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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Fra Krig og Fred     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal  
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioterrorism & Biodefense     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access  
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Defense Studies & Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Terrorism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal on Baltic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Martial Arts Studies     Open Access  
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Navigator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 257)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Problemy Mechatroniki. Uzbrojenie, lotnictwo, inżynieria bezpieczeństwa / Problems of Mechatronics. Armament, Aviation, Safety Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Agulhas Negras     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Naval de Odontologia On Line / Naval Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Política y Estrategia     Open Access  
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access  
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wiedza Obronna     Open Access  
선진국방연구     Open Access  

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Military Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.373
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0026-4075 - ISSN (Online) 1930-613X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • IDCRP Trauma-Related Infection Research

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      Authors: Tribble D.
      First page: 2
      Abstract: Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases10.13039/100006492Y1-AI-5072
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usab508
       
  • Department of Defense Trauma Registry Infectious Disease Module Impact on
           Clinical Practice

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      Authors: Tribble D; Spott M, Shackleford S, et al.
      First page: 07
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundThe Joint Trauma System (JTS) is a DoD Center of Excellence for Military Health System trauma care delivery and the DoD’s reference body for trauma care in accordance with National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. Through the JTS, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed and subsequently refined to standardize and improve combat casualty care. Data are amassed through a single, centralized DoD Trauma Registry to support process improvement measures with specialty modules established as the registry evolved. Herein, we review the implementation of the JTS DoD Trauma Registry specialty Infectious Disease Module and the development of infection-related CPGs and summarize published findings on the subsequent impact of the Infectious Disease Module on combat casualty care clinical practice and guidelines.MethodsThe DoD Trauma Registry Infectious Disease Module was developed in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP) Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS). Infection-related information (e.g., syndromes, antibiotic management, and microbiology) were collected from military personnel wounded during deployment June 1, 2009 through December 31, 2014 and medevac’d to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany before transitioning to participating military hospitals in the USA.ResultsTo support process improvements and reduce variation in practice patterns, data collected through the Infectious Disease Module have been utilized in TIDOS analyses focused on assessing compliance with post-trauma antibiotic prophylaxis recommendations detailed in JTS CPGs. Analyses examined compliance over three time periods: 6 months, one-year, and 5 years. The five-year analysis demonstrated significantly improved adherence to recommendations following the dissemination of the 2011 JTS CPG, particularly with open fractures (34% compliance compared to 73% in 2013-2014). Due to conflicting recommendations regarding use of expanded Gram-negative coverage with open fractures, infectious outcomes among patients with open fractures who received cefazolin or expanded Gram-negative coverage (cefazolin plus fluoroquinolones and/or aminoglycosides) were also examined in a TIDOS analysis. The lack of a difference in the proportion of osteomyelitis (8% in both groups) and the significantly greater recovery of Gram-negative organisms resistant to aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones among patients who received expanded Gram-negative coverage supported JTS recommendations regarding the use of cefazolin with open fractures. Following recognition of the outbreak of invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) among blast casualties injured in Afghanistan, the ID Module was refined to capture data (e.g., fungal culture and histopathology findings, wound necrosis, and antifungal management) needed for the TIDOS team to lead the DoD outbreak investigation. These data captured through the Infectious Disease Module provided support for the development of a JTS CPG for the prevention and management of IFIs, which was later refined based on subsequent TIDOS IFI analyses.ConclusionsTo improve combat casualty care outcomes and mitigate high-consequence infections in future conflicts, particularly in the event of prolonged field care, expansion, refinement, and a mechanism for sustainability of the DoD Trauma Registry Infectious Disease Module is needed to include real-time surveillance of infectious disease trends and outcomes.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usac050
       
  • DoD-VA Trauma Infection Research Collaboration

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      Authors: McDonald J; Liang S, Li P, et al.
      First page: 17
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBackgroundIn the aftermath of wars, there is a surge in the number of wounded service members who leave active duty and become eligible for healthcare through the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Collaborations between the Department of Defense (DoD) and VA are crucial to capture comprehensive data and further understand the long-term impact of battlefield trauma. We provide a summary of the development, methodology, and status of an effective collaboration between the Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program and the St. Louis VA Health Care System with the multicenter, observational Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS), which examines the short- and long-term outcomes of deployment-related trauma.MethodsAs part of TIDOS, wounded service members who transitioned to participating military hospitals in the United States (2009–2014) were given the opportunity to enroll in a prospective follow-up cohort study to continue to capture infection-related data after their hospital discharge. Enrollees in the TIDOS cohort who left military service and received health care through the VA also had the option of consenting to have relevant VA medical records abstracted and included with the study data. Infections considered to be complications resulting from the initial trauma were examined.ResultsAmong 1,336 TIDOS enrollees, 1,221 (91%) registered and received health care through the VA with 633 (47%) consenting to follow-up using VA records and comprising the TIDOS-VA cohort. Of the first 337 TIDOS-VA cohort enrollees, 38% were diagnosed with a new trauma-related infection following hospital discharge (median: 88 days; interquartile range: 18–351 days). Approximately 71% of the infections were identified through DoD sources (medical records and follow-up) and 29% were identified through VA electronic medical records, demonstrating the utility of DoD-VA collaborations. The TIDOS DoD-VA collaboration has also been utilized to assess intermediate and long-term consequences of specific injury patterns. Among 89 TIDOS-VA cohort enrollees with genitourinary trauma, 36% reported sexual dysfunction, 21% developed at least one urinary tract infection, 14% had urinary retention/incontinence, and 8% had urethral stricture. The rate of urinary tract infections was 0.05/patient-year during DoD follow-up time and 0.07/patient-year during VA follow-up time.ConclusionsWider capture of infection-related outcome data through the DoD-VA collaboration provided a clearer picture of the long-term infection burden resulting from deployment-related trauma. Planned analyses include assessment of osteomyelitis among combat casualties with amputations and/or open fractures, evaluation of mental health and social factors related to injury patterns, and examination of health care utilization and cost in relation to infectious disease burdens.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usab482
       
  • IDCRP Combat-Related Extremity Wound Infection Research

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      Authors: Petfield J; Lewandowski L, Stewart L, et al.
      First page: 25
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionExtremity trauma is the most common battlefield injury, resulting in a high frequency of combat-related extremity wound infections (CEWIs). As these infections are associated with substantial morbidity and may impact wounded warriors long after initial hospitalization, CEWIs have been a focus of the Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP). Herein, we review findings of CEWI research conducted through the IDCRP and discuss future and ongoing analyses.MethodsMilitary personnel with deployment-related trauma sustained between 2009 and 2014 were examined in retrospective analyses through the observational Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS). Characteristics of wounded warriors with ≥1 open extremity wound were assessed, focusing on injury patterns and infection risk factors. Through a separate trauma-associated osteomyelitis study, military personnel with combat-related open fractures of the long bones (tibia, femur, and upper extremity) sustained between 2003 and 2009 were examined to identify osteomyelitis risk factors.ResultsAmong 1,271 wounded warriors with ≥1 open extremity wound, 16% were diagnosed with a CEWI. When assessed by their most severe extremity injury (i.e., amputation, open fracture, or open soft-tissue wound), patients with amputations had the highest proportion of infections (47% of 212 patients with traumatic amputations). Factors related to injury pattern, mechanism, and severity were independent predictors of CEWIs during initial hospitalization. Having a non-extremity infection at least 4 days before CEWI diagnosis was associated with reduced likelihood of CEWI development. After hospital discharge, 28% of patients with extremity trauma had a new or recurrent CEWI during follow-up. Risk factors for the development of CEWIs during follow-up included injury pattern, having either a CEWI or other infection during initial hospitalization, and receipt of antipseudomonal penicillin for ≥7 days. A reduced likelihood for CEWIs during follow-up was associated with a hospitalization duration of 15-30 days. Under the retrospective osteomyelitis risk factor analysis, patients developing osteomyelitis had higher open fracture severity based on Gustilo–Anderson (GA) and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association classification schemes and more frequent traumatic amputations compared to open fracture patients without osteomyelitis. Recurrence of osteomyelitis was also common (28% of patients with open tibia fractures had a recurrent episode). Although osteomyelitis risk factors differed between the tibia, femur, and upper extremity groups, sustaining an amputation, use of antibiotic beads, and being injured in the earlier years of the study (before significant practice pattern changes) were consistent predictors. Other risk factors included GA fracture severity ≥IIIb, blast injuries, foreign body at fracture site (with/without orthopedic implant), moderate/severe muscle damage and/or necrosis, and moderate/severe skin/soft-tissue damage. For upper extremity open fractures, initial stabilization following evacuation from the combat zone was associated with a reduced likelihood of osteomyelitis.ConclusionsForthcoming studies will examine the effectiveness of common antibiotic regimens for managing extremity deep soft-tissue infections to improve clinical outcomes of combat casualties and support development of clinical practice guidelines for CEWI treatment. The long-term impact of extremity trauma and resultant infections will be further investigated through both Department of Defense and Veterans Affairs follow-up, as well as examination of the impact on comorbidities and mental health/social factors.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usab065
       
  • Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections

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      Authors: Rodriguez (; Ganesan A, Shaikh F, et al.
      First page: 34
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionDuring Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, an outbreak of combat-related invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) emerged among casualties with dismounted blast trauma and became a priority issue for the Military Health System.MethodsIn 2011, the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS) team led the Department of Defense IFI outbreak investigation to describe characteristics of IFIs among combat casualties and provide recommendations related to management of the disease. To support the outbreak investigation, existing IFI definitions and classifications utilized for immunocompromised patients were modified for use in epidemiologic research in a trauma population. Following the conclusion of the outbreak investigation, multiple retrospective analyses using a population of 77 IFI patients (injured during June 2009 to August 2011) were conducted to evaluate IFI epidemiology, wound microbiology, and diagnostics to support refinement of Joint Trauma System (JTS) clinical practice guidelines. Following cessation of combat operations in Afghanistan, the TIDOS database was comprehensively reviewed to identify patients with laboratory evidence of a fungal infection and refine the IFI classification scheme to incorporate timing of laboratory fungal evidence and include categories that denote a high or low level of suspicion for IFI. The refined IFI classification scheme was utilized in a large-scale epidemiologic assessment of casualties injured over a 5.5-year period.ResultsAmong 720 combat casualties admitted to participating hospitals (2009-2014) who had histopathology and/or wound cultures collected, 94 (13%) met criteria for an IFI and 61 (8%) were classified as high suspicion of IFI. Risk factors for development of combat-related IFIs include sustaining a dismounted blast injury, experiencing a traumatic transfemoral amputation, and requiring resuscitation with large-volume (>20 units) blood transfusions. Moreover, TIDOS analyses demonstrated the adverse impact of IFIs on wound healing, particularly with order Mucorales. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay to identify filamentous fungi and support earlier IFI diagnosis was also assessed using archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens. Although the PCR-based assay had high specificity (99%), there was low sensitivity (63%); however, sensitivity improved to 83% in tissues collected from sites with angioinvasion. Data obtained from the initial IFI outbreak investigation (37 IFI patients) and subsequent TIDOS analyses (77 IFI patients) supported development and refinement of a JTS clinical practice guideline for the management of IFIs in war wounds. Furthermore, a local clinical practice guideline to screen for early tissue-based evidence of IFIs among blast casualties at the Landstuhl Regional Medical Center was critically evaluated through a TIDOS investigation, providing additional clinical practice support. Through a collaboration with the Uniformed Services University Surgical Critical Care Initiative, findings from TIDOS analyses were used to support development of a clinical decision support tool to facilitate early risk stratification.ConclusionsCombat-related IFIs are a highly morbid complication following severe blast trauma and remain a threat for future modern warfare. Our findings have supported JTS clinical recommendations, refined IFI classification, and confirmed the utility of PCR-based assays as a complement to histopathology and/or culture to promote early diagnosis. Analyses underway or planned will add to the knowledge base of IFI epidemiology, diagnostics, prevention, and management.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usab074
       
  • Multidrug-Resistant and Virulent Organisms Trauma Infections: Trauma
           Infectious Disease Outcomes Study Initiative

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      Authors: Mende K; Akers K, Tyner S, et al.
      First page: 42
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIntroductionDuring the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, increased incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms, as well as polymicrobial wounds and infections, complicated the management of combat trauma–related infections. Multidrug resistance and wound microbiology are a research focus of the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study (TIDOS), an Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program, Uniformed Services University, research protocol. To conduct comprehensive microbiological research with the goal of improving the understanding of the complicated etiology of wound infections, the TIDOS MDR and Virulent Organisms Trauma Infections Initiative (MDR/VO Initiative) was established as a collaborative effort with the Brooke Army Medical Center, Naval Medical Research Center, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. We provide a review of the TIDOS MDR/VO Initiative and summarize published findings.MethodsAntagonism and biofilm formation of commonly isolated wound bacteria (e.g., ESKAPE pathogens—Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp.), antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, and clinical outcomes are being examined. Isolates collected from admission surveillance swabs, as part of infection control policy, and clinical infection workups were retained in the TIDOS Microbiological Repository and associated clinical data in the TIDOS database.ResultsOver the TIDOS study period (June 2009 to December 2014), more than 8,300 colonizing and infecting isolates were collected from military personnel injured with nearly one-third of isolates classified as MDR. At admission to participating U.S. military hospitals, 12% of wounded warriors were colonized with MDR Gram-negative bacilli. Furthermore, 27% of 913 combat casualties with ≥1 infection during their trauma hospitalization had MDR Gram-negative bacterial infections. Among 335 confirmed combat-related extremity wound infections (2009–2012), 61% were polymicrobial and comprised various combinations of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, yeast, fungi, and anaerobes. Escherichia coli was the most common Gram-negative bacilli isolated from clinical workups, as well as the most common colonizing MDR secondary to extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Assessment of 479 E. coli isolates collected from wounded warriors found 188 pulsed-field types (PFTs) from colonizing isolates and 54 PFTs from infecting isolates without significant overlap across combat theaters, military hospitals, and study years. A minority of patients with colonizing E. coli isolates developed subsequent infections with the same E. coli strain. Enterococcus spp. were most commonly isolated from polymicrobial wound infections (53% of 204 polymicrobial cultures). Patients with Enterococcus infections were severely injured with a high proportion of lower extremity amputations and genitourinary injuries. Approximately 65% of polymicrobial Enterococcus infections had other ESKAPE organisms isolated. As biofilms have been suggested as a cause of delayed wound healing, wound infections with persistent recovery of bacteria (isolates of same organism collected ≥14 days apart) and nonrecurrent bacterial isolates were assessed. Biofilm production was significantly associated with recurrent bacteria isolation (97% vs. 59% with nonrecurrent isolates; P < 0.001); however, further analysis is needed to confirm biofilm formation as a predictor of persistent wound infections.ConclusionsThe TIDOS MDR/VO Initiative provides comprehensive and detailed data of major microbial threats associated with combat-related wound infections to further the understanding of wound etiology and potentially identify infectious disease countermeasures, which may lead to improvements in combat casualty care.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/milmed/usab131
       
 
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