), as did the percent very low frequency (%VLF) component of HRV (t = –4.274, p < 0.001). Equine HRV values remained in the normal range, mostly VLF. In 10 cases, during mindful grooming, horse and human HRVs showed matching VLF frequencies. Grooming the simulation horse significantly elevated SDRR but did not alter %VLF. Exit interviews revealed significantly more positive gestures (t = –3.814, p = 0.031) and fewer negative gestures (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Z-statistic = –2.12, p = 0.036, p < 0.05) when participants spoke about the real horse compared to the simulation. These findings demonstrate that during mindful grooming people aged 55 and older benefit by experiencing increased HRV, heightened awareness of pleasant bodily sensations, and often some synchronization of their HRV frequency spectrum with that of their horse, possibly reflecting emotional bonding.
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Mar 2023 05:55:38 PDT
       
  • From In-Person to Virtual: A Case Study of an Animal-Assisted Visiting
           Program in a Pediatric Setting

    • Authors: Whitney Romine
      Abstract: This article focuses on the practical aspects of converting a successful in-person AAA program to a virtual program in a health care setting including human, canine, and physical resources; animal welfare considerations; training, infection control, and safety guidelines; and visit delivery procedures. In 1992, an interdisciplinary team at Akron Children’s Hospital founded the Doggie Brigade, an animal-assisted activities (AAA) program where volunteer therapy dogs and their handlers visit pediatric patients. The program has become a cornerstone of the hospital’s culture over its now 30-year tenure. In March 2020, the announcement of the COVID-19 pandemic forced health care organizations to suspend nonessential services, including volunteer-based patient activity programs, to reduce viral exposure risk for immunocompromised or otherwise medically vulnerable patients. Doggie Brigade volunteers proposed virtual visits as a temporary solution based on news media coverage of other virtual visitation programs. The author, henceforth known as the Doggie Brigade advisor (DBA), designed a program with two goals: (1) to provide alternative delivery of services abruptly suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and (2) to reduce hospitalization-related anxiety through the experience of positive feelings associated with interacting with Doggie Brigade teams. From July 2020 to April 2021, the DBA provided nearly 300 one-on- one live video calls with Doggie Brigade volunteers and their dogs via iPad and Microsoft Teams.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Feb 2023 07:00:37 PST
       
  • A Scoping Review of Campus-Based Animal-Assisted Interactions Programs for
           College Student Mental Health

    • Authors: Tanya K. Bailey
      Abstract: Background: People have long found support by interacting with animals, which has developed into a health care modality called animal-assisted interactions (AAI). In the past 10 years, AAI has increased as a way to support college students’ mental health; however, there is no comprehensive evidence on the effectiveness of these programs.
      Method: A scoping review was conducted using the JBI and PRISMA-ScR criteria. Empirical articles were identified through Academic Search Premier (EBSCOhost), PsychINFO (Ovid), and Web of Science using three groups of keywords: AAI, college students, and mental health.
      Results: Of the 1,195 publications identified, 37 met this study’s eligibility criteria. Results reported statistically significant (positive) changes in college students’ mental health within the cognitive, physiological, psychological, and social quality of life domains.
      Contributions: This study demonstrated that AAI for college student mental health is an emerging interest in research, practice, and education; however, a robust understanding of these programs remains vastly understudied.
      PubDate: Wed, 04 Jan 2023 07:10:25 PST
       
  • An International Survey of Animals in Schools: Exploring What Sorts of
           Schools Involve What Sorts of Animals, and Educators’ Rationales for
           These Practices

    • Authors: Helen Lewis et al.
      Abstract: Over recent decades, the use of animal-assisted interventions (AAIs) in educational settings has attracted growing international interest both among educators and the research community. However, there has been little comparative analysis of the demographics of participants and the rationale behind such practices. The aim of this paper is to address this. An anonymous online questionnaire was distributed via social media and other networks. Quanti-tative and qualitative data were collected from 610 participants across 23 countries, mostly from the United Kingdom and North America. In total, 315 (51.6%) participants reported involving animals in their settings. The results show that although animals featured from preschool to adult education contexts, the primary school years (5–11) accounted for 60% of responses. More than 30 different species were reported, with dogs being the most popular. The overriding reason educators give for involving animals is the perception that they make an important contribution to children’s well-being. Practices around the involvement of dogs provide a focus for discussion. The research breaks new ground in highlighting commonalities and contrasts in school demographics associated with the involvement of animals across a range of international contexts. It also points to a consensus around the perceived well-being benefits for children of such interventions. For practitioners, the paper has value in prompting reflection on the need for a clear rationale before embarking on such an intervention, and highlights practical considerations needed before bringing an animal into an educational setting. The paper also suggests potential areas for future research, relating to possible benefits for and agency of the animals who are involved.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 20:10:35 PDT
       
  • Exploring Children’s Insights about Participating in Recreational
           Activities with Horses and Farm Animals: Social Emotional Experiences and
           Belief in Animal Mind

    • Authors: Chrstine Yvette Tardif-Williams Dr. et al.
      Abstract: Research continues to shed light on the impact of children’s interactions with horses in equine-assisted, learning, and therapeutic contexts. However, we know relatively less about the impact of children’s recreational activities with horses and a diversity of farm animals. What is needed is research that explores how recreational programs involving activities with horses and farm animals are perceived by the child participants themselves. This pilot study sought to explore the insights of children who participated in a nine-week recreational program involving activities with horses and farm animals, with a focus on children’s social emotional experiences and belief in animal mind, which involves attributing to animals the ability to think, feel, and experience emotions. Prior to beginning the nine-week program and upon its conclusion, we interviewed eight children (5 girls; 3 boys; aged 9 to 11 years) who were referred to the pro-gram because they were living in socioeconomically disadvantaged homes. Children responded to open-ended questions about their belief in animal mind and social emotional experiences. Salient themes in children’s responses prior to and following their participation in the program were identified using qualitative content analysis. Overall, children’s responses revealed new insights into animal minds and positive social emotional experiences following their participa-tion in the program. Children’s responses also revealed the following themes as key aspects of their experience in the program: (1) new opportunities and interest in the program, (2) feeling more confident with horses and farm animals, (3) new social opportunities and support, and (4) sadness that the program was ending. These findings hold significance for human–animal interaction practitioners and educators interested in supporting children’s positive social and emotional experiences and stimulating children’s belief in animal mind and knowledge of and respect for the needs of diverse animals.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Nov 2022 20:10:27 PDT
       
 
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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Animal Welfare     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Equine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Rangifer     Open Access  
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 12)

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