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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
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Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1936-0886 - ISSN (Online) 1934-6832
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Editor’s Note

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      Abstract: As most readers of Buildings and Landscapes (B&L) know, the Vernacular Architecture Forum (VAF) emerged in 1980 from a cohort of researchers committed to liberating the compelling stories of buildings that were not being given adequate attention, or in some cases were simply being ignored. So, in no small way, while VAF is about buildings, it is also, in equal measure, about building a paradigm that democratizes our considerations regarding what is experienced and meaningful in the widely conceived realms of architectural tradition and cultural landscape.This double issue of B&L reflects these aspirations—both in its content and in the diversity of approaches taken by its authors. Throughout his career, longtime ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “The Strange Artistic Genius of This People”: The Ephemeral Art and
           Impermanent Architecture of Italian Immigrant Catholic Feste

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      Abstract: For his 1974 sequel The Godfather: Part II, director Francis Ford Coppola went to extraordinary lengths to recreate in mediated form a festa, or Italian Catholic street feast, in 1917 immigrant New York City. Bunting and flags hanging from tenement façades, decorative illuminations arching across the street, and an Italian-style processional band give the film’s mise-en-scène a sense of authenticity. Coppola’s cinematic ethnic realism includes using the statue of St. Roch (San Rocco) that belongs to a lay religious voluntary association active since 1889.1 The centerpiece of this extravagant cinematic setting was an outdoor chapel where the processed figure was placed (Figure 1). What Coppola (and the production ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bodies, Shawls, and Train Cars: Women and the Traveling Homes of the
           Mexican Revolution

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      Abstract: The Mexican Revolution to overthrow dictator Porfirio Díaz started on November 20, 1910. During the three decades of his presidency, a period known in Mexico as the Porfiriato, politicians, leaders in the Roman Catholic Church, aristocrats, foreign investors, and landowners held great power in a society in which the poor majority lived under conditions akin to slavery. Dispossession of peasant lands and the misery of the general population, in combination with discontent with Díaz’s fake democracy, initiated an armed mobilization.1 The decade-long revolution slowly shifted from a fairly unified effort to depose Díaz to a series of power struggles among factions.Throughout this civil war, federal and rebel armies ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Structural Ironworkers of New York City, 1845–1895

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      Abstract: In the late nineteenth century, New Yorkers witnessed the erection of skyscrapers, loft buildings, and other iron-framed structures that transformed the landscape of the city. Given the prominent role that architects, engineers, and manufacturers played in developing iron construction, the history of the industry is often portrayed as the triumph of design and engineering over craft. Yet it also created a new building trade that skillfully erected ironwork. The demand for iron construction elevated housesmiths, as these ironworkers were known at the time, into one of the most important trades in the building industry. Laboring in a loud, exciting, and dangerous trade, they became the iconic representatives of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Half House Made Whole: Evidence from Southeastern Massachusetts

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      Abstract: Both the tourist and the scholar of New England architecture will likely imagine the center-chimney hall-and-parlor house as the region’s archetypal early form, and not without reason: the majority of extant houses built in Massachusetts prior to around 1730 follow this pattern. Yet the past few decades of scholarship on early colonial New England’s architecture have justly asserted that these large houses—the result of survivor-ship bias—are not representative of early housing stock more broadly.1 Many of those large houses started life as what are sometimes called “half houses”—end-chimney houses that, as the name suggests, are about half the size of the central-chimney double-pile houses into which they were ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hiring Out: Enslaved Black Building Artisans in North Carolina

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      Abstract: Henry, an enslaved carpenter aged about thirty, was hired out by a widow’s executor and was working near Wilmington when he escaped. In an advertisement for Henry’s return, the executor commented, “As he has never before ranaway [sic], and is supposed to have absconded without cause of complaint, it is thought that his object may have been his freedom.”1As I have studied the history of African American builders in North Carolina, I have realized more and more the importance of hiring enslaved artisans as well as laborers in the antebellum construction industry. Slave hiring was common in most slaveholding states, but its prevalence, operation, and significance in the building trades have seldom been addressed. I ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fire Insurance Records and the Architectural Historian

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      Abstract: For architectural historians in the United States, the vast scope of recordkeeping produced by and for the nation’s fire insurance companies and their agents holds great potential to inform, and sometimes to transform, vernacular architecture studies.1 Any type of building that one may wish to research was probably insured, and surviving records may document it. Fire insurance companies faced a universal need to describe the buildings they insured, to ascertain their real estate values, to confirm that they were neither underinsured nor overinsured, and to ensure that damage claims could be paid out in the proper amounts. Even from the early years of the American fire insurance industry in the eighteenth century ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Building Antebellum New Orleans: Free People of Color and Their Influence
           by Tara A. Dudley (review)

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      Abstract: Engagement, as Tara A. Dudley defines it in Building Antebellum New Orleans, encapsulates the architectural and building histories of underrepresented communities, bringing to the fore the signification of commitment and conflict that faces a racialized group when acquiring property and asserting the right to build on their property. As Louisiana grew rapidly between the 1830s and the 1840s, the gens de couleur libres community—free people of color who were of mixed Black and European ancestry—prospered, engaging in building trades and property acquisitions that left an indelible mark on the built environment. As Dudley writes, these free people of color and their buildings have been unexplored fully in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City by
           Carolyn L. White (review)

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      Abstract: The boundaries of disciplines and professions are evolving cultural constructs.1 Author Carolyn White—the Mamie Kleberg Chair in Historic Preservation, director of the Historic Preservation Program, and director of the Anthropology Research Museum at the University of Nevada—explicitly positions her own work within the ongoing construction of disciplines in The Archaeology of Burning Man: The Rise and Fall of Black Rock City. Following anthropologist James Deetz’s view of “the fields of archaeology, history, and cultural anthropology as pursuing the same object,”2 White participated in and studied the “mundane” aspects of the place called Black Rock City, the annual encampment of the Burning Man Festival in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Detroit Story: Urban Decline and the Rise of Property Informality by
           Claire W. Herbert (review)

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      Abstract: In her book A Detroit Story: Urban Decline and the Rise of Property Informality, author Claire W. Herbert, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Oregon, examines Detroit through the lens of occupied space to document the conditions that spur the decline of urban centers, and to understand how those conditions promote informal practices within vacant and abandoned spaces. Her study also seeks to determine who participates and who ultimately benefits (and concurrently suffers) when such practices are recognized and formalized through rules. Property informality, as Herbert defines the term, encompasses the “informal practices that arise from the transgression of laws regulating ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dreaming the Present: Time, Aesthetics, and the Black Cooperative Movement
           by Irvin J. Hunt, and: Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the
           Black Freedom Movement by Monica M. White (review)

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      Abstract: Over the last two decades, researchers and scholars have begun the complicated process of untangling the colonial landscape. These efforts are not confined to the colonial landscape of seventeenth-century wood-frame houses in greater Boston or the eighteenth-century plantation fields along the James River, many of which have been preserved over centuries and are now open for public tours and events. Those sites, even when there is no remaining structure visible—a plantation, a church, a cemetery—are forged in the settler-colonial imagination. Much like vernacularism encouraged architectural historians to look beyond monumental structures, settler colonialism as a methodology demands accountability for the White ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Border Land, Border Water: A History of Construction on the US-Mexico
           Divide by C. J. Alvarez (review)

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      Abstract: During the past few years, a proliferation of publications around border issues were inspired by the racist, anti-immigrant discourse surrounding the United States’ border with México. Scholars, designers, planners, and architects focused on finding solutions to the “border problem”; these solutions typically simplified the México/U.S. border into a line, and the border problems into the figure of the immigrant. Revisions of a border history that focused on the political delineation of the borderline supported the design solution proposed for the border. Although social, political, and anthropological histories of the México/U.S. border have been produced, few books focusing on the history of its built environment ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Modern Mobility Aloft: Elevated Highways, Architecture, and Urban Change
           in Pre-Interstate America by Amy D. Finstein (review)

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      Abstract: Amy D. Finstein’s Modern Mobility Aloft: Elevated Highways, Architecture, and Urban Change in Pre-Interstate America is a welcome addition to the growing body of literature on the impact of automobiles on the American built environment that includes suburbanization and large-scale highway systems.1 Instead of the broad national scope of most studies, Finstein offers a doubly focused approach, analyzing a specific type of automobile infrastructure—the elevated urban highway—through three early examples: Wacker Drive in Chicago, the West Side (or Miller) Highway in New York, and the Central Artery in Boston. Her sharper focus allows her to unpack the complexities of urban highway construction at the local level. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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