A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 107 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Animal Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access  
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Animal Studies Journal
Number of Followers: 7  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2200-9140 - ISSN (Online) 2201-3008
Published by Australian Animal Studies Group Homepage  [1 journal]
  • [Review] Mieke Roscher, André Krebber, and Brett Mizelle, editors.
           Handbook of Historical Animal Studies. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2021.
           637 pp.

    • Authors: David Herman
      Abstract: [Review] Mieke Roscher, André Krebber, and Brett Mizelle, editors. Handbook of Historical Animal Studies. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2021. 637 pp. In their introduction to the volume under review, ‘Writing History after the Animal Turn' An Introduction to Historical Animal Studies’ (1–18), which uses Harriet Ritvo’s 2007 article ‘On the Animal Turn’ as a key reference point, the editors describe as follows the main goal of and broader rationale for the book: "the discourses of human-animal studies and historical animal studies, just like all the other disciplines involved in the reevaluation of the lives of animals and our relationship with them, past and present, are not identical. Rather, they inform one another. What we aim at with this handbook, then, is to gather and make accessible the contribution of historical research to the field of human-animal studies as well as the contribution of human-animal studies to the study of history. History as a discipline and scholarly venture, in other words, can no [more] ignore animals than animal studies can history." (3–4). As the editors and also a number of the contributors underscore, however, to bring about this rapprochement between animal studies and history, it is not enough to study ‘the lives, experiences, and deaths of animals [as] a powerful lens to understand and explain human histories, ideas, and practices’ (3), even if in the recording and interpretation of history humans remain ‘an omnipresent factor’ (4). Rather, animals’ own histories must take centre stage, to the fullest extent possible – given that the discourse of historiography is inescapably mediated by human perspectives.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:50 PDT
       
  • [Review] ‘Every Moving Thing Shall Be Meat for You.’ A review of David
           Brooks. Animal Dreams. Animal Publics series, Sydney University Press,
           2021. 290 pp.

    • Authors: Michelle Hamadache
      Abstract: [Review] ‘Every Moving Thing Shall Be Meat for You.’ A review of David Brooks. Animal Dreams. Animal Publics series, Sydney University Press, 2021. 290 pp. Animal Dreams is David Brooks’s third book assailing the vast edifice of the human-animal’s obdurate refusal to rethink its relationship with other animals. It is an erudite and searching contribution to the field of animal studies, and a passionate, persuasive appeal to the mind, heart and senses to change the way of human being-in-the-world that is pushing so many species to extinction and exploiting and truncating the lives of individual animals. Brooks is ‘on the side of the animal’, but experience and insight into the workings of the human animal leads him to argue not just for and on behalf of nonhuman animals, but that human animals too will benefit from ceasing to abuse other animals. In this vein, Brooks argues that the human animal is wounded in a primal, yet repressed manner by its complicity and active role in causing the ‘tide of suffering’ of other animals. This is an idea explored in the opening essay ‘The Smoking Vegetarian’ and drilled to the quick in a later essay on Derrida, ‘The Wound’. Given the human propensity for self-centredness, this is a strategy in the defence of animals, rather than a display of empathy for the human animal. It is Brooks’s steady gaze into the heart of darkness, combined with the unflinching pen, that makes Animal Dreams so eloquent a critique of the human animal and so eloquent and urgent a defence of animals.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:46 PDT
       
  • [Review] Liz P.Y. Chee. Mao’s Bestiary: Medicinal Animals and Modern
           China. Duke University Press, 2021. 288 pp.

    • Authors: Peter J. Li
      Abstract: [Review] Liz P.Y. Chee. Mao’s Bestiary: Medicinal Animals and Modern China. Duke University Press, 2021. 288 pp. The COVID-19 pandemic has secured its place as a 21st century global public health disaster. It has killed more than 6.2 million and infected close to 500 million people worldwide (Worldometer). Acknowledging Wuhan’s wildlife market as the ground zero of the pandemic and the devastation caused by SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) 17 years earlier, China’s Communist authorities made the long overdue decision on February 24, 2020 and outlawed wildlife breeding and trade for the country’s exotic food market (National People’s Congress of China). This decision was commendable. Yet, breeding of wildlife for the exotic food market was only one of the five-piece captive farming operation that generated a revenue of $78 billion a year (Ma Jianzhang et al.). What the Chinese authorities have retained is captive breeding for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the third largest component of the country’s controversial industry. Called a ‘national treasure’, TCM, in the minds of many, brooks no questioning (see for example, ‘Xi Jinping Calls’). Liz P.Y. Chee’s Mao’s Bestiary: Medicinal Animals and Modern China (Duke University Press, 2021) steps in this minefield with questions not about the efficacy of TCM but about the drivers of its faunal medicalization in the last seven decades.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:43 PDT
       
  • Breed(ing) Narratives: Visualizing Values in Industrial Farming

    • Authors: Camille Bellet et al.
      Abstract: In this study, we consider how farmed animals, specifically pigs and chickens, are visualised in literature designed for circulation within animal production industries. The way breeding companies create and circulate images of industrial animals tells us a lot about their visions of what industrial animals are and how they believe animals should be treated. Drawing upon a wide range of material designed for circulation within animal production industries, from the 1880s to the 2010s, this paper examines how representations of pigs and chickens contribute to stories of perfection and advance ideals of power, race, gender, and progress. We demonstrate that visual representations of industrial animals have remained remarkably stable over time, testifying to the deep roots of human desires and assumptions about animals in capitalist societies. We argue that breed-standard images of pigs and chickens uphold complex and deeply imbricated value systems that extend beyond discourses centred on the animal body.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:29 PDT
       
  • The spotted hyena in popular media and the biopolitical implications for
           conservation strategy

    • Authors: Annika Hugosson
      Abstract: The hyena has been depicted as a villain for millennia, with examples spanning from ancient European texts to today’s popular culture. In the past 30 years, especially, catalysed by Disney’s The Lion King, the hyena-as-villain has been cycled throughout various media. By taking a critical animal studies approach to analysing Western media content depicting hyenas, specifically the spotted hyena, I theorize the implications of morally othering hyenas such that they are rendered killable, which relegates them relative to other species-specific conservation concerns. Hyenas are vilified in part through misrepresentations of their actual ecological roles, the biopolitical ramifications of which are discussed. Hyena conservationists have long argued that shifting negative attitudes about hyenas is paramount to conserving them; beyond quantifiable conservation-minded objectives, there is a moral impetus to eliminate suffering and provide for the welfare and quality of life for individual hyenas. Rather than dismissing caricatures of hyenas as harmless, we must acknowledge that fictional representations of hyenas do not exist in isolation from actual hyenas and their lifeworlds.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:22 PDT
       
  • Learning Hope in the Anthropocene: The Party for the Animals and Hope as a
           Political Practice

    • Authors: Eva Meijer
      Abstract: This article investigates the role of hope in politics, in the context of the current climate crisis. Hoping for positive transformation may seem naïve and or a way to avoid action, but there is a close connection between hope and democratic action. Understood as a collective political practice, hope can contribute to imagining and articulating alternative futures, and motivate action. The first part of the paper explicates the relevance of the work of Ernst Bloch for the challenges of the Anthropocene. It focuses specifically on learning hope as a collective political practice, the function of utopias in fostering political imagination, and the connection between political agency and hope. The second part of the paper draws on the work of the Dutch Party for the Animals to investigate how political hope can change existing political systems from the inside. In their party program and policies, the Party for the Animals gives central importance to the wellbeing of the earth and all its inhabitants, and demonstrate that a different way of doing politics, based on care and responsibility instead of economic growth, is possible.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:16 PDT
       
  • Zoolondopolis

    • Authors: Pablo P. Castelló
      Abstract: Imagine a future in which animals had fundamental rights to political participation and voting. What would our towns and cities look like' What kind of infrastructure would we need' And what kind of zoodemocracy would we, animals, co-author' As counterintuitive as it might seem, sometimes what is needed is not a minimal agenda. Animal rights theorists and the animal rights movement more generally have focused for decades on abolishing the farming of animals and one-issue campaigns such as the abolition of the animal fur trade. These are noble and important pursuits, but what if the driving force to produce meaningful change did not reside in looking at the horrors of factory farming, but rather in envisaging beautiful and joyful futures; what if what we needed was to provide imaginaries full of possibilities, opened to create new relationships and communities; futures that we might long for and might be willing to strive for. In this speculative article, I imagine a realistic and fictional zoodemocracy after the devastating effects of climate change hit Earth and Earth’s inhabitants with full force. The reader should imagine that the scenario portrayed in this article is situated at some point at the beginning of the 22nd century and after many catastrophic events had happened. Location-wise, the article portrays different historical moments in which London, England, transitions from a human-centric polis and democracy to a zoopolis and zoodemocracy.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:09 PDT
       
  • Snake Church

    • Authors: Sue Hall Pyke
      Abstract: This paper imagines Snake Church as a post-secular worship practice that reaches with and beyond the vilified serpent held within the limits of Judeo-Christianity. Snake Church offers a devotional practice enlivening enough to shift the languish of a post-secular world where the reasonableness of Enlightenment has crumbled into numbers like 440ppms and 1.5C. The Western empire has been revealed as stark naked, vulnerable, an old skin that cannot hold my world. Snake Church offers me a sacred opiating hope. As I approach a nascent liturgy, here, in the settler-ravaged Stony Rises, home to the Eastern Maar tiger snake and Eastern brown for millennia, I wonder, what might a prayer do for these ancient locals' Snake Church is not a holy rolling out of the self, to assume the mantle of a snake who wants nothing at all to do with me and the harms of my species. Instead, perhaps, it is a shedding of my old He-God skin, freeing me to grow towards something new in this play of sacrilegious devotion. Like a drop of poison, Snake Church might change my body completely.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:18:02 PDT
       
  • ‘Her Brains Are All Over Her Body’: Jeff VanderMeer’s
           Avian Weird

    • Authors: Toyah Webb
      Abstract: Drawing on the thinking of Donna Haraway and other transdisciplinary thinkers, this paper makes the case for an ‘avian Weird’ by exploring the representation of birds in the New Weird fiction of Jeff VanderMeer. Distinct from the Lovecraftian ‘Old Weird’ of the twentieth century, the New Weird has been defined by VanderMeer himself as “a type of urban, secondary-world fiction that subverts the romanticized ideas about place found in traditional fantasy” (2008, 31). However, VanderMeer’s oeuvre is also something of a textual aviary, where the avian comes to represent the entangled and monstrous ontologies of the ‘Chthulucene’. A substitute for the human-centred ‘Anthropocene’, Donna Haraway’s ‘Chthulucene’ indexes the fibrous and squishy bits of the world (2016). Like Haraway, I am unsatisfied with the term ‘Anthropocene’, the planetary effects of which implicate more than only human life-forms: we need new translocal, transspecies, and transbiological ways of thinking. In its chthonic and tentacular etymology, the Chthulucene gestures to the imagery of Weird worlds, as well as the tangled, twiggy body of the nest. What happens when we look at the world through avian eyes' Might these tetrachromats offer a response to Haraway’s call to “see the world in hues of red, green, and ultraviolet”' (1991, 295) In VanderMeer’s New Weird fiction, avian epistemologies reveal the possibility of monstrous survival in the Chthulucene.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:17:55 PDT
       
  • Wild Dogs and Decolonization: Ivan Sen’s Mystery Road and Omar
           Musa’s Here Come the Dogs

    • Authors: Iris Ralph
      Abstract: The broad subject of First Nations and decolonial perspectives on animal flourishing is addressed in this paper in a reading of references to canids in Mystery Road (2013), a film by the First Nations-Australian director, Ivan Sen, and Here Come the Dogs (2014), a novel by the Malaysian-Australian author Omar Musa. Dingoes and other wild dogs are a prominent trope in Sen’s film and tie to seemingly perdurable debates about the rights of these animals to flourish in Australia. Dingo advocates argue that dingoes are endemic to Australia, are Australia’s oldest introduced animals, and are a top predator species and so critical to the sustainability of many ecosystems across the length and breadth of Australia. In light of this argument, Australia’s biosecurity laws betray dingoes. The Act lists these animals as being pests, and therefore as animals that can be and should be eradicated. Dingo advocates point out also that what is threatening dingoes today more than the humans abiding by and enacting Australia’s biosecurity laws are other wild dogs – descendants of canids who were brought to Australia between 1788 and today and are mixing with dingoes and diluting the so-called dingo gene pool. Sen’s film discernibly engages with both of these arguments, and it does so in a way that resonates with animal studies scholar Fiona Probyn-Rapsey’s critique of the so-called ‘hybridity equals extinction’ argument. Canids also appear in Omar Musa’s novel in the figure of a lone critter, Mercury Fire, an animal discarded by the greyhound racing industry. The novel draws attention to this multi-billion-dollar gambling and animal entertainment industry and to the parallels between the dogs that the industry exploits and others of Australia’s ‘underdog’ populations, who face formidable race, class, and ethnic barriers. These barriers compare with the speciesist barricades that Australia’s wild dogs and many other dogs inclusive of greyhound racing industry dogs face as they strive to flourish.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:17:47 PDT
       
  • Mutual Rescue: Disabled Animals and Their Caretakers

    • Authors: Lynda Birke et al.
      Abstract: In this paper, we explore how caretakers experience living with disabled companion animals. Drawing on interviews, as well as narratives on websites and other support groups, we examine ways in which caretakers describe the lives of animals they live with, and their various disabilties. The animals were mostly dogs, plus a few cats, with a range of physical disabilities; almost all had been rehomed, often from places specializing in homing disabled animals.Three themes emerged from analysis of these texts: first, respondents drew heavily on the common narrative of disabled individuals as heroes, often noted in disability rights literature – while simultaneously drawing on, and challenging, ideas of disability as incapacity. The second theme was love and empathy. Several of our interviewees spoke of empathy being enhanced throWe discuss these caretakers' stories of animal disability in relation to both studies of human-animal relationships, and to disability rights, as well as to ideas about what constitutes care. What these narratives emphasize is a particular sense of sharing and reciprocity, felt through the body, especially when caretakers spoke of their own ill-health. They saw disability – the animals' or their own – not as limiting, but as enabling both to flourish within caring relationships
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:17:38 PDT
       
  • The Number Game: Counting Kangaroos

    • Authors: David Brooks
      Abstract: Well over one million kangaroos are shot each year in New South Wales, around half of them for the kangaroo ‘industry’, a harvest underpinned by the annual supply of population estimates sustaining the widespread impression that kangaroos are a ‘pest’, ‘in plague proportions’. Each year these figures, added to historical tables (typically from 1990 onward), are published as part of the state’s Quota Report, upon which the following year’s shooting quota is based. Drawn from aerial surveys, these estimates are nevertheless characterised by the persistent incidence of extraordinary annual population growth rates, well in excess of biological possibility. This paper interrogates these anomalies and considers them in the context of actual reproductive capacity of kangaroos and other factors (male-to-female ratios, infant survival rates, etc.) determining a population’s capacity to regenerate. It suggests that the sudden and extraordinary elevations in population registered in the tables are less the result of massive kangaroo migrations, as some suggest, than of inflationary systemic biases at once reflecting and promulgating erroneous assumptions – a myth – of hyperfecundity and of the kangaroo as a ‘boom’ species. Considerable confusion surrounds the regenerative capacities of kangaroos. The paper attempts to clarify this issue with calculations demonstrating that, even in a very good year, a kangaroo population is unlikely to grow at a rate much exceeding 12%, let alone a rate of 200, 400, or even 500% as official tables sometimes state. Figures of the actual ‘take’ (kill count) over the last decade, it argues, tell a very different story and suggest not abundance but populations in serious decline..
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:17:31 PDT
       
  • Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Contributor Biographies

    • Authors: Sally Borrell et al.
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2022 11(1): Cover Page, Table of Contents, Editorial and Contributor Biographies.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:17:26 PDT
       
  • [Review] Marcus Byrne and Helen Lunn. Dance of the Dung Beetles: Their
           Role in Our Changing World. Johannesburg: Wits University Press, 2019. 228
           pp.

    • Authors: Wendy Woodward
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Marcus Byrne and Helen Lunn. Dance of the Dung Beetles: Their Role in Our Changing World. Johannesburg: Wits University Press, 2019. 228 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:38 PST
       
  • [Review] Tomaž Grušovnik, Reingard Spannring and Karen Lykke Syse,
           editors. Environmental and Animal Abuse Denial: Averting Our Gaze.
           Lexington Books 2021. 242 pp.

    • Authors: Teya Brooks Pribac
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Tomaž Grušovnik, Reingard Spannring and Karen Lykke Syse, editors. Environmental and Animal Abuse Denial: Averting Our Gaze. Lexington Books 2021. 242 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:35 PST
       
  • [Review] Jason Hannan, editor. Meatsplaining: The Animal Agriculture
           Industry and the Rhetoric of Denial. Sydney: Sydney University Press,
           2020. 334 pp.

    • Authors: Alex Lockwood
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Jason Hannan, editor. Meatsplaining: The Animal Agriculture Industry and the Rhetoric of Denial. Sydney: Sydney University Press, 2020. 334 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:31 PST
       
  • [Review] Deborah Bird Rose. Shimmer: Flying Fox Exuberance in Worlds of
           Peril. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2022. 240 pp.

    • Authors: Tessa Laird
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Deborah Bird Rose. Shimmer: Flying Fox Exuberance in Worlds of Peril. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2022. 240 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:27 PST
       
  • [Review] Gordon Meade with Jo-Anne McArthur. Zoospeak. London:
           Enthusiastic Press, 2020. 126 pp.

    • Authors: Wendy Woodward
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Gordon Meade with Jo-Anne McArthur. Zoospeak. London: Enthusiastic Press, 2020. 126 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:25 PST
       
  • [Review] Austin McQuinn. Becoming Audible: Sounding Animality in
           Performance. Pennsylvania State University Press, 2021. 200 pp.

    • Authors: Annie Garlid
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Austin McQuinn. Becoming Audible: Sounding Animality in Performance. Pennsylvania State University Press, 2021. 200 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:21 PST
       
  • [Review] Felice Cimatti and Carlo Salzani, editors. Animality in
           Contemporary Italian Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan Animal Ethics Series.
           Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020. 341 pp.

    • Authors: Matthew Calarco
      Abstract: Animal Studies Journal 2021 10(2): [Review] Felice Cimatti and Carlo Salzani, editors. Animality in Contemporary Italian Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan Animal Ethics Series. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020. 341 pp.
      PubDate: Sun, 12 Dec 2021 17:58:17 PST
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.201.97.26
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-