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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 274)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 266)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 266)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Defence Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Terrorism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Naval de Odontologia On Line / Naval Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 5)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Navigator     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bioterrorism & Biodefense     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Problemy Mechatroniki. Uzbrojenie, lotnictwo, inżynieria bezpieczeństwa / Problems of Mechatronics. Armament, Aviation, Safety Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Scandinavian Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Fra Krig og Fred     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Studies & Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal on Baltic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista do Exército     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Revista Agulhas Negras     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Wiedza Obronna     Open Access  
선진국방연구     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Revista Política y Estrategia     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Martial Arts Studies     Open Access  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Digital War
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2662-1975 - ISSN (Online) 2662-1983
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • The transformation of participatory warfare: The role of narratives in
           connective mobilization in the Russia–Ukraine war

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The participatory affordances of digital media allow a broad spectrum of new forms of participation in conflicts that go beyond the information domain (Boichak in Battlefront volunteers: mapping and deconstructing civilian resilience networks in Ukraine. #SMSociety’17, July 28–30, 2017). This article explores the factors that shape forms of digitally mediated participation in warfare. It highlights the association between narratives of statehood and forms of conflict-related mobilization of volunteers that rely on digital platforms. Rooted in an analysis of a dataset of digital platforms that mediated engagement in the warfare and 31 in-depth interviews with Ukrainian digital activists, it offers a model that helps to explain the diversity of modes of connective mobilization in the context of the war and the shifts in the role of digitally mediated conflict-related mobilization. The analysis does not aim to provide a linear model that explains the forms of mobilization but rather seeks to develop a framework that helps us understand the changes taking place in the scope and forms of participation in wars relying on digital platforms. The model suggests that the strengthening of narratives of statehood is associated with a transformation of conflict-related mobilization away from crowdsourcing and towards the emergence of organizations offering warfare-related outsourcing services and in some cases the incorporation of digital resources into state institutions (insourcing).
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
       
  • Coloring outside the lines' Imaginary reconstitution of security in
           Yemen through image transformations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Inspired by new—forming in 2020—hopes for security and peace in Yemen, this essay explores the potential of digital image transformations for further empowerment of local actors already working for security and peace as well as bringing grassroots solutions into spotlight and into being. The essay analyzes the artistic transformation of a series of photographs submitted by a Yemeni citizen to the informal art-for-peace project Color Up Peace and turned into coloring pages for further engagement and transformation. Employing the utopia-informed methodology of Imaginary Reconstitution of Security, the analysis explores coloring pages as fields of opportunity to facilitate participation in peacework. Three questions guide this exploration: “what are visual images',” “what do they do'” and “what is the normative basis of employing them'”—in relation to security as part of sustaining quality peace. The essay seeks to emphasize the importance of inclusive peace processes and arrangements, informed by everyday experiences of (in)security/(non)peace of regular citizens and allowing for a wide range of actors to participate. The included virtual exhibition of photographs, coloring pages and colored art further asks questions about participation, visuality and digitality of images and invites readers to make art and make peace within the project.
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
       
  • ‘“Son – you’ll be a soldier one day”: reconceptualising YouTube
           discourses on participation in memetic warfare’

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract “Son – you’ll be a soldier one day”, one of thousands of comments on a YouTube video about using memes (particularly viral images) in war. Memes have grown in global importance, from their central propaganda/morale-influencing role in the War in Ukraine to political campaign conflicts around major issues to virtual ‘battles’ involving online communities. However, while citizen participation in discourses concerning conflict has been receiving increased attention, such wider participation around meme conflict remains under-explored in scholarship. The online audio-visual and textual discourse around memetic warfare is important both in understanding wider public views of conflict, and, particularly in this case, given the blurring of distinctions in which acts of speech or creating videos may themselves involve directly contributing to meme ‘warfare’. This article will aim to map emerging perceptions of this digital participation, including how views of memetic warfare are framed by particular historical analogies and tropes from popular culture. The research draws on comments of selected YouTube videos on memetic warfare. The new framework adopted may serve as a basis for future investigation of online public debates and attitudes towards memetic or other forms of technological innovation in war, such as broader definitions of cyber, drone, or space security.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
       
  • To subdue the enemies without fighting: Chinese state-sponsored
           disinformation as digital warfare

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines the nuanced practices of Chinese state-sponsored disinformation campaigns as participatory digital warfare. Utilising Sun Tzu’s three concepts qizheng (奇正), xingshi (形势) and xushi (虚实), it proposes to analyse disinformation beyond the framework of political communication. With two examples, I analyse how disinformation campaigns can implicate contemporary China’s state-building. I demonstrate that disinformation campaigns strategically utilise suggestive half-lies to mobilise alliances and silence enemies regardless of their nationalities. Depending on whether they conform to the Party agenda, some foreign actors can be enlisted as allies, while critical citizens portrayed as enemies. Overall, the paper argues that Chinese state-sponsored disinformation campaigns can stealthily recruit netizens to combat in an ongoing state-making project that potentially consolidates the authoritarian Party-state. Addressing the gap between Chinese traditional war philosophies and contemporary, technologically informed practices, this paper points out the significance of participatory and cultural countermeasures.
      PubDate: 2022-09-23
       
  • Topologies of air: Shona Illingworth’s art practice and the ethics
           of air

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract In her video and sound art practice, artist Shona Illingworth has extensively engaged with atmospheric environments as they are experienced physically and affectively. In the multi-screen and sound installation, Topologies of Air (2021), Illingworth addresses the conditions and discourses that define today’s perception and understandings of airspaces. This article closely examines Topologies of Air and further relates it to Illingworth’s art research practice, outlining key features and methodologies to argue that Illingworth’s decentralized approach to airspaces is rooted in an ethics of air that fosters empathic understanding. This is congruent with the aim of proposing a new human right on the freedom to live without threats from above put forward through the Airspace Tribunal, an integral component of Illingworth’s project that she has developed in collaboration with human right expert, Nick Grief.
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
       
  • If you sense it coming, it may be too late: the digital screen as a window
           into warfare. Art Review – I Saw the World End (2020)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In an increasingly digitised reality, our interactions with war are often filtered through the screen. This review, If you sense it coming, it may be too late: the digital screen as as window into warfare, focuses on Es Devlin and Machiko Weston’s I Saw the World End (2020) as an enmeshing of distanced spectatorship and an abstract intimacy that provides a window into warfare. The digital artist’s collaborative conceptualisation of the 1945 atomic bombings entangles a virtual and physical co-presence through its publicly networked projection. The artwork I Saw the World End enacts a personal, societal, and cultural dialogue for the past and future on the atrocities of warfare and the fragility of humanity, epitomizing digital’s art’s innate responsibility to bear witness and critique such events.
      PubDate: 2022-09-09
       
  • Framing ISIL: the media’s photograph discrimination between Africa,
           Europe, and the United States

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      Abstract: Abstract In January 2019, The New York Times sparked internet outrage after publishing photographs from an attack in Kenya that included dead bodies. Readers drew comparisons between these images and images posted from attacks in the west, reaffirming that the mass media play a vital role in agenda-setting. We ask how American and European News websites use images to frame attacks connected to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIL) on domestic soil compared to attacks in Africa. Do news websites differ in their image frame usage across geographical boundaries' We analyzed elements in images of ISIL attacks in Africa, Western Europe, and the USA published by American, European, Middle Eastern, and African media outlets to answer these questions. We expect the American and European press to use more feminine, weaker frames when reporting on African events and more “responsibility” and “consequence” frames for domestic. We use a sample of all reported ISIL attacks in Africa, Western Europe, and the USA beginning in 2015 to the end of 2018. This research demonstrates an implicit framing bias within media outlets, impacting international relations and public opinion.
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
       
  • Terrorism and the lawful preemptive use of force: the case of cyberattacks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Twenty years of war against terror has led to humanitarian tragedies where the West has chosen to intervene in addition to being unable to durably eradicate the terrorist threat. As this text argues, this situation calls for a renewed strategy that needs to amend the legitimate use of force by reconsidering the criteria of pre-emptive actions in order to pave the way for non-violent and violent alternatives to war. In this regard, different forms of cyber actions can play a significant role in this well-needed renewed strategy.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-022-00043-8
       
  • See Spot save lives: fear, humanitarianism, and war in the development of
           robot quadrupeds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Boston Dynamics’ robotic quadrupeds have achieved infamy and virality through a series of social media videos since 2008. In 2019 Boston Dynamics began commercial sale of ‘Spot’, a moving, sensing, networked robot dog. Spot has been designed to be a platform, which can be augmented with hardware payloads (e.g. sensors, robotic arm) and software to command Spot to conduct specific missions. In this paper we first trace the development of Spot and highlight the interest of the United States military in its development. This is followed by our text analysis of social media reactions to Boston Dynamics’ quadrupeds, revealing public fascination as well as ongoing suspicion and dark humour about ‘killer robots’. We then discuss how humanitarian applications, including in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, have been used as an opportunity to promote Spot and overcome public negativity. This is an example of a more general strategy advocates use to garner acceptance for autonomous robots in both civilian and military roles using humanitarian justifications: the robots ‘save lives.’ We conclude by discussing how Spot and other robot quadrupeds demonstrate the intertwining of humanitarian and military applications in the development, normalization and deployment of autonomous robots.
      PubDate: 2021-11-24
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00037-y
       
  • From warrior geek to prototype warrior: entrepreneurialism, future war,
           and the emergence of twenty-first century civil-military relations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Armed forces are now in a race to exploit the technologies associated with Artificial Intelligence. Viewed as force multipliers, these technologies have the potential to speed up decision making and roboticise warfighting. At the same time, however, these systems disintermediate military roles and functions, creating shifts in the relationships of power in military organizations as different entities vie to shape and control how innovations are implemented. In this article we argue that new innovation processes are sites of emerging forms of public–private interaction and practices. On the one hand this is driving entrepreneurialism into government bureaucracy even as it forges new bonds between defence and industry. On the other, as technologies replace soldiers, a new martial culture is emerging, one that reframes the warrior geek as an elite innovation corps of prototype warrior. We seek to map these relationships and explore the implications for civil-military relations in the twenty-first century.
      PubDate: 2021-11-23
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00039-w
       
  • Remember Afghanistan'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-11-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00038-x
       
  • Interview with Paolo Cirio

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-11-05
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00036-z
       
  • This is how they tell me the world ends: the cyber weapons arms race, by
           Nicole Perlroth, 2020. New York: Bloomsbury publishing. ISBN
           978-1526629852, 512 pages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-08-12
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00035-0
       
  • Patrícia Campos Mello (2020), The Hate Machine: notes from a reporter on
           fake news and digital violence [A máquina do ódio: notas de uma
           repórter sobre fake news e violência digital]. São Paulo: Companhia das
           Letras. Language: Portuguese Brazilian. ISBN-10: 853593362X. Pbk, 296
           pages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00034-1
       
  • Sensors, interpreters, analysts: operating the ‘electronic barrier’
           during the Vietnam War

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract This article examines a widely cited case study in histories of remote, computer-mediated warfare: the US Air Force’s ‘electronic barrier’, a system designed to detect and destroy communist truck convoys entering South Vietnam via the Ho Chi Minh Trail during the Vietnam War. Existing scholarship on the programme has foregrounded the technological novelty of the system, in particular its use of sensors, unmanned aircraft, and the computer centre from which the programme was remotely managed. This article seeks to provide an alternative perspective on the barrier by asking how human operators remained as fixtures in the system. To do so, I focus on ‘embodiment’ and ‘tacit knowledge’ through an analysis of the practices of photograph interpretation and data analysis which persisted despite efforts to successively computerise the barrier. Drawing on internal reports and memoranda gathered following extensive archival research, I show how these practices were required in an effort to manage critical, systemic problems of ambiguity and inaccuracy that could not be resolved by the computer. The effect was a constant drive for expansion in data and bombs, and the construction of a blunt and extraordinarily aggressive instrument which was instrumental in facilitating the unprecedented scale of the bombing campaign waged by the US Air Force on eastern Laos.
      PubDate: 2021-07-08
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00033-2
       
  • The hidden hierarchy of far-right digital guerrilla warfare

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The polarizing tendency of politically leaned social media is usually claimed to be spontaneous, or a by-product of underlying platform algorithms. This contribution revisits both claims by articulating the digital world of social media and rules derived from capitalist accumulation in the post-Fordist age, from a transdisciplinary perspective articulating the human and exact sciences. Behind claims of individual freedom, there is a rigid pyramidal hierarchy of power heavily using military techniques developed in the late years of the cold war, namely Russia Reflexive Control and the Boyd’s decision cycle in the USA. This hierarchy is not the old-style “command-and-control” from Fordist times, but an “emergent” one, whereby individual agents respond to informational stimuli, coordinated to move as a swarm. Such a post-Fordist organizational structure resembles guerrilla warfare. In this new world, it is the far right who plays the revolutionaries by deploying avant-garde guerrilla methods, while the so-called left paradoxically appears as conservatives defending the existing structure of exploitation. Although the tactical goal is unclear, the strategic objective of far-right guerrillas is to hold on to power and benefit particular groups to accumulate more capital. We draw examples from the Brazilian far right to support our claims.
      PubDate: 2021-06-09
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00032-3
       
  • It came from something awful: how a toxic troll army accidentally memed
           Donald Trump into office, by Dale Beran, 2019. St. Martin’s Publishing
           Group. ISBN: 9781250189745, 304 Pages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00030-5
       
  • Philip Di Salvo (2020): Digital Whistleblowing Platforms in Journalism:
           Encrypting Leaks. Palgrave Macmillan. 188 pages

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2021-06-08
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-021-00031-4
       
  • How did Russian and Iranian trolls’ disinformation toward Canadian
           issues diverge and converge'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The study analyzes Russian and Iranian trolls’ intervention in Canadian politics focusing on the 2015 election, revealing a wide spectrum of disinformation. Russian trolls showed some support for then prime minister Stephen Harper and were very critical of the current prime minister, Justin Trudeau. Also, they closely aligned themselves with conservative and far-right figures, while Iranian trolls supported the far left as well as the Palestinian cause. Iranian trolls frequently attacked the former prime minister, Harper, falsely accusing him of being a CIA agent and an ISIS supporter. However, Russian and Iranian trolls converged around the issue of the conflict in Syria with both showing support for Bashar Assad’s regime and animosity toward the Syrian White Helmets group.
      PubDate: 2021-02-12
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-020-00029-4
       
  • Notes on the role of the camera within a (virtual) war: the case of
           Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Since the outbreak of uprisings in Syria in 2011, which later became the ongoing armed conflict, the Syrian population has been using small digital cameras and personal mobile phones to produce a vast number of images as graphic testimonies of the crucial events taking place in the country. The documentary essay Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait (2014), co-directed by Ossama Mohammed and Wiam Simav Bedirxan, was partly made remixing these vernacular videos found online. This article is an aesthetic and sociocultural analysis of the film with the aim of remarking on the role of cameras and the power of images and cinema in a conflict such as the Syrian war, defined by a deep intermingling of actual and virtual struggle. How can the use of vernacular video of the Syrian conflict in film works influence the shaping of public perceptions of the conflict and launch a truly political reflection about it' To what extent can images be used as a political weapon in a hyper-mediatized era where, having proliferated to infinity, images have lost their strength' I argue that the political capacity of images is not only limited, it also depends to a great extent on mediations, gatekeepers and the material conditions of their production and dissemination, their motivations, creators and propagators, and on the aesthetical strategy used to (re)contextualize them and (re)shape the dominant representations of the conflict given by the mass media and by the authorities.
      PubDate: 2021-01-12
      DOI: 10.1057/s42984-020-00026-7
       
 
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