A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Frontiers in Sustainable Cities
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2624-9634
Published by Frontiers Media Homepage  [96 journals]
  • Flood risk reduction and resilient city growth in sub-Saharan Africa:
           searching for coherence in Accra's urban planning

    • Authors: Martin Oteng-Ababio, Jytte Agergaard, Lasse Møller-Jensen, Manja H. Andreasen
      Abstract: Urban resilience experts have highlighted that frequent extreme weather events are a result of rapid, unplanned development and climate change. To ensure coherent urban planning, effective land governance has been a priority since the introduction of the national urban policy in 2012. However, despite implementing this policy for over a decade, poor land governance continues to negatively impact city development, yet this subject has received limited academic attention. Our study focuses on Santa Maria, a community historically neglected by planning officials and currently facing unregulated urbanization and increasing flood risks. We used qualitative research methods, including key informant interviews and document reviews, to unpack land ownership and management complexities. These complexities have led to “planning by the commons,” the creation of green space deserts, and challenges related to residents' mobility and livelihood. Our study affirms that auto-constructed communities like Santa Maria reflect a form of tenacious urbanism that should be acknowledged and respected. Incorporating its logic into proposals for consolidation, informed by the opinions and desires of the residents themselves, can help integrate “planning by the commons” into the urban planning process of Accra. Rather than being viewed as a problem to be cured, this approach should be incorporated into the planning process, incorporating locally specific social functions and traditional structures to ensure equitable and just urban societies. The public sector must recognize that building on local capacity, skills, and expertise is essential in the quest for a resilient city. The experience from Santa Maria provides a great opportunity to nurture local development, fulfill the growing demand for solutions and services without biases, and provide an excellent opportunity for inclusive growth.
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T00:00:00Z
       
  • Trees and sidewalks: toward an infrastructure protection
           approach|Introduction|Methods|Results|Discussion|Conclusion

    • Authors: Laura Otero-Durán, Andrés Torres
      Abstract: IntroductionNature-based solutions are increasingly recognized as vital components of urban resilience strategies, particularly within the framework of green infrastructure. This study aims to propose an approach that fosters symbiosis between green and gray infrastructure to address the challenges posed by climate change in urban environments.MethodsWe conducted a comprehensive review of guidelines and scientific literature to inform the selection of species and the design of root containers for urban tree planting. Additionally, we performed a multicriteria analysis and assessed water comfort to guide decision-making regarding species selection in specific city areas.ResultsThe methodology was applied to a case study in Bogotá, yielding insights applicable to any city with basic knowledge of suitable species for planting in built public spaces. Crucial criteria for selecting local species for sidewalks were identified, including size, permeability, soil compaction characteristics, and climatic adaptability. A list of desirable species adapted to all humidity zones of the case study city was generated. Hydrological sizing methods proposed are contingent upon both the species to be planted and the geometry of the streets.DiscussionThe approach and findings presented in this study promote the development of trees and their ecosystem services while mitigating potential damage to surrounding infrastructure.ConclusionImplementing strategies that facilitate symbiosis between green and gray infrastructure contributes to urban resilience and aids in climate change adaptation efforts.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial: Reviews in cities in the Global South: 2022

    • Authors: Ruzana Sanusi, Lutfun Nahar Lata, Swasti Vardhan Mishra, Deljana Iossifova
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T00:00:00Z
       
  • How do governance visions, institutions and practices enable urban
           sustainability transformations' A study of Battambang and Sihanoukville,
           Cambodia

    • Authors: Fiona Lord, Jason Prior
      Abstract: Whilst research has highlighted the challenges of rapid urbanization in Cambodia, few studies have focused on increased interest within Cambodia on how reforming urban governance can support urban sustainability transformations. Addressing this research gap, this study explores how urban governance might enable sustainability transformations in two second-tier cities—Battambang and Sihanoukville—in Cambodia, based on the analysis of open-ended interviews with fifty-five representatives involved in the development and implementation of urban sustainability plans and policies for these cities. The findings identify how urban governance visions, institutions and practices can be strengthened to enable sustainability transformations within these cities. The study highlights that alignment between the three tiers of governance—meta-governance (visions and worldviews), second-tier (structural and institutional) and third-tier (day-to-day interactions) is needed for urban sustainability transformations.
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T00:00:00Z
       
  • Environmental worldviews and attitudes of public-sector urban planners in
           shaping sustainable urban development: the case of South Africa

    • Authors: Rebecca Read, Charlie M. Shackleton, Gisele K. Sinasson Sanni
      Abstract: Public-sector urban planners are essential role-players in the development of sustainable cities. However, there is relatively little understanding of their perceptions of sustainability generally and how or where they obtain information and knowledge around urban sustainability, especially in the Global South. This study, therefore, adopted a mixed-methods approach, employing both an online survey (34 valid respondents) and eight in-depth interviews (together spanning 31 different municipalities), to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and worldviews (based on the New Ecological Paradigm scale) of public-sector planners in South Africa. Generally, the planners held ecocentric worldviews and acknowledged the importance of sustainable urban development and the need to understand urban ecological dynamics and principles in planning and urban greening. However, they also identified a range of factors that hinder their ability to plan for sustainable futures, including institutional flaws, politics and misaligned development goals. Most felt that the extent and distribution of urban green infrastructure in their municipality was below what they deemed as ideal, although the majority were unaware of national guidelines in this respect. Consequently, perceptions and worldviews appeared to be misaligned with what is prioritized and implemented. Therefore, environmental issues and ecological principles need to be better communicated to public-sector urban planners.
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T00:00:00Z
       
  • Transport-related social exclusion and mobility in developing countries:
           the South African case|Introduction|Methods|Results|Discussion

    • Authors: Rose Luke
      Abstract: IntroductionTransport-related social exclusion has been studied in many countries, and from many different perspectives. In Africa, however, there is little recent research into the phenomenon, even though African cities tend to have poor transport services, urban sprawl is extensive usually resulting in long travel times and high travel costs, and certain areas experience high levels of crime. By implication, there are several factors that impact the ability of people to access economic and societal opportunities, however these are not well documented. Building on previous work from several authors, this research sought to describe transport-related social exclusion in a large metropolitan area in an emerging economy.MethodsUsing a qualitative methodology, 60 interviews were conducted with City of Johannesburg residents. The data was analyzed using manual thematic and classic content analysis.ResultsThe study found that residents often did not have access to services due to availability, but also that economic, geographic and fear-based exclusion were particularly prevalent in the sample, although there were several other psychological exclusion dimensions, as well as information exclusion.DiscussionThis study is the first recent study in South Africa to consider a wide range of commuters from varying demographic strata, thus providing a novel perspective on TRSE in a major urban area in the country. The study recommends that policy actions be considered, taking into account the minibus taxi industry, which is often overlooked in government policy. TRSE should also be an inherent element in urban (and other) transport planning, as well as take into account the broader societal realities faced by citizens. Future research directions include conducting broader quantitative studies across a variety of urban areas in South Africa, and beyond, to determine specific TRSE dimensions in various urban areas. Policy analysis is also recommended, to determine TRSE policy gaps and align interventions with specific commuter needs.
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T00:00:00Z
       
  • Revolutionizing mobility: a comprehensive review of electric vehicles
           charging stations in India

    • Authors: Yonis Gulzar, Monica Dutta, Deepali Gupta, Sapna Juneja, Arjumand Bano Soomro, Mohammad Shuaib Mir
      Abstract: An Electric Vehicle (EV) charger or Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) is a piece of equipment that supplies electrical power for charging plug–in electric vehicles. Although batteries can only be charged with Direct Current (DC) power, most electric vehicles have an onboard Alternative Current AC—to—DC converter and most fully electric cars can accept both AC and DC power. The adoption of EVs can bring about significant relief in noise pollution and also environmental pollution if the required electricity is generated using renewable sources. DC charging stations of various levels are commonly equipped with multiple ports of various levels to be able to charge a wide variety of EVs. EVSEs are found at various facilities such as street–side or retail shopping centers, government facilities, and other parking areas. To ensure a sustainable environment by reducing the carbon emissions from vehicles, the use of EVs needs to be promoted. The need for having Electric Vehicle Charging Stations (EVCS) in any region depends upon the demand and cluster density of EVs in that region and is a major factor in the process of promoting the use of EVs and facilitating sustainable tourism using cleaner fuels. The authors of this study have located the various types and numbers of EVSEs throughout all the states and union territories of India, showing the emerging use of EVs so that EV users can conveniently locate charging stations and plan their routes accordingly. Furthermore, other citizens may be encouraged to own and use EVs for better environmental sustainability.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T00:00:00Z
       
  • Expectations of i-Tree Eco as a tool for urban tree management in Nordic
           cities

    • Authors: Johanna Deak Sjöman, Eeva-Maria Tuhkanen, Miia Mänttäri, Žofie Cimburová, Sanna Stålhammar, David N. Barton, Thomas B. Randrup
      Abstract: While urban forests are recognized as imperative toward climate adaptation in cities and provide health and recreational benefits to citizens, municipal tree officers often struggle to find successful governance arrangements and budget support toward long-lasting investment and implementation in new planting schemes and protection of existing trees. Since its release in 2006, i-Tree Eco has helped urban tree officers worldwide to find tangible leverage in the means of quantitative mapping, numeric measures, and economic values of ecosystem services. This may in turn help ease gridlocks and potentially support constructive dialogues across sectors, with decision-makers and public engagement. With the release of i-Tree Eco v. 6 in Europe 2018, 13 Nordic cities were engaged in a larger research project with ambitions to use i-Tree Eco for the purpose of retrieving numeric and monetary data of the biophysical structures and ecosystem services of the urban forest. Based on questionnaires and semi-structured interviews, we present the results from the Nordic i-Tree project with a focus on expectations, opportunities, and potential barriers experienced in using i-Tree Eco in urban forest management. The most prominent expectation and foreseeing opportunities were recognized toward using numeric information on trees to change policies and support cross-sectoral collaboration while reaching politicians and the public. Identified barriers involved how limited resources are spent on public outreach and how information about the project to relevant stakeholders were not distributed from the beginning which may have implications on the dissemination of results. As some important ecosystem services, e.g., cultural services, are not captured by i-Tree Eco, presenting the partial value of urban trees may pose also potential risks to cross-sectoral collaboration. Other findings conclude that although numeric information on ecosystem services is seen as beneficial in terms of communicating with different stakeholders, a deeper understanding toward the criteria used in the valuation process and the potential risks of numeric approaches may provide more context-specific applications.
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial: Environmental data, governance and the sustainable city

    • Authors: James Evans, Maria Pregnolato, Christopher D. F. Rogers, Jim A. Harris, David Topping
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T00:00:00Z
       
  • A triple whammy: how urban heat, housing unaffordability and disadvantage
           affect urban spatial resilience

    • Authors: Shanaka Herath, Elizelle Juanee Cilliers, Eveline Mussi
      Abstract: Climate change generates multiple negative impacts for cities, such as the urban heat island effect. Social stresses, including social disadvantage and housing unaffordability, compound the poor living conditions of urban residents and make our cities less resilient. This paper considers a climate event (urban heat) and social stresses (housing affordability and urban disadvantage) to explore urban resilience in Sydney. We draw on a framework for building urban climate resilience, incorporating facets of urban resilience, social stresses that amplify crises, and solutions that strengthen individuals and communities with coping abilities to withstand climate events. The study diverges from aggregate city-level analyses that hide small-area differences in climate impacts and vulnerability. The findings reveal the spatiality of these natural and social impacts, identifying 11 critical areas in Sydney impacted by the highest levels of urban heat and urban disadvantage, and two critical areas impacted by the highest levels of urban heat and housing unaffordability. We highlight the importance of context-based approaches and place-based policies to address climate risks and social vulnerabilities on the path toward creating more resilient cities.
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T00:00:00Z
       
  • Editorial: Urban hierarchies in an economic transition to sustainable
           cities

    • Authors: Daniel A. Griffith
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T00:00:00Z
       
  • Navigating the impact of climate change in India: a perspective on climate
           action (SDG13) and sustainable cities and communities (SDG11)

    • Authors: Sharfaa Hussain, Ejaz Hussain, Pallavi Saxena, Ashish Sharma, Pooja Thathola, Saurabh Sonwani
      Abstract: Climate change is a global concern of the current century. Its rapid escalation and ever-increasing intensity have been felt worldwide, leading to dramatic impacts globally. The aftermath of climate change in India has brought about a profound transformation in India's environmental, socio-economic, and urban landscapes. In 2019, India ranked seventh, among the most affected countries by extreme weather events caused due to changing climate. This impact was evident in terms of both, the human toll with 2,267 lives lost, and the economic damage, which accounted for 66,182 million US$ Purchasing power parities (PPPs). Over the recent years, India has experienced a significant increase in the number and frequency of extreme weather events, causing vulnerable communities. The country experienced severe air pollution problems in several metropolitan cities and was highlighted in the list of the world's most polluted cities. Additionally, India has become the most populous nation globally, boasting a population of 1.4 billion people, equating to ~18% of the global population, and experiencing an increased rate of consumption of natural resources. Owing to the country's current scenario, various climate mitigation strategies, including nature-based solutions, must be implemented to reduce such impacts and support India's target of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This review tries to have a holistic understanding of the effects of climate change on different sectors to identify India's challenges in achieving SDG 13 and SDG 11. Finally, it also highlighted the future recommendations for climate change-related research from an Indian perspective.
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T00:00:00Z
       
  • Tripartite relationship of urban planning, city growth, and health for
           sustainable development in Akure, Nigeria

    • Authors: Taye Bayode, Alexander Siegmund
      Abstract: We live in an urban planet. As the world continues to urbanize, urban development that support the health and wellbeing of city dwellers is far more important than ever before to achieve sustainable development targets. This study explores the complex relationship among urban planning, city growth, and health as critical drivers of sustainable development in the rapidly growing nodal city of Akure, Nigeria. The study provides a four-decade spatio-temporal model of urban Land Use Land Cover (LULC) changes in Akure between the years 1984 and 2023 from acquired Landsat satellite imageries. The result shows more than 20% net change increase in developed LULC classes between the study years. A strong positive correlation exists between the years covered in the analyses and urban development (r = 0.93, p = 0.002), and a strong negative relationship with the forest land use (r = −0.94, p = 0.002) with potential debilitating impacts on residents’ health, green infrastructures and the city’s sustainability in the future. Furthermore, results of key informant interviews (KIIs) of officials of the Ministry of Physical Planning and Urban Development (MPPUD) in Akure, Ondo State, unveil various views on the “place of health” in urban planning practices in Akure. A lack of synergy between urban planners and public health practitioners in the city and limiting scope of functions of urban planning on the impact of health in Akure were observed. Thus, we recommend the integration of a sustainable urban planning approach as a guide to manage the city.
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T00:00:00Z
       
  • Biodiversity and quality of urban green landscape affect mental
           restorativeness of residents in Multan,
           Pakistan|Introduction|Methods|Results and discussion

    • Authors: Zainab Rehman, Muhammad Zubair, Dalia Osama Hafiz, Syed Amir Manzoor
      Abstract: IntroductionThe influence of urban green spaces on public health is receiving unprecedented attention. Managing urban greenspaces sustainably requires an understanding of the mechanisms behind the positive effects of urban biodiversity on the wellbeing of residents. Urban parks could improve mental restoration of park users. The restoration potential may be influenced by the biophysical characteristics of the park.MethodsThis study aimed to understand two aspects of urban parks in Multan, Pakistan: (a) How does the perception of biodiversity and the quality of urban parks relate to mental restorativeness of park visitors' (b) What are the determinants of respondents' willingness to pay for the conservation and management of park biodiversity and quality in urban parks' Data were collected from October 2021 to December 2021 through a cross-sectional survey in which 550 park visitors were interviewed from six randomly selected urban parks in Multan. Multiple linear regression analysis, a binary logistic model, and a chi-square test were applied to analyze the data.Results and discussionThe study empirically highlights the positive contribution of park visits to mental restorativeness. Biodiversity and quality were positively correlated with the mental restorativeness of park visitors. Sixty-two percent (62%) of the visitors were reluctant to pay, whereas 38% were ready to pay between Rs. 850/3.7$ and Rs. 1,700/7.4$ each year. Education, occupation, and monthly income significantly positively affected the respondent's WTP attitudes. The study highlights the importance of using urban parks as tools to promote mental restorativeness, combat social stress, and increase urban vegetation cover.
      PubDate: 2024-01-08T00:00:00Z
       
  • Solving the mysteries of Lahore smog: the fifth season in the country

    • Authors: Rabia Majeed, Muhammad Shehzaib Anjum, Muhammad Imad-ud-din, Suhaib Malik, Muhammad Naveed Anwar, Bilal Anwar, Muhammad Fahim Khokhar
      Abstract: South Asian smog is an annually recurring air pollution event that is characterized by high concentrations of air pollutants, low visibility, and severe socio-economic disruptions. It is most frequently observed across the north-western parts of the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Since 2016, it has become so frequent and pervasive that they are colloquially referred to as “the fifth season” in the region. During this season populations residing in this area including cities such as Lahore, Amritsar, Faisalabad, Multan, Delhi etc. are exposed to hazardous levels of air pollution. This study attempts to understand the reasons for the recent increase in the intensity and frequency of intense air pollution episodes by utilizing ground-based and satellite observations. Time-series analysis, seasonal and annual variations in PM2.5 and AOD were carried out. Satellite data of UVAAI, CO, and fire count were used to determine the fire incidences and aerosol characterization. The results indicate that during the last decade, there has been an increase in air pollution sources while crop residue burning, and motor vehicles have greatly contributed to the increased frequency and intensity of such events. The meteorological and topographical data analysis revealed that the IGP provides ample cloud-condensation nuclei and optimum conditions for the accumulations of pollutants, especially in the post-monsoon and winter periods. The Mann-Kendall test was performed to confirm the annual and seasonal trends of PM2.5. The major cities of South Asia such as Lahore, Delhi, Kathmandu, and Dhaka have recently shown a decreasing trend with respect to annual AOD. However, an increase has been observed for the period of post-monsoon especially for cities of Lahore and Delhi. To distinguish potential sources of air pollutants during extreme smog episodes in the region, Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was conducted to estimate the most contributing factors to the annual smog episodes. According to the data, the transboundary pollution resulting from open-field agriculture fires has been assigned moderate importance over vehicular emissions. A HYSPLIT trajectory model coupled with ground observations and satellite data shows that the agricultural fires do have a profound impact on the air quality of the region. It highlights the importance of transboundary pollution and cooperation among cities, regions, and countries across the shared airshed of the Indo-Gangetic Plains.
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T00:00:00Z
       
  • Allocation of national renewable expansion and sectoral demand reduction
           targets to municipal level

    • Authors: Simon Schneider, Edit Paráda, David Sengl, José Baptista, Paulo Moura Oliveira
      Abstract: Despite the ubiquitous term “climate neutral cities”, there is a distinct lack of quantifiable and meaningful municipal decarbonization goals in terms of the targeted energy balance and composition that collectively connect to national scenarios. In this paper we present a simple but useful allocation approach to derive municipal targets for energy demand reduction and renewable expansion based on national energy transition strategies in combination with local potential estimators. The allocation uses local and regional potential estimates for demand reduction and the expansion of renewables and differentiates resulting municipal needs of action accordingly. The resulting targets are visualized and opened as a decision support system (DSS) on a web-platform to facilitate the discussion on effort sharing and potential realization in the decarbonization of society. With the proposed framework, different national scenarios, and their implications for municipal needs for action can be compared and their implications made explicit.
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T00:00:00Z
       
  • Land acquisition policy and practice for cooperative housing scheme in
           Bahir Dar, Ethiopia: toward affordable housing solutions

    • Authors: Dereje Tessema Adigeh, Birhanu Girma Abebe
      Abstract: Bahir Dar, a city in Ethiopia, is grappling with the challenges of rapid urbanization, which has made affordable housing a critical issue for its growing population. This study specifically focuses on the urban land acquisition process for cooperative housing schemes, which serve as an essential component of Bahir Dar’s affordable housing program. This atudy aimed to examine the current practices, identify the challenges faced by housing cooperatives during land acquisition and construction, and propose strategies for improvement. The primary data for this research were collected through interviews with key informants from the Bahir Dar City administration’s land management, cooperative organizer office, housing development and management office, and housing cooperative committees. Additionally, three focus group discussion (FGD) sessions were conducted, involving 21 participants from cooperative members who had acquired residential land and from those who were waiting for allocation, including both female- and male-headed households. These discussions explored their views on the effectiveness of the cooperative housing scheme, the challenges encountered during cooperation and construction, and their recommendations for enhancement. Secondary data were also gathered through a comprehensive review of policies, regulations, research articles, reports, and relevant legal documents. The study revealed that, out of the 35,512 certified housing cooperative members since 2014, only 31,596 of them had received residential land plots. However, a relatively small fraction, i.e., less than 7,000 cooperative members, managed to partially or fully construct their homes. This indicates that the scheme has not fully achieved its intended goal and remains unaffordable for many members. The main challenges faced by cooperative members include lengthy delays in obtaining serviced land, high construction costs, and unrealistic building standards for cooperative housing units. In light of these findings, it is recommended that the Amhara National Regional State revise its housing cooperative policy to become affordable for cooperative housing members, particularly in terms of land acquisition costs and building standards.
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T00:00:00Z
       
  • Assessing the “virality” of a road safety communication campaign
           intended to change behavior: a case study in
           Spain|Introduction|Methods|Results|Discussion

    • Authors: Mireia Faus, Francisco Alonso, Cesáreo Fernández, Sergio A. Useche
      Abstract: IntroductionThe relationships between above-the-line (ATL) and below-the-line (BTL) communication and advertising strategies have been studied in many fields and procedures. Likewise, the interrelationships between both communicative typologies, when they exist, either strategically induced or spontaneously, are also known concerning their reinforcing effects. However, in the social communication field, specifically road safety communication, these interrelationships have been little studied, and few case studies have been done, particularly of those that have stood out as particularly significant.MethodsThus, this paper investigates the implementation process of an ATL awareness campaign of the Spanish Traffic Authority (DGT-General Directorate of Traffic) through the analysis of key digital reach indicators.ResultsDespite the foreseeable limitations of this research regarding the repercussions and positive impact on society of the DGT communication campaign, it is nevertheless a contribution of interest regarding the digital impact that has been generated in networks (BTL communication) from a DGT campaign broadcast on various media such as television, radio, posters, and social networks.DiscussionThus, from a methodology based on an exact delimitation (two DGT TV spots -from 2022- generating a quantitative activity on X (formally Twitter) that had never before produced DGT spots), significant conclusions and results have been reached related to issues of age groups, loyalty and distortion of messages, communication impact strategies, among others.
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T00:00:00Z
       
  • The presence of polluting sites in urban contexts: an analysis of the
           effects on the dynamics of the residential real estate
           market|Introduction|Method|Results|Discussion and practical implications

    • Authors: Francesco Tajani, Pierluigi Morano, Felicia Di Liddo, Debora Anelli, Francesco Sica
      Abstract: IntroductionThe industrial activity constitutes one of the most driving sectors of a nation, as it is often considered at the center of public debate as the fulcrum of development policies. However, considering the climate impacts generated, many industries have necessarily changed, relocated, and/or interrupted their production. Due to the connection of industrial sites with the socio-economic, environmental, and health systems of cities, the real estate market dynamics can be differently affected by the presence of polluting industrial sites. With reference to the Italian context, the goal of the research is to, firstly, verify whether there is a functional relationship between the presence of polluting industrial sites and the residential real estate market dynamics, for then determining its type and the extent of purchase price affection.MethodThe proposed logical-evaluative model is based on the application of an econometric technique for investigating the significance of the industrial sites on the residential real estate dynamics through a set of technological, locational, and health variables.ResultsThe obtained results show that the total surface area of the polluting sites, the activity level and the industrial plant opening date are among the most relevant variables, instead the accessibility to the industrial site does not influence the real estate market dynamics.Discussion and practical implicationsThe main practical implication of the present research consists of the possibility to provide a support for the activation of strategies aimed at adopting sustainable development models in the industrial sector.
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T00:00:00Z
       
  • The factors that influence the growth and performance of micro and
           small-scale enterprises in Dessie Town administration|Introduction|Methods
           

    • Authors: Endris Assen Ebrahim, Ahmet Toy, Yissa Hassen Kassim
      Abstract: IntroductionThe growth or performance of Micro and Small-Scale Enterprises (MSSEs) is widely recognized for their important contributions to economic developments in developing countries. Small and Medium-sized businesses (MMEs) in most developing nations encounter obstacles throughout and after the start-up process. This research aims to explore the determinants of the growth of MSSEs with a special emphasis on five work sectors: manufacturing, trade, construction, service, and urban agriculture in Dessie Town, Ethiopia.MethodsThe primary data was collected using a self-questionnaire from a sample of 218 managers/owners of MSE operators. Both descriptive and inferential analysis were used to analyze the collected data. Descriptive narrations were used to analyze qualitative data as a concurrent triangulation strategy. The sample respondents were selected using a stratified random sampling method based on the type of business sector. This practical study provoked nine major issues affecting the growth of MSSEs in town: political & legal factors, including bureaucratic bottlenecks system, the COVID-19 pandemic, working premises, market-related issues, road infrastructures, management system, technology-related factors, and entrepreneurial-related factors. The results show that linear and positive substantial to strong significant relationships or associations exist between some independent variables and the growth of MSSEs. Among the expected nine determinants of MSSEs' growth and performance, only political & legal-related, management-related, market-related, technology-related, infrastructure-related, entrepreneur-related factors, and COVID-19 pandemic were statistically significant. Besides, the nominated factors explained the total variations in the MSSEs' growth and performance at a 5% significance level. Realizing this conclusion, the government and non-government bodies and operators of MSSEs should give attention to management, marketing, technology infrastructure, and entrepreneur-related factors.
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T00:00:00Z
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.175.201.191
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
We no longer collect new content from this publisher because the publisher has forbidden systematic access to its RSS feeds.
Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.175.201.191
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-