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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 103 journals)
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Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.297
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0261-1929 - ISSN (Online) 2632-3559
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • The Current Status and Work of Three Rs Centres and Platforms in Europe*

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      Authors: Winfried Neuhaus, Birgit Reininger-Gutmann, Beate Rinner, Roberto Plasenzotti, Doris Wilflingseder, Joery De Kock, Tamara Vanhaecke, Vera Rogiers, Dagmar Jírová, Kristina Kejlová, Lisbeth E. Knudsen, Rasmus Normann Nielsen, Burkhard Kleuser, Vivian Kral, Christa Thöne-Reineke, Thomas Hartung, Giorgia Pallocca, Costanza Rovida, Marcel Leist, Stefan Hippenstiel, Annemarie Lang, Ida Retter, Stephanie Krämer, Peter Jedlicka, Katharina Ameli, Ellen Fritsche, Julia Tigges, Eliška Kuchovská, Manuela Buettner, Andre Bleich, Nadine Baumgart, Jan Baumgart, Marcus W. Meinhardt, Rainer Spanagel, Sabine Chourbaji, Bettina Kränzlin, Bettina Seeger, Maren von Köckritz-Blickwede, José M. Sánchez-Morgado, Viola Galligioni, Daniel Ruiz-Pérez, Dania Movia, Adriele Prina-Mello, Arti Ahluwalia, Valeria Chiono, Arno C. Gutleb, Marthe Schmit, Bea van Golen, Leane van Weereld, Anne Kienhuis, Erica van Oort, Jan van der Valk, Adrian Smith, Joanna Roszak, Maciej Stępnik, Zuzanna Sobańska, Edyta Reszka, I. Anna S. Olsson, Nuno Henrique Franco, Bogdan Sevastre, Helena Kandarova, Sara Capdevila, Jessica Johansson, Emma Svensk, Christopher R. Cederroth, Jenny Sandström, Ian Ragan, Nataliia Bubalo, Jens Kurreck, Horst Spielmann
      Pages: 381 - 413
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Volume 50, Issue 6, Page 381-413, November 2022.
      The adoption of Directive 2010/63/EU on the protection of animals used for scientific purposes has given a major push to the formation of Three Rs initiatives in the form of centres and platforms. These centres and platforms are dedicated to the so-called Three Rs, which are the Replacement, Reduction and Refinement of animal use in experiments. ATLA’s 50th Anniversary year has seen the publication of two articles on European Three Rs centres and platforms. The first of these was about the progressive rise in their numbers and about their founding history; this second part focuses on their current status and activities. This article takes a closer look at their financial and organisational structures, describes their Three Rs focus and core activities (dissemination, education, implementation, scientific quality/translatability, ethics), and presents their areas of responsibility and projects in detail. This overview of the work and diverse structures of the Three Rs centres and platforms is not only intended to bring them closer to the reader, but also to provide role models and show examples of how such Three Rs centres and platforms could be made sustainable. The Three Rs centres and platforms are very important focal points and play an immense role as facilitators of Directive 2010/63/EU ‘on the ground’ in their respective countries. They are also invaluable for the wide dissemination of information and for promoting the implementation of the Three Rs in general.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T12:36:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221140909
      Issue No: Vol. 50, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Corrigendum to Case Studies Exemplifying the Transition to Animal
           Component-Free Cell Culture

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      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T11:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221141160
       
  • Editorial

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      Authors: Judith C. Madden
      First page: 373
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-29T10:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221136645
       
  • Spotlight on Three Rs Progress

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      First page: 375
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T08:32:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221134334
       
  • Resources Round-up

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      First page: 378
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T11:35:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221134333
       
  • Optimisation of Conditions for the Formation of Spheroids of Head and Neck
           Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines for Use as Animal Alternatives

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      Authors: Esther Tenschert, Johann Kern, Annette Affolter, Nicole Rotter, Anne Lammert
      First page: 414
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      The use of in vitro 3-D cell culture models in cancer research has yielded substantial gains in knowledge on various aspects of tumour biology. Such cell culture models could be useful in the study of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), where mimicking intratumoral and intertumoral heterogeneity is especially challenging. Our research aims to establish 3-D spheroid models for HNSCC that reproduce in vitro the connections between tumour cells and the surrounding microenvironment. The aims of this study were to determine the optimal conditions for the culture and use of spheroids from HNSCC cell lines and optimal timepoint for using the spheroids obtained, to evaluate the effects of coculture with tumour-specific fibroblasts on spheroid formation, and to investigate spheroid responses to cisplatin treatment. Four HNSCC cell lines (UMSCC-11A, UMSCC-11B, UMSCC-22B and UD-SCC-01) were seeded in flat or round bottom well ultra-low attachment spheroid plates, and spheroid formation was evaluated. The HNSCC cell lines were then cocultured with stromal cells of the tumour microenvironment, producing an accelerated formation of dense spheroids. The viability of cells within the spheroids was assessed during cell culture by using a fluorescent dye. Our results suggest that: three out of the four cell lines tested could form usable spheroids with acceptable viability; the addition of stromal cells did not improve the number of viable cells; and the use of round bottom well plates supported the formation of a single spheroid, whereas flat bottom well plates led to the formation of multiple spheroids of different sizes.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T11:36:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221135042
       
  • Biomedical Research on Substances of Abuse: The Italian Case Study

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      Authors: Chiara Magliaro, Arti Ahluwalia
      First page: 423
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Substances of abuse have the potential to cause addiction, habituation or altered consciousness. Most of the research on these substances focuses on addiction, and is carried out through observational and clinical studies on humans, or experimental studies on animals. The transposition of the EU Directive 2010/63 into Italian law in 2014 (IT Law 2014/26) includes a ban on the use of animals for research on substances of abuse. Since then, in Italy, public debate has continued on the topic, while the application of the Article prohibiting animal research in this area has been postponed every couple of years. In the light of this debate, we briefly review a range of methodologies — including animal and non-animal, as well as patient or population-based studies — that have been employed to address the biochemical, neurobiological, toxicological, clinical and behavioural effects of substances of abuse and their dependency. We then discuss the implications of the Italian ban on the use of animals for such research, proposing concrete and evidence-based solutions to allow scientists to pursue high-quality basic and translational studies within the boundaries of the regulatory and legislative framework.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T10:03:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221132215
       
  • The Capability Maturity Model as a Measure of Culture of Care in
           Laboratory Animal Science

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      Authors: Dulshara Sachini Amarasekara, Hasanthi Rathnadiwakara, Kalpani Ratnayake, Mangala Gunatilake, Vijay Pal Singh, Suresh Poosala
      First page: 437
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Culture of care in Laboratory Animal Science (LAS) refers to a commitment toward improving animal welfare, scientific quality, staff wellbeing, and transparency for all stakeholders, ensuring that the animals and personnel involved are treated with compassion and respect. A strong culture of care can be established by the proactive implementation of the Three Rs, sharing best practices, caring for and respecting animals and colleagues, empowering staff, taking responsibility for our actions, and having a caring leadership. Culture of care, when established, should be evaluated continuously, in order to foster its progress and persistence. Even though several tools for assessing the culture of care within an institution have been proposed, an ultimate standard for measuring the concept is lacking. Here, we review the culture of care concept and propose the ‘Capability Maturity Model’ as a means of quantifying culture of care in the laboratory animal setting.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T08:39:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221131313
       
  • Conference Diary

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      First page: 447
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T08:20:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221134335
       
  • Corrigendum to The Relevance of In Silico, In Vitro and Non-human Primate
           Based Approaches to Clinical Research on Major Depressive Disorder

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      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2020-09-24T12:17:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261192920964278
       
 
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