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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
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Digital War
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2662-1975 - ISSN (Online) 2662-1983
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Sino-Cal realism: TikTok as a medium between new market dynamics

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      Abstract: Abstract The meteoric rise of TikTok, the video-sharing app owned by Chinese technology giant ByteDance, is already being hailed as a potent platform for political expression, but this is complicated by its economic and geopolitical entanglements, namely the ongoing power rivalry between China and the US, as well as TikTok’s adherence to a business bottom line. This short commentary aims to unpack some of the structural issues which contextualise TikTok’s particular brand of political ambivalence ahead of designations of the platform as a meaningful site for political participation.
      PubDate: 2022-11-21
       
  • Bow Echo: surrounding memories of loss

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      Abstract: Abstract This art review responds to Aziz Hazara's audio-visual work Bow Echo, exhibited in the Biennale of Sydney, 2020 at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia. Considering anechoic chambers and stifled sound, this review explores the individual experience of warfare in Afghanistan. By metaphorically associating natural storms with military devastation, this review pays close attention to the mechanics of tone and the choreography of movement within the video work. Overall, Hazara artfully merges digital technology and installation design to create an affecting environment in memoriam of lives lost.
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
       
  • Circuits of truth: Process-oriented approach to digital fakes and
           authenticity

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      Abstract: Abstract My investigative project explores social media platforms’ fact-checking, debunking, and verification policies, the development of which has been accelerating. Their growth is unsurprising, given that militarisation of cyberspace has increased the stakes on rating systems that help users distinguish between ‘true’ and ‘fake’. What is striking is how little clarity the race for truth provides. The very difference between ‘true’ and ‘fake’ in such policies is self-referential, with implicit definitions of ‘true’ as what is ‘not false’ and vice versa. To analyse these core terms, I focus on how something is rendered ‘true’ or ‘fake’ rather than what. Informed by interviews with thinkers and practitioners of cyberwar, the process-oriented approach allows me to dissect this binary as a loop—a ‘Circuit of Truth’ whose polarisation only arises when its core terms are placed in opposition to each other.
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
       
  • On naming drones: a European perspective

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      Abstract: Abstract This article discusses the naming of military drone technology by different actors. It thus explores the tension between producing, using, and experiencing drone technology. I will look at, among other things, the project of a drone called the Euro Hawk while reflecting on the experiences and perceptions of people from “outside” Europe. For my investigation, I used three types of journalistic texts in Arabic: (1) texts produced by professional platforms that are financed by European governments like Deutsche Welle and Qantara.de, (2) texts published on the news platform Aljazeera.net and (3) entries at the popular online encyclopedia Wikipedia.
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
       
  • RT UK’s Facebook audiences’ interpretation of Russia’s strategic
           narrative of the Syrian conflict

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      Abstract: Abstract Study of participative war has tended to focus on digital content produced by civilians and combatants in the region, but foreign citizens also participate by interacting with international broadcast coverage via social media. Russia’s international broadcaster, RT, is accused of promoting Russian foreign policy goals and being a tool of ‘information war’ with the West. Its coverage has been shown to promote Russia’s strategic narrative of the Syrian conflict, legitimating Russia’s heavily criticised pro-Assad military interventions. However, how these narratives are interpreted by foreign audiences and thus their actual consequences are not well understood. Based on data from an interview study with 26 Facebook users who interacted with RT UK, this paper asks whether and how RT’s narrative of Syria resonated with them. RT’s narrative appealed to these individuals’ disaffection with domestic media and politics, and residual feelings of betrayal around Britain’s involvement in the Iraq war. These results reveal the localised mechanisms by which RT was able to disseminate its strategic narrative around the conflict, and how this simultaneously functioned as an effective tool in Russia’s ‘information war’ with the West.
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
       
  • “The war phone”: mobile communication on the frontline in
           Eastern Ukraine

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      Abstract: Abstract One of the problems in the growing subfield of mediatization of war is evidence on how exactly civilian communication devices become integrated with warfare. In this article, I focus on patterns of use of mobile phones on the frontline in Eastern Ukraine. Based on qualitative in-depth interviews with Ukrainian servicemen and women, this article presents a typology for the frontline use of mobiles in the spirit of actor–network theory. The omnipresence of mobiles on the battlefield creates a set of unique participatory media practices. A variety of personal purposes, such as private communication and entertainment, are combined in the same device with wiretapping, fire targeting, minefield mapping and combat communication. Mobiles supplant old or unavailable equipment and fill gaps in military infrastructure, becoming weaponized and contributing to the hybridization of the military and the intimate, and of war and peace. These results imply the role of mobiles as a mediated extension of battlefield and question the very definition of what constitutes weapon as tool of combat.
      PubDate: 2022-10-21
       
  • Über Cyber

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      Abstract: Abstract A performative art installation in public space. Consisting only of barrier tape and the recording of the German military's “cyber march”, it invites the audience and passers-by to engage with it and fall into the trap of underestimating the amount to which it exerts force on participants.
      PubDate: 2022-10-14
       
  • How to witness a drone strike

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      Abstract: Abstract Witnessing is crucial to public engagement with war, but the remote violence of drones presents distinct challenges: its victims are largely invisible to Western publics; operations are cloaked in secrecy; and promises of precision targeting, accurate surveillance, and legal monitoring obscure the brutalities of the system. With so many barriers to witnessing, remote warfare tends to remain on the periphery of political debate and has not occasioned widespread resistance. Yet the means for witnessing drone warfare exist; the question is how they might be leveraged to make remote war more accessible and contestable. This article analyses the high-profile drone strike that killed 10 civilians in Kabul on 29 August 2021 to consider the limits and possibilities of witnessing drone strikes, alongside the database of conflict monitor Airwars and the aesthetic practice of the research agency Forensic Architecture. It argues that witnessing drone strikes requires assembling new conceptual techniques with long-standing practices of media witnessing and human rights testimony. It is not a manual or primer but rather maps four critical, analytical, and ethico-political trajectories demanded by the problem of how to witness a drone strike: lived experiences, violent mediations, infrastructural scales, and aesthetics.
      PubDate: 2022-09-29
       
  • The transformation of participatory warfare: The role of narratives in
           connective mobilization in the Russia–Ukraine war

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      Abstract: Abstract The participatory affordances of digital media allow a broad spectrum of new forms of participation in conflicts that go beyond the information domain (Boichak in Battlefront volunteers: mapping and deconstructing civilian resilience networks in Ukraine. #SMSociety’17, July 28–30, 2017). This article explores the factors that shape forms of digitally mediated participation in warfare. It highlights the association between narratives of statehood and forms of conflict-related mobilization of volunteers that rely on digital platforms. Rooted in an analysis of a dataset of digital platforms that mediated engagement in the warfare and 31 in-depth interviews with Ukrainian digital activists, it offers a model that helps to explain the diversity of modes of connective mobilization in the context of the war and the shifts in the role of digitally mediated conflict-related mobilization. The analysis does not aim to provide a linear model that explains the forms of mobilization but rather seeks to develop a framework that helps us understand the changes taking place in the scope and forms of participation in wars relying on digital platforms. The model suggests that the strengthening of narratives of statehood is associated with a transformation of conflict-related mobilization away from crowdsourcing and towards the emergence of organizations offering warfare-related outsourcing services and in some cases the incorporation of digital resources into state institutions (insourcing).
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
       
  • Coloring outside the lines' Imaginary reconstitution of security in
           Yemen through image transformations

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      Abstract: Abstract Inspired by new—forming in 2020—hopes for security and peace in Yemen, this essay explores the potential of digital image transformations for further empowerment of local actors already working for security and peace as well as bringing grassroots solutions into spotlight and into being. The essay analyzes the artistic transformation of a series of photographs submitted by a Yemeni citizen to the informal art-for-peace project Color Up Peace and turned into coloring pages for further engagement and transformation. Employing the utopia-informed methodology of Imaginary Reconstitution of Security, the analysis explores coloring pages as fields of opportunity to facilitate participation in peacework. Three questions guide this exploration: “what are visual images',” “what do they do'” and “what is the normative basis of employing them'”—in relation to security as part of sustaining quality peace. The essay seeks to emphasize the importance of inclusive peace processes and arrangements, informed by everyday experiences of (in)security/(non)peace of regular citizens and allowing for a wide range of actors to participate. The included virtual exhibition of photographs, coloring pages and colored art further asks questions about participation, visuality and digitality of images and invites readers to make art and make peace within the project.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
       
  • ‘“Son – you’ll be a soldier one day”: reconceptualising YouTube
           discourses on participation in memetic warfare’

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      Abstract: Abstract “Son – you’ll be a soldier one day”, one of thousands of comments on a YouTube video about using memes (particularly viral images) in war. Memes have grown in global importance, from their central propaganda/morale-influencing role in the War in Ukraine to political campaign conflicts around major issues to virtual ‘battles’ involving online communities. However, while citizen participation in discourses concerning conflict has been receiving increased attention, such wider participation around meme conflict remains under-explored in scholarship. The online audio-visual and textual discourse around memetic warfare is important both in understanding wider public views of conflict, and, particularly in this case, given the blurring of distinctions in which acts of speech or creating videos may themselves involve directly contributing to meme ‘warfare’. This article will aim to map emerging perceptions of this digital participation, including how views of memetic warfare are framed by particular historical analogies and tropes from popular culture. The research draws on comments of selected YouTube videos on memetic warfare. The new framework adopted may serve as a basis for future investigation of online public debates and attitudes towards memetic or other forms of technological innovation in war, such as broader definitions of cyber, drone, or space security.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
       
  • To subdue the enemies without fighting: Chinese state-sponsored
           disinformation as digital warfare

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines the nuanced practices of Chinese state-sponsored disinformation campaigns as participatory digital warfare. Utilising Sun Tzu’s three concepts qizheng (奇正), xingshi (形势) and xushi (虚实), it proposes to analyse disinformation beyond the framework of political communication. With two examples, I analyse how disinformation campaigns can implicate contemporary China’s state-building. I demonstrate that disinformation campaigns strategically utilise suggestive half-lies to mobilise alliances and silence enemies regardless of their nationalities. Depending on whether they conform to the Party agenda, some foreign actors can be enlisted as allies, while critical citizens portrayed as enemies. Overall, the paper argues that Chinese state-sponsored disinformation campaigns can stealthily recruit netizens to combat in an ongoing state-making project that potentially consolidates the authoritarian Party-state. Addressing the gap between Chinese traditional war philosophies and contemporary, technologically informed practices, this paper points out the significance of participatory and cultural countermeasures.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
       
  • Topologies of air: Shona Illingworth’s art practice and the ethics
           of air

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      Abstract: Abstract In her video and sound art practice, artist Shona Illingworth has extensively engaged with atmospheric environments as they are experienced physically and affectively. In the multi-screen and sound installation, Topologies of Air (2021), Illingworth addresses the conditions and discourses that define today’s perception and understandings of airspaces. This article closely examines Topologies of Air and further relates it to Illingworth’s art research practice, outlining key features and methodologies to argue that Illingworth’s decentralized approach to airspaces is rooted in an ethics of air that fosters empathic understanding. This is congruent with the aim of proposing a new human right on the freedom to live without threats from above put forward through the Airspace Tribunal, an integral component of Illingworth’s project that she has developed in collaboration with human right expert, Nick Grief.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • If you sense it coming, it may be too late: the digital screen as a window
           into warfare. Art Review – I Saw the World End (2020)

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      Abstract: In an increasingly digitised reality, our interactions with war are often filtered through the screen. This review, If you sense it coming, it may be too late: the digital screen as as window into warfare, focuses on Es Devlin and Machiko Weston’s I Saw the World End (2020) as an enmeshing of distanced spectatorship and an abstract intimacy that provides a window into warfare. The digital artist’s collaborative conceptualisation of the 1945 atomic bombings entangles a virtual and physical co-presence through its publicly networked projection. The artwork I Saw the World End enacts a personal, societal, and cultural dialogue for the past and future on the atrocities of warfare and the fragility of humanity, epitomizing digital’s art’s innate responsibility to bear witness and critique such events.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-022-00047-4
       
  • Framing ISIL: the media’s photograph discrimination between Africa,
           Europe, and the United States

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      Abstract: Abstract In January 2019, The New York Times sparked internet outrage after publishing photographs from an attack in Kenya that included dead bodies. Readers drew comparisons between these images and images posted from attacks in the west, reaffirming that the mass media play a vital role in agenda-setting. We ask how American and European News websites use images to frame attacks connected to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIL) on domestic soil compared to attacks in Africa. Do news websites differ in their image frame usage across geographical boundaries' We analyzed elements in images of ISIL attacks in Africa, Western Europe, and the USA published by American, European, Middle Eastern, and African media outlets to answer these questions. We expect the American and European press to use more feminine, weaker frames when reporting on African events and more “responsibility” and “consequence” frames for domestic. We use a sample of all reported ISIL attacks in Africa, Western Europe, and the USA beginning in 2015 to the end of 2018. This research demonstrates an implicit framing bias within media outlets, impacting international relations and public opinion.
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-022-00044-7
       
  • Terrorism and the lawful preemptive use of force: the case of cyberattacks

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      Abstract: Abstract Twenty years of war against terror has led to humanitarian tragedies where the West has chosen to intervene in addition to being unable to durably eradicate the terrorist threat. As this text argues, this situation calls for a renewed strategy that needs to amend the legitimate use of force by reconsidering the criteria of pre-emptive actions in order to pave the way for non-violent and violent alternatives to war. In this regard, different forms of cyber actions can play a significant role in this well-needed renewed strategy.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-022-00043-8
       
  • This is how they tell me the world ends: the cyber weapons arms race, by
           Nicole Perlroth, 2020. New York: Bloomsbury publishing. ISBN
           978-1526629852, 512 pages

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      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00035-0
       
  • Patrícia Campos Mello (2020), The Hate Machine: notes from a reporter on
           fake news and digital violence [A máquina do ódio: notas de uma
           repórter sobre fake news e violência digital]. São Paulo: Companhia das
           Letras. Language: Portuguese Brazilian. ISBN-10: 853593362X. Pbk, 296
           pages

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      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00034-1
       
  • It came from something awful: how a toxic troll army accidentally memed
           Donald Trump into office, by Dale Beran, 2019. St. Martin’s Publishing
           Group. ISBN: 9781250189745, 304 Pages

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      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00030-5
       
  • Philip Di Salvo (2020): Digital Whistleblowing Platforms in Journalism:
           Encrypting Leaks. Palgrave Macmillan. 188 pages

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      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00031-4
       
 
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