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Journal of Delta Urbanism
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2666-7851
Published by TU Delft Homepage  [18 journals]
  • Radical Observation: A series of awareness exercises for developing
           inter-relationalities with natural world ecosystems

    • Authors: Debra Solomon
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2023-12-24
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7333
       
  • Rising Waters, Rooted Memories: Cultural Heritage as a resource for
           climate adaptation in Sinking Cities

    • Authors: Hilke Marit Berger, Teresa Erbach, Annika Kuehn, Jan-Philipp Possmann, Gaby S. Langendijk
      Abstract: Coastal communities around the world are on the frontline of dealing with climate change impacts, such as sea level rise. The research project “Sinking Cities: Cultural Heritage as a transformational resource” at the City Science Lab in Hamburg focuses on how cultural heritage can play a pivotal role in building resilient coastal communities. The aim of this pioneer project is to better understand the role of cultural heritage in social transformation processes and propose paths of action for socially integrated and fair climate adaptation. We argue that climate narratives are a continuum in cultural heritage and therefore should be considered more comprehensively by embracing historical sources as well as present cultural practices, like staging, arranging and performing as a form of knowledge production to broaden the view on climate narratives and tap into the transformative knowledge they offer.
      PubDate: 2023-12-24
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7334
       
  • Post Rationality of a Hydraulic Civilization: An Ecological Transition for
           the Vietnamese Mekong Delta

    • Authors: Sylvie Nguyen
      Abstract: A radical project is proposed for the Vietnamese Mekong Delta, calling for the urgency to realize its Ecological Transition, as a response to the need to reverse the detrimental environmental impacts accumulated over the course of its history of agrarian colonization.  The article reveals the evolution of the delta’s territory, through an atlas of palimpsests regarding the delta’s past transformations primarily driven by the hydraulic management of its territory. The resulting environmental degradation and obliteration of much of the Mekong Delta’s ability to self-regenerate are found in large part as the consequence of the devotion of the delta’s ecosystem resources to mass rice production; driven by vast irrigation infrastructural expansion. However, as an unintentional consequence of the investments made in infrastructural networks during the Green Revolution, a new value was propelled by farmers and the local community through the diversification of infrastructural uses, resulting in hybrid rururban land transformations, indicating the potential for Ecological Transition in the delta. Through the theoretical perspective of alternative ways for metropolization defined in the ‘Horizontal Metropolis’ and the conceptual approach developed under the ‘Project of Isotropy’, post-rationality of the agrarian territory is proposed through the reorganization and design of the primary canals established for irrigation after the 1986 ‘Doi Moi’ reform period. Social-Techno-Ecological corridors are proposed to transform the currently overlooked and engineered canal settlements living in Long Xuyen Quadrangle and Can Tho province, through a resilient community-based living and cultivation paradigm based on the advancement of the traditional Vietnamese VAC (Garden-Pond-Animal) model.  In addition, the Water Ecological Framework is proposed as a wider Delta Intervention whereby a series of circular water processes can take place ecologically across the territory, to promote the partial reinstatement of the Mekong’s deltaic regenerative processes.  As a radical integration between the wider Water Ecological Framework and the Social-Techno-Ecological corridors, the evolution of the deltaic territory is envisioned to create new social ecologies across the Mekong Delta, offering valuable climate-resilient ecosystems through biodiversity and a synergetic coexistence. Bringing into reality an Ecological Transition for the delta’s resilient future, whereby the regeneration of its deltaic processes shall be reinstated with a more conducive coexistence between humans and nature, as a new paradigm to address the wicked problems of our time.
      PubDate: 2023-12-24
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7331
       
  • Landscape Policies ‘by Design’

    • Authors: Clara Olóriz Sanjuán, Alfredo Ramírez Galindo
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2023-12-24
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7332
       
  • Delta

    • Authors: Kristina Hill
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2023-12-24
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7335
       
  • Dialogue on Values, Design, Practice, and the Future

    • Authors: Kate Orff, Henk Ovink
      Abstract: Redesigning deltas is the theme for our 182nd anniversary week at the Delft University of Technology. Two honorary doctorates are awarded to people who have an outstanding contribution to the field of Delta Urbanism: Kate Orff and Henk Ovink. The dialogue between Kate and Henk focused on four key aspects, each shedding light on their shared values, design philosophies, real-world projects, and their future visions. The first part delved into their commonalities, uncovering shared approaches to work, a strong commitment to making the world a better place, and advocacy efforts. Their dialogue revealed a mutual optimism and dedication to motivating people while emphasizing responsibility. The second part encompassed design and design-driven solutions. The conversation explored their perspectives on design in the context of design-based research, both in its present state and future trajectories. They deliberated on the definition of design, its role in problem-solving, and what changes might be necessary in academia. The third part centered on their real-world projects, such as the Water as Leverage program and the Living Breakwaters initiative. They shared insights gained from these endeavors, outlining lessons learned, areas for improvement, and collaborative opportunities for learning and growth. The discussion covered lessons learned from these projects and outlined the next steps. Finally, in the last part, they envisioned the future, particularly academia's role in catalyzing positive change and fostering innovation. Their dialogue encapsulated shared values, experiences, and aspirations, highlighting the potential for collaborative action within design, advocacy, and academia.
      PubDate: 2023-12-22
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7350
       
  • Prospects

    • Authors: Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin, Fransje Hooimeijer, Baukje Kothuis
      Abstract: The latest IPCC report which is named ‘The Synthesis Report , Climate Change 2023’ was released on 20 March 2023 to inform the 2023 Global Stocktake under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The report finds that ‘there is more than 50% chance that global temperature rise will reach or surpass 1.5 degrees Celsius between 2021 and 2040 across studied scenarios, and under a high-emissions pathway, specifically, the world may hit this threshold even sooner, between 2018 and 2037.’ These findings again emphasise the growing pressures and challenges that deltas are confronting in their path towards future development. It is evident that the global imperative for deltas to adapt has reached an unprecedented level, but at the same time the question arises if adaptation is enough. Especially considering the scope of societal challenges that need to be the point of departure for sustainable spatial transformation in general. Aren't they of such a fundamental nature that we need to reconsider our urban system as a whole and aim for transformation instead of adaptation'
      Looking more closely to the societal challenges we can organise them according to their environmental and socio-economic drivers. The environmental drivers are the climate crisis and the biodiversity crisis. The socio-economic drivers are ongoing urbanisation, the energy transition, and the new economy.
      PubDate: 2023-12-22
      DOI: 10.59490/jdu.4.2023.7349
       
 
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