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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
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Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1936-0886 - ISSN (Online) 1934-6832
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Editor's Note

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      Abstract: Buildings & Landscapes showcases stories about relationships. Our articles and reviews chronicle the ways in which human beings interact with, shape, and are impacted by their physical environments. They detail how spaces bring people together—as well as push them apart.The process of producing the journal also engenders relationships. Writing, editing, and publishing an issue of B&L establishes and furthers exchanges between scholars and the field(s) they engage with their research; between authors, blind peer reviewers, and the editors; and between the editors and their advisors. One of the distinct privileges of serving as an editor for B&L is fostering these relationships.As coeditor for eight issues over the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Viewpoint: Spatial Ethnography of Devon Avenue, Chicago

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      Abstract: I study cultural landscapes of immigrants in North American cities. As an architectural historian I am interested in documenting the physical worlds of twentieth-century immigrants of color in cities such as Chicago. A section of Devon Avenue in Chicago—from north Ridge Boulevard to north Kedzie Avenue—is known for its immigrant-owned stores. Some call this area Little India because of the concentration of South Asian stores and cultural centers.1 Others refer to the stretch as the International Marketplace to acknowledge the presence of a more diverse community of immigrants from Asia, Europe, Africa, and South and Central America.2One chilly fall morning in 2014, I stood in front of Hyderabad House (2225 W. Devon ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Los Angeles's Indoor Swap Meet Boom and the Emergence of a Multiethnic
           Retailscape

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      Abstract: In September 2017, the Spanish-language television network Univision aired Unidos por Los Nuestros (United for our own), a televised campaign to help Latinx people recover from recent natural disasters in Puerto Rico, Mexico, and the southern United States.1 A concert benefiting the initiative featured famous recording artists Ana Barbera and Jencarlos Canela, who performed in front of a façade of Jalisco's government palace as boxer Oscar de la Hoya and comedian Eugenio Derbez snapped selfies with the crowd. The popular entertainment news show El Gordo y la Flaca covered the event and projected images of it to viewers across the Americas.2Despite the Mexican celebrities and architectural backdrop, the event took ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Roman Temple to Baptist Church: Sin and Transformation in Southern
           Baptist Culture

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      Abstract: In 1958, in the days following the purchase of Vestavia, a 1925 faux-Roman temple house (and later restaurant) outside of Birmingham, Alabama, the newly formed Vestavia Hills Baptist Church congregation went about transforming the house from a pleasure estate that had once hosted parties, dancing, and drinking to a space fit for Baptist worship (Figure 1). Church members covered up statues of Roman goddesses like the copy of the bare-chested Venus de Milo for modesty, even as a mural celebrating Vesta—the goddess of hearth and home and the estate's namesake—and statues of seven other Roman goddesses remained in the pagan Temple Room in the fourth-floor attic.1 The congregants also transformed spaces for new ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Where Tenants and Tenets Don't Agree": Elisabeth Coit and the Planning
           Practices of the New York City Housing Authority (1934–51)

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      Abstract: Fourteen-story apartment buildings tower over neighboring low-rise single- and two-family homes on East 174th Street in Soundview, the Bronx (Figure 1). The Bronx River Houses are a low-income public housing project completed in 1951 by the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA). At first glance, the houses seem to exemplify the NYCHA's increasingly rigid design orthodoxy of the late 1940s and early 1950s, which was characterized by uniform brick high-rise towers sited on superblocks. However, the Bronx River Houses diverge from NYCHA norms in their unusual floor plans due to Elisabeth Coit's advocacy. Coit, who was a principal project planner at the NYCHA at the time this project was built, developed a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A Suitable Memorial": The History of Public Health Centers in
           Post–World War II Virginia

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      Abstract: "Who deliberately will choose to place himself on the side of disease, suffering and misery'" editor Daphne Dailey wrote for the Caroline Progress in 1939 as a part of her years-long campaign to persuade the Caroline County board of supervisors to establish a local public health unit.1 In another editorial, Dailey presented a series of photographs depicting White and Black children living in decrepit conditions and experiencing severe maladies in the county (Figure 1). One family occupied a place which was "worse than a pig-sty," where the father and son were "wasting away." A second family had a "deformed" child who "made guttural sounds instead of words" and another child suffering from rickets with "match-stem ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Invention of Public Space: Designing for Inclusion in Lindsay's New
           York by Mariana Mogilevich (review)

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      Abstract: In The Politics, Aristotle makes a fundamental distinction between oikos, the household, and polis, the political community. Existing alongside the oikos, the polis is often translated as "city-state," and has territorial and political connotations. According to Aristotle, the polis was established "with a view to the common good" and it represented the sovereignty of the "civic body."1 In other words, the polis had the potential to become a space of political equality where men could assemble, deliberate, and make decisions that ideally would benefit citizens. While such ideology has certainly evolved—primarily to include women and children—Aristotle's polis construct continues to shape spatial practitioners' ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond's Historic Cemeteries by
           Ryan K. Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Not everyone's daily perambulations include a walk by or through a cemetery, but after reading Ryan K. Smith's book you might change your habits. In his latest book, Death and Rebirth in a Southern City: Richmond's Historic Cemeteries, Smith sets out an ambitious goal: to survey three hundred years of urban history by reviewing the concomitant changes to a city's burial grounds. This approach allows him to survey local community ideas about and attitudes toward Native Americans, enslaved and free African Americans, elite and poor Whites, as well as Christian and Jewish communities. By keeping his focus on one southern city—Richmond, Virginia—he is able to survey the diversity of mortuary traditions within that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Responsive Environment: Design, Aesthetics, and the Human in the 1970s
           by Larry D. Busbea (review)

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      Abstract: Larry Busbea begins with a large, perhaps unanswerable, question. "Where do we—as subjects and objects—begin and end'" Busbea, an art and design historian at Arizona State University, attempts to formulate a response to that very question in his new book, The Responsive Environment: Design, Aesthetics, and the Human in the 1970s. While focused explicitly on the 1970s, Busbea observes that the decades after the end of World War II inspired copious projects by architects, designers, technologists, and social scientists that scrutinized, conflated, and exploded the boundary between a human being and the environment. These inquiries ultimately culminated in a belief that "aesthetics and design could play pivotal roles ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Environmental Design: Architecture, Politics, and Science in Postwar
           America by Avigail Sachs (review)

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      Abstract: As Avigail Sachs notes on the book's first page, Environmental Design: Architecture, Politics, and Science in Postwar America tries to answer a question posed by her doctoral advisor, Jean-Pierre Protzen: "What did happen to the scientific approach" (ix)' In what follows, Sachs skillfully retraces how a series of "scientific" theories and exchanges with adjacent disciplines radically transformed architectural education in the United States in the mid-twentieth century. "The answer," she writes, "is that 'science' was caught up (unsurprisingly) in both national and professional politics" (ix). For some, the story may be familiar, perhaps even intimately so, and may remind them of time spent in participatory design ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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