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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
Showing 201 - 264 of 264 Journals sorted by number of followers
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Nepalese Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Student Project Reporting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Delta Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
UOU Scientific Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Public Space     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Architectural and Engineering Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cultural Heritage and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Actas de Arquitectura Religiosa Contempor├ínea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Design, Tecnologia e Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Creative Space     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oz : the Journal of the College of Architecture, Planning &Design at Kansas State University     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
On the w@terfront. Public Art. Urban Design. Civic Participation. Urban Regeneration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estructuras     Open Access  
Sinektika : Jurnal Arsitektur     Open Access  
Arquitectura M├ís (Arquitectura +)     Open Access  
interFACES     Open Access  

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Modernism/modernity
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.188
Number of Followers: 44  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1071-6068 - ISSN (Online) 1080-6601
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Black Pulp: Genre Fiction in the Shadow of Jim Crow by Brooks E. Hefner
           (review)

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      Abstract: In this powerhouse study of popular genres in Black newspapers from the 1920s through the 1950s, Brooks E. Hefner achieves two interrelated goals. The first is to adumbrate a history of these writers and their serials, an important expansion of African American literary history beyond the usual Harlem Renaissance suspects. The second is to offer a theory of genre play as necessarily political and racial. Drawing on Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s term “signifyin(g)” as well as Stuart Hall’s term “articulation,” Hefner animates the historical archive’s anti-racist politics in its citing and rewriting of tropes, characters, and plot conventions from contemporaneous white genre fiction. In the early twentieth century, Hefner ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Returning the Gift: Modernism and the Thought of Exchange by Rebecca
           Colesworthy (review)

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      Abstract: In To the Lighthouse, Lily Briscoe speculates on the “thousand shapes” that love takes: “[t] here might be lovers whose gift it was to choose out the elements of things and place them together and so, giving them a wholeness not theirs in life, make of some scene, or meeting of people (all now gone and separate), one of those globed compacted things over which thought lingers, and love plays.”1 The ability to place elements in relation to one another is a gift (either you have this aesthetic and perceptual talent or you don’t) and it results in a gift: something new, and newly whole, an object of contemplation and delight over which the mind lingers and the affections play. Whether practiced by Mrs. Ramsay in her ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cold Warriors: Writers Who Waged the Literary Cold War by Duncan White
           (review)

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      Abstract: Duncan White’s Cold Warriors is an ambitious undertaking. It seeks to trace the role of writers and intellectuals who (as the subtitle puts it) “waged the literary Cold War.” In fact, the first 200 pages of the book deal with events before the Cold War began, following the tangled involvement of George Orwell, Stephen Spender and Arthur Koestler with the Spanish Civil War, which led each of these authors to a fervent anti-Communism. White also explores responses to Stalin’s Great Purges in the 1930s through discussions of Isaac Babel, who was shot by the NKVD in a Moscow prison one morning in January 1940, and of Mary McCarthy, who shot to fame as a novelist of American socialites and an opinionated friend of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Frame by Frame: A Materialist Aesthetics of Animated Cartoons by Hannah
           Frank (review)

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      Abstract: One cannot review Hannah Frank’s Frame by Frame without observing that it is a book marked by tragedy, specifically its author’s passing in 2017. That might have meant the end of the present volume—a lightly edited revision of Frank’s dissertation—had it not been for a few prominent advocates who saw it through to publication, even as they cautioned that, without much opportunity for revision, readers should consider Frame by Frame a work in progress. In his editor’s introduction, Daniel Morgan explains that the book “is basically the dissertation that Frank defended in August 2016,” and “not the book that she would have published,” as Frank had already begun planning extensive changes to the manuscript that she ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The New Wallace Stevens Studies ed. by Bart Eeckhout and Gül Bilge
           Han (review)

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      Abstract: The New Wallace Stevens Studies seeks to extend the continuing importance of Stevens criticism into the present century by presenting “confluences of what used to be there, what happens to be here, and what is in the process of becoming” (1). The book opens up new possibilities of reading Stevens in the light of contemporary theoretical movements in the humanities, neurosciences, and environmental studies, while preserving the impression of the poet as responding to the intellectual and cultural currents of Anglo-American modernism in the locality of his sensibilities as a poet-businessman based his entire life in Hartford, Connecticut. Divided into three sections, this collection of essays presents curated ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Modernism’s Animal Metaphors

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      Abstract: In his classic essay “Why Look at Animals',” John Berger speculates that “the first metaphor was animal.” His hunch is that at some point in time human proximity to animals initiated a metaphorical relation through which the earliest questions could be asked about what the human and the nonhuman “shared in common” and “what differentiated them.” But if evidence of the ancient significance of animals for human life can be found in zodiac signs, Hindu mythology and Homer’s Iliad (among a list that is, Berger admits, “endless”), in capitalist modernity this relationship has been ostensibly lost, with animals physically marginalized and psychically co-opted.1 The story of how modernism fits into this sweeping history ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Global Autofictional Flânerie

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      Abstract: He is a walking paradox: a loner who desires the crowd, “a prince who everywhere rejoices in his incognito,” a spectator who casts off his air of detachment, a skeptic who can experience states of childlike wonder, “an ‘I’ with an insatiable appetite for the ‘non-I.’”1 More gaze than body, he is a phantom of the arcade, “a mirror as vast as the crowd itself . . . a kaleidoscope gifted with consciousness” (Baudelaire, “Painter,” 9). Who is this person' “Observer, philosopher . . . —call him what you will,” the flâneur is the modern man par excellence, an urban stroller who will always be encountered, en passant, in the act of capturing “the ephemeral, the fugitive, the contingent”—that is, the contradictory ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Eccentric Primitivism: The World of Jan “Eskimo” Welzl

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      Abstract: For almost thirty years, beginning in the early 1980s, the richest vein of scholarship on primitivism was its critique. During this period, numerous studies were published explaining how the primitive is an invented category whose invocation leads, via a kind of “Hegelian determinate negation,” back to the reaffirmation of “our” modernity.1 And primitivist modernism—represented primarily by the 1984 MoMA exhibition, Primitivism in the 20th Century: Affinity of the Tribal and Modern—was exposed as appropriative, abusive, and complicit with colonialism.2 More recently, this mode of engagement has waned. As the critique of primitivism appears to be running out of steam, other kinds of study have become more prominent ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “An Eternal Dance”: Paul Claudel, Japan, and Thermodynamics

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      Abstract: Early during his time as French Ambassador to Japan from 1921 to 1927, Paul Claudel reflected on the structure of the universe.1 Having read at length about developments in physics, especially thermodynamics, Claudel wished to make recent discoveries in science fit with his Catholic cosmology. The world, he wrote in his journal, must have had an origin, but that origin must have been prompted by an outside power. The world has a trajectory, therefore a sense of movement. But movement cannot begin by itself: it must have been commenced “by a foreign power” (par une force étrangère).2 Once in movement, the world and all of the things in it gradually wind down and, “having achieved their task, enter into a state of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unpacking the MoMA Myth: Modernism under Revision

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      Abstract: As reviewers evaluated the “new” Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) on the occasion of the institution’s ninetieth anniversary in 2019, several critics invoked a common myth of the museum’s origins. The myth goes something like this: Alfred Barr, the museum’s founding director, was a mastermind who established a narrow canon of modern art while building MoMA’s collection. This myth has recently been echoed by several writers, but it was most eloquently articulated by New York Times art critic Holland Cotter:1Early on, the Museum of Modern Art developed a snugly tailored origin myth for modern art itself. This was invented by the museum’s first director, Alfred H. Barr Jr., and mapped out in a began-and-begat chart of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dancing Returns: Recovering Modernism’s Movements

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      Abstract: In the fall of 2016, as performers rehearsed for an exhibition by choreographer-artist Tino Sehgal at Paris’s Palais de Tokyo, the walls were literally coming down around them.1 In Sehgal’s previous retrospectives, such as the one mounted at Berlin’s Martin-Gropius-Bau in the summer of 2015, visitors had moved through separated, often pitch-black spaces, orienting themselves around invisible bodies who announced their presence in individual outbursts or erupted, unsettlingly, in collective humming. But for the Palais de Tokyo, for a piece titled “These Associations,” Sehgal wanted to open up the central space, to set his moving mass of performers —an international, cross-generational group of dancers, writers ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Imagined Authors: Reading the Homeric Question in James Joyce’s
           Ulysses

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      Abstract: Stolen, mistaken, and confused identities weave their way through the “Eumaeus” episode of James Joyce’s Ulysses: bodied forms of the lies and storytelling with which the episode is permeated.1 A man spuriously named Lord John Corley mistakes Leopold Bloom for a friend of Blazes Boylan; the keeper of the cabman’s shelter where much of the episode is set is “said to be the once famous Skin-the-Goat, Fitzharris, the invincible”; someone bears “a distant resemblance to Henry Campbell, the townclerk”; the story-telling and uncertainly named sailor D. B. Murphy transforms Simon Dedalus into a circus performer, and, when asked, Stephen Dedalus claims only to have “heard of him.”2 Though it is now rarely discussed in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Was it marriage'”: Queer Relationships and Early
           Twentieth-Century Anti-Realism

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      Abstract: On February 17, 1909, Virginia Stephen (not yet Woolf) accepted a marriage proposal from a panicked Lytton Strachey; it was called off before the end of their conversation.1 Other prominent queer authors in the early twentieth century lived in marriages, as Virginia would with Leonard, that afforded the appearance of propriety even if they did not practice it. Although he preferred short-lived relationships over monogamy, Guillaume Apollinaire married Jacqueline Kolb only a few months before his death from Spanish Flu in 1918. After marrying his first wife, Ray, David Garnett maintained his habit of conducting affairs with men and women alike. In each of these cases, otherwise sexually deviant people felt an ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Shi Zhi and Chinese Literary Modernism in the Late Twentieth Century:
           Modernity, Consumerist Economics, and Chinese Modernist Poetry

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      Abstract: In this article, we argue that Western literary modernism is part of the longer history of Enlightenment modernity, originating in the seventeenth century. We suggest that it is useful to see late nineteenth-century literary modernism as what David Damrosch describes as “a literary movement arising both within and against modernity.”1 Our larger aim, as we mention in the conclusion to this article, is to attempt to begin a new definition of what and where modernism “is.” When many scholars talk about the economic “miracle” in China since “The Reform and Opening Policy” (Gai Ge Kai Fang 改革开放) beginning in 1978, they contrast that “miracle” against the economic transformation of the West since the eighteenth century. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fernand Léger’s Mechanical Ballets: On Dance and the Machine
           Aesthetic

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      Abstract: Fernand Léger’s preliminary notes for the film Ballet mécanique (1924) suggest that its first scene would feature “a little dancer”: a “light” and “graceful” figure clad in a white maillot, positioned against a dark background.1 In staccato prose, Léger indicated that the dancer would be absorbed by “mechanical elements” of an unspecified nature. Then, cryptically, he wrote, “transpositions of images.” Ultimately, Ballet mécanique’s opening sequence did not follow Léger’s original scheme. He replaced the little dancer with a kinetic, painted-wood sculpture, a Cubistic rendering of Charlie Chaplin.2 Animated by stop-action camera work, the sculpture pops into the frame from beneath its lower edge (fig. 1). Léger’s ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Legibility of the Modern Literary Soundscape

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      Abstract: In his introduction to The Sound Studies Reader, Jonathan Sterne emphasizes that every sound scholar must decide on the conditions under which something is recognized, labeled, and valorized as audible. That choice, he writes, “has direct consequences for what gets studied in terms of what counts as the fundamental phenomenon under investigation and the very definition of context.”1 One fascinating element of scholarship that pertains to, revolves around, or circumscribes concepts like the audible, sound, and noise is less what is said about those concepts than the choices that authors make about “what gets studied,” which are determined by methodologies that derive at least in part from those authors’ own fields ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dada Magazines: The Making of a Movement by Emily Hage (review)

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      Abstract: When in 1920 Dada spokesperson Tristan Tzara created specialized stationary emblazoned with the words “Mouvement Dada,” he listed seven magazines on it, demonstrating how journals were inextricable from the identity of Dada. At once material objects, archives of artistic production, and themselves new forms of media, Dada periodicals were as self-reflexive and parodic as the movement itself, and thus maddening, slippery objects of study. In Dada Magazines: The Making of a Movement, Emily Hage does not reduce their complexity but rather examines individual Dada publications within distinct phases of the movement, while also noting their imbrication with Dadaist art and exhibition practices. Toggling between analyses ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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