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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 285)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 251)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access  
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.303
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0035-8665 - ISSN (Online) 2052-0468
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • COP27 climate change conference: urgent action needed for Africa and the
           world

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      Authors: Zielinski, C; on behalf of the authorship group listed below
      Pages: e2 - e2
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002290
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Realising the ambition of the Defence Medical Services research strategy

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      Authors: Woodgate; P.
      Pages: 189 - 190
      Keywords: Open access
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002274
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Relative energy deficiency in military (RED-M)

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      Authors: W Constantini, N; Alves, E, L Mountjoy, M, E Ackerman, K.
      Pages: 191 - 192
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002341
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • 4A after access: a new mnemonic to aid timely administration of IV/IO
           treatment in trauma patients

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      Authors: Campbell, K; Scanlon, E, Bhanot, K, Harper, F, Naumann, D. N.
      Pages: 193 - 195
      Abstract: Administration of medication is a well-established part of prehospital trauma care. Guidance varies on the types of recommended medications and when they should be administered. Mnemonics have become commonplace in prehospital medicine to facilitate recall and retention. However, there is no comprehensive aid for the administration of medication in trauma patients. We propose a new mnemonic for the delivery of relevant intravenous or intraosseous medications in trauma patients. A ‘4A after Access’ approach should enhance memory recall for the efficient provision of patient care. These 4As are: antifibrinolysis, analgesia, antiemesis and antibiotics. This mnemonic is designed to be used as an optional aide memoire in conjunction with existing treatment algorithms in the military prehospital setting.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2023-002463
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Total hip and knee arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation in a
           military population

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      Authors: Li, A. D.-F; Eccleston, C. T, Abraham, V, Balazs, G. C, Goldman, A. H.
      Pages: 196 - 201
      Abstract: IntroductionThe military includes lower extremity amputees requiring arthroplasty; however, there is little literature on this population. The primary aim of this study was to report demographics and clinical factors in amputees who undergo total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA) in the Military Health System (MHS). Second, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are reported.MethodsThe Military Data Repository was queried for patients with lower extremity amputations and TKA or THA between 1 October 2014 and 12 October 2020. The medical records were reviewed and patients were contacted to complete PROMs. Mean follow-up for TKA and THA was 5.5 and 2.5 years, respectively.ResultsNineteen TKAs (76%) and eight THAs (28%) were performed in 25 patients. Mean age of TKA and THA patients at the time of arthroplasty was 57 years old. A majority of TKA (68%) and THA (57%) patients underwent amputations secondary to trauma. Nearly all TKAs were performed on the contralateral side to the amputation (95%), while half of THAs were performed on the ipsilateral side (50%). Two THAs (29%) were revised due to periprosthetic fractures, whereas six TKAs (32%) were revised or reoperated on due to infection. Ten TKA patients completed PROMs. The mean score on Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score for Joint Replacement (KOOS JR) was 41.8 and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global-10 (PROMIS-10) was 41.6 (Global Physical Health) and 49.6 (Global Mental Health).ConclusionsMost TKAs were performed on the contralateral limb, suggesting increased demand on the joint. The most common indication for amputation and post-TKA complication was trauma and infection, respectively. KOOS JR may not accurately capture the outcomes of this population, or they simply do worse. However, PROMIS-10 scores were similar to the non-amputee population, suggesting that the PROMIS-10 may be more useful than the KOOS JR.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002106
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The Mystery Arts Box Project: a qualitative exploration of the
           experiences, benefits, and challenges of participating in a remotely
           delivered art and craft project for British veterans with visual
           impairment

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      Authors: Castle, C; Engward, H, Kersey, T, Kirk-Partridge, L.
      Pages: 202 - 206
      Abstract: IntroductionThe clinical application of the arts among military personnel and veterans has been well documented, particularly in relation to service-related mental health difficulties. However, the impacts of engaging recreationally with art activities on general well-being remain underexplored and even more so among those living with visual impairment (VI). This pilot explored the artistic experiences of veterans with VI participating in a remotely delivered art and craft project during continued COVID-19 restrictions in Spring/Summer 2021.MethodsSix participants received a mystery arts box (MAB) containing a selection of materials, collated to encourage experimentation with unfamiliar techniques. Participants were asked to journal their process as they developed a final piece/pieces. They were invited to join group video calls to share work and ideas and seek guidance. Semistructured interviews were run with participants at the end of the project. Journal and interview data were thematically analysed.ResultsAnalysis identified 11 themes relating to initial and ongoing responses to the MAB and creative and journalling process. Several benefits were identified, including artistic learning, trying something new, and social, cognitive and emotional experiences. The value of the activity to participants’ lives within the context of the ongoing pandemic was also considered. Challenges were associated with the use of unfamiliar materials, impacts of sight loss and the limitations of remote delivery.ConclusionThis pilot brings to the fore the everyday artistic experience of veterans living with VI and considers the benefits, challenges and well-being implications of a remotely delivered arts activity. Findings illustrate the importance of ensuring accessibility of artistic activities to those for whom disability might limit participation and highlight the ongoing role that remotely delivered arts activities might play in meeting the social and recreational needs of individuals beyond the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Keywords: Open access, COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002174
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Secure app-based secondary healthcare clinical decision support to
           deployed forces in the UK Defence Medical Services

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      Authors: Naumann, D. N; McMenemy, L, Beaven, A, Bowley, D. M, Mountain, A, Bartels, O, Booker, R. J.
      Pages: 207 - 211
      Abstract: BackgroundModern instant messaging systems facilitate reach-back medical support for Defence Medical Services (DMS) by connecting deployed clinicians to remote specialists. The mobile app Pando (Forward Clinical, UK) has been used for this purpose by the DMS via the ‘Ask Advice’ function. We aimed to investigate the usage statistics for this technology in its first 1000 days to better understand its role in the DMS.MethodsAn observational study was undertaken using metadata extracted from the prospective database within the application server for clinical queries between June 2019 and February 2022. These data included details regarding number and name of specialties, timings, active users per day and the number of conversations.ResultsThere were 29 specialties, with 298 specialist users and 553 requests for advice. The highest volume of requests were for trauma and orthopaedics (n=116; 21.0%), ear, nose and throat (n=67; 12.1%) and dermatology (n=50; 9.0%). There was a median of 164 (IQR 82–257) users logged in per day (range 2–697). The number of requests during each day correlated with the number of users on that day (r=0.221 (95% CI 0.159 to 0.281); p
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002172
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Occupational health screening during Gurkha Central Selection: a
           retrospective cohort study

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      Authors: Wong, A. K. H; Paton, M, Dalbahadur, P, Williams, A. M, Semakula, F, Sweeney, C, Smith, M, Parsons, I. T.
      Pages: 212 - 215
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe selection process to the British Army’s Brigade of Gurkhas is rigorous, demanding and competitive. The ethos of recruitment to the Gurkhas is grounded in an overarching tenant: that selection is free, fair and transparent. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review reasons for potential recruits (PRs) to be deemed medically unsuitable or deferred suitability on medical grounds for selection to the Brigade of Gurkhas.MethodsA retrospective review was conducted by extracted data from published post-exercise reports for the past four years to ascertain numbers of PRs deemed medically fit, medically unsuitable or deferred suitability on medical grounds. The International Classification of Disease version 11 (ICD-11) codes were retrospectively assigned to code medical reasons for non-progression. Rates of medical non-progression were compared by year.ResultsA total of 3154 PRs were analysed between 2018 and 2021. There was no significant difference between PRs deemed medically fit and those deemed medically suitable or deferred on medical grounds over the study period (p=0.351). There was a significant difference in the ratio of PRs deferred on medical grounds and those deemed medically unsuitable over the study period (p
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002158
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Outcomes of UK military personnel treated with ice cold water immersion
           for exertional heat stroke

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      Authors: Wood, F; Roiz-de-Sa, D, Pynn, H, Smith, J. E, Bishop, J, Hemingway, R.
      Pages: 216 - 222
      Abstract: IntroductionDespite mitigation efforts, exertional heat stroke (EHS) is known to occur in military personnel during training and operations. It has significant potential to cause preventable morbidity and mortality. International consensus from sports medicine organisations supports treating EHS with early rapid cooling by immersing the casualty in cold water. However, evidence remains sparse and the practice is not yet widespread in the UK.MethodsFollowing changes to enable on-site ice cold water immersion (ICWI) at the Royal Marines Commando Training Centre, Lympstone, UK, we prospectively gathered data on 35 patients treated with ICWI over a 3-year period. These data included the incidence of adverse events (e.g. death, cardiac arrest or critical care admission) as the primary outcome. Basic anthropometric data, cooling rates achieved and biochemical and haematological test results on days 0–5 were also gathered and analysed.ResultsDespite being a cohort of patients in whom we might expect significant morbidity and mortality based on the severity of EHS at presentation, none experienced a serious adverse event. In this cohort with rapid initiation of effective cooling, biochemical derangement appeared less severe than that reported in previous studies. Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with a lower cooling rate across a range of values previously reported as potentially of clinical significance.ConclusionsThis case series supports recent updates to UK military guidance that ICWI should be more widely adopted for the treatment of EHS. Clinicians should be aware of likely patterns of blood test abnormalities in the days following EHS. Further work should seek to establish the impact of lower rates of cooling and develop strategies to optimise cooling in patients with higher BMI.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002133
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Use of a head-mounted patient display in a task driven anaesthesia
           simulator: a randomised trial

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      Authors: Cole, J. H; Hughey, S.
      Pages: 223 - 227
      Abstract: IntroductionHead-mounted displays (HMDs) are becoming increasingly investigated in the realm of healthcare. These devices are worn on the user’s head and display information directly to the eye. This allows for near-constant delivery of information, regardless of user position. Increasing advances in technology have allowed for miniaturisation, increasing sophistication, wireless capability and prolonged battery life, all of which allow for more opportunities for these devices to be used in a clinical setting.MethodsA prospective, randomised, controlled, parallel-group study was conducted. Subjects were randomised to either an HMD group or a non-HMD group. All subjects then underwent a standardised intraoperative care simulation experience consisting of multiple procedures that required completion within a set time limit. During this period, subjects concurrently monitored the physiological state of a simulated patient. Multiple standardised physiological derangements were displayed to the subjects via either the worn HMD or standard monitors. The primary outcome was the time to recognition of these physiological derangements.ResultsA total of 39 anaesthesia providers were enrolled in this study. There was a significant decrease in the total time it took them to recognise the simulated physiological derangements in the HMD group (difference of 38.2% (95% CI 20.3% to 56.1%); p=0.011) No significant differences in the time that it took to perform the required simulated procedures were observed. Significantly fewer physiological derangements were overlooked by the HMD group than the control group overall (relative risk reduction 0.78 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.94); p=0.003).ConclusionsRecent advances in HMD technology may be able to produce a functional adjunctive monitoring device that improves the speed with which anaesthesia providers respond to intraoperative events. This benefit comes without increasing distraction from the task. Further studies in true operative environments are needed to validate this technology.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002108
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Physiological and radiological parameters predicting outcome from
           penetrating traumatic brain injury treated in the deployed military
           setting

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      Authors: Breeze, J; Whitford, A, Gensheimer, W. G, Berg, C.
      Pages: 228 - 231
      Abstract: IntroductionPenetrating traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death in current military conflicts, and results in significant morbidity in survivors. Identifying those physiological and radiological parameters associated with worse clinical outcomes following penetrating TBI in the austere setting may assist military clinicians to provide optimal care.MethodAll emergency neurosurgical procedures performed at a Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility in Afghanistan for penetrating TBI between 01 January 2016 and 18 December 2020 were analysed. The odds of certain clinical outcomes (death and functional dependence post-discharge) occurring following surgery were matched to existing agreed preoperative variables described in current US and UK military guidelines. Additional physiological and radiological variables including those comprising the Rotterdam criteria of TBI used in civilian settings were additionally analysed to determine their potential utility in a military austere setting.Results55 casualties with penetrating TBI underwent surgery, all either by decompressive craniectomy (n=42) or craniotomy±elevation of skull fragments (n=13). The odds of dying in hospital attributable to TBI were greater with casualties with increased glucose on arrival (OR=70.014, CI=3.0399 to 1612.528, OR=70.014, p=0.008) or a mean arterial pressure
      Keywords: Editor''s choice
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002118
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Evolution of military evacuation activity in French Guiana over 10 years:
           a retrospective observational study

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      Authors: Vial, V; Egmann, G, Jost, D, Ilcinkas, C, Manot, C, Astrie, P.-M, Arrive, K, Travers, S, Andre, N.
      Pages: 232 - 236
      Abstract: BackgroundThree permanent military operations are established in French Guiana. The Cayenne medical unit is a French military search and rescue unit and provides MEDEVAC and CASEVAC for ill and injured soldiers. The main objective of this study was to describe the temporal trends of its evacuation missions over 10 years. The secondary purpose was to document the means used for these missions.MethodsThis retrospective observational study included patients who were evacuated for a medical reason or an injury during military operations in French Guiana. We collected the data from the computerised registers the medical department had stored.ResultsFrom 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2019, 1070 patients were included, representing a median annual incidence of 115 (IQR 91–122) evacuations. Of these, 602 (59%) were evacuated by helicopter, 214 (21%) by airplane, 182 (18%) by ambulance and 19 (2%) by pirogue.Reasons for evacuation were diseases in 664 (62%) patients, non-battle injuries in 389 (36%) patients and battle injuries in 17 (2%) patients. Finally, 286 (29%) evacuations were MEDEVAC and 712 (71%) were CASEVAC.Over the years, the increasing number of evacuations reached a maximum of 183 in 2018. Helicopter evacuations, once the primary mode of evacuation, have declined proportionately in favour of other means of evacuation.ConclusionEvacuation missions by the Cayenne medical unit increased over the 10-year study period, while helicopter use decreased. This evolution is a response to the constraints of adapting military operations to fight against illegal gold mining in the Amazonian Forest. Improvement of the means and procedures allows provision of the best care to patients while ensuring the ongoing conduct of military operations.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002125
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Adherence to Healthy Eating Index-2015 and severity of disease in
           hospitalised military patients with COVID-19: a cross sectional study

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      Authors: Parastouei, K; Shokooee Jud, S, Sepandi, M, Abbaszadeh, S, Samadi, M, Meftahi, G, Taghdir, M.
      Pages: 237 - 241
      Abstract: IntroductionProper nutrition can play an important role in preventing and improving disease progression in patients with COVID-19. The Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) is one of the most common measures used to assess overall nutritional quality. This research aimed to identify the relationship between the HEI-2015 score and disease severity in hospitalised military patients with COVID-19.MethodsThis cross-sectional study was conducted in 295 hospitalised military patients (retired military and military reserve) with COVID-19. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess food intake. To evaluate the quality of the diet, the HEI-2015 score was calculated. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to measure the association between HEI-2015 scores and disease severity (intensive care unit (ICU) admission and length of hospital stay greater than 4 days) in hospitalised military patients with COVID-19.ResultsThe mean HEI-2015 score was significantly higher in non-ICU patients than in ICU patients (58.39±15.02 vs 53.54±15.65, p=0.01). After adjusting for possible confounding factors including age, sex, comorbidities, calorie intake, body mass index and physical activity, adherence to HEI-2015 inversely related to ICU admission (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.00) and length of hospital stay of more than 4 days (OR 0.99; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.00) in hospitalised military patients with COVID-19, although statistically not significant.ConclusionsAccording to the results of the study, adherence to HEI-2015 inversely related to both ICU admission and length of hospital stay in hospitalised military patients with COVID-19, although it was not statistically significant.
      Keywords: COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002173
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Musculoskeletal injury in military specialists: a 2-year retrospective
           study

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      Authors: Hayhurst, D; Warner, M, Stokes, M, Fallowfield, J.
      Pages: 242 - 247
      Abstract: BackgroundMilitary specialists are elite personnel who are trained to work across diverse operational environments where a high level of physical conditioning is a prerequisite for their role. Anecdotally, personnel are acknowledged to be at high risk of developing musculoskeletal injuries (MSKIs). However, there are presently no published data on this UK military population to support this view. This is the first (2-year) retrospective epidemiological study to identify the MSKI sustained by this military population.MethodsAll MSKI reported over a 2-year period (January 2018–December 2019) were recorded to identify the incidence, frequency, nature, onset, cause, location and reporting times. Injuries were described using injury count and relative frequency (percentage). Time at risk for each personnel day was calculated as 365 days.ResultsA total of 199 personnel reported 229 injuries over the reporting periods. The injury incidence rates were 26.8 personnel per 100 person years (2018) and 27.7 personnel per 100 person years (2019), respectively. Military training accounted for the highest number of injuries (32%), followed by ‘other injuries’ (28%), personal training (28%) and sport (12%). The leading activity associated with injury was weight training (15%), followed by running (11%) and military exercise (10%). Lower extremity injuries accounted for the highest number of injuries (40%), followed by trunk (36%) and upper extremity (24%) injuries.ConclusionThis study identifies the MSKI profile of a military specialist population over a 2-year period. Areas where modifiable risk factors may be identified to reduce risk of injury are highlighted. Recommendations for further research include investigating injury burden and the impact of injury on operational readiness.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002165
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • What can the Defence Medical Services learn from the COVID-19 pandemic in
           order to be ready for the future'

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      Authors: Newman; C.
      Pages: 248 - 250
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic placed significant global pressure on public health, with the demand for specialist clinical input, equipment and therapeutics often outweighing supply in many well-established healthcare systems. The UK was no exception to this burden, resulting in unprecedented demands being placed on its NHS. Throughout the pandemic, the UK Defence Medical Services (DMS) aided the civilian healthcare sector, while concurrently adapting as an organisation to meet its enduring commitment in promoting the operational output of the wider UK Armed Forces. This paper serves to provide an overview of some of these key activities while offering proposed lessons which can be learnt, in order to promote the DMS’ output in times of future crises. Of note, the DMS aided to mitigate surge demands placed on the NHS’ supply chain, assisting in promoting its resilience to provide key materials to civilian clinical personnel. Adaptation of military policy generation mechanisms, together with adoption of novel technological approaches to promote remote working, empowered efficient DMS operational output throughout the pandemic. Direct provision of personnel to assist in the NHS’ clinical output served to foster mutually beneficial interorganisational relationships, while providing objective benefit for the UK public.This paper was selected as the BMJ Military Health Royal Society of Medicine Colt Foundation National Essay Prize Winner 2021.
      Keywords: COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002205
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Retrospective spatial analysis of cases of COVID-19 in a single military
           accommodation block corridor, RMAS, January-March 21

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      Authors: Taylor, H; Routledge, M, Fawcett, J, Ross, D.
      Pages: 251 - 254
      Abstract: Shared ablutions and stairwells, corridor cross-ventilation and non-deliberate perflation (natural draft blowing through a space) are potential risk factors for COVID-19 transmission in corridor-based accommodation. This paper uses retrospective spatial analysis to identify potential built environmental risk factors during the January–March 2021 outbreak in Victory College, Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.Distance was measured in units of single room spacing. Odds, ORs and 95% CIs were calculated to identify and measure associations between distance from exposure and having COVID-19. Distance response trends were assessed using Pearson’s 2 for trend test. Linear relationships were tested using the t-test or rank-sum test.Stairwells and ablutions were not identified as likely sources of infection for all corridor occupants. Assuming occupants used their nearest ablutions, closer distance among those attributed to using ablutions 2 (one of four sets of ablutions), was identified as a risk factor (p=0.05). Testing distance response by 2 linear trend testing showed a potential association between nearest adjacent positive room and COVID-19 (p=0.06), strongest if dominant air movement along the corridor length was from the left (p=0.10) compared with the right (p=0.24).Formal qualitative spatial analysis and environmental assessment of ventilation and air movement has a role in outbreak investigation in assessing factors related to the built environment. Environmental investigations would best inform outbreak investigations if undertaken contemporaneously. Pre-emptive and retrospective studies can help inform public health advice to military establishments in business continuity planning for isolation facilities, during outbreaks or in future development of the built environment.
      Keywords: COVID-19
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002204
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Body dysmorphic disorder, muscle dysmorphia, weight and shape
           dissatisfaction and the use of appearance-enhancing drugs in the military:
           a systematic review

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      Authors: Applewhite, B; Olivola, M, Tweed, C, Wesemann, U, Himmerich, H.
      Pages: 255 - 266
      Abstract: BackgroundBody dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and muscle dysmorphia (MD) are common but often underdiagnosed disorders. These disorders have rarely been explored in the context of military personnel by mental health researchers despite the emphasis on physical fitness in military populations. We conducted a comprehensive systematic literature review on scientific studies of BDD and MD and the accompanying symptoms within the military.MethodsWe used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines and used PubMed, Web of Science and PsycINFO as databases with "body dysmorphic disorder," "muscle dysmorphia," "body image," "performance and image enhancing drugs," "anabolic steroid," military personnel," "soldiers," "navy," "air force," "army" and "armed forces" as search terms.ResultsA total of 20 eligible articles reporting data of 42 952 study participants were used. According to the identified literature, prevalence rates of BDD in the military are ~10% in men and ~20% in women, whereas ~15% of men and ~5% of women may suffer from MD. Further identified related problems in military populations were excessive bodybuilding, the use of anabolic drugs, the intake of stimulants, weight and shape concerns, and weight-control behaviours.ConclusionsBDD, MD, as well as the use of anabolic and stimulating drugs, are highly prevalent in military personnel. Despite the importance of these problems in the military, there are no military-specific treatment studies available. A pre-existing focus on physical appearance and fitness might contribute to the decision to pursue a professional military career. The military environment might be a maintaining factor of BDD or MD, but not the ultimate cause of the disorder in an affected individual.
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmjmilitary-2022-002135
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Broken silicone earplugs: removal success using a small camera in a
           deployed environment

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      Authors: Hammond, W. T; Gray, M. W.
      Pages: 267 - 268
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002251
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Eyes on the target: band-associated ocular injury in military training

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      Authors: Nitzan, I; Cohen, B, Akavian, I, Shmueli, O, Heller, D.
      Pages: 268 - 269
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2023-002348
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Creating a military medical school: the 'Castrense experience in Italy

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      Authors: Zampieri, F; Zanatta, A.
      Pages: 270 - 271
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2023-002465
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Neurosurgical management of penetrating spinal cord injury in the French
           Armed Forces during the Afghan Campaign

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      Authors: Fawaz, R; Maison, F. L, Beucler, N, Delmas, J.-M, Ene, B, Dulou, R, Dagain, A, Fouet, M.
      Pages: 272 - 273
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002255
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Application of near-infrared spectroscopy to triage of traumatic brain
           injuries in high-intensity conflicts

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      Authors: Fawaz, R; Laitselart, P, Morvan, J.-B, Riff, J.-C, Delmas, J.-M, Dagain, A, Joubert, C.
      Pages: 273 - 274
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002301
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Utilising an E-Reader as a medical tactical aide memoir (MedTAM) platform
           in the military prehospital environment

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      Authors: Kirkham; H.
      Pages: 275 - 275
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002295
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Pharmacovigilance in Defence Primary Healthcare: a simple educational
           intervention to raise awareness of risk of opioid dependency

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      Authors: Adams; G.
      Pages: 276 - 277
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002233
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Investigation of military patients with high-kinetic energy gunshot wounds

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      Authors: Akbalik, S; Taslıdere, B, Erdogan, O, Sonmez, E.
      Pages: 277 - 278
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002187
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Management and prevention of surgeon skill decay during US military
           deployment: a response to the UK

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      Authors: Morris, C. A; Beery, J. H, Stinner, D. J.
      Pages: 279 - 279
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002286
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Early training in clinical ultrasound for general-practitioner military
           residents

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      Authors: Cazes, N; Galant, J, Renard, A, Boutillier Du Retail, C, Leyral, J.
      Pages: 280 - 281
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002266
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Network analysis of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol
           misuse in treatment-seeking UK Armed Forces veterans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Biscoe, N; Baumann, J, Murphy, D.
      Pages: 281 - 282
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T00:45:26-07:00
      DOI: 10.1136/military-2022-002329
      Issue No: Vol. 170, No. 3 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 285)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 251)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access  
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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