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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 107 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Animal Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access  
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.297
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0261-1929 - ISSN (Online) 2632-3559
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helena Kandarova
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T05:32:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221129667
       
  • Transparency in Non-Technical Project Summaries to Promote the Three Rs in
           Respiratory Disease Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Martina Bonassera, Esther Clews, Kelly BéruBé
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Non-Technical Project Summaries (NTS) are legal documents that were first introduced by the Directive 2010/63/EU to enhance transparency within scientific animal experimentation. Researchers intending to conduct biological research on animal models must fulfil the NTS requirements by outlining their proposed use of animals and how they plan to implement the Three Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement of animal use) in their experiments. This study outlines a novel systematic analysis approach that enables the assessment of NTS transparency based on the accuracy of reporting of certain Three Rs-specific information. This potentially customisable strategy could help toward the development of practical guidelines for use by Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Bodies (AWERBs) in establishments conducting animal research, in the process of scrutinising NTS during their pre-submission review of proposed licence applications. This could help to identify gaps in reporting of Three Rs-specific information relating to the planned animal experiments, which represents a remarkable step toward achieving greater openness in scientific communication. This study supports the concept that NTS transparency can promote the implementation of non-animal alternatives in fields where this is currently lacking, such as respiratory disease research. Although NTS were originally conceived as informative documents for a lay audience, we can conclude that data in NTS can be successfully used as a basis for systematic analysis. By reviewing the NTS, the experimental limitations of the currently available replacement strategies can also be highlighted, potentially pinpointing where there is a need for future method development.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T12:50:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221121076
       
  • Resources Round-up

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T01:20:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221121256
       
  • An Evaluation of Different Types of Peptone as Partial Substitutes for
           Animal-derived Serum in Vero Cell Culture

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chloe Lezin, Philippe Mauduit, Georges Uzan, Mohamed Essameldin Abdelgawad
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Vero cells are one of the most frequently used cell types in virology. They can be used not only as a vehicle for the replication of viruses, but also as a model for investigating viral infectivity, cytopathology and vaccine production. There is increasing awareness of the need to limit the use of animal-derived components in cell culture media for a number of reasons, which include reducing the risk of contamination and decreasing costs related to the downstream processing of commercial products obtained via cell culture. The current study evaluates the use of protein hydrolysates (PHLs), also known as peptones, as partial substitutes for fetal bovine serum (FBS) in Vero cell culture. Eleven plant-based, two yeast-based, and three casein-based peptones were assessed, with different batches evaluated in the study. We tested the effects of three concentration ratios of FBS and peptone on Vero cell proliferation, four days after the initial cell seeding. Some of the tested peptones, when in combination with a minimal 1% level of FBS, supported cell proliferation rates equivalent to those achieved with 10% FBS. Collectively, our findings showed that plant-based peptones could represent promising options for the successful formulation of serum-reduced cell culture media for vaccine production. This is especially relevant in the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, in view of the urgent need for SARS-CoV-2 virus production for certain types of vaccine. The current study contributes to the Three Rs principle of reduction, as well as addressing animal ethics concerns associated with FBS, by repurposing PHLs for use in cell culture.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-09-03T02:40:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221122780
       
  • Conference Diary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T08:11:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221121254
       
  • Spotlight on Three Rs Progress

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-08-26T08:04:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221121255
       
  • A History of Regulatory Animal Testing: What Can We Learn'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Doortje Swaters, Anne van Veen, Wim van Meurs, Janette Ellen Turner, Merel Ritskes-Hoitinga
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      The contemporary pharmaceutical industry is voicing growing concerns about the translatability and reproducibility of animal models. In addition, the usefulness of certain of the required regulatory safety tests in animals is being increasingly questioned. It remains difficult, however, to make the move toward alternative testing methods, not least because of legislative demands. A historical analysis was performed, in order to study how the mandatory animal studies in legislative requirements came about. This article reflects on the role that specific public health disasters played in the creation of (more) regulatory requirements for animal testing. It will show how the regulatory changes prompted by the sulfanilamide elixir disaster in the 1930s and the thalidomide disaster in the early 1960s were based on the belief that extensive animal testing would prevent similar future human health tragedies. As scientists increasingly highlight issues with translatability between non-human animals and humans, the belief that current regulatory requirements ensure safety becomes more difficult to maintain. In addition, it means that some of the regulations now in place require animal tests that do not contribute to the safety of a drug, as shown in a third case study of the court case by Vanda industries against the FDA. We finally argue that regulations should be critically examined and altered where necessary, so that they are no longer a barrier in the transition toward animal-free testing and more human-relevant science.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T09:35:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221118001
       
  • Case Studies Exemplifying the Transition to Animal Component-free Cell
           Culture

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tilo Weber, Joachim Wiest, Stina Oredsson, Karen Bieback
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Cell culture techniques are strongly connected with modern scientific laboratories and production facilities. Thus, choosing the most suitable medium for the cells involved is vital, not only directly to optimise cell viability but also indirectly to maximise the reliability of the experiments performed with the cells. Fetal bovine or calf serum (FBS or FCS, respectively) is the most commonly used cell culture medium supplement, providing various nutritional factors and macromolecules essential for cell growth. Yet, the use of FBS encompasses a number of disadvantages. Scientifically, one of the most severe disadvantages is the lot-to-lot variability of animal sera that hampers reproducibility. Therefore, transitioning from the use of these ill-defined, component-variable, inconsistent, xenogenic, ethically questionable and even potentially infectious media supplements, is key to achieving better data reproducibility and thus better science. To demonstrate that the transition to animal component-free cell culture is possible and achievable, we highlight three different scenarios and provide some case studies of each, namely: i) the adaptation of single cell lines to animal component-free culture conditions by the replacement of FBS and trypsin; ii) the adaptation of multicellular models to FBS-free conditions; and (iii) the replacement of FBS with human platelet lysate (hPL) for the generation of primary stem/stromal cell cultures for clinical purposes. By highlighting these examples, we aim to foster and support the global movement towards more consistent science and provide evidence that it is indeed possible to step out of the currently smouldering scientific reproducibility crisis.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T09:22:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221117999
       
  • Addressing Animal Welfare Issues in Fetal Blood Collection for Fetal
           Bovine Serum Production

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Terence J. McCann, Carol Treasure
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      There is ethical debate over whether fetal calves suffer when their dam is slaughtered and fetal blood extracted by cardiac puncture for fetal bovine serum (FBS) production. Yet, the serum industry does not follow best practice, as recommended by the European Food Standards Agency (EFSA), to avoid fetal distress. We discuss the key elements of this debate, and recommend how the serum industry can alter its practices to improve animal welfare.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T07:16:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221117992
       
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rita Seabra
      First page: 249
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T07:38:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221112302
       
  • Spotlight on Three Rs Progress

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 251
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T02:14:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221112318
       
  • Resources Round-up

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 253
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T03:37:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221112314
       
  • The Evolution of Regulatory Toxicology: Where is the Gardener'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert Landsiedel, Barbara Birk, Dorothee Funk-Weyer
      First page: 255
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      There is a need for paradigm change in the methodology employed for toxicological testing and assessment. It could be said that this change is well on its way, through an evolutionary progress analogous to that of natural selection. Darwin’s Theory of Evolution has defined the idea of evolution and descendancy since the last third of the 19th century. Increasingly, this concept of ‘evolution’ is being applied beyond the field of biology. This Comment article discusses the progress of toxicological testing in the context of ‘evolutionary pressure’ and deliberates how this process can help foster the development, implementation and acceptance of mechanistic and human-relevant methods in this field. By comparing the current regulatory landscape in toxicity testing and assessment to specific elements in Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory, we aim to better understand the needs and requirements for the future.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T09:43:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221107617
       
  • 2021 Michael Balls Award

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 263
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T08:45:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221110115
       
  • The Use of Human Tissues for Research: What Investigators Need to Know

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      Authors: Marianna J. Bledsoe, William E. Grizzle
      First page: 265
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      While laboratory animals are necessary for some aspects of the development of scientific and biomedical advances, including those of precision medicine, the use of human tissues is necessary in order to explore the findings and ensure that they are relevant to human systems. Many sources of human tissues exist, but researchers — particularly those making the transition from animal to human systems — may not be aware of how best to find quality sources of human tissues or how best to use them in their research. In this article, we discuss the advantages of using human tissues in research. In addition, we highlight some of the major advances made possible through the use of human tissue, and describe how human tissue is collected for research. We discuss the various types of bioresources that make human tissue available, and advise on how investigators can find and use appropriate bioresources to support their research — with the hope that this information will help facilitate the transition from research on animals to research using human tissues, as rapidly as is practicable.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T01:44:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221107933
       
  • Biobank Personnel — The Key to its Success

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anna Chróścicka, Angelika Paluch, Ilona Kalaszczyńska, Ilona Szabłowska-Gadomska
      First page: 275
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Resources from biobanks and biorepositories, such as human samples, are of increasing interest to specialists in various fields. However, whilst biobanks provide a crucial service, their efficient and effective management can prove challenging. When establishing a biobank many factors should be considered, such as the need for appropriate infrastructure, equipment, financial support, and highly specialised and suitably qualified personnel. The number and qualifications of the necessary personnel depend both on the biobank’s size and type — i.e. a biobank that is large and diversified in terms of the stored material should be organised differently to a small biorepository. The core of the biobank should be composed of highly trained personnel that closely co-operate with the general and quality control manager. Due to the large amount of data related to the samples, an IT specialist might be needed. In the case of large population biobanks, personnel responsible for patient recruitment, documentation handling, sample collection and distribution to the biobank would be necessary. Furthermore, staff responsible for the infrastructure are also highly important, as they are the first responders to failures that may be critical for the biobank functioning. Depending on the type and size of the biobank/biorepository, some responsibilities and tasks could potentially be combined. Nevertheless, highly trained personnel with clear and precisely defined duties are the key to the proper functioning of a biobank.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T03:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221113976
       
  • Development of an Accessible Gene Expression Bioinformatics Pipeline to
           Study Driver Mutations of Colorectal Cancer

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lisa van den Driest, Caroline H. Johnson, Nicholas J.W. Rattray, Zahra Rattray
      First page: 282
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a global cause of cancer-related mortality driven by genetic and environmental factors which influence therapeutic outcomes. The emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies enables the rapid and extensive collection and curation of genetic data for each cancer type into clinical gene expression biobanks. We report the application of bioinformatics tools for investigating the expression patterns and prognostic significance of three genes that are commonly dysregulated in colon cancer: adenomatous polyposis coli (APC); B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF); and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS). Through the use of bioinformatics tools, we show the patterns of APC, BRAF and KRAS genetic alterations and their role in patient prognosis. Our results show mutation types, the frequency of mutations, tumour anatomical location and differential expression patterns for APC, BRAF and KRAS for colorectal tumour and matched healthy tissue. The prognostic value of APC, BRAF and KRAS genetic alterations was investigated as a function of their expression levels in CRC. In the era of precision medicine, with significant advancements in biobanking and data curation, there is significant scope to use existing clinical data sets for evaluating the role of mutational drivers in carcinogenesis. This approach offers the potential for studying combinations of less well-known genes and the discovery of novel biomarkers, or for studying the association between various effector proteins and pathways.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221107546
       
  • Ciliary Beat Frequency: Proceedings and Recommendations from a
           Multi-laboratory Ring Trial Using 3-D Reconstituted Human Airway
           Epithelium to Model Mucociliary Clearance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Holger P. Behrsing, Adam Wahab, Lindsey Ukishima, Chad Grodi, Stefan Frentzel, Stephanie Johne, Shinkichi Ishikawa, Shigeaki Ito, Roman Wieczorek, Jessica Budde, Brian M. Keyser, Linsey E. Haswell, David Thorne, Emma Bishop, Damien Breheny, Xuefei Cao, Qin Qin, Vivek Patel
      First page: 293
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      The use of reconstituted human airway (RHuA) epithelial tissues to assess functional endpoints is highly relevant in respiratory toxicology, but standardised methods are lacking. In June 2015, the Institute for In Vitro Sciences (IIVS) held a technical workshop to evaluate the potential for standardisation of methods, including ciliary beat frequency (CBF). The applicability of a protocol suggested in the workshop was assessed in a multi-laboratory ring study. This report summarises the findings, and uses the similarities and differences identified between the laboratories to make recommendations for researchers in the absence of a validated method. Two software platforms for the assessment of CBF were used — Sisson-Ammons Video Analysis (SAVA; Ammons Engineering, Clio, MI, USA) and ciliaFA (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA). Both were utilised for multiple read temperatures, one objective strength (10×) and up to four video captures per tissue, to assess their utility. Two commercial RHuA tissue cultures were used: MucilAir™ (Epithelix, Geneva, Switzerland) and EpiAirway™ (MatTek, Ashland, MA, USA). IL-13 and procaterol were used to induce CBF-specific responses as positive controls. Further testing addressed the impact of tissue acclimation duration, the number of capture fields and objective strengths on baseline CBF readings. Both SAVA and ciliaFA reliably collected CBF data. However, ciliaFA failed to generate accurate CBF measurements above ∼10 Hz. The positive controls were effective, but were subject to inter-laboratory variability. CBF endpoints were generally uniform across replicate tissues, objective strengths and laboratories. Longer tissue acclimation increased the percentage active area, but had minimal impact on CBF. Taken together, these findings support the development and validation of a standardised CBF measurement protocol.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T11:22:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221114383
       
  • Conference Diary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 310
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T08:50:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221112325
       
  • Corrigendum to The Relevance of In Silico, In Vitro and Non-human Primate
           Based Approaches to Clinical Research on Major Depressive Disorder

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2020-09-24T12:17:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261192920964278
       
 
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