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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
Showing 201 - 264 of 264 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nepalese Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cultural Heritage and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Public Space     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Student Project Reporting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
UOU Scientific Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Architectural and Engineering Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Oz : the Journal of the College of Architecture, Planning &Design at Kansas State University     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Actas de Arquitectura Religiosa Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herança : Revista de História, Património e Cultura     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Design, Tecnologia e Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
On the w@terfront. Public Art. Urban Design. Civic Participation. Urban Regeneration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Creative Space     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estructuras     Open Access  
Sinektika : Jurnal Arsitektur     Open Access  
Arquitectura Más (Arquitectura +)     Open Access  
interFACES     Open Access  

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UOU Scientific Journal
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2697-1518
Published by Universidad de Alicante Homepage  [9 journals]
  • Between camp and slum

    • Authors: Laura Ghabris
      Abstract: Immersed in a world where economic crises are intensifying, displaced populations, such as refugees and migrants, find themselves grappling with not only social inequalities and political conflicts but also the stark denial of their most fundamental rights. It is in camps and slums that many are forced to live in challenging conditions, making do with what is offered (and often not offered) on the fringes of our societies. These populations often enter an informal settlement process, where notions of survival, « home » and temporality overlap. Created in contexts of urgency and/or poverty, these so-called « relegation » or « transitory » spaces are established with the idea of accommodating individuals for a limited period. Fundamental questions arise regarding the evolution of these spaces and the stance an architect should take towards them. Focusing specifically on the Sabra and Shatila camp and slum (Fig.1), located on situated on the southern periphery of Beirut, Lebanon, this research addresses, through various scales (Fig.2.3.4.5), different aspects of these informal settlements, including the temporality of existing structures and future interventions proposed. Sabra and Shatila becomes a territory where preconceived ideas dissolve, and a new understanding is illuminated through the movement of populations, their cohabitation over time, and their territorial appropriations in space. Delving into an informal place like this is not a marginal challenge, as it constitutes the daily reality for over 1/7th of the global population. This work thus testifies to the challenges of daily life, the way of life of the inhabitants of Sabra and Shatila and raises awareness of how quickly a territory like this evolves. Transitioning from ephemeral structures to a lasting densification of the territory (Fig.5), everything is orchestrated and implemented by the inhabitants according to their desires and needs. Adopting construction and arrangement methods that are unique to them, these inhabitants improvise living spaces and informal systems to survive. The trace of an architect is therefore minimal, if not absent. The proposed interventions (Fig.7.8.9.10) do not aim to fix an idea in a specific time but rather to act punctually by providing a toolkit that allows inhabitants to modify a space according to their needs while providing social infrastructures (Fig.6). The goal is not to mimic a city frozen in time and erase all human aspects of these neighborhoods, but to enable every inhabitant to meet their basic needs and access a fundamental right: the right to the city.
      PubDate: 2023-12-20
       
  • An account of a day-trip

    • Authors: İpek Avanoğlu, Aslıhan Şenel
      Abstract: Based on a day-trip and drawing experiments by one of the authors to an archaeological site, Aşağıpınar Höyük, we engage in a discussion on the unfixedness of the knowledge of a place of archaeological significance, challenging the traditional rigid perception of it as a past to be unearthed. Considering the rare case of bonding with dogs, this research incorporates non-human approaches through which space, time, and matter acquire entangled meanings and understandings. We argue that the site-specific bonding with the dogs gives access to interconnected narratives of the site, challenging the human-centred value of time in relation to matter. The drawn research project "An Account of a Day-Trip" is an attempt to make sense of the archaeological site Aşağıpınar Höyük through non-hierarchical configurations of space, time, and matter. Evolving through a series of drawing experiments, this project operates with corporeal and material temporalities, breaking the logic of simultaneity, linearity, and chronology. Through constant re-configurations of space, time, and matter, we suggest constructing and exploring bonded narratives.
      PubDate: 2023-12-19
       
  • 3 Questionnaires for UOU

    • Authors: Javier Sánchez Merina
      Abstract: LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Temporality

    • Authors: Mauricio Morales-Beltran, Jerzy Latka
      Abstract: editorial
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • On Temporality

    • Authors: Nobile Maria Luna, Alvado Bañón Joaquín, Stevens Sarah, Devereux Michael, Morales-Beltran Mauricio, Latka Jerzy
      Abstract: A conversation between the Editorial Committee members
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Temporality in the works of Shigeru Ban

    • Authors: Mauricio Morales-Beltran, Jerzy Latka
      Abstract: Interview with Shigeru Ban
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Teaching with prototypes

    • Authors: Mauricio Morales-Beltran
      Abstract: Atlas
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • ProtoLAB design & build workshop

    • Authors: Jerzy Latka
      Abstract: ProtoLAB design & build workshop is an annual international event that takes place in Wrocław, Poland. The unique character of the workshop lies in the process, where students of architecture and related studies, prepare the whole project from the first idea and sketch until the prototyping and final realisation of the design. The workshop is divided into a one-week online design part and 8 days of onsite manufacturing process.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Urban Devices for the City of Évora II

    • Authors: Sofia Aleixo, João Santa Rita
      Abstract: First-year students of the Integrated Master in Architecture programme developed proposals on the topic of Follies in the academic year 2022-2023 within the framework of a UoU (University of Universities) international workshop in the  Design Studio II unit. The challenge was to conceive temporary spatial structures that allow different perceptions of the identifying elements of a specific place, aiming to encourage the creation of new meanings for a transitional urban space—one where individuals do not stay but move, indifferent to what defines and characterises it. This was presented to the students as a challenge to design a temporary urban device for two public spaces in the historic city of Évora where the temporality of the place is captured. The final proposals demonstrate that it is possible to create moments of pause in a device that relates time to the enjoyment of space in a city, where the constant movement of its residents and visitors often superimposes itself on the pleasure and prolonged appreciation of its simplest values. The two-week workshop, led by Évora, encouraged autonomy in decision-making and collaborative work with peers on the international master programme in a paired relationship. In the World Heritage City and future European Capital of Culture, first-year students served as "the eyes, skin, ears, nose, and mouth" for their peers who, from a distance, could not experience the sensations induced by these unique spaces. The final critique, with the participation of several faculty members from other architecture schools in the UoU, was a moment of sharing ideas, discussing themes, and presenting work developed in a professionally committed manner, resulting in surprising and exciting outcomes. The aim of exploring the concept of place-making in Évora was to use perception in defining a public space for time, for relaxation, socialising, and understanding the city's identity. This involved creatively using common spaces while considering the physical, cultural, and social identities that shape a place and contribute to its enjoyment. The objectives and strategies aligned with Bruno Zevi's idea of "knowing how to see," employing a teaching method that explores concrete reality in time and space. The Exhibition Museography, Museology, and Communication As a second exercise, the works were exhibited in the city. The temporary exhibition designed for the Church of Salvador, located in the historic core of Évora, is the result of a second exercise carried out by ten groups of Évora students who then participated in the development and production of the exhibition. The museography group developed the exhibition details and enhanced the organisation of the visiting route and the spatial organisation of all physical display stands. The museology group curated the outputs of the intense international workshop and the subsequent development process. Finally, the communication group prepared new content, whilst considering effective communication with a non-specialised public. The videos produced during the exercise were edited, and promotional and publicity materials for the exhibition were created in the form of posters, leaflets, Instagram posts, and the dissemination of QR codes in the city. The temporality of the exhibition's contents required consideration of the life cycle of materials, involving both students and academics in adherence to the Sustainable Development Goals promoted by the United Nations. The aim has been to encourage, on the one hand, the reuse of all exhibition support elements and, on the other hand, the future recycling of all materials produced. It is also worth noting that materials from non-renewable sources, especially plastics, were excluded. By publicly presenting these eight proposals within and for the city, the connection between architectural education and the community from where the Architecture Master programme is delivered has been strengthened.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Architecture and temporality

    • Authors: Camille Renard
      Abstract: On 8 May 1902, at 7:52 a.m., the city of Saint-Pierre was no more, ravaged by the Pelean eruption
      of its Montagne. In a matter of seconds, one of the Caribbean's most important cities was wiped out.
      More than a century later, life goes on, leaving the ruins as a reminder of a past not to be forgotten.
      But this former capital, emptied of its 30,000 inhabitants on the eve of the eruption, is still struggling
      to regain its former dynamism and glory.
      And yet, nestled in a gully high above the city, Domaine DIKI's architecture blends history, culture
      and modernity to create a sensitive setting. With its large overhanging roofs in the colors of tropical
      dwellings, the rehabilitation of the ruins of this former dwelling once again resonates as a touch of
      hope and rebirth.
      Despite the looming threat of risk, the project finds its place and flourishes alongside the surrounding
      nature, reminding us perhaps that architecture is first and foremost about accepting that not
      everything can be mastered, and that risk is reason enough to make it worthwhile to exist even for a
      moment.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • How to design (and assemble) a pavilion

    • Authors: Miguel Luengo Angulo, José Antonio Carrillo Andrada
      Abstract: The goal of this essay is to illustrate a very personal and, though, hopefully general approach to the concept of “temporality” in contemporary architecture. With the empirical example of Mastercard’s Tourism Innovation Hub (TIH) we’ll try to walk our readers through the meanings of modularity, repetition, transportation, systematisation, economy, easy assembly and disassembly, quality within the core idea of ephemeral architecture. Starting off with a short introduction about what means “temporal” (as the opposite of “permanent”) since the Roman tratadist Vitruvius to some contemporary ephemeral proposals to a more extensive description of our TIH as a modern way of reinterpreting Augustine Taylor’s famous “Ballon Frame” diverting towards the creation of a Hans Arp three-dimensional oasis. A stand/pavilion that addresses temporality from the very beginning of the design process to the last phase of disassembly and storage.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Wit[h]nesses of Time, A Note-Book of Hours on an Astrolabe

    • Authors: E. Bahar Avanoglu, Ayşe Şentürer
      Abstract: How do we navigate in time' Astrolabes, described in general terms, are astronomical instruments that guide us to ‘read’, ‘extract’, ‘interpret’ and ‘reflect’ the hidden spatio-temporal cosmological and celestial knowledge. Though, they have been known to be adorned with the celestial knowledge with manifold uses from practical applications to intellectual, poetic, theoretical reflections, today, there is a wider historical interest in their precision in navigation and in calculating time. Relatedly, these instruments have been often associated with mathematical certainty and with “a uniform, measurable, geometrically structured space” (Aiken, 1994). Yet, our embodied engagement with astrolabes as drawings seems to have been repressed in time; and the entangled spatio-temporal relations that are set between the universe, the observer and the astrolabe, seem to fly under radar, as well as the spatio-temporal inconsistencies that come along with it. In this article, rather than taking drawing as a set of “reported” spatial databank, but as an embodied act that is internalized bodily, I would like to focus on our (repressed) embodied engagement with the astrolabe as a drawing, and unfold a discussion that does not necessarily rehearse the astrolabe as a ‘consistent’ spatio-temporal celestial map and that does not necessarily locate it historically within the origins of computerization. Akin to Aby Warburg’s ‘not-historical’ reading of images in his Bilderatlas Mnemosyne (1924-1929), I intend to track this historically repressed survival of embodiment of astrolabes, in the form of an analogical and anachronic reading mainly between two time-pieces: astrolabes (9th – 13th century) and John Hejduk’s The Collapse of Time (1984). Instead of panels of images, I will use my note-books as a denklage for such a historical imagination with the hope to set a historical imagination in motion, “located somewhere between fact and fiction.” (Rendell, 2007).
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Time in the Shell

    • Authors: Fatma Ipek Ek
      Abstract: Time is perceived and lived within a different understanding in Japanese culture, which brings new possibilities and existential modes for the construction of space. Time follows a cyclical/circular structure of temporality and ensures impermanence with its transience, and permanence of transience with its repetition. Both past and future are intertwined within the culture of spatial design as well as within the language. Language and philosophy of living reflect the architectural and aesthetic approaches for building a temporal spatiality. The phenomenological generators of these spatiotemporal atmospheres echo through the key concepts such as ma, mu, and kū, as well as through the aesthetic conceptions of, for example, mono no aware, shakkei, wabi-sabi, and hanasuki. It may be claimed that the love of imperfect and impermanent beauty is the gene of the Japanese spatial atmosphere in the traditional context. In this framework, this paper examines three projects of Japanese spatial design that reflect the cyclical understanding of time and the aesthetic conceptions connected to it: the Summer Solstice Light-Worship 100-Meter Gallery and the Winter Solstice Light-Worship Tunnel / Light Well designed by Sugimoto Hiroshi, and the Benesse House Oval designed by Ando Tadao. These three examples perfectly demonstrate the unique way in which Japanese culture understands and expresses time and space. Based on these projects, the paper also argues that temporality is one of the most powerful modes of spatiality in Japanese culture, which aims to weave a shell for time to exist in space.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • A Landscape in the air

    • Authors: Ivan Torregrosa Morales
      Abstract: “Landscape in the air" is a reflection on a place, focusing on the understanding of a natural ecosystem and the existing dynamics through the investigation of the elements that shape it, alter it, or inhabit it, such as air, sand, water, humidity, vegetation, and humans, among others. Examples such as capturing humidity to survive like a desert beetle, the growth and survival of vegetation on the dunes, the functioning of kites to stay aloft, or the machines that traverse a beach by a Dutch artist serve as tools that help me comprehend and engage with the landscape in a dynamic manner. While wooden footbridges, breakwaters, or houses are static elements constructed and dismantled within a changing system, the project integrates and embraces these cycles of construction and destruction as integral elements. In places where the project succeeds, paths will endure, vegetation will thrive, or the impact of tides will diminish. In cases where nature rejects the project, it will simply fade away, rapidly degrading like a dying tree or expired leaves carried away by the wind.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • L’orizzonte della memoria

    • Authors: Miguel Paredes Maldonado
      Abstract: This contribution uses a recent competition project for a materially lightweight intervention in a historically significant cemetery in Catania, Italy—developed as part of the author’s research-led design practice—to articulate and explore the interrelated temporal dimensions of architecture. In so doing, it maps these dimensions against a series of contemporary philosophical positions, which attempt to interrogate the notion of “time” beyond its relation to human experience. To this end, this contribution seeks to frame the intervention (and its originating design approach) in terms of its fluid, transformative, extended temporality, demonstrating how it may exceed its "visible" life cycle as an architectural proposal. Developing as a discussion that articulates design decisions in relation to specific theoretical positions, the text proceeds to flesh out "architectural temporality" in programmatic, material, and instrumental terms. This threefold approach aims to offer a comprehensive exploration of the interrelated (and potentially intertwined) dimensions of "temporality," with a view to positing them as three active principles for structuring design: The programmatic extension of time embedded in the spiritual character of the necropolis, the constantly evolving nature of the design process —both within and outside the human temporal sequence— and the consideration of materiality beyond the ephemeral moment when material components become an architectural object.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • The potential Roles of Design and Designers within a Time-based approach

    • Authors: Giovangiuseppe Vannelli
      Abstract: Considering the urgency to update design disciplines in respect to the current times describable with the word transition, the paper proposes a critical analysis on the basis of a long research involving the former convent of the SS. Trinità delle Monache in Naples. The multiple research contexts have all been aimed at the recovery, valorization and opening to the city of the former convent. Focusing on this case study, the contribution identifies possible roles for the design and the designer within a time-based approach. Assuming the complexity and coexistence of multiple temporalities, one can broaden the spectrum of action of the project itself. In this sense, the contribution proposes six connotations of the project, through an examination of as many project experiences, to which correspond different purposes, communities, scales and – above all – temporalities. It is believed that the case study presented here provides a possible example of a minor and processual project developed within a time-based approach where the designer-researcher plays the role of the choral architect. Within this theoretical framework, the recognition of multiple and interrelated temporalities as indispensable tools of contemporary design is urgent.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Playful methods for inclusive cities

    • Authors: Hans Intveen
      Abstract: Public space initiatives in growing intermediate cities are facing increasing challenges in the contemporary urban landscape, primarily due to emerging issues like migration and the establishment of camps.These challenges frequently end up in longer planning and execution timeframes for standard initiatives, increasing the significance of ephemeral interventions, which are distinguished by their rapid execution and low cost. Local urbanism practice has established that these initiatives can also serve as community-driven experiments that precede long-term urban programs. Recognizing that traditional community assembly methodologies are currently facing a crisis in terms of both representativeness and functionality in the context of participatory urbanism, an alternative ludic approach is proposed within the framework of the ‘Urbanism’ course at ‘University 1’[1]. This exercise aims to approach an urban project in an playful manner, with several student groups suggesting games to participatively build an architectural program for a tactical urbanism project. As each community has its temporality, which translates into daily routines and rhythms, the challenge of exercise is also posed as a way of fitting in with the times of each place: a brief, synthetic group dynamic that is capable of adjusting to the routine of each human group. Given the regional urban practice in “Program X’, there is a clear need for methodological innovation to include new participants and, consequently, to achieve more representative outcomes, considering the playful approach as a viable strategie to accomplish these objectives. Key Words: tactical urbanism, placemaking, participatory urbanism [1] For concerns of anonymity, the precise names of the university, program, and city have been withheld.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Temporalities and the Urban Fabric: Co-Producing Liminal Spaces in
           Transitional Epochs

    • Authors: Asma Mehan, Sina Mostafavi
      Abstract: Within the framework of 'Temporalities and the Urban Fabric: Co-Producing Liminal Spaces in Transitional Epochs,' this rigorous examination unravels the multilayered nuances of temporality and its intimate relationship with urban spaces in times of transition. The research delineates the intricate interplay between public exhibitions, urban realms, and socio-political paradigms, particularly within the dynamic settings of the metropolitan entities of Houston and Amsterdam. These cities, as epitomes of temporal urban flux, become fertile grounds for exploring the ephemeral essence of liminal spaces and their transformative manifestations. By weaving together diverse academic domains – from Design Computation and Fabrication to Urban Communities and Spatial Justice – this study underscores the symbiotic fusion of Augmented Reality (AR) and Gamification within the broader canvas of urban temporalities. Crucially, the research accentuates the transformative potential of Extended Reality (XR) in augmenting the theoretical and methodological contours of urban studies within these transitional epochs. Key words: Urban Temporalities; Liminal Spaces; Augmented Reality in Urban Design; Spatial Justice; Transitional Urban Epochs
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
  • Student Mentoring Programme as a new Tempo in Architecture Education

    • Authors: Pablo Jeremías Juan Gutiérrez
      Abstract: During the last few years, the PAT teachers of the degree in fundamentals in architecture have been wondering for some time the reason for the low participation and involvement of their students in the EPS of Alicante. After a series of meetings, the conclusion has been reached on the need to involve the students so that, from now on, one of the fundamental purposes is to transform it into a medium that serves as a voice for the concerns of the students. This way, it will contribute to improving the fluidity between the tutorial action at the service of the university academic phase and the reality of their professional life. The methodology proposed by the teachers involved is based on a prior analysis of the set of goals and tasks of the tutorial action and a collection of data that summarizes the choice, relevance, orientation and planning of each of the excursions (that will be articulated in future meetings). Thus, the students are provided with the training dimension and real practical application to form part of their hidden curriculum, considering it interdisciplinary and implicitly valuing all the educational activity received up to this point. It is proposed to develop a framework of reference in which the research work allows us to reveal not only the exportable method that guides the strategy in the three stages of work, namely, preparation (for the work), action (during the work) and reflection (after the work) but also allows the creation of a rubric (also exportable) for self-assessment of the work developed. The findings are as simple as they are radical. As obvious as they are important. And they have to do with the fertility that the consideration of the participation of the student body in their own teaching-learning process, undoubtedly favoring the development of values in their students and materializing the objectives of coexistence and participation that allow them to improve their training in accordance with the PAT.
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
       
 
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 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2        [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
Showing 201 - 264 of 264 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nepalese Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cultural Heritage and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Public Space     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Student Project Reporting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
UOU Scientific Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Architectural and Engineering Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Oz : the Journal of the College of Architecture, Planning &Design at Kansas State University     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Actas de Arquitectura Religiosa Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herança : Revista de História, Património e Cultura     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Design, Tecnologia e Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
On the w@terfront. Public Art. Urban Design. Civic Participation. Urban Regeneration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Creative Space     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estructuras     Open Access  
Sinektika : Jurnal Arsitektur     Open Access  
Arquitectura Más (Arquitectura +)     Open Access  
interFACES     Open Access  

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