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  Subjects -> ARCHITECTURE (Total: 219 journals)
Showing 201 - 264 of 264 Journals sorted alphabetically
tecYt     Open Access  
Terrain.org : A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments     Free   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Architecture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Thresholds     Hybrid Journal  
Town and Regional Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Undagi : Jurnal Ilmiah Arsitektur     Open Access  
UOU Scientific Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
URBAN DESIGN International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Urban Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Vernacular Architecture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Vitruvian     Open Access  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Vivienda y Ciudad     Open Access  
VLC arquitectura. Research Journal     Open Access  
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ZARCH : Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access  

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URBAN DESIGN International
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.48
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1357-5317 - ISSN (Online) 1468-4519
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Toward a social responsibility-based model for urban design education

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      Abstract: Abstract There is a need for a model for urban design education due to its responsibility for the impact on the society and environment according to the twenty-first-century paradigm shift in higher education toward the social responsibility of universities. As an academic discipline concerned with the built environment, urban design can have a pivotal role in meeting the university social responsibility goal of promoting sustainable development. This article aims to provide the background for redesigning and adapting the educational program of urban design to the social responsibility approach. To this end, the study proposes a social responsibility-based model for urban design education through expert discussion in order to operationalize the responsibility of urban design toward the environment and society. The model is a process-oriented one consisting of four steps, namely, values, management, practices, and impacts.
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
       
  • A critical review for Cairo’s green open spaces dynamics as a prospect
           to act as placemaking anchors

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      Abstract: Abstract In recent decades, the integration of nature into cities has witnessed a wave of progressive advancement due to the environmental and anthropological disciplines. However, cities still face numerous challenges in terms of providing and maintaining green spaces. Thus, collaboration and partnerships between various stakeholders are being promoted as a possible solution to such a dilemma with a specific focus on community engagement and placemaking. This research examines the gaps triggering the scarce green open space challenge in Cairo, Egypt, as an example of a rapidly urbanising city in the Global South. In contrast to previous research on green spaces in Cairo, the current study investigates the cascade of the different scales and hierarchical levels of strategies as well as stakeholders concerned with green spaces. The results demonstrate the importance of understanding the dynamics and activating stronger networks between different stakeholders, especially on the community scale. The current research also highlights the importance of determining the actual value of green open spaces for various stakeholders as an essential entry point for placemaking. In addition, it is urging considering the multifunctionality of green spaces as a basis for formulating and negotiating an urban greening policy and strategy in Cairo.
      PubDate: 2022-07-22
       
  • Morphogenesis of contemporary informal settlement in Chile

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite a massive investment in subsidized housing, informal settlement remains a significant aspect of urban development in Chilean cities. This paper first surveys the urban morphology of contemporary settlements in four Chilean cities to maps the extent and location of neighbourhoods that have developed informally or semi-formally. The broad pattern is that the more informal of settlements have been practically eliminated from the capital of Santiago, yet mixed informality flourishes and is expanding on the peripheries of regional cities. Four cases are then mapped and analysed to show the morphogenesis—the ways buildings and street networks are incrementally designed and produced. A range of morphogenic patterns are identified including highly irregular morphologies on escarpment conditions, semi-regular street grids, and informal encrustations within formal housing projects. It is argued that informal production will remain significant and that a better understanding of informal settlement morphology is crucial to the design and planning for the future of Chilean cities.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Measuring age-friendliness based on the walkability indices of older
           people to urban facilities

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aims to measure age-friendliness based on the walkability indices of the older people to urban facilities in the sample area of Istanbul, Turkey and the various districts within. It focuses on three key urban facilities in age-friendly cities: open public spaces, health services and basic needs; Quantitative datasets are also utilised in order to measure the age-friendliness of the urban environment. There are two main quantitative dimensions of the study: to generate accessible areas to facilities and to identify age-friendly values within the identified accessibility areas. To measure age-friendliness, new index sets were created using the Age-Friendly Approach Index and the Weighted Age-Friendly Approach Index. The results underline that the most age-friendly areas of open spaces are in the districts: Fatih, Beyoğlu and Üsküdar; the most age-friendly areas of health services are in Kadıköy, Şişli, Beyoğlu, Fatih, Bayrampaşa, Güngören and Bahçelievler; the most age-friendly areas of basic needs are in Fatih, Kadıköy, Şişli and Gaziosmanpaşa. Overall, Fatih, Kadıköy, Beyoğlu and Şişli districts were found to have the widest age-friendly accessible areas, whilst districts moving towards the periphery of the city decrease in terms of age-friendliness. The least accessible areas are found in Beykoz, Çekmeköy, Büyükçekmece and Silivri. The results allow us to discuss, compare and better understand age-friendliness and local government policies.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • The urban food forest: Creating a public edible landscape

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      Abstract: Abstract With the growing trend of fruit and nut trees in urban public spaces, many cities worldwide have opted in the last 10 years to turn vacant city lots and patches of parks and community parcels into urban food forests. This study explored how to create multifunctional urban food forests that can be integrated into public places and encourage public participation. In addition, this study looked at the urban food forest as a provider of food and space that encourages public and community participation, with a focus on how to design spaces, facilities, and events to support and encourage public participation and involvement in urban food forests. By comparing the spaces and functions of urban public places with the specialties of urban food forests, the “from food to space” design guidelines were summarized.
      PubDate: 2022-07-05
       
  • Correction to: Urban design in China

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      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • A typological approach to the transformation of cave dwellings in Baishe
           Village, Shaanxi, China

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      Abstract: Abstract With the recent boom in rural tourism, many Chinese historic villages are experiencing a rapid transformation process in which traditional residences are shifted to become mixed-use zones of residential and commercial functions. This rapid transformation process presents threats to local villagers’ daily lives. Cave villages in the Loess Plateau of China have historically benefited from adaptability to social, historical, and natural conditions and have retained their living function for over a thousand years. However, in the present time, the increasing tourism needs caused contradiction on how to sustain the living needs in the transformation process. It follows that the cave villages are an appropriate case study by which to illustrate the transformation of historic villages in China. Based on a field survey that addressed the practical needs of residents in Baishe village, Shaanxi, this paper provides a practical typological approach to demonstrate how future interventions in traditional dwellings could be implemented through prototyping the formation and spatial structure evolution of cave-dwellings. This paper contributes to integrating historical values into modern residents’ needs through spatial evolutionary analysis and provides an analytic perspective on the construction of people-oriented communities in China.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Knowledge evolution in transit-oriented development: a comparative
           bibliometric analysis of International versus Chinese publications

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      Abstract: Abstract The concept of transit-oriented development (TOD) originated in the USA in the early 1990s, and was widely accepted and applied worldwide over the following decades. Recently, along with the massive construction of urban rail transit systems, TOD has become a major focus of researchers and planners in China at both theoretical and empirical levels. This study is based on the publications between 2000 and 2019 retrieved from the Web of Science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure database. Bibliometrics and information visualization were applied using VOSviewer to identify the theoretical base and research dimensions for an evolutional study of TOD. Four research dimensions were identified, and the research features and foci characteristics of two groups of researchers were explored: those publishing internationally and those publishing in China. The research focuses of TOD under the international and Chinese contexts are quite different. This reflects differences in the understanding regarding TOD concepts under the contexts of different urban development patterns and policies.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Exploring the use of restorative component scale to measure street
           restorative expectations

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      Abstract: Abstract Contemporary high-density urban environments frequently have limited green resources, such as parks and woodlands, that are conventionally associated with psychological restoration. The restorative potential of everyday spaces such as urban streets, therefore, takes on heightened significance. Our study proposes that the delivery of streets for psychological restoration differs from that of wider urban open spaces. This is because streets serve functions not primarily associated with optional leisure activities. During the study, we used an online questionnaire (n = 153) based on Restorative Component Scales (RCS) to assess peoples’ restorative expectations on four different types of Shanghai street. We also adopted a scenario approach which asked participants to imagine and evaluate the ideal condition of each street type for providing them with restorative experiences. Our results show that users expected the highest restorative quality in the street scenario ‘landscape and leisure’, with the lowest expectations expressed for ‘traffic-oriented’ streets. People’s expectations on ‘commercial’ and ‘living and service’ street scenarios were similar. These findings reveal clear design implications for the delivery of socially restorative streets, with special consideration on street typology and user expectations.
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00186-w
       
  • Plot transformation and effects on public space in eight verticalized
           neighborhoods of the Santiago Metropolitan Area, Chile

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      Abstract: Abstract Verticalization reconfigures plot patterns and private space's relationship with public space at the street level. This paper analyzes eight verticalized neighborhoods in the Santiago Metropolitan Area (SMA) to understand what plot patterns emerge from verticalization and how plot transformation processes affect public space. The empirical research was based on the analysis of plot surface and plot geometry transformations, and of spatial planning urban codes. The study develops quantitative measures and qualitative analysis identifying and presenting four plot transformation categories: (1) Homogenous verticalization through regular plot transformation, (2) Incomplete verticalization through diverse plot configuration, (3) Scattered and intense verticalization, with a partial plot reconfiguration, and (4) Scattered verticalization with changes in plot pattern. The evidence suggests that the plot structure's initial configuration contributes to the urban fabric's consistency and adaptability to verticalization and that urban codes are inconsistent with pre-existing urban form. Plot pattern transformations derived from verticalization unleash significant scale changes in the urban fabric that reconfigure the public–private interface, with greater degrees of enclosure between the plot and the street.
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00187-9
       
  • Friction space and the re(dis)covery of urban roads

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      Abstract: Abstract For the majority of cities worldwide, car-based mobility has begun to be replaced by alternative mobility modes. This process has augmented the lens for infrastructural topics, and placed infrastructure's latent potentiality at the forefront. Car-dependent infrastructure, however, persists in and conditions urbanism in many others. For such cities, the encounter of roads with the city and human-scale spaces raises critical ground in need of new strategies, particularly to mediate the relation between roads and their vicinities. This article, hereby, dwells on the interfacial relations and spaces betwixt urban roads and relational geographies, conceptualizing friction as a spatial notion. In this, the study departs from the conflicting presence of urban roads in Ankara. Dwelling on two Boulevards—Atatürk and Malazgirt—the article reflects on the obscured spatial, cultural, and social conditions caused by frictionless mobility strategies over time. It uncovers and accentuates the urgency of friction space strategies to claim infrastructural terrains and re(dis)cover severed or missing continuities (in Ankara).
      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00185-x
       
  • Urban design in China

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      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00188-8
       
  • The controversial impact of pedestrian guardrails on road crossing
           behaviours. Evidence from Hong Kong

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      Abstract: Abstract Pedestrian guardrails (PGs) are common in high-density cities, but growing debate focuses on whether PGs provide pedestrian comfort and assure safety. The quasi-experimental condition, created by 2019–2020 Hong Kong protesters dismantling PGs the government later restored, allowed for a longitudinal study of how PGs impact pedestrian crossing behaviours at the intersection of Mong Kok Road and Sai Yeung Choi Street South. 6762 pedestrian behaviours were collected through video recording from periods before and after PG restoration; psychological factors linked to crossing behaviour were further investigated through a questionnaire. Per observations, crossing through the shortest route comprised most (25.24%) aberrant behaviours. PG restoration significantly reduced low-risk crossings but increased high-risk behaviours. Specifically, people aged 65+ were more likely to cross the road aberrantly to avoid grade-separated pedestrian crossings. The questionnaire results (N = 205) suggest pedestrians feel ambivalent about PGs. Taking shortcuts was the main reason for pedestrian misbehaviour (85.8% agreement rate). Additionally, pedestrians relied more on internal judgements of traffic situations than on external controls. Noticeably, PGs provided feelings of safety, despite not being designed to protect pedestrians from straying vehicles. These findings could inform designs for safe, comfortable pedestrian environments.
      PubDate: 2022-04-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00184-y
       
  • Place attachment and identity in shrinking cities: anticipating decline by
           combining perceptions of locals and visitors in Chōfu, Japan

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      Abstract: Abstract Planners worldwide are exploring ways to regenerate shrinking cities, varying from pro-growth strategies with the aim of reversing population losses, to strategies that manage urban decline by adjusting the built environment to a smaller population. However, both approaches are reactionary rather than anticipatory, addressing decline after substantial shrinkage has happened. This paper examines the relationship between place identity and attachment and urban shrinkage, arguing that reinforcing place attachment based on building a strong local identity can help cities reduce the negative consequences of shrinkage. We propose an identity-building method that can become the base for design strategies fostering place identity and attachment. The paper applies this method to Chōfu, one of Tokyo’s bedroom towns, which is currently developing strategies to anticipate its future shrinkage. The method collects the radically exterior perceptions of international visitors to trigger conversations with local stakeholders with the final aim of finding critical elements to consider when developing design strategies to anticipate decline. Policymakers and planners are better advised to consider alternatives to business-as-usual approaches to shrinkage, so that regeneration strategies can be more significantly linked with the specifics of the place and how it is perceived, achieving a higher attachment and involvement with residents.
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00183-z
       
  • Ramming attacks, pedestrians, and the securitization of streets and urban
           public space: a case study of New York City

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      Abstract: Abstract Over the last decade, vehicles have been used as weapons to target, kill, and injure pedestrians in cities such as London, New York, and Berlin. In response to these attacks, governments are implementing new policies and physical interventions to securitize pedestrian spaces. A previous wave of urban securitization hardened buildings against explosives delivered by vehicles, but ramming attacks, by using the vehicles themselves as weapons, challenge established ideas about relationships between pedestrians and automobility. In this paper, we explore the conceptual shifts that need to accompany planning and designing for security from vehicle-ramming attacks, as compared to traditional anti-terrorism efforts. Using New York City as a case study, we review the design strategies cities are using to prevent vehicle-ramming attacks, and consider the potential trade-offs between these securitization efforts, contemporary models of street design, and the everyday use of urban public spaces.
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00180-2
       
  • On the spontaneous beauty of cities: neither design nor chaos

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      Abstract: Abstract A clear bridge connecting the theory of spontaneous order and the issue of beauty in and for cities has not yet been developed. After a general exploration of the concept of beauty, this article builds an alternative idea of beauty, namely, beauty as spontaneity. In particular, it argues that beauty in the urban realm greatly depends on forms and orders that can hardly be comprehensively designed but rather emerge as the result of the freedom granted to multiple urban agents to express themselves in space. In this article the works of Jacobs and Romano are analysed and explored. Starting from some of their main ideas, the paper suggests certain planning and design tactics to nurture this kind of beauty and provides some essential ethical principles.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00170-w
       
  • Changing perceptions and usage of public and pseudo-public spaces in the
           post-pandemic city: the case of Istanbul

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      Abstract: Abstract Public space has critical importance for the city and society because it forms a sense of community. The debate on the end of public space, which is ongoing as the privatization in the city rises, moves on to a new phase with the Covid-19 outbreak. Since the perception of public spaces will be a determinant factor in the future of the city, the question arises: How the perception and usage of the public, virtual public and pseudo-public spaces (particularly shopping malls) have been affected by the recent Covid-19 pandemic' The aim of this study is to examine the changing perception and usage of public and pseudo-public spaces during the Covid-19 outbreak in Istanbul, Turkey. Within this scope, an online survey was conducted with 337 participants living in Istanbul between the dates of 1–5 June 2020. With this survey, the change in perceptions and usage of these spaces based on personal, residential and district characteristics were investigated. The findings of the study revealed statistically significant differences between the perceptions and usage of public spaces and pseudo-public spaces before and after the Covid-19 outbreak in terms of personal, residential and district characteristics. According to survey results, there would be a significant decrease in the frequency of possible visits to public places. The outbreak reduces interest in virtual spaces as a leisure activity, but it also increases the interest in virtual spaces as a shopping and meeting/chat platform. In addition, it was determined that the demand for shopping centres and virtual platforms as both before-after-the-outbreak leisure activities decreased significantly as the amount of green space per capita increases. Besides, the diminishing reputations of pseudo-public spaces and the increasing importance of virtual public spaces may be observed from the survey results. The longer the outbreak, the greater its impact on the design and planning of public spaces and pseudo-public spaces. Rather than planning huge and crowded spaces such as big squares and huge malls, there is likely a shift toward planning a large number of small-scale public spaces within walking distance.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-020-00147-1
       
  • Image-oriented design control in China: a case study from Nanjing

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper investigates urban image-making through the lens of different sets of design control tools and mechanisms in use in the Chinese planning system before 2019. It takes the South Railway Station area of Nanjing, part of a planned new town, as the case study and examines the design and planning of the overall area, a sub-area and two selected building sites. The research offers an understanding of the performative role of urban planning in place promotion with its distinctive Chinese characteristics, which are related to the planning culture and socio-political context of China. The paper identifies a few problems resulting from an image-oriented approach to planning in the case studies. Firstly, planning strategies have stressed grandness as opposed to the human scale and wide spatial qualities. Secondly, the approach has emphasised marketability of urban images rather than the representation of socio-cultural values. The study suggests that place identity catering for the interests of ordinary citizens should be foregrounded in design control in new town development in China.
      PubDate: 2022-02-28
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00182-0
       
  • Urban identity, perception, and urban design

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      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-022-00179-9
       
  • Public’s perceptions of urban identity of Thessaloniki, Greece

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      Abstract: Abstract Urban identity (UI) is a multi-faceted concept that encompasses different aspects of urban environment, built heritage and natural environment and is also related to important properties of the cities. The paper studies the associations between the inhabitants’ perceptions of UI and their socio-demographic profile. The city of Thessaloniki is the case study of this research. The research was based on data collection via structured questionnaires, and the results were statistically analyzed using: descriptive statistics, χ2 analysis, crosstabs method, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. The results show that UI, being a generally unknown term to the public, incorporates the notions of history and culture, urban environment, social behavior and everyday life, and it is influenced by social and economic factors. The perceptions on the city’s identity are associated with gender, age and family status, as well as the way people spend their spare time. It emerges that, in Thessaloniki, a policy mix is necessary to preserve and upgrade the historical assets of the city, along with the improvement of its every day functions.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00172-8
       
 
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