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  Subjects -> ANIMAL WELFARE (Total: 107 journals)
Showing 1 - 22 of 22 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acrocephalus     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agrivet : Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Pertanian dan Peternakan / Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veteriner)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Animal - Science Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Animal Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Animal Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Animal Sentience : An Interdisciplinary Journal on Animal Feeling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Animal Welfare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Applied Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Archiva Zootehnica     Open Access  
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
British Poultry Abstracts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corpoica Ciencia y Tecnología Agropecuaria     Open Access  
Derecho Animal. Forum of Animal Law Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
European Journal of Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Human-Wildlife Interactions     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for Parasitology : Parasites and Wildlife     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Italian Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Animal Science and Products     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Botany     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Animal Learning and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Pest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Wildlife and Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access  
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu dan Kesehatan Hewan (Veterinary Science and Medicine Journal)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu-Ilmu Peternakan     Open Access  
Jurnal Sain Peternakan Indonesia     Open Access  
Jurnal Veteriner     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Majalah Ilmiah Peternakan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Natural History Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Pet Behaviour Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Vertebrate Pest Conference     Open Access  
Rangifer     Open Access  
Research Journal of Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Colombiana de Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue de primatologie     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RUDN Journal of Agronomy and Animal Industries     Open Access  
Science and Animal Health     Open Access  
Scientific Papers Animal Science and Biotechnologies     Open Access  
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Society and Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
South African Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
TRACE ∴ Finnish Journal for Human-Animal Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Animal Science     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access  
Uluslararası Tarım ve Yaban Hayatı Bilimleri Dergisi / International Journal of Agricultural and Wildlife Sciences     Open Access  
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary and Animal Science     Open Access  
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Wartazoa. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.297
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0261-1929 - ISSN (Online) 2632-3559
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • 2021 Michael Balls Award

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T08:45:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221110115
       
  • Development of an Accessible Gene Expression Bioinformatics Pipeline to
           Study Driver Mutations of Colorectal Cancer

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lisa van den Driest, Caroline H. Johnson, Nicholas J.W. Rattray, Zahra Rattray
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a global cause of cancer-related mortality driven by genetic and environmental factors which influence therapeutic outcomes. The emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies enables the rapid and extensive collection and curation of genetic data for each cancer type into clinical gene expression biobanks. We report the application of bioinformatics tools for investigating the expression patterns and prognostic significance of three genes that are commonly dysregulated in colon cancer: adenomatous polyposis coli (APC); B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF); and Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homologue (KRAS). Through the use of bioinformatics tools, we show the patterns of APC, BRAF and KRAS genetic alterations and their role in patient prognosis. Our results show mutation types, the frequency of mutations, tumour anatomical location and differential expression patterns for APC, BRAF and KRAS for colorectal tumour and matched healthy tissue. The prognostic value of APC, BRAF and KRAS genetic alterations was investigated as a function of their expression levels in CRC. In the era of precision medicine, with significant advancements in biobanking and data curation, there is significant scope to use existing clinical data sets for evaluating the role of mutational drivers in carcinogenesis. This approach offers the potential for studying combinations of less well-known genes and the discovery of novel biomarkers, or for studying the association between various effector proteins and pathways.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221107546
       
  • The Evolution of Regulatory Toxicology: Where is the Gardener'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert Landsiedel, Barbara Birk, Dorothee Funk-Weyer
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      There is a need for paradigm change in the methodology employed for toxicological testing and assessment. It could be said that this change is well on its way, through an evolutionary progress analogous to that of natural selection. Darwin’s Theory of Evolution has defined the idea of evolution and descendancy since the last third of the 19th century. Increasingly, this concept of ‘evolution’ is being applied beyond the field of biology. This Comment article discusses the progress of toxicological testing in the context of ‘evolutionary pressure’ and deliberates how this process can help foster the development, implementation and acceptance of mechanistic and human-relevant methods in this field. By comparing the current regulatory landscape in toxicity testing and assessment to specific elements in Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory, we aim to better understand the needs and requirements for the future.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T09:43:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221107617
       
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Susan Trigwell
      First page: 177
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:37:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221101658
       
  • Spotlight on Three Rs Progress

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 179
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T05:33:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221101990
       
  • Resources Round-up

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 182
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T03:20:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221101659
       
  • The Use of Simulators for Teaching Practical Clinical Skills to Veterinary
           Students — A Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Helen R. Braid
      First page: 184
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      In the context of veterinary education, simulators are devices or sets of conditions aiming to imitate real patients and enable students to practice skills without the need for live animal use. Simulator use in veterinary education has increased significantly in recent years, allowing consistent practical teaching without reliance on clinical cases. This review examines the available literature regarding the use of simulation and simulators for teaching practical day one competences to veterinary students. Scientific databases were searched and 73 relevant articles were reviewed. The reviewed articles revealed that there are a number of simulators currently available to veterinary educators, that simulators can enhance student skills and provide an alternative learning environment without the need for live animal and/or cadaver use, and that they usually receive positive feedback from the students who use them. There appears to be a bias towards small animal simulators — however, some skills that are developed through the use of small animal or table-top models will be transferrable to other species. The majority of large animal simulators focus on bovine rectal palpation and/or pregnancy diagnosis. Further research is required to increase the repertoire of available simulators for use in veterinary education, in order to improve the practical skills of veterinary students and reduce the use of live animals and cadaver material for teaching purposes.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T04:12:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221098138
       
  • A Low-fidelity Simulator for the Development of Vascular Ligation Skills

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      Authors: Juan José Perez-Rivero, Ileana María Barbosa-Callejas, Lilia Delgado-Garduño, Lidia Rodríguez-Buitrón, Amira Eunice Lavalle-Avalos, José Antonio Herrera-Barragan
      First page: 195
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Training simulators can facilitate the acquisition and development of basic surgical skills, and they constitute a safe and humane method that does not harm animals in the process. The objective of this work was to create and evaluate a low-cost simulator to help undergraduate students of veterinary medicine acquire and practise vascular ligation skills. A training model was made by using easily accessible and inexpensive materials. Fifteen students, without prior surgical experience, each performed the orchiectomy technique on the simulator seven times. The emphasis was on performing vascular ligatures in both testicles of the simulator (n = 14), in two different scenarios: firstly, with the contents of the blood vessels not under pressure; and secondly, with the syringe plunger depressed by 1 ml to pressurise the blood vessels. The outcomes of the procedure in the simulator were based on three qualitative criteria: Correct (no ‘bleeding’), Sufficient (light ‘bleeding’) and Incorrect (heavy ‘bleeding’). After the seventh attempt, all participants were able to perform vascular ligatures with at least a score of Sufficient in both scenarios. By the 10th ligature attempt, they were all able to perform the procedure with a score of Correct (p < 0.05). There was a trend toward a decrease in the time taken to carry out the procedure as learning progress was made during training, with this being significant from the 12th attempt (p < 0.05). The use of this low-cost simulator represents a useful didactic tool, which supports the acquisition and practise of manual skills by using methods that do not involve the use of animals. In addition, this training simulator could be useful in distance learning, in view of the ready accessibility of the materials required for its construction.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:25:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221096677
       
  • Evaluation of a Low-cost Renal Simulator for the Diagnostic Ultrasound
           Training of Veterinary Medicine Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Angel R. Lozada-Gallegos, Irma Campero-Ruíz Velasco, Juan J. Pérez-Rivero
      First page: 201
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      The acquisition of ultrasound diagnostic skills via training is important for undergraduate veterinary medical students. Unfortunately, commercial simulators are costly, which limits their use and makes it necessary to develop low-cost simulators for training purposes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of an easily constructed, low-cost, high-fidelity renal simulator for use in diagnostic ultrasound training of veterinary medical students. To construct the simulators, donated cat kidneys were embedded in a prepared agar matrix. The echogenicity of ultrasound scans obtained on the kidney simulator was assessed by the subject lecturers and compared with images acquired during clinical routine diagnostic procedures. Five students with no prior experience of the technique, under the direct supervision of a lecturer, performed five B-mode ultrasound examinations of the renal structure of the simulator. The structure of the kidney was assessed, and its length, width and thickness were measured. Three lecturers performed the same procedure as the students, and their results were used for comparison. Appropriate anatomical and ultrasonographic realism was achieved for each of the three layers of the kidney (cortex, medulla and pelvis), and similar pixel values were obtained with the simulator model and actual clinical diagnostic ultrasounds. In addition, the kidney dimensions acquired by the students were consistent with those acquired by the lecturers. Thus, the proposed kidney simulator can be used for the training of veterinary medicine students in ultrasonographic diagnostic techniques.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:36:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221101610
       
  • The Use of 3-D Models of Echocardiographic Imaging Planes for Teaching
           Echocardiography Techniques for Use in Dogs and Cats

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      Authors: Bruna N. da Costa, Marlos G. Sousa, Fernanda N. Tanji, Mariana Ulanin, Marcela Wolf, Simone T. O. Stedile
      First page: 208
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Echocardiography is an invaluable technique for the diagnosis of heart disease. The aim of this study was to develop 3-D models of healthy and diseased hearts of dogs and cats, and to evaluate their effectiveness in assisting veterinary undergraduates to understand echocardiographic imaging planes. Resin models depicting the main echocardiographic imaging planes of normal hearts were created, as well as example hearts with features of mitral degeneration in dogs and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in cats. After a theoretical class, fourth-year students were randomly assigned to one of two groups (model group or control group). The model group had access to the 3-D models, along with self-explanatory text about echocardiographic imaging planes; the control group only had access to the self-explanatory text. Both groups were allowed 2 weeks to study their allocated resources, after which the students undertook an assessment to evaluate their learning and completed a questionnaire about their experiences and satisfaction with the respective teaching method. A total of 39 students participated in the study, 19 in the model group and 20 in the control group. Students assigned to the model group spent more time studying (p = 0.0027). The proportion of students who achieved a satisfactory grade in the assessment was 89.5% in the model group and 60% in the control group (p = 0.0449). The 3-D models facilitated, and significantly improved, the identification of cardiac structures and disease-associated abnormalities, and the learning process in general. Additionally, the models seemed to provide greater student motivation for studying echocardiography.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T12:44:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221101608
       
  • The Perceptions of Students and Lecturers on the Use of Animals in
           Biomedical Science Undergraduate Education in Brazil

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      Authors: Paula S. Matos, Bruna dos Santos Rodrigues, Thaís de Oliveira Fernandes, Renato Ivan de Ávila, Marize C. Valadares
      First page: 221
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      The use of animals in research and education is a controversial topic that has raised extensive debates. Undergraduate students (n = 404) and lecturers (n = 62) from biomedical science schools at the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) in the municipality of Goiânia, Jataí and Catalão, Goiás, Brazil, were asked about their knowledge and opinions on bioethics, the use and importance of animals in education, the replacement of animal use with non-animal alternatives, and the current legislation of the National Council for the Control of Animal Experimentation (CONCEA) that bans animal use in some practical classes within technical and higher education (i.e. Resolution No. 53/2021). Most students and lecturers agreed not only that animal use can contribute to education, but also that it is important to replace this animal use with innovative non-animal alternatives where appropriate. The lecturers emphasised that the replacement of animal models will be possible only with the provision of appropriate training to improve the skills of educators in their use, as well as ensuring reliable access to suitable facilities and materials.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T08:30:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221103252
       
  • Educators’ Views on the Use of Dissection and Dissection Alternatives in
           American Biology Classrooms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pamela Osenkowski, Ignas Karaliunas, Merari Diorio
      First page: 235
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.
      Animal dissection remains a common practice in American biology classrooms, despite the availability of dissection alternatives to study anatomy and physiology. Indeed, there is a growing body of evidence in the literature suggesting that the use of alternatives leads to the greater achievement of learning objectives, as compared to dissection. To better understand the current use of and attitudes toward dissection and alternatives, a nationwide survey of (mainly high-school) biology teachers (n = 2687) was conducted. Most educators believed that learning objectives related to biology subject content could be met through the use of alternatives, yet they preferred the hands-on experience of dissection. Most educators allow their students to use alternatives if requested, although few teachers ask students about their preference for using an animal specimen versus an alternative. Educators cited student engagement as the main factor driving their decision to choose between dissection specimens and alternatives, and felt that cost is the biggest barrier to implementing alternatives at their schools. Additional perspectives on dissection and alternatives were shared by survey participants. Since alternatives can be used to meet learning objectives associated with dissection, we recommend their use as replacements for traditional animal specimens, in line with the replacement, reduction and refinement of animal use in education, according to the Three Rs principles.
      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T06:27:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221096578
       
  • Conference Diary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 244
      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02611929221101991
       
  • Corrigendum to The Relevance of In Silico, In Vitro and Non-human Primate
           Based Approaches to Clinical Research on Major Depressive Disorder

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      Abstract: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Alternatives to Laboratory Animals
      PubDate: 2020-09-24T12:17:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0261192920964278
       
 
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