A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 285)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 252)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access  
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Military Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.373
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0026-4075 - ISSN (Online) 1930-613X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Foreword: U.S. Marine Gender Integration in Recruit Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe 2020 National Defense Authorization Act mandated that the Marine Corps not segregate recruit training by gender. This Military Medicine supplement details an independent academic study contracted by the Marine Corps Training and Education Command to inform the Marine Corps’ future approaches to gender integration at recruit training. The authors conclude that with proper science-based training and an intentional approach to gender integration, the Marine Corps can bolster gender integration without losing its traditions, high standards, or warrior ethos in recruit training. A feasible path lies ahead to enhance the Corps’ legacy of success. This special issue supports the Marine Corps Training and Education Command 2030 posture statement for leveraging science and technology for policy and doctrine to prepare and modernize the Marine Corps for the future operating environment.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usae244
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Design Considerations for a Multidisciplinary Approach to Provide Policy
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 3 - 11
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionRecruit training is designed to transform civilians into physically fit military service members, who embody their service’s core values and possess military discipline and skills. At the time this research began, the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) remained the only service that segregated recruits by gender at the lowest unit level (e.g., platoon) and employed gender-segregated drill instructor teams. USMC’s Marine Corps Recruit Depots (MCRD) must comply with a 2020 Congressional Mandate to not segregate training by gender in Parris Island by 2025 and San Diego by 2028. In turn, USMC requested an independent scientific study to analyze current approaches to gender integration at recruit training to propose alternate models and other policy recommendations that increase gender integration while maintaining current USMC standards. The Marine Corps is currently evaluating alternate models and recommendations to optimize entry-level training. This article outlines considerations for choosing the optimal research study design, research methods, and types of data collected in a study intended to provide policy recommendations on gender-integrated recruit training for the USMC.Materials and MethodsResearch data were collected during visits to the MCRDs and selected recruit training locations for the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Coast Guard. Data collection on USMC recruits from three cohorts involved social science assessments (focus groups and surveys) and human performance testing (countermovement jumps and isometric mid-thigh pulls, sleep and activity wearables, and cortisol data) at multiple points in the training cycle. Data on recruits from the sister services were limited to social science assessments. Approximately 600 recruits between the two MCRDs and 160 recruits from the sister services participated in the study during a 7-month timeframe in 2021. The research team conducted extensive ethnographic observations of recruit training at all selected research sites and interviewed training cadre, drill instructors, and service leadership responsible for recruit training (∼90 interviews). Additionally, the research team interviewed 20 experts on gender integration or recruit training who possessed alternate viewpoints from the current USMC practice.ResultsThe mixed methods study was designed to assess the current gender integration practices at recruit training across the services to generate alternative models of gender integration for USMC. The research team developed a set of multidisciplinary objectives and research questions serving as the foundation of the research study design and data collection process. The study was designed to collect qualitative, quantitative, and administrative data informed by social science and human performance disciplines. To ensure that all aspects and implications relevant to gender integration were considered, select data were collected across services and with stakeholders at all levels.ConclusionsThis multidisciplinary research approach provided a comprehensive picture of the current USMC recruit training models. The research team captured multiple perspectives and data points for analysis through an expansive view on gender integration across all services, by interacting with participants at all levels of the institutions in varied ways. The information and data gathered enabled the research team to establish objective, data-driven alternate models, and recommendations for enhancing gender integration at recruit training for the USMC.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usad037
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Neuromuscular Strength and Power Predict Musculoskeletal Injury and
           Attrition During Marine Corps Recruit Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 12 - 20
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionElevated rates of musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) and attrition are documented in military recruit training. By identifying and addressing modifiable risk factors, the rate of successful training completion and military readiness can be enhanced. Despite their impact, the causes of MSIs and attrition among U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) recruits remain underexplored. This study investigates demographic, psychological, and physiological predictors of MSIs and attrition among USMC recruits.Materials and MethodsIn this prospective cohort study, we evaluated USMC recruits at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island and San Diego. Recruits were briefed and invited to volunteer. All recruits who were medically cleared to participate in recruit training were eligible to participate in the study. We gathered baseline data on potential predictors at the start of training, with follow-up data on MSIs and attrition collected post-training. Analyzed predictors encompassed dynamic and static strength measures from countermovement jumps, isometric mid-thigh pulls; and participant surveys. We employed multiple logistic regression to discern risk factors for MSI and attrition.ResultsOur study comprised 584 USMC recruits (183 female recruits, 19.49 ± 1.88 years, 160.10 ± 7.17 cm, 61.19 ± 8.05 kg; 401 males, 18.94 ± 1.92 years, 172.97 ± 7.26 cm, 73.86 ± 11.04 kg). We observed 193 MSIs in 135 recruits, with 80.31% affecting the lower extremity (LE). Notably, lower relative peak power (odds ratio [OR] 0.91 [0.89, 0.94], P < .001) and shorter eccentric deceleration duration (OR 0.99 [0.99, 1.00], P = .005) were significant predictors of MSIs. Specifically, for LE MSIs, similar trends were noted for relative peak power and eccentric deceleration duration, with additional risks associated with lower body mass index (OR 0.93 [0.86, 0.99], P = .036) and previous LE MSIs (OR 2.25 [1.18, 4.27], P = .013). Attrition was more likely with a reduced eccentric deceleration impulse (OR 0.98 [0.97, 0.99], P < .001) and prolonged time to peak force (OR 1.36 [1.17, 1.59], P < .001) and cigarette use (OR 2.12 [1.01, 4.43], P = .046).ConclusionsMSIs and attrition during USMC recruit training significantly undermine force readiness and escalate costs. Our research has pinpointed several modifiable risk factors, chiefly reduced muscular power and cigarette smoking. We advocate for neuromuscular training programs to bolster strength and power, integrated nutrition and exercise strategies for optimal body composition, and support for smoking cessation to alleviate the incidence of MSIs and curtail attrition. Initiating training with a gradual increase in activity intensity can provide a critical window to correct pre-existing neuromuscular imbalances and weaknesses, particularly those stemming from prior MSIs. Effectively addressing these risk factors is pivotal for diminishing the rates of MSIs and attrition among recruits, thereby enhancing overall military readiness and operational efficiency.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usae134
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Descriptive Epidemiology of Musculoskeletal Injuries During Marine Corps
           Recruit Training in Gender-Integrated and Male-Only Training Units

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 21 - 29
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionMusculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) occur frequently in military personnel. U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) recruits participate in an intense 13-week training program designed to transform civilians into basically trained Marines, during which they are susceptible to MSIs. Previous injury epidemiology research with USMC recruits was conducted in a non-gender-integrated training. Data for the current study were derived from a larger study, the USMC Gender-Integrated Recruit Training study, that was initiated to provide data-driven recommendations for gender integration during USMC recruit training. The purpose of the current analysis was to describe the unique profile of MSIs during USMC recruit training and compare MSIs between female and male recruits in gender-integrated training.Materials and MethodsMedical record–reviewed MSI data were obtained for recruits in three models of USMC recruit training: two models of gender-integrated recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) Parris Island—the older Series Track (ST) model and the newer Integrated Company (IC) model, and a Male-Only (MO) cohort at MCRD San Diego. Incidence, anatomic region and subregion, event at the time of MSI, MSI type and onset, and disposition following MSI were described for each model. Group comparisons were conducted using Fisher’s exact tests or independent samples t tests, as appropriate.ResultsMSI data were available for 584 recruits (ST: 98 female recruits, 95 male recruits; IC: 85 female recruits, 106 male recruits; MO: 200 male recruits). The cumulative incidence of MSIs was significantly higher among female compared to male recruits in the ST (59.2% vs. 29.5%, P < .001) and in the IC (25.9% vs. 12.3%, P = .023) cohorts. The most frequent anatomic location for MSIs was the lower extremity (female recruits: ST: 76.5% of MSIs, IC: 88.6%; male recruits: ST: 81.1%, IC: 80.0%, MO: 83.8%). The most frequent body part affected was the hip among female recruits (ST: 26.5% of MSIs, IC: 37.1%). The most frequent body part affected by MSIs among the male recruits was the knee in the ST (32.4%) and IC (53.3%) cohorts and the lower leg (27.0%) in the MO cohort. A significantly greater percentage of female compared to male recruits sustained a hip MSI in the ST (23.5% vs. 2.1%, P < .001) and IC (12.9% vs. 0.0%, P < .001) cohorts. There was no significant difference in knee MSI incidence between sexes in the ST (P = .323) or IC (P = .757) cohorts. A large percentage of MSIs resulted in light duty (female recruits: ST: 69.4% of MSIs, IC: 74.3%; male recruits: ST: 64.9%, IC: 73.3%, MO: 94.6%).ConclusionsThis was the first study to assess the burden of MSIs concurrently among female and male USMC recruits in gender-integrated training. MSIs, especially those affecting the lower extremity, continue to occur frequently in this population. Female recruits are more susceptible to MSIs during USMC recruit training compared to male recruits and are especially prone to hip MSIs. Future research should focus on identifying modifiable risk factors for MSIs in this population, with a focus on reducing lower-extremity MSIs in all recruits and hip MSIs in female recruits.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usad206
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Using the Capture-Recapture Technique to Estimate the
           Ascertainment-Corrected Incidence of Musculoskeletal Injuries During
           Marine Corps Recruit Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 30 - 37
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionInjury epidemiology research with military populations typically utilizes data obtained through medical chart review (MCR) or injury self-reports (ISRs). MCR data will not capture musculoskeletal injury (MSKI) data for which medical care was not sought, which is common during military recruit training. Injury self-report is affected by issues with recall, especially for MSKIs perceived as less severe. U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) recruits participate in an intense 13-week recruit training program during which they are susceptible to MSKIs. The purpose of the current analysis was to utilize a novel statistical method, the capture-recapture (CRC) technique, to account for the undercounting inherent in MSKI data sources and estimate the ascertainment-corrected cumulative incidence of MSKIs during USMC recruit training.Materials and MethodsData for the current study were derived from a larger study, the USMC Gender-Integrated Recruit Training Study, which was initiated to provide data-driven recommendations to increase gender integration in USMC recruit training. The estimated cumulative incidence of MSKIs during 13-weeks of USMC recruit training was calculated from the 2 sources of MSKI data (MCR, ISR) and using CRC analysis. Medical charts were reviewed to extract data about MSKIs that occurred during recruit training. Self-reported MSKI data for the same period were obtained from recruits at the end of recruit training. MSKIs were classified according to their anatomical location and type. The Chapman modification of the Lincoln-Peterson estimator was utilized to conduct the CRC analysis.ResultsMedical chart review and ISR MSKI data were available for 464 USMC recruits (age: 19.1 ± 1.9 years; gender: men 70.0%). The observed 13-week cumulative incidence of MSKI in the sample was 21.8% in the MCR and 28.4% in the ISR, while the CRC incidence was much higher (62.0%). The MCR and ISR ascertainment were 35.1% and 45.9%, respectively, while the overall ascertainment or completeness of MSKI data when 2 sources were used was moderate (65.0%). When stratified by MSKI anatomical location, the overall ascertainment varied by anatomical location of the MSKI. It was highest for lower extremity MSKIs (64.8%), but lower for upper extremity (38.9%) and spine (33.3%) MSKIs. The overall ascertainment also varied by MSKI type; it was highest for sprain (55.1%), followed by strain (54.8%), and the pain/spasm/ache (43.3%).ConclusionsThis was the first study to utilize the CRC technique to access the ascertainment-corrected incidence of MSKIs among USMC recruits. There was significant undercounting in both sources of the data analyzed, and the extent of undercounting varied by both MSKI anatomical location and type. When 2 sources of data were utilized simultaneously, the percent of CRC-estimated MSKIs observed from 2 sources of data was more complete. There is a need for further application of the CRC technique to MSKI data in military populations to provide a more complete assessment of MSKIs. Identification of modifiable factors that influence completeness of MSKI data obtained during military recruit training is also warranted.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usae129
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Unsupervised Machine Learning in Countermovement Jump and Isometric
           Mid-Thigh Pull Performance Produces Distinct Combat and Physical Fitness
           Clusters in Male and Female U.S. Marine Corps Recruits

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 38 - 46
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionSeveral challenges face the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) and other services in their efforts to design recruit training to augment warfighter mobility and resilience in both male and female recruits as part of an integrated model. Strength and power underpin many of the physical competencies required to meet the occupational demands one might face in military. As the military considers adopting force plate technology to assess indices of strength and power, an opportunity presents itself for the use of machine learning on large datasets to deduce the relevance of variables related to performance and injury risk. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether cluster analysis on baseline strength and power data derived from countermovement jump (CMJ) and isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP) adequately partitions men and women entering recruit training into distinct performance clusters. The secondary aim of this study is then to assess the between-cluster frequencies of musculoskeletal injury (MSKI).Materials and MethodsFive hundred and sixty-five males (n = 386) and females (n = 179) at the Marine Corps Recruit Depots located at Parris Island and San Diego were enrolled in the study. Recruits performed CMJ and IMTP tests at the onset of training. Injury data were collected via medical chart review. Combat fitness test (CFT) and physical fitness test (PFT) results were provided to the study team by the USMC. A k-means cluster analysis was performed on CMJ relative peak power, IMTP relative peak force, and dynamic strength index. Independent sample t-tests and Cohen’s d effect sizes assessed between-cluster differences in CFT and PFT performance. Differences in cumulative incidence of lower extremity %MSKIs were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. Relative risk and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were also calculated.ResultsThe overall effects of cluster designation on CMJ and IMTP outcomes ranged from moderate (relative peak power: d = −0.68, 95% CI, −0.85 to −0.51) to large (relative peak force: d = −1.69, 95% CI, −1.88 to −1.49; dynamic strength index: d = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.02-1.38), indicating acceptable k-means cluster partitioning. Independent sample t-tests revealed that both men and women in cluster 2 (C2) significantly outperformed those in cluster 1 (C1) in all events of the CFT and PFT (P < .05). The overall and within-gender effect of cluster designation on both CFT and PFT performance ranged from small (d > 0.2) to moderate (d > 0.5). Men in C2, the high-performing cluster, demonstrated a significantly lower incidence of ankle MSKI (P = .04, RR = 0.2, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0). No other between-cluster differences in MSKI were statistically significant.ConclusionsOur results indicate that strength and power metrics derived from force plate tests effectively partition USMC male and female recruits into distinct performance clusters with relevance to tactical and physical fitness using k-means clustering. These data support the potential for expanded use of force plates in assessing readiness in a cohort of men and women entering USMC recruit training. The ability to pre-emptively identify high and low performers in the CFT and PFT can aid in leadership developing frameworks for tailoring training to enhance combat and physical fitness with benchmark values of strength and power.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usad371
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Recruit Profiles Across the U.S. Armed Forces: Implications for Increasing
           Gender Integration in Recruit Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 47 - 56
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionThis article uses recent survey data from a study on gender integration at recruit training across the U.S. Armed Forces to examine service, gender, and training differences in recruit’s gender attitudes, beliefs, and cohesion metrics. In addition to providing a descriptive understanding of our recruit sample, this article examines factors germane to gender integration at recruit training such as gender attitudes, sexist beliefs, and unit cohesion.Materials and MethodsThis article uses data from a survey of U.S. Marine Corps (USMC), U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Coast Guard recruits as part of a USMC-commissioned study to develop alternate models and recommendations for increasing gender integration in USMC recruit training. At all sites but the USMC, recruits completed the survey 1 to 2 weeks before graduation. At the Marine Corps Recruit Depots, recruits participated in the survey at the beginning (week 2) and end (week 11) of their 13-week training cycle. A 19-question survey captured sociodemographic information, perspectives and experiences during recruit training, and gender attitudes and beliefs. Analyses were conducted on the sample with complete data on the measures reported, including those USMC recruits observed at both week 2 and week 11 (n = 629). Descriptive statistics (percentage) were calculated for all categorical outcome variables. Outcome variables (cohesion, gender, and sexism attitudes) were compared between groups using chi-squared tests or Fisher’s exact tests, as appropriate.ResultsRecruits differed significantly across services in perceptions of unit cohesion on 3 of the 4 indicators: Platoon members are cooperative, know they can depend on each other, and really respect each other (P < .05). These differences appear to be driven by female recruit difference across service. They reported significant differences in gender role attitudes across the services, with USMC recruits being most likely to endorse traditional gender roles compared to other service recruits. Male USMC recruits were significantly more likely than their female peers to agree that men should achieve outside the home and women should take care of the home and family (21.3% versus 6.3%, P < .05). The only statistical differences in attitudes about equality of treatment and opportunity among recruits were between male and female USMC recruits. All items capturing sexist attitudes elicited statistically significant differences between male USMC recruits and male recruits in other services (P < .05). There were significant differences in all sexism measures between male and female USMC recruits (P < .05). There is a significant decline in some sexist attitudes between weeks 2 and 11 of training among male USMC recruits (P < .05). Nearly one-half to three-fourths of male USMC recruits hold sexist attitudes, even near the end of recruit training.ConclusionsThe disparate gender and sexism attitudes of male USMC recruits compared with their peers in other services, and their fellow female USMC recruits suggest efforts to increase gender integration at entry-level training are needed, but also may be challenging since male USMC recruits report the highest levels of sexist attitudes among all recruits.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usae254
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Recruit Perspectives on Gender Integration at Recruit Training: A
           Comparison by Service and Gender

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 57 - 66
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionRecruit training is the initial entry for enlisted personnel in the military. The Services execute gender-integrated recruit training differently. The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) maintains same-gender platoons led by same-gender drill instructors in integrated companies; further integration occurs at select training events. The other Services train recruits in gender-integrated units with mixed-gender drill instructor teams. We examine recruits’ experiences and perceptions of gender integration at recruit training, their desired level of integration, and preferences for increasing gender integration, comparing by Service and gender.Materials and MethodsRecruit perspectives and experiences were captured in a 19-question survey (n = 632) and 90-min focus groups (n = 260) near graduation from recruit training. Data were collected from June to November 2021. Because of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic restrictions, the Navy and Air Force were not conducting gender-integrated recruit training during data collection. Outcome variables were compared cross-Service by gender and within Service by gender using chi-squared tests or Fisher’s exact tests, as appropriate; focus group data were analyzed using initial and secondary coding schemes. Three USMC training models, varied by level of integration, were also analyzed (Male-Only, Series Track, and Integrated Company).ResultsSignificant gender differences across and within Service emerged in recruits’ experience being trained by an opposite-gender instructor. Male recruits had significant differences by Service (P < .001), and USMC female recruits reported being trained by male instructors more than their male peers by female instructors (Series Track P = .002; Integrated Company P < .001). In the focus groups, recruits described common differences with how men and women embodied being a drill instructor. Significant gender differences across (both male and female P < .001) and within Service were reported for closeness of training with opposite-gender peers (Air Force P = .028; U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) Integrated Company P = .010; Army P = .048), an expected finding given varied integration during data collection. Male and female recruits had significant differences by Service in their preference for integration at the lowest unit level (both male and female P < .001), with those who experienced integrated training showing higher levels of endorsement. In the focus groups, recruits articulated benefits and challenges of gender-integrated recruit training. Significant gender differences across Service emerged in preferences for more integration in specific training activities. Within Service, female USMC Integrated Company recruits wanted more integration in tactical/field, physical fitness, and classroom training than their male peers (P < .001 for all). In the focus groups, USMC recruits of both genders desired more integrated training events, particularly those involving combat and tactical skill development.ConclusionsThis study provided an opportunity to examine recruit perspectives on gender-integrated training. Services valuing opposite-gender instructor exposure in recruit training must ensure that male recruits are being taught and led by female instructors given disproportionate demographics. Recruits who experienced integrated training were more supportive of integration, indicating that this experience may increase their support for gender-integrated training units and environments. Today’s recruits understand that they are entering gender-integrated working environments, and our results indicate that they expect recruit training to mirror that reality.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usad421
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • The Role of Drill Instructors and Gender Integration at Recruit
           Training: Examining Intersections of Gender and Integration in the
           Recruit Training Environment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 67 - 73
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionDrill instructors (DIs) are responsible for executing their Services’ recruit training programs and for training recruits. DIs assume a variety of roles, including teaching and developing practical skills and knowledge, mentoring, modeling appropriate behavior and attitudes, motivating recruits for success during and after recruit training, applying and instilling discipline, and ensuring the safety and welfare of recruits. This article examines two major research questions at the intersection of gender, gender-integrated training, and the DI role: (1) What differences exist in how DIs experience their role by gender' and (2) how does gender-integrated recruit training affect DIs’ approach to training'Materials and MethodsThis article draws from 87 semistructured interviews conducted with Service leaders, training cadre, and DIs in service of a broader Marine Corps interdisciplinary study on gender integration at recruit training. Interviews were conducted virtually and in-person with Marine Corps, Army, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard personnel from June to November 2021. Each interview was coded with initial and secondary codes developed through a flexible coding approach. Data were analyzed across and within relevant categories such as gender and Service to identify themes and patterns.ResultsAlthough the DI role was universally described as demanding and difficult, unique challenges for women consistently emerged from the data. The top reported challenges faced by female DIs were personnel shortages, work and family conflict, culture-driven sexism in the training environment from male peers and recruits, and pressure to excel above and beyond their male peers. In recruit training, DIs are responsible for executing gender-integrated practices. Service leaders, training cadre, and DIs described how gender integration practices affect their approach to the role and implementation of training, including addressing and dismantling sexism, shutting down recruit romantic relationships, training all recruits in an equal manner, knowing gender-specific grooming standards, increasing communication among DIs, and working with mixed-gender DI teams.ConclusionsFemale DIs face additional challenges in and outside the role compared with their male peers, and some of these challenges are preventable. Staffing and personnel issues plague the female DI population and are a persistent and pervasive challenge to gender integration efforts. Women are a necessary and highly desirable population to fill the DI role, particularly as Services aim to expose recruits to leaders of both genders during their critical first training experience. DIs play an important role in ensuring the successful completion of recruit training, ultimately helping to build the future leaders of the military. The success of gender integration efforts depends on DIs’ intentional approach to the process. Future research can build on this work by expanding the scope to other military training environments (beyond recruit training) and examining how DIs’ own sociodemographic positions (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation) inform their perspective on and approach to equity in the training environment.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usad422
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • A Sex Comparison of the Physical and Physiological Demands of United
           States Marine Corps Recruit Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 74 - 83
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionThe U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) recruit training is a 13-week preparatory period for military service men and women. Differences in absolute performance capabilities between sexes may impact physical and physiological responses to the demands of recruit training. The purpose of this study was to monitor U.S. Marine Corps recruits throughout recruit training to comparatively assess workload, sleep, stress, and performance responses in men and women.Materials and MethodsA total of 281 recruits (men = 182 and women = 99; age = 19 ± 2 years) were monitored and tested. Workload, sleep, and stress assessments occurred at week 2, week 7/8, and week 11 of training. Workload (energy expenditure per kg body mass [EEREL], distance [DIS], steps) and sleep (continuity and duration) were tracked over 72-hour periods using wearable accelerometry and heart rate technology. Stress responses were determined through salivary cortisol analyses. Performance testing, consisting of countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) and isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP) performance relative to body mass, occurred at weeks 2 and 11. Linear mixed models were used to test for sex, time, and sex-by-time interactions (α < .05).ResultsOn average, recruits covered 13.0 ± 2.7 km/day, expended 3,762 ± 765 calories/day, and slept 6.2 ± 1.1 hours/night. Sex-by-time interactions were found for DIS, steps, sleep duration, cortisol, and CMJREL performance (P < .05). Planned contrasts revealed that men covered more DIS than women at week 7/8 (P < .001). Women experienced greater step counts compared to men at week 11 (P = .004). Women experienced no significant change in sleep duration (P > .05), whereas men increased sleep duration from week 2 to week 7/8 (P = .03). Women experienced greater sleep duration at week 2 (P = .03) and week 11 (P = .02) compared to men. Women exhibited higher cortisol levels than men at week 2 (P < .001) and week 11 (P < .001). Women experienced declines in cortisol at week 7 compared to week 2 (P < .001). Men experienced no changes in cortisol response at any timepoint (P > .05). Both sexes experienced declines in CMJREL from week 2 to week 11 (P > .001). Sex main effects were observed for EEREL, DIS, CMJREL, and IMTPREL (P < .05) with men experiencing greater overall workloads and producing greater strength and power metrics. Sex main effects were also found for sleep continuity and cortisol (P < .05), for which men experienced lower values compared to women. Time main effects were observed for EEREL, DIS, steps, cortisol, CMJREL, and IMTPREL (P < .05).ConclusionsThis study not only highlights the known sex differences between men and women but also sheds light on the different physical and physiological responses of each sex to military training. Interestingly, the greatest physical demands incurred earlier in the training cycle. Despite declining workloads, the stress response was maintained throughout the training, which may have implications for adaptation and performance. In addition, average sleep duration fell notably below recommendations for optimizing health and recovery. Effectively monitoring the demands and performance outcomes during recruit training is essential for determining individual fitness capabilities, as well as establishing the effectiveness of a training program. Individual performance assessments and adequately periodized workloads may help to optimize recruit training for both men and women.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usae071
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • United States Marine Corps Recruit Training Demands Associated With
           Performance Outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 84 - 93
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionUnited States Marine Corps’ (USMC) recruit training is a 13-week program designed to maximize physical and mental performance adaptations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the training demands and characteristics that are associated with performance outcomes during USMC recruit training.Materials and MethodsA total of 196 recruits (M = 97 and W = 99) were monitored and tested throughout training. Laboratory-based performance testing occurred at the start of weeks 2 and 11 and consisted of body mass assessments, countermovement vertical jump, and isometric mid-thigh pull. Military-specific performance testing occurred twice within the first 8 weeks of training and included the physical fitness test (PFT) and combat fitness test (CFT) implemented by the USMC. Resilience data were collected at week 2 using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Workload, sleep, and stress responses were monitored at weeks 2, 7, and 11. Recruits were provided with a wearable tracking device which utilized heart rate and accelerometry-based technology to determine energy expenditure (EE), distances (DIS), and sleep metrics. Data were averaged over a 3-day period. Salivary cortisol testing occurred at the start of each monitoring week. Change scores were calculated for performance tests, and body mass was calculated from data obtained at week 2 to week 11. Area under the curve was calculated for the workload, sleep metrics, and cortisol responses using the trapezoidal method. Pearson product–moment correlations (r) were used to assess the relationships between training demands and performance. An α level of 0.05 was used to establish significance.ResultsA moderate positive correlation was found between changes in body mass and peak power (P < .001; r = 0.43). Weak positive correlations were found between changes in body mass and peak force (P = .002; r = 0.28), as well as body mass and resilience (P = .03; r = 0.19). A moderate negative correlation was observed between changes in body mass and PFT (P < .001; r = −0.49). A weak negative correlation was found between changes in body mass and EE (P = .003; r = −0.24). A weak negative correlation was found between changes in peak power and EE (P = .001; r = −0.29). A weak positive correlation was found between changes in peak power and changes in CFT (P = .05; r = 0.19) A weak negative correlation was found between changes in sleep continuity and CFT (P = .02; r = −0.20). A weak negative correlation was found between cortisol and changes in PFT (P = .05; r = −0.20). A weak negative correlation was found between cortisol and both EE (P = .001; r = −0.27) and DIS (P = .045; r = −0.16). A weak negative correlation was found between EE and sleep continuity (P < .001; r = −0.34). Weak negative correlations were found between sleep duration and both DIS (P = .01; r = −0.18) and steps (P = .003; r = −0.21).ConclusionsIncreases in body mass throughout training were positively associated with strength and power changes, but negatively related to PFT scores. Changes in peak power related to improvements in CFT scores; however, higher workloads (i.e., EE) were negatively associated with peak power. The identification of the USMC physical and physiological training demands that are associated with performance outcomes may be a valuable resource to guide conditioning efforts to boost military readiness.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usae124
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
  • Increasing Gender Integration in U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Training:
           Policy Recommendations and Rationales From an Interdisciplinary Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 94 - 103
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionThis article describes alternate models and policy recommendations created by an interdisciplinary team of researchers to increase gender integration at U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) recruit training. The USMC requested a study to analyze current approaches to gender integration at recruit training and provide alternate models that maximize integration, while continuing to train marines to established standards. USMC remains the only service that segregates recruits by gender at the lowest unit level (e.g., platoon) in recruit training and maintains gender-segregated drill instructor teams (i.e., same-gender teams train platoons of same-gender recruits).Materials and MethodsA mixed-method, interdisciplinary approach was used to capture multiple perspectives and informed recommendations and alternate models for gender integration. The team studied select USMC, army, navy, air force, and coast guard recruit training locations, between June and November 2021. At each site, the team collected qualitative, quantitative, and administrative data as well as physical performance metrics and human performance outcomes. Study participants included recruits, drill instructors, training cadre, service leaders, and subject matter experts on gender integration in military services. Each alternate model was designed to maximize the feasibility of implementation within current USMC training conditions.ResultsThe research team developed three alternate models and several policy recommendations. Alternate model 1 proposed a methodology for mixed-gender drill instructor teams within the Integrated Company model, USMC’s current integrated training model. Alternate model 2 proposed an Integrated Company Plus model which increases the number and types of gender-integrated training events at or below the platoon level within the Integrated Company model. Alternate model 3 outlined an integrated platoon model where recruits fall out into integrated training platoons after their morning routine, with two options of varying integration based on USMC priorities for integration. The team also proposed a set of policy recommendations independent of the three alternate models to support current and future gender integration efforts at the Marine Corps Recruit Depots.ConclusionsGender-integrated military training has been shown to positively alter perceptions and evaluations of women in military settings over detrimental aspects developed by gender-segregated training. The study team recommended USMC train recruits in the Integrated Company model with mixed-gender drill instructor teams (alternate model 1) and integrate more training events following the priority tiers outlined in the Integrated Company plus model (alternate model 2). The combined execution of these two alternate models would provide USMC recruits increased exposure to direct, sustained training from opposite-gender drill instructors and deliver intentional training opportunities for male and female recruits to work together and interact in meaningful ways. The integrated platoon model (alternate model 3) would offer USMC recruits the most direct exposure to training and working with members of the opposite gender, but it requires substantial changes to current logistics, accountability, and training procedures.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usad209
      Issue No: Vol. 189, No. Supplement_2 (2024)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 285)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 252)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access  
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.235.182.206
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-