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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
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Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1936-0886 - ISSN (Online) 1934-6832
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Fine Airs in the Sand Hills: Richmond Bath, a Summer Retreat in a
           Landscape of Slavery

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      Abstract: In 1818, cotton planter James Whitehead of Burke County, Georgia, purchased a 450-acre parcel of land in neighboring Richmond County that little resembled his prosperous home plantation. In fact, the places were a study in contrasts. While his Spread Oak plantation in Burke County was a sprawling agricultural complex with a main house, outbuildings, slave quarters, and open fields planted in cotton and corn, the Richmond County tract was a dense forest. In a clearing stood the charred remnants of a failed summer resort. There were more essential differences as well, and these were of greater interest to Whitehead. Though only fifteen miles apart, the two sites occupied distinct natural environments. Spread Oak's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • New Spaces for a New Midwifery at the Lying-In Hospital of the City of New
           York

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      Abstract: On January 14, 1897, the New York Times announced that J. P. Morgan had given $1,000,000—equivalent to about $30,700,000 in 2019—to the Society of the Lying-In Hospital of the City of New York (referred to as "the society" throughout) for the construction of a new hospital building.1 The society positioned itself as a charitable institution that strove to provide vanguard medical care for "the destitute and helpless mother," regardless of her marital status.2 The existing hospital, the former Hamilton Fish mansion, was razed to allow construction of the new eight-story building on the same Lower Manhattan site, on Second Avenue between Seventeenth and Eighteenth Streets (Figures 1 and 2). Morgan's patronage arrived ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Altars of Hope: Venezuelan Domestic Workers and the Material Culture of
           the Divine

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      Abstract: For thousands of impoverished, uneducated women in Venezuela and worldwide, performing domestic service is the only means of procuring a salary and immediate access to shelter. Traditionally, and until recently, domestic workers lived in a dedicated area of their employer's house. Their bedrooms were consistently placed at the back of the building, directly connected to the laundry, kitchen, and food delivery quarters. Regardless of the size or configuration of the employers' houses, the "service" bedrooms had standard features: they were typically small (shaped like a rectangle of about seven by ten feet—hardly allowing space for a single bed, a closet, and an old television set), finished with low-cost materials ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Object Lesson: Fiske Kimball and the Restoration of Moors End, Nantucket

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      Abstract: Like so many of the endeavors associated with architect Fiske Kimball, the restoration of Moors End (1829–1834), a federal-style house on Nantucket, drew together notable individuals, garnered publicity, and included a dash of intrigue (Figure 1). The Moors End project offered an exceptional opportunity for Kimball: the restoration included not just the house but also the grounds, including a formal garden, and interiors that the client intended to fully furnish with period accessories. Additionally, Kimball took on the project in the spring of 1925, a pivotal moment in his professional career. In those same months he resigned from New York University to accept the position as director of the Pennsylvania Museum ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How the Working-Class Home Became Modern, 1900–1940 by Thomas C.
           Hubka (review)

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      Abstract: Winner of the VAF 2021 Cummings Award, Thomas Hubka's How the Working-Class Home Became Modern, 1900–1940 is, first and foremost, a methodological manifesto that cuts across the boundaries of vernacular architecture studies, architectural history, and historic preservation.1 Challenging the style-centered analysis of American domestic architecture established by the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places and advanced by scholars like Gwendolyn Wright, this fieldwork-based study focuses on advances in housing for the middle 60 percent of U.S. residents: the so-called middle-majority. Long before Levittown, he explains, the lives of working people, whether homeowners or renters, were modernized through ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Is the Cemetery Dead' by David Charles Sloane (review)

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      Abstract: Discussion of subjects related to death, memorials, and associated traditions, whether historical or evolving, are certainly worthy of contemplation, examination, and discussion; after all, they are subjects we all confront sooner or later, and any investigation of how these topics take physical form and shape cultural attitudes should be of value. David Charles Sloane's Is the Cemetery Dead' is a Janus-like study that looks selectively backward into how Americans have dealt with death and forward into how new lifestyles, cultural sensitivities, concerns, and technologies are changing long-held conceptions and practices related to death, burial, and remembrance. In his investigation, the author employs a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Central Park's Adventure-Style Playgrounds: Renewal of a Midcentury Legacy
           by Marie Warsh (review)

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      Abstract: In March 2021, images circulating on social media showed the plaza of the Stephen Wise Towers in New York City, suddenly absent its eighteen concrete horses, which had apparently been sawed off at their feet. The squat equine sculptures, created in 1964 by the artist Constantino Nivola, had served for nearly six decades as play-structures for resident children. While the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), which owns the towers and plaza, sought to allay concerns by stating that the horses had been temporarily removed to facilitate needed repairs to the plaza, questions remained about the integrity of the sculptures, and indeed of the plaza itself, amid calls for greater consultation around any changes to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Improbable Metropolis: Houston's Architectural and Urban History by Barrie
           Scardino Bradley (review)

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      Abstract: In the literature of architectural history, Houston appears most often as an example of the formal chaos that occurs in a city without zoning. This exceptional aspect of Houston's modern growth leads to skyscrapers neighboring shotgun houses, liquor stores next to elementary schools, and other juxtapositions improbable in other cities. But Houston is more than a story of zoning exceptionalism. A small but insightful literature rooted in the expertise of faculty at Rice and Texas Southern Universities and the University of Houston has opened up more complex and nuanced avenues for thinking about the role of architecture and planning in Houston's rapid late twentieth-century growth. Cite Magazine, monographs issued ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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