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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
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Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.303
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0035-8665 - ISSN (Online) 2052-0468
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Retraction: Impact of cold exposure on life satisfaction and physical
           composition of soldiers

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      Pages: e1 - e1
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002237ret
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Musculoskeletal injuries in UK service personnel and the impact of
           in-theatre rehabilitation during cold weather warfare training: Exercise
           CETUS 2020

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      Authors: Ferraby, D; Hayhurst, D, Fallowfield, J.
      Pages: 1 - 3
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002139
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Academic Department of Military Rehabilitation (ADMR): avoiding the
           pitfalls of 'the Walker Dip

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      Authors: Coppack, R. J; Ladlow, P, Cassidy, R. P, Egginton, N, Barker-Davies, R, Houston, A, Lunt, K. M, O'Sullivan, O, Bennett, A. N.
      Pages: 4 - 8
      Abstract: A key research theme identified during the 2021 Strategic Delivery Plan (SDP) for Defence Medical Services (DMS) Research was preventing and treating musculoskeletal injury (MSKI). MSKI is a significant burden to military populations globally, reducing both operational strength and force readiness. It is therefore essential that research is conducted to gain a greater understanding of the epidemiology, aetiology and risk factors associated with MSKI to develop targeted prevention strategies and rehabilitation interventions. The Academic Department of Military Rehabilitation (ADMR) and the recently established MSKI research-theme working group must use a combination of balance and flexibility when coordinating research priorities to ensure they align and reflect both higher level DMS and UK Defence Rehabilitation practitioner-driven priorities. This article describes the response ADMR have taken to meet and align with the requirements of the 2021 SDP.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2023-002469
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Significance of tibial MRI findings of special forces recruits at the
           onset of their training

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      Authors: Milgrom, C; Tsur, N, Eshed, I, Milgrom, Y, Beyth, S, Spitzer, E, Gofman, I, Finestone, A. S.
      Pages: 9 - 14
      Abstract: IntroductionMRI is commonly used to evaluate medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), based on grading assessments developed in civilian populations. When MTSS represents stress fracture, rest is required to allow for bone remodelling to occur. False positive evaluations can lead to unnecessary recruit attrition.MethodsThirty randomly selected new recruits to a special forces training unit underwent MRI of their tibias using the T2-Dixon sequence at the onset of training. Evaluation was according to the Fredericson MTSS grading system. Prior to undergoing MRI, anthropomorphic measurements, a survey of sports history and an orthopaedic examination of subject tibias were performed. Orthopaedic follow-up was through 11 weeks of training.ResultsMedial periosteal oedema without the presence of bone marrow oedema, corresponding to a grade 1 stress reaction, was present on MRI in 10 recruits (17 tibias). In only one case did the periosteal oedema include the posterior aspect of the medial cortex where medial tibial stress fractures usually occur. Tibial tenderness was present in seven tibias on examination done just prior to the MRI studies, but none were symptomatic and only one had periosteal oedema present on MRI, but without anatomical correlation between the site of the tenderness and the periosteal oedema. During subsequent training, five tibias in four recruits developed pain and tenderness. Two had periosteal oedema in their prior MRIs, but the location did not coincide anatomically with that of the tibial tenderness. The time from stopping sports before induction and the presence of periosteal oedema was not significant.ConclusionPeriosteal oedema, one of the hallmarks used in MRI grading systems to evaluate MTSS, was found to have a 37.7% false positive rate for anatomically corresponding tibial tenderness at the time of the examination and during subsequent training, indicating the grading systems’ low utility for the military.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-002041
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Nutritional knowledge in British Army recruits during basic training

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      Authors: Rawcliffe, A. J; Ogden, H. B, Rushmere, J, Morgan, A. S. L, Jacka, K, Struszczak, L, Chapman, S, Roberts, A.
      Pages: 15 - 19
      Abstract: BackgroundAppropriate nutritional intake is essential to optimise both general health and performance in military recruits. General nutritional knowledge is a significant and modifiable determinant of dietary behaviour; however, the level of nutritional knowledge in British Army recruits undertaking basic training is poorly understood.MethodsThe Nutritional Knowledge Questionnaire for Athletes was completed by 29 male (age: 22.3±3.8 years) and 26 female (age: 22.0±3.0 years) standard-entry recruits at the end of basic training, and 15 male (age: 20.7±3.2 years) infantry recruits both at the start and end of basic training for the British Army. Between-group and within-group differences in total and subcomponent (ie, carbohydrate, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals, general nutrition, fluid intake, and sporting performance) scores were analysed.ResultsStandard-entry male recruits had more correct answers (52%) than standard-entry female recruits (38%) and male infantry recruits (40%) at the end of training. Infantry recruits had similar levels of nutritional knowledge at the start (39% correct) and end (40% correct) of training. Nutritional knowledge related to protein (range: 53%–75% correct answers) and vitamins and minerals (range: 42%–63% correct answers) were the two highest scoring subcomponents within each group.ConclusionBritish Army recruits, in particular standard-entry female and infantry recruits, have poor nutritional knowledge, which did not improve throughout basic training. Better nutritional intervention, especially surrounding carbohydrate and fluid education, is required during British Army basic training to optimise career-long dietary behaviour.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-002036
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Followership: an undervalued concept in effective teams within the
           military and NHS

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      Authors: Adams, T; Gibson, A.
      Pages: 20 - 25
      Abstract: IntroductionLeadership is accepted as a crucial component of effective working within teams. Followership’s contribution to successful performance is increasingly recognised but understudied. This study evaluated followership levels in military doctors at different stages of their careers and made recommendations for how followership concepts can be used to develop the self and better understand the challenges of small team working.MethodsA self-report study in which Kelley’s followership questionnaire was distributed to 64 military doctors in three cohorts. 53 results were assessed using Kelley’s followership framework. Subgroup analysis was undertaken to look at differences depending on service, age, gender and career stage.ResultsThe study demonstrated a predominant exemplary followership style within military doctors. No statistical difference was identified at the 0.05 level in followership by career stage, age, gender or service in the sample group.ConclusionThis study gives insight into the attributes of doctors within the Defence Medical Services and laid out a methodology for further cohort evaluations of followership. It made recommendations on the areas of the field that require further research and how followership concepts may be included in further development courses and reporting for military medical personnel.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-002039
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Thoracic spinal anaesthesia for abdominal surgery in a humanitarian
           military field hospital: a prospective observational study

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      Authors: Aissaoui, Y; Bahi, M, El Khader, A, El Barni, R, Belhadj, A.
      Pages: 26 - 30
      Abstract: BackgroundProviding safe and effective anaesthesia in the context of humanitarian medicine is always a challenging situation. Spinal anaesthesia, and in particular its thoracic approach, represents a promising technique for such a limited-resource environment. This prospective observational study investigated the feasibility of thoracic spinal anaesthesia (TSA) for abdominal surgery in a field-deployed military hospital.Materials and methodsWe included adults scheduled for elective open cholecystectomy in a field hospital. Patients received TSA at the T9–T10 level. The primary outcomes were the feasibility of surgery under TSA and the haemodynamic/respiratory stability of this anaesthetic technique. The secondary outcomes included patient satisfaction and surgeon comfort regarding the anaesthesia technique and postoperative events (nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, postdural puncture headache).ResultsSurgery was performed successfully in 61 patients under TSA (90% female, 53±13 years old). Intraoperative pain scores were low, with a median Numeric Rating Scale score of 0 (IQR 0–2). Surgeon and patient satisfaction scores were excellent. The haemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable throughout the surgery. The incidence of postoperative events was low (nausea/vomiting=8%). None of our patients presented with postdural puncture headache or urinary retention.ConclusionTSA could be an effective anaesthetic technique for abdominal surgery in the context of a field hospital or austere environment.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002075
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Core stabilisation exercises reduce chronic low back pain in Air Force
           fighter pilots: a randomised controlled trial

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      Authors: Mendes, P. R. F; Gomes, S. R. A, Costa, L. D. O, Liguori, A. D. A. L, Bulhoes, L. C. C, Brasileiro, J. S.
      Pages: 31 - 36
      Abstract: BackgroundThere is evidence that core stabilisation, strength and endurance training contribute to reduce low back pain in the general population. However, we are not aware of the effect of these exercises on fighter aviation pilots. Therefore, the present study aims to investigate the effects of an exercise protocol on chronic low back pain in Brazilian Air Force fighter pilots. Changes in neck pain, lumbar disability, range of motion, strength and resistance were also investigated.MethodsFourteen participants with chronic low back pain were randomised into two groups: stabilisation exercise group (SEG—n=7), exercise protocol twice a week for 12 weeks) and the regular exercise group (REG—n=7), which performed their own usual exercise routine. The evaluations were carried out before and after the training period. The primary outcome was the intensity of low back pain and the secondary outcomes were cervical pain, functional disability, range of motion, maximum isometric strength and trunk muscle resistance.ResultsThe SEG had a significant reduction in low back pain compared with the REG (difference of 2.3 points, p=0.04) and a lower rate of cervical pain (difference of 2.5 points, p=0.01) at the end of the protocol. Maintenance of trunk muscle strength was also observed in the SEG over the period, while the REG presented a decrease in flexural strength to the right side (difference between groups: –3.7%, p=0.04). There were no differences in the rates of disability, range of motion or resistance to fatigue between groups.ConclusionsThe stabilisation exercise programme focused on the core muscles was successful in decreasing the fighter pilots’ chronic lumbar pain. Pilots are normally active; however, our results indicate that specific trunk training programmes should be offered considering the work needs of these subjects.Clinical trials‘Exercise protocol for pilots with back pain’ (registered: 09 October 2018)—NCT03713814 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03713814).
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-002005
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Influence of combat boot types on in-shoe forces and perceived comfort
           during unloaded and loaded walking

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      Authors: Yeo, E. X. S; Chhabra, K, Kong, P. W.
      Pages: 37 - 42
      Abstract: IntroductionCombat boots are essential protective gear for military personnel. The purposes of the present study were to examine (1) the influence of combat boot type on ground reaction force (GRF) variables and perceived comfort during unloaded and loaded walking and (2) the relationship between comfort and biomechanical measurements.MethodsFour types of combat boots with different physical features (eg, mass, thickness) and mechanical properties (eg, cushioning, rigidity) were compared across 61 male participants with experience in military marching while carrying heavy loads. In each boot type, participants completed a 10-m walk under an unloaded and a 20-kg loaded conditions at their preferred speeds. Peak force and loading rate during walking were measured using the loadsol wireless in-shoe sensor system. Comfort level was assessed using a 7-point Likert scale. Difference between loaded and unloaded walking, and across boot types were statistically compared. Correlation analyses were performed between comfort and GRF variables.ResultsOn average across all boot types, participants walked 2.1% slower when carrying 20-kg loads while experiencing 24.3% higher peak force and 20.8% higher loading rate. Boot D was perceived as most comfortable, followed by boots C, B and A (2(2)=115.4, p
      Keywords: Editor''s choice
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-002061
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • What do environment-related illnesses tell us about the character of
           military medicine and future clinical requirements'

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      Authors: Stacey, M. J; Brett, S, Fitchett, G, Hill, N. E, Woods, D.
      Pages: 43 - 46
      Abstract: Extreme environments present medical and occupational challenges that extend beyond generic resuscitation, to formulating bespoke diagnoses and prognoses and embarking on management pathways rarely encountered in civilian practice. Pathophysiological complexity and clinical uncertainty call for military physicians of all kinds to balance intuition with pragmatism, adapting according to the predominant patterns of care required. In an era of smaller operational footprints and less concentrated clinical experience, proposals aimed at improving the systematic care of Service Personnel incapacitated at environmental extremes must not be lost to corporate memory. These general issues are explored in the particular context of thermal stress and metabolic disruption. Specific focus is given to the accounts of military physicians who served on large-scale deployments into the heat of Iraq and Kuwait (Operation TELIC) and Oman (Exercise SAIF SAREEA). Generalisable insights into the enduring character of military medicine and future clinical requirements result.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-001934
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Innovation in education: the military medical ethics 'playing cards and
           smartphone application

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      Authors: Miron, M; Bricknell, M.
      Pages: 47 - 50
      Abstract: Military medical personnel need to understand military medical ethics to comply with international humanitarian law, national health practice and professional norms. Teaching this subject is constrained by a lack of educational resources, being further exacerbated by the limits imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper describes an innovative approach to deliver military medical ethics education using 52 scenarios published as a set of playing cards and a smartphone app. The rationale for the methodology and the development of these scenarios is summarised. This package forms a part of a ‘d(igital)-learning’ educational suite that includes physical cards, the app and a website for teaching both military and military medical ethics. The paper describes the experience of delivering this d-learning package in military medical ethics to UK and international audiences. The final sections offer a look ahead to the next stages for refinement to the current suite and the wider d-learning resources.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-001959
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Addressing moral injury in the military

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      Authors: Phelps; A. J., Adler, A. B., Belanger, S. A. H., Bennett, C., Cramm, H., Dell, L., Fikretoglu, D., Forbes, D., Heber, A., Hosseiny, F., Morganstein, J. C., Murphy, D., Nazarov, A., Pedlar, D., Richardson, J. D., Sadler, N., Williamson, V., Greenberg, N., Jetly, R., Members of the Five Eyes Mental Health Research Innovation Collaborative
      Pages: 51 - 55
      Abstract: Moral injury is a relatively new, but increasingly studied, construct in the field of mental health, particularly in relation to current and ex-serving military personnel. Moral injury refers to the enduring psychosocial, spiritual or ethical harms that can result from exposure to high-stakes events that strongly clash with one’s moral beliefs. There is a pressing need for further research to advance understanding of the nature of moral injury; its relationship to mental disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and depression; triggering events and underpinning mechanisms; and prevalence, prevention and treatment. In the meantime, military leaders have an immediate need for guidance on how moral injury should be addressed and, where possible, prevented. Such guidance should be theoretically sound, evidence-informed and ethically responsible. Further, the implementation of any practice change based on the guidance should contribute to the advancement of science through robust evaluation. This paper draws together current research on moral injury, best-practice approaches in the adjacent field of psychological resilience, and principles of effective implementation and evaluation. This research is combined with the military and veteran mental health expertise of the authors to provide guidance on the design, implementation and evaluation of moral injury interventions in the military. The paper discusses relevant training in military ethical practice, as well as the key roles leaders have in creating cohesive teams and having frank discussions about the moral and ethical challenges that military personnel face.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002128
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Effect of smoke-free policies in military settings on tobacco smoke
           exposure and smoking behaviour: a systematic review

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      Authors: Falconer Hall, T; Siddiqi, K.
      Pages: 56 - 63
      Abstract: IntroductionSmoke-free legislation has been instrumental in reducing secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in public places. However, the evidence of the impact of institutional smoke-free policies in settings such as healthcare and defence is weaker. Specifically, the literature on the effect of smoke-free policies in military settings has not yet been synthesised.MethodsThis review aimed to identify, critically appraise and synthesise the available evidence to evaluate the effect of defence smoke-free policies on SHS exposure. Eight electronic databases (eg, EMBASE, MEDLINE) were searched from inception to June 2020. We included English-language studies on smoke-free policies introduced in a defence setting, assessing their impact on SHS exposure (primary outcome) and healthcare utilisation, smoking behaviours and defence efficiency (secondary outcomes). Risk of bias was assessed using ROBINS-I. Synthesis without meta-analysis was conducted using vote counting of direction of effect.ResultsThe search retrieved 4503 citations of which eight met inclusion criteria; two controlled and six uncontrolled before-and-after studies. The evidence, although low-quality, from one study indicated reduced SHS exposure following the introduction of a defence smoke-free policy. For secondary outcomes the review found mixed results, with the quit rate being the one outcome favouring smoke-free policies. The cumulative confidence of evidence is uncertain and therefore reliable conclusions cannot be drawn from these studies.ConclusionsA research gap exists for high-quality studies on the impact of defence smoke-free policies which should use comparators and, if possible, randomisation. Policy-makers should introduce institutional smoke-free policies in defence settings within an evaluative framework to generate such evidence.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-001795
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Prescribed footwear and orthoses are not prophylactic in preventing lower
           extremity injuries in military tactical athletes: a systematic review with
           meta-analysis

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      Authors: Paradise, S. L; Beer, J. R, Cruz, C. A, Fechner, K. M, MacGregor, A. J, Fraser, J. J.
      Pages: 64 - 71
      Abstract: IntroductionMilitary members are exposed to high cumulative physical loads that frequently lead to injury. Prescribed footwear and orthoses have been used to prevent injury. The purpose of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to assess if prescribed prophylactic footwear or foot orthoses reduced the risk of lower extremity injury in military tactical athletes.MethodsMEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, SportDiscus, and Defense Technical Information Center databases were searched for randomised controlled trials published at any time that compared foot orthoses or prescribed footwear (to include shock-absorbing insoles and socks) with a placebo intervention or a no-treatment control. Methodological quality was assessed and the number of injuries, population at risk and duration of the study epoch were extracted and relative risk (RR) calculated. An omnibus meta-analysis was performed assessing all prescribed footwear and orthoses intervention studies, with subgroup analyses conducted on studies with similar interventions (ie, basketball athletic shoes, athletic shoes (prescribed by foot type), foot orthoses, shock-absorbing insoles, socks, tropical combat boots).ResultsOf 1673 studies identified, 22 were included. Three of eight studies that employed orthoses demonstrated significantly reduced overuse injuries compared with no-treatment controls (RR range: 0.34–0.68); one study showed neoprene insoles significantly decreased overuse injuries (RR: 0.75). There were no other significant effects in the individual studies and no protective effects observed in the omnibus meta-analysis or in the component subanalyses.ConclusionsPrescribed footwear and orthoses do not appear to have a prophylactic effect on lower quarter musculoskeletal injuries in military members and cannot be recommended at this time.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-001955
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Epidemiological methods used in the periodontal health research in
           military personnel: a systematic review

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      Authors: Barcena Garcia, M; Cobo Plana, J. M, Rodriguez Cagiao, G, Arcos Gonzalez, P. I.
      Pages: 72 - 77
      Abstract: IntroductionPeriodontal disease is a prevalent pathology in military personnel worldwide. The objective is to analyse the methodological features of periodontal health research performed in military personnel in their home countries.MethodsA PRISMA systematic review of literature was carried out in PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science databases on military periodontal health studies. Study design type, language, publication date, year, country, size and sample selection, age, sex, military, diagnostic procedure, examiners, periodontal, gingival and oral hygiene index were extracted.ResultsEighty-eight out of 5355 studies found were selected, published between 1921 and 2020, with samples ranging from 52 to 16 869 individuals, generally not randomised, and consisting mainly of men with a mean age of 25 years. Predominant studies were cross-sectional descriptive studies, carried out in the Army, on American military personnel, and in the English language. Most of the studies used the WHO periodontal probe handled by two or more examiners. The Löe and Silness gingival index and the Silness and Löe plaque index were the most used indexes to assess gingival condition and oral hygiene, respectively. Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs was the most widely used periodontal index.ConclusionsResearch on periodontal health carried out in military populations from the 1920s to the present has been performed from an almost exclusively descriptive approach. Issues such as the characteristics and representativeness of the samples, the epidemiological design and the different gingival-periodontal indexes used may limit the comparability of the study results.
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2021-001977
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Introducing heart rate variability technology into the UK defence mild
           traumatic brain injury service

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      Authors: Houston, A. D; Brunger, H, White, T, Ellis, H, Dharm-Datta, S, Brockman, K, Ladlow, P.
      Pages: 78 - 79
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002113
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Emergency endovascular management of a shrapnel injury to the left common
           carotid artery with impending blow-out

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      Authors: Mehra, R; Patra, V, Dhillan, R, Jha, M.
      Pages: 80 - 81
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002083
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Delayed management of a ring finger injury by a thinned and tubed groin
           flap in a forward surgical unit

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      Authors: Pfister, G; Ranc, C, Mathieu, L.
      Pages: 82 - 83
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002160
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Chemical burns in a French submariner

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      Authors: Bouis, F.-X; Le Roy, B, Agousty, M.
      Pages: 83 - 84
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002167
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • The cholera outbreak during the Balkan Wars in Greece and the anticholeric
           vaccine as a force multiplier of the Greek army

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      Authors: Diamantis, A; Velisariou, I, Magiorkinis, E.
      Pages: 85 - 86
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002094
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Liberty ship sinking disrupts military medical mobilisation in 1942

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      Authors: Shanks; G. D.
      Pages: 87 - 88
      Abstract: Medical mobilisation is vital to support tropical campaigns where many disease casualties are expected. Much of the medical supplies and equipment for nine station and three general hospitals that were being placed in Australia were aboard the Liberty Ship SS Rufus King when it went aground off Moreton Island on 7 July 1942. A concerted salvage operation rescued 85% of the stores from the freighter that had broken in half on the Amity sandbar. This emergency effort allowed medical support to New Guinea to proceed without delays due to medical supplies that were nearly lost at sea.
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002123
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Military exposure and kidney stones among US adults: findings from
           2007-2018 NHANES

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      Authors: Wang, Y; Ni, J, Mao, W, Zhang, H, Yin, L, Zhang, T, Wang, K, Chen, S, Chen, M.
      Pages: 89 - 91
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002117
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Vaccine efficacy against the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant during a COVID-19
           outbreak aboard a military ship

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      Authors: Maugey, N; Lefebvre, T, Tournier, J.-N, Neulat-Ripoll, F, Chapus, C, Grandperret, V, Raynaud, F, Letois, F, Dutasta, F, Janvier, F, Wolf, A, de Laval, F.
      Pages: 91 - 92
      Keywords: COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002082
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Aesthetics and identity: can tattoos help the prehospital clinician'

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      Authors: Kyle, E; Naumann, D. N, Bowley, D. M.
      Pages: 92 - 93
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002097
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Smoking cessation in the Greek Air Force: associations with shift work and
           flight status

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      Authors: Kalkanis, A; Diamantidou, V, Papadopoulos, D, Eleftheriou, M, Testelmans, D, Buyse, B.
      Pages: 93 - 94
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T03:15:29-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002144
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 1 (2024)
       
 
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