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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
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Modernism/modernity
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.188
Number of Followers: 48  
 
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ISSN (Print) 1071-6068 - ISSN (Online) 1080-6601
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Provocative Personifications: Dada Aesthetics of Alterity at the Galerie
           Montaigne, Paris, 1921

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      Abstract: In 1921, the Paris dadaists rented the top floor of the Champs-Élysées Theatre in the chic eighth arrondissement for the entire month of June. Tristan Tzara (1896–1963), the Romanian-born poet-founder of the movement who had recently relocated from Zürich, took the lead in organizing a series of group productions. According to press accounts, the space—renamed the Galerie Montaigne—accommodated two hundred attendees at the first of three planned evening and matinee programs. The Soirée Dada, held in the evening on June 10, featured at least five acts—songs by Madame Bujaud, poems read by Louis Aragon and Valentin Parnak, a masquerade, and a play written by Tzara himself, interspersed with musical interludes by ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Looking In: Teresa Deevy, Deafness, and Radio

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      Abstract: The Irish playwright Teresa Deevy wrote for the radio medium without ever hearing a broadcast. She had been deaf since 1913 when she lost her hearing as a result of Ménière’s disease as a nineteen-year-old student at University College Dublin.1 In the decade that followed, radio developed into a popular medium, inaugurated on the British Isles with the founding of the BBC in 1922. As radio was coming into its own as an increasingly reputable venue for dramatic writing in the 1930s, Deevy was beginning her career as a playwright at the Abbey Theatre, one of the few women of her generation to find acceptance on Ireland’s national stage (fig. 1). By the 1940s, she had fallen out of favor with the increasingly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Modernist Epithalamia: Revival, Revision, and Subversion of Sappho in
           H.D.’s “Hymen”

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      Abstract: In 1921, Hilda Doolittle, known more widely as H.D., published her second collection of lyric poems, titled Hymen after the ancient Greek god of marriage Hymen and the Greek hymenal wedding song.1 The collection opens with “Hymen,” a highly performative poetic sequence that revises the Sapphic epithalamium or “marriage song,” in so far as H.D. uses the genre not to celebrate heterosexual marriage but to reimagine marriage altogether as a creative union between a community, or chorus, of women. In “Hymen,” the voices of the Sapphic chorus, scattered throughout Sappho’s fragments, are brought together into one space and literary moment: present, visible, and unmistakable. Thus H.D. revives the Sapphic corpus and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Van Gogh’s Postal Paradigm

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      Abstract: “[T]he postal service knows no boundaries, its purpose is to satisfy needs that can’t be bound to the limits of a country and it will not provide complete satisfaction of these needs except under the condition that different states make efforts to organize it in an analogous and as often as possible uniform manner.”“[A]rtistic education must extend beyond these esteemed Salon walls; it must penetrate into all layers of our society.”On May 1, 1880, the last state-run Salon opened in Paris before its restructuring under the control of the Société des Artistes Françaises. Due to this transfer of power, historians of modern art have come to treat the 1880 Salon as a signal event, after which time France’s once ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ulysses, Vampiric Representation, and Ludic Modernism

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      Abstract: Giorgio Vasari closes his Life of Giotto (1568) with a sly anecdote, which sees the aging Florentine master Cimabue waving, vainly, at a fly resting on the nose of a freshly painted figure.1 The joke is that his young apprentice had painted the fly behind his back, giving new birth to Italian artistry with a few deft strokes. Alluding to Pliny’s account of the Athenian rivals Zeuxis and Parrhasius, “Giotto’s fly” not only alights on a classical antecedent that could support Vasari’s teleology, it also worked to make fidelity to nature the basis of Western art for the next six hundred years.2 In the quest to represent reality truthfully, aided by logical principles of perspective and similitude, subsequent artists ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Scourge as Safety-Valve: John Rodker’s Analysis of the
           Avant-Garde

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      Abstract: In a series of letters written to John Rodker from St. Elizabeth’s, Ezra Pound variously wheedled, interrogated, and criticized. In one letter, Pound proposed that Rodker publish an anthology of The Exile, the magazine which Pound had edited for four issues (1927–28) and in which Rodker’s Adolphe 1920 had been serialized. In fact, added Pound, it had been “the MAIN reason fer the mag.”1 There was also precedent with the republication of other work by Pound:Kulch [Guide to Kulchur] is out again / Of course yr / stinckging Freud racket is useful fer gittin in the rent / but no need to sink into that sewer entirely / AND “Adolf” never did git across by itself / AND yu were toodam lazy to rewrite two pages of it / and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making Psychoanalysis New: Freud, Print Culture, and Modernism

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      Abstract: Who would still be so naïve as to see Freud as the conventional Viennese bourgeois who so astonished André Breton by not manifesting any obsession with the Bacchanalian' Now that we have nothing but his works, will we not recognize in them a river of fire'In “Der Dichter und das Phantasieren” (Creative Writers and Day-Dreaming, 1907), one of the few talks Sigmund Freud ever gave to a literary audience, the psychoanalyst explored the nature of literary imagination and aesthetic pleasure.2 It took Freud only about twenty minutes to get his message across to the ninety or so listeners present, in terms the local press the day after reported to have been “subtle and at times clairvoyant”: the poet resembling a selfish ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Still Under Western Eyes' Three Recent Books on Modern Arabic Poetry

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      Abstract: In December of 1976, a heated debate about Arabic poetry raged on the pages of the Times Literary Supplement. It began as a book review. The work in question was British-Egyptian scholar M. M. Badawi’s A Critical Introduction to Modern Arabic Poetry. The review, “Under Western Eyes,” was written by an up-and-coming Palestinian scholar named Edward Said. Said calls Badawi’s method “remorselessly serial,” his optic “not critical . . . but archival,” his voice “more like a harassed cataloguer than a literary critic,” and ultimately suggests, by not-so-subtle implication, that the product of Badawi’s labor is “uninteresting” and “unsophisticated.”2 He claims that Badawi views “Arabic literature as something to be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Violent Peace: Media, Truth, and Power at the League of Nations by
           Carolyn N. Biltoft (review)

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      Abstract: The title of this swift, powerfully written monograph on the archives of the League of Nations in Geneva offers a prodigious portrait of its real object of study: the so-called “interwar” period in European culture. Rather than a mere history of the League itself, A Violent Peace reads like a humanistic treatise on the most magmatic chronotope of western late-modernity: the ironically utopian, painfully bureaucratic, Freudianly fascist years that put into question, arguably for good, earlier concepts of reality, opinion, State, and world. Through the philosophical aspirations and material remains of a quintessentially stateless, translingual, and transnational institution, this book retraces the cultural ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Inventing Tomorrow: H. G. Wells and the Twentieth Century by Sarah Cole
           (review)

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      Abstract: In Inventing Tomorrow, Sarah Cole undertakes the considerable challenge of rewriting the literary history of the twentieth century in England. H. G. Wells, she claims, has been maligned. Such a process began in Wells’s day, with his tendency to portray himself as a journalist rather than an artist, and to display scant respect for his venerated peers. For example, he famously lampooned Henry James in his novel Boon (1915), causing an irreparable rift in their friendship; repaid Joseph Conrad’s admiration by expressing impatience with literary impressionism; and frankly admitted to James Joyce that he considered Finnegans Wake (1939) to be a “dead end.” Conversely, many of the writers who are now considered ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Transatlantic Modernism and the US Lecture Tour by Robert Volpicelli
           (review)

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      Abstract: Robert Volpicelli’s Transatlantic Modernism and the US Lecture Tour, co-winner of the MSA First Book Prize, offers readers a new way to consider how modernist writers circulated in the American literary and social ecosystem through the “paraliterary practice” of the lecture tour (8). In this rich, interdisciplinary study, Volpicelli combines archival research with close readings of a variety of media to illustrate how the US lecture tour made modernist authors into movable commodities. The book augments the trend correcting the view that modernism was antithetical to popular culture and shows modernist lecturers (particularly poets) as embodied products to be distributed and to distribute modernist cultural ideas. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Between Worlds: Mina Loy’s Aesthetic Itineraries by Yasna Bozhkova
           (review)

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      Abstract: Yasna Bozhkova’s debut monograph is an eclectic study of the multidisciplinary avant-gardist Mina Loy (1882–1966) that arrives at a critical juncture. With scholarly momentum developing over decades, the centenary of Loy’s 1923 poetry collection, published with a titular typographical error as Lunar Baedecker [sic], has been met with a flurry of activity. In tandem with a variety of new publications, this increasing academic engagement is most apparent in the organization of two conferences: “Mapping Mina Loy Studies 2023” (August 4–5, 2023) and “Mina Loy and Her Networks” (September 8–9, 2023), the latter of which Bozhkova co-organized. The remarkable variety of Loy’s experimentation is becoming increasingly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Modernist Anthropocene: Nonhuman Life and Planetary Change in James
           Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Djuna Barnes by Peter Adkins (review)

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      Abstract: Peter Adkins’s The Modernist Anthropocene joins several recent studies in the literary humanities that read works of the early twentieth century in light of ecologically charged thinking. Unlike many such studies to date, however, Adkins’s fascinating book takes as its focus neither ecology nor environmentalism per se, but the scale of the planetary writ large—more specifically, the advent of the anthropocene, our recent (geologically speaking) timeframe of anthropogenic changes in earth systems.In effect, The Modernist Anthropocene performs a model of interdisciplinary reperiodization, identifying modernist writers (namely James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, and Djuna Barnes) as early theorists of the anthropocene. This ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Psychomotor Aesthetics: Movement and Affect in Modern Literature and Film
           by Ana Hedberg Olenina (review)

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      Abstract: Ana Hedberg Olenina’s Psychomotor Aesthetics received the 2021 Wayne S. Vucinich Book Prize, awarded for the most important contribution to Russian, Eurasian, and East European studies by the ASEEES (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). Olenina’s book has become a groundbreaking event in Slavic studies, but its significance spreads far beyond this field. The study mostly focuses on Russian modernist literature, criticism, and film. However, a close analysis of these texts and films as well as related events and names leads the author to explore the general effects of physiological psychology on art. By bringing together a wide range of sources, from rare archival materials to various ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dutch Neorealism and Cinema Magic: The Case for a Filmic Modernism

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      Abstract: In May 1929, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam held an exhibition of German paintings under the banner of “Neue Sachlichkeit,” based on Gustav Hartlaub’s seminal 1925 show at the Kunsthalle Mannheim of the same title.1 The Amsterdam leg of the tour exhibited many of the same artists included in the original program. Well-known painters such as George Grosz, Rudolf Schlichter, Carl Mense, and George Schrimpf hung alongside several other artists who did not appear in the Mannheim iteration, including Franz Radziwill, Christian Schad, and Carl Grossberg. Exhibition organizers capitalized on the Dutch art world’s growing appreciation for the return to figuration that was emerging among artists associated with the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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