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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
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Media, War & Conflict
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.585
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1750-6352 - ISSN (Online) 1750-6360
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • The War on Terror beyond the barrel of a gun: The procedural rhetorics of
           the boardgame Labyrinth

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      Authors: Thomas Ambrosio, Jonathan Ross
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      Utilizing Bogost’s procedural rhetoric framework in his book Persuasive Games, this article examines Labyrinth, a boardgame that simulates the conflict between the United States and global terrorism. The authors systematically integrate ludology (rules/gameplay) and narratology (narratives/representations) to illustrate how Labyrinth was intentionally designed so that players became active participants in a narrative about how good governance undermines the sources of terrorism and the counterproductive nature of militarized counterterrorism, as well as bear witness to the agency of the Muslim world and the region’s political dynamism on the tabletop. This is a very different account of the War on Terror than has previously been studied in the literature, which has focused overwhelmingly on first-person shooter videogames and, in turn, has provided a very limited range of how this conflict can be represented in ludic form. However, Labyrinth is not alone, and the wargames that many players grew up with have given way to a variety of boardgames which approach complex historical or contemporary situations and environments beyond simply killing one’s enemies. This represents a diverse, but largely untapped, resource already in the public space and ready to be investigated. Media studies can therefore benefit from considering how boardgames similar to Labyrinth present alternative ways in which the ‘real world’ has been, and indeed can be, translated through popular culture objects.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T11:23:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221108824
       
  • The Kosovo war and the Washington Post: Bombings and alignments

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      Authors: Astrid A Fleischer
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the alignments on the Kosovo war during the spring of 1999 in the Washington Post newspaper. How did the Washington Post represent the events during Operation Allied Force, NATO’s war against Yugoslavia' How did reporters align themselves with the narrated events' What linguistic and other means signal alignments in the Washington Post discourse on the war' The examined linguistic structures (evaluative vocabulary and agent inclusion/exclusion), the identified themes (in particular, demonization of the Serbs), and the lack of critical voices suggest an alignment with NATO and US government official discourse. The article concludes that the Washington Post did not challenge the dominant national discourse during the Kosovo war.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T11:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221078015
       
  • Corrigendum to “Book review: British Media and the Rwandan
           Genocide”

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      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T11:36:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221116957
       
  • ‘We may have bad days . . . that doesn’t make us killers’: How
           military veterans perceive contemporary British media representations of
           military and post-military life

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      Authors: Katy Parry, Jenna Pitchford-Hyde
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last two decades of long wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the media’s attention on military veterans in the UK has been characterized by a series of shifts: from a focus on combat operations; to initiatives to support transition to civilian life; and finally to a largely invisible presence of veteran issues in the mediated public sphere. This article presents findings from an online qualitative survey conducted with British veterans in 2020. The authors’ primary focus is on how veterans express their concerns when asked about varied televised representations of military and post-military experience. How did the respondents perceive differences across television genres (drama, news, reality TV), and how did this affect their engagement' How do they see their veteran identity reflected back at them through popular media culture'There is a growing research interest in ‘veteran studies’ from a range of disciplines, but the relationship between veteran identity and perceptions of (post)-military representations remains largely under-researched, at least in the UK context. One concern is that negative or misleading stereotypes of veterans among publics could hinder their successful reintegration into society, but the authors are interested in how veterans make sense of such representations across popular media culture, how they imagine the ‘general public’ audience in their reflections, and the nature of veteran identity they project within the survey responses. This study finds that anxieties about ‘mad, bad or sad’ stereotypical representations of veterans continue, but the diversity within its findings also reaffirms the importance of not treating veterans as a homogeneous group in research.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T12:54:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221113958
       
  • Exploring the use of #MyAnglophoneCrisisStory on Twitter to understand the
           impacts of the Cameroon Anglophone Crisis

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      Authors: Soomin Lee, Lynn Cockburn, Julius T. Nganji
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      Since October 2016, Cameroon has been involved in a violent conflict known as the Anglophone Crisis. This study examines the impact of the hashtag #MyAnglophoneCrisisStory on Twitter in capturing and amplifying the stories of people affected by the crisis. Using R, the authors extracted and analyzed tweets using this hashtag that were posted between 21 October 2020 and 3 November 2020. Only tweets posted in English and French languages were included. To understand the content of the tweets, the authors inductively coded and manually analyzed a total of 1064 tweets, replies, and comments. A categorical analysis revealed the presence of three different types of tweets: ‘Story’, ‘Response to Story’, and ‘Awareness and Advocacy’. The ‘Story’ category had four distinct themes: (1) Senseless Loss of Life: Shot and Killed; (2) The Disappeared: Lost and Kidnapped; (3) On the Move/Elusive Safety: Escape, Displacement; and (4) Prevention and Trauma, Mental Health, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. This study supports the concept that even short tweets can have a significant impact and signals the need for more attention and research on this overlooked conflict. Future work can involve the use of more advanced analysis tools to conduct a more thorough examination of tweets.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T12:08:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221103487
       
  • Death’s common sense: Casualty counts in war reportage from Syria
           and beyond

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      Authors: Isaac Blacksin
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      In distilling war to the amount of bodily harms it causes, war becomes measurable, comparable, and intelligible in its journalistic depiction. Yet the self-evidence of casualty counts mystifies both the contingencies of numerical production and the discursive authority that numbers are employed to evoke. Utilizing two years of ethnographic research with the international press corps in Syria, Iraq, and Lebanon, this article argues that the importance of casualty counts may be less the statistical reality of war such numbers purport to deliver than it is the symbolism these numbers provide. The ongoing conflict in Syria provides a central case study, approached ethnographically through two registers. First, the author examines on-the-ground casualty counting, demonstrating that what cannot be counted of war yet affects those journalists tasked to quantify war. This circumstance throws into doubt the utility of numbers – and the authority of journalism – for distilling war’s reality. Second, he examines how data on total wartime deaths in Syria, collected by monitoring organizations, is acquired and reproduced by journalists. Here journalists must reckon with the translation of statistical uncertainty into symbolic truth. Finally, the author reflects on the particularity of casualty counts as a journalistic convention, and considers how this particularity is hidden behind a journalistic common sense.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T12:05:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221101269
       
  • Ringing true' The persuasiveness of Russian strategic narratives

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      Authors: Charlotte Wagnsson, Magnus Lundström
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      International Relations (IR) scholars have theorized the significance of communication and messaging across state borders, using notions such as soft power, sharp power, propaganda and illiberal communication. This study contributes to this body of research by investigating narrative persuasiveness by way of a large-scale experimental exploration of narrative reception. The projection of strategic narratives has become a central feature of modern influencing across borders. Despite the existence of a growing literature on the potentially harmful effects of such narratives, however, their persuasiveness remains under-researched. This article seeks to help fill this gap by asking what might induce people in Sweden to side with strategic narratives projected by Sputnik, the Russian state-funded news media platform. The article puts a central component of Walter Fisher’s classic narrative paradigm to the test: the notions of narrative probability (consistency and coherence) and fidelity (previous life experience). In a rare large-scale survey experiment (N = 2,032), three narratives from Sputnik were presented to respondents to establish the potential perceived narrative probability and fidelity. Contrary to Fisher’s argument and some previous works on strategic narratives, the results show that people can be persuaded by a narrative without having personal experience of the topic, and despite regarding the text as incoherent. This indicates that information influence projected through strategic narratives can be effective regardless of the form of the message and even when introducing unfamiliar ideas. This is an interesting addition to findings in previous studies that source awareness does not negatively affect the effectiveness of strategic narratives. The article ends by highlighting contributions to previous research on persuasion and by suggesting avenues ahead.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T12:58:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221101273
       
  • The platformization of military communication: The digital strategy of the
           Israel Defense Forces on Twitter

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      Authors: Alessandra Massa, Giuseppe Anzera
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      Platforms are conditioning the way public communication is conducted while presenting themselves as neutral connectors. Social media logic encompasses norms, strategies, mechanisms and economies acting at the intersection between online platforms and society. Military communication is adapting itself to communicative and socio-technical innovations dictated by online platforms and social network sites. Armies are currently using digital media and online platforms in at least two different ways: a promotional one, based on the ‘normalization’ of militarism, and a conflictual one, based on the display and management of conflicts. In this article, the authors apply qualitative content analysis to investigate the platformed strategy of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Twitter account. Results show how the IDF embraces platformization and uses social media logic to develop a coherent narrative, projecting an attractive image, establishing an international positioning and defining international interlocutors. The institution of communicative formats, the multiplication of themes and representational artefacts, and a re-defined aesthetics of army and violence are enabled by social media logic. Tweets from the IDF follow a dual path: they contribute to normalizing militarism and act on the conflictual display of current affairs.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:12:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221101257
       
  • ‘No difference between journalism and suicide’: Challenges for
           journalists covering conflict in Balochistan

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      Authors: Sidra Agha, Márton Demeter
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      The safety of journalists reporting from conflict zones is a complex issue as they are exposed to a variety of challenges on a daily basis. This research aims to identify those multi-dimensional challenges that make Balochistan one of the world’s riskiest places for journalists. Based on 30 in-depth interviews with journalists working in the area, the authors found that the dynamics of conflict in Balochistan are different from those in other parts of Pakistan. Their findings reveal that different threatening agents – nationalist movements, separatist groups, the international agencies active there and the high level of extremism – all mean that journalists often cannot even identify the exact sources of threats. Moreover, journalists state that they receive no help from their media houses when they are reporting from conflict zones and look to the Pakistani army to protect the interests of the Baloch people while facing such challenges and risks.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T01:47:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221101258
       
  • Media reverberations on the ‘red line’: Syria, metaphor and
           narrative in news media

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      Authors: Federica Ferrari
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses a CADS (Corpus Assisted Discourse Studies) approach to identify a series of axes around which degrees of persuasion can be mapped in debates about international affairs. The author investigates how US and UK news media reported Obama’s use of the term ‘red line’ to describe the potential transgression if Syrian leader Assad used chemical weapons on civilians, which Assad then did. The article examines the connotational, argumentational and rhetorical behaviour of ‘red line’ across news media in the period 4–28 September 2013. In a corpus-assisted analysis of ‘red line’, six discoursal factors emerged as persuasive axes at work: (1) leader’s image; (2) ideological positioning, even in mutual intervention; (3) persuasion consistency; (4) factual investigation; (5) factual interpretation reporting; and (6) evaluated metaphor development. These axes proactively work at the crossroads of metaphor and narrative as transformative and mutually interactive agents in discoursal change. The analysis also identified other subcategories of research potential, plus correlated lexis and concepts such as ‘weakness’ vs ‘strength’. The study’s significance is to ground reflection on the function of metaphor and narrative in steering sense-making in diplomatic practice and to highlight their pragmatic force and dynamics – here in the news genre.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T06:34:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221078014
       
  • Conflict in the international system in the time of Trump: Strategic
           narratives in White House daily newsletters

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      Authors: Faith Leslie, Laura Roselle
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      During the Trump administration, official daily newsletters served as an important form of communication between the President and his constituents. These newsletters provided an overview of how the Trump Administration perceived conflict in the international system, the role and characteristics of the United States and other actors, and policy priorities. These newsletters, 1600 Daily, West Wing Reads, and Resolute Reads, provided a unique and important data source for understanding the Trump administration’s strategic narratives on the international system, especially in the realm of conflict. This article analyzes 810 daily newsletters from March 2017 to March 2020 to assess the administration’s narratives about the international system and several areas of conflict including relations with North Korea, Russia, and China. As the past four years of the Trump presidency saw tensions increase in many areas of American foreign policy, it is necessary to understand the narratives that shaped the Trump administration’s combative approach to diplomacy. The authors find that the strategic narratives of the Trump administration took a unilateral, transactional, and zero-sum approach to foreign policy. The newsletters reflected a prioritization of conflict with long-held allies and a focus on competition with enemies who undermine US dominance in the international system, mainly China and Russia. Within this discussion of foreign policy, this research additionally found a significant emphasis on trade policy, set within a conflictual, mercantilist framework. These newsletters set out conflictual strategic narratives that sought to shape the international system.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T12:45:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221082610
       
  • Multilingual public diplomacy: Strategic communication of Israeli Defence
           Forces (IDF) in Twitter during Operation Guardian of the Walls

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      Authors: José Manuel Moreno-Mercado, Adolfo Calatrava-García
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      Operation Guardian of the Walls was the most serious military conflict between the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) and Palestinian armed groups since 2014. This article aims to explore the Organized Persuasive Communication (OPC) made by IDF, in English, Spanish and French, during the 11 days of the escalation of the war. For this purpose, it has resorted to techniques typical of computational science, specifically the unsupervised machine learning Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) and sentiment analysis (multilingual). The data show that there are no significant differences between a range of official Twitter accounts giving a process of information uniformity. The results of the study allow us to know the scope of IDF’s communication within the framework of the so-called new Israeli diplomacy. In addition, this text attempts to demonstrate the usefulness of text mining and Natural Language Processing (NLP) to strategic studies and international relations.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T10:32:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221082608
       
  • Book review: British Media and the Rwandan Genocide

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      Authors: Catherine Bond
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T07:07:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352211073201
       
  • Messiness in photography, war and transitions to peace: Revisiting Bosnia:
           Uncertain Paths to Peace

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      Authors: Rasmus Bellmer, Frank Möller
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.
      During and after the wars in ex-Yugoslavia, Bosnia was a laboratory for new photographic approaches to war, violence and civilian suffering. Among these approaches, Fred Ritchin and Gilles Peress’s online photo essay, Bosnia: Uncertain Paths to Peace (1996), emphasized interpretive openness, plurality of meaning, narrative non-linearity and audience interaction, thus redefining as merits what photojournalism had formerly regarded as liabilities. The project convincingly represented the ongoing conflict’s multilayeredness and the vicissitudes of the transition to peace: on a day-to-day level, ambivalence ruled and alliances shifted; chaos, confusion and unpredictability prevailed. The project’s users experience the conflict’s messiness through the website’s overall organization which inhibits easy orientation, thus reproducing the conflict’s disorder. In the grids, in particular, non-sequitur panel-to-panel transitions illustrate the conflict’s lack of sense as it is traditionally understood. The project is an important precursor to current war photography, aiming to acknowledge the messiness of violent conflict rather than reducing it to simple but misleading narratives.
      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T09:20:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352211072463
       
  • Book Review: Transmitted Wounds: Media and the Mediation of Trauma

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      Authors: Gretchen Hoak
      First page: 399
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T05:48:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221077480
       
  • Book Review: The Desertmakers: Travel, War, and the State in Latin America

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      Authors: W George Lovell
      First page: 401
      Abstract: Media, War & Conflict, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media, War & Conflict
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T11:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17506352221081574
       
 
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