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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 285)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 251)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access  
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Armed Forces & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0095-327X - ISSN (Online) 1556-0848
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Moral Injury: A Framework for Understanding Conflict-Related Sexual
           Violence Against Men

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emeka Thaddues Njoku, Isaac Dery, Scott Nicholas Romaniuk
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Studies on conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) emphasize the need for the integration of a victim-centered lens into Feminist International Relations (IR) frameworks on sexual violence victimization in conflict or war. However, our understanding of the perpetrator-centered lens is limited. Drawing from ethnographic accounts of Nigerian security agents, male victims of CRSV, and aid workers, we analyze moral injury as a framework for discussing CRSV. In Nigeria, counterterrorism operations can lead to morally detrimental circumstances due to the government’s poor management of counterterrorism operations, resulting in the loss of lives and subsequent feelings of betrayal, anger, and guilt by security agents. Some security agents often display these emotions through violent acts to others, such as CRSV against men and boys suspected of terrorism, thereby exacerbating moral injury. The guilt-based moral injury arises when security agents witness CRSV against men and boys by colleagues and fail to seek justice for victims, as this contradicts social and institutional norms. Our article broadens the concept of moral injury by elucidating its significance to CRSV. In doing so, it advances the concept’s disciplinary focus on psychology to IR or international security—counterterrorism and CRSV—for conceptual sophistication and interdisciplinary exchange of thoughts. This article offers valuable insights into trauma-informed international humanitarian interventions for security agents and victims.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T06:47:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241259708
       
  • Revisiting Propensity to Serve and Motivations to Enlist: Insights and
           Implications for Contemporary Military Recruitment Challenges and Research
           

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      Authors: Todd Woodruff, Ryan Kelty, David R. Segal
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      As recruitment challenges persist, understanding enlistment motivations remains pivotal in ensuring military readiness and guiding evolving recruitment strategies. This article examines the enduring relevance of the 2006 study “Propensity to Serve and Motivation to Enlist Among American Combat Soldiers” by Woodruff, Kelty, and Segal and underscores its significance amid contemporary military recruitment challenges. The original article was selected to be profiled as part of the 50th anniversary issue. Building on work by some of the most important names in military sociology, our research underscores the critical importance of understanding the complex interplay of factors influencing enlistment decisions and the effects of declining propensity to serve for all-volunteer militaries. By recognizing the multifaceted nature of enlistment motivations, we emphasize the importance of tailored approaches to attract diverse cohorts of recruits. Our study not only contributes to military sociology and recruiting actions but has also informed policy discussions, stimulated interdisciplinary research, and facilitated the transmission of scholarly knowledge and mentorship to future generations of scholars and leaders.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T06:44:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241259465
       
  • Book Review: The U.S. military in the print news media: Service and
           sacrifice in contemporary discourse

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Donald S. Travis
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T05:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241261658
       
  • “I Just Don’t Want to Be Part of It Anymore”: How Harm and Betrayal
           Erode Cohesion in the Aftermath of Military Sexual Misconduct

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stacey Silins
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study addresses the nature of harm and betrayal following sexual misconduct from the perspective of military personnel and veterans with lived experience, and its impact on military cohesion. A total of 67 semistructured interviews were originally conducted to explore experiences seeking related support in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). A secondary analysis revealed descriptions of interpersonal and institutional betrayal, which damaged their trust and regard for the organization and weakened organizational commitment and connection. Participants framed these impacts in relation to their peers, their leaders, and the organization more broadly, demonstrating that harm from poor organizational responses destabilizes the fundamental bonds that support military cohesion on multiple levels. These findings provide insight into the subjective experience of betrayal associated with sexual misconduct and highlight how organizational responses can substantially mitigate or exacerbate this harm.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T05:51:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241257515
       
  • Commentary on: Military Institutions and Citizenship in Western Societies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brenda L. Moore
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This is a commentary on Morris Janowitz’s article, “Military Institutions and Citizenship in Western Societies,” published in February 1976, in Armed Forces & Society, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 185–204. In the article, Janowitz links sociopolitical changes to the rise and subsequent fall of mass popular Armies. Military service during the 19th century was an integral part of citizenship. However, in the 1960s, mass militaries based on compulsory service began to transform into smaller volunteer forces “with profound implications for social structure, political power, and nationalism.” In this article, I highlight Janowitz’s analysis of the rise and fall of the mass armed forces. I also discuss the three sets of factors Janowitz used in his analysis: (a) technological and organizational change, (b) a rise in small professional militaries that are unrepresentative of the larger society, and (c) ideological and normative change. I end with a brief discussion on how Morris Janowitz’s legacy helps to shape our understanding of civil–military events that have taken place over the last 50 years.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-06-19T12:25:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241261297
       
  • Access and Equity Among Veterans During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Research
           Note

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      Authors: Christos A. Makridis, Gil Alterovitz, Michael Darden
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      It has long been recognized that at-risk groups tend to experience a greater proportion of burden during times of turbulence. Motivated by the COVID-19 pandemic as a source of unprecedented crisis and change, this article uses data on employment, wages, and subjective well-being (SWB) to examine how U.S. veterans—an at-risk group for a variety of social ailments, including homelessness, disability, depression, anxiety, substance use, and suicide—fared over the pandemic between 2020 and 2021. While veterans were less likely to be employed, those who were employed have higher wages, conditional on being employed, and higher levels of SWB. Our results are qualitatively robust to controlling for a wide array of demographic factors, such as age and education, as well as industry and occupational differences. To better understand why veterans fared better than anticipated, we explore the moderating role of local Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers (VAMCs). We find that veterans who live closer to VAMCs exhibit higher levels of SWB with some evidence that the benefits of VAMC proximity are concentrated among more rural veterans, suggesting that VAMCs may have played an important role of supporting veteran communities during the pandemic.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-06-12T08:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241256311
       
  • The Military Academy as a Civilizing Institution: A Historical Sociology
           of the Academization of Officer Education in Sweden

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      Authors: Sebastian Larsson
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Throughout history, military officers’ standing in society has been maintained through the establishment and reforming of military academies. Gradually infusing officer education with academic standards and scholarly ideals has helped secure the corps’ status as a legitimate profession. Drawing on Norbert Elias and Pierre Bourdieu, this article explores the “academization” of officer education in Sweden over 200 years. It finds that academization processes have been prominent in the military officer field, first, during 19th-century struggles to establish a state-organized educational system and war science discipline for the emerging profession, and second, during post-Cold War struggles to reinstate the military’s legitimacy and status by integrating officer education in the university sector. It argues that academic capital has been drawn on instrumentally in the officer field, as a means to endow the corps with a wider credibility and, more broadly, justify the existence of violent professions in peaceful societies.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T02:59:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241256127
       
  • Right or Wrong' The Civil–Military Problematique and Armed Forces &
           Society’s 50th

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      Authors: Peter D. Feaver
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The central concern of civil–military relations theory is how to have a military institution simultaneously strong enough to protect society and the state from enemies while also properly sized and obedient enough not to pose a threat itself to that society and state. When scholars wrestle with this question, they must engage the seminal contributions from Samuel Huntington and Morris Janowitz, as I did in “The Civil-Military Problematique: Huntington, Janowitz, and the Question of Civilian Control.” In hindsight, it is clear that I was right enough in theory but perhaps not in practice. Thirty years of American civil–military relations shows the importance of norms and the strain on military professionalism imposed by the principal norm for democracies: that civilians have the right to be wrong. Future scholars must emphasize the shoring up of norms that build the trust that lubricates day-to-day civil–military interactions.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T10:16:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241255642
       
  • Theories of Democratic Civil–Military Relations and the Enduring Value
           of the Citizen-Soldier Ideal

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      Authors: Suzanne C. Nielsen, Hugh Liebert
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      James Burk’s “Theories of Democratic Civil-Military Relations” stands out for the theoretical insights and bold vision that underpin his critique of Samuel Huntington’s The Soldier and the State and Morris Janowitz’s The Professional Soldier. Burk situates these authors within long-standing traditions of political thought to clarify the need for a new normative theory of civil–military relations for mature democracies. A new normative theory, Burk says, will build on the idea of the “citizen-soldier” to explain how good civil–military relations sustain liberal democratic values. More than 20 years after Burk’s article appeared, the theoretical work he called for remains to be done. However, Burk’s intuition that the citizen-soldier ideal offers the most promising foundation for understanding how civil–military relations sustain liberal democratic values is sound. The political education the citizen-soldier ideal requires contributes to both sustaining liberal democratic values at home and to protecting democracies from external threats.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T10:08:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241254030
       
  • A Problem in the Huntingtonian Universe: The Military Side of the Gap

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dragan Stanar
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the military side of the civil–military value gap in societies with fully professionalized armed forces. The “Huntingtonian Universe” is a paradigm of civil–military relations in which isolation and alienation of armed forces are inevitable once the military becomes separated not just from politics but from the entire political realm by its full professionalization. It is argued that the emergence of a value gap, a sentiment of moral superiority, and contempt toward civilian society is less probable in societies which rely on mandatory military service, as conscription preserves the necessary link between the military and the political realm by keeping the military profession in constant contact with society via conscripts, that is, “temporary soldiers.” Article offers a potential solution for saving the “Huntingtonian Universe” and the concept of objective control of the military by asserting that the optimal way of solving the problem of civil–military value gap is reinstating conscription along with meaningful changes in military education.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T05:34:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241254354
       
  • Do Elections Cause Military Spending to Go Up or Down' New
           International Evidence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeroen Klomp, Jakob de Haan
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores whether the level of military expenditures is affected by the occurrence of elections. From a theoretical perspective, it is not immediately clear whether, and if so, in which direction, upcoming elections shift military expenditures. On the one hand, the incumbent may try to enhance the likelihood of being re-elected by supporting the domestic defense industry. On the other hand, it might be more attractive to cut defense spending and increase non-defense spending. It is also possible that both effects coexist. We therefore apply the finite mixture model (FMM), which is able to test competing hypotheses. Our results, based on a panel of 93 democratic countries between 1980 and 2018 and Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) data on military spending, yield support for both hypotheses. Countries facing security risks or having a significant defense industry are most likely to expand their defense spending in an election year, while other countries are more likely to reduce their defense expenditure.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-05-02T10:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241247063
       
  • The Military and the Family as Greedy Institutions: Then and Now

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mady Wechsler Segal
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In response to a request for this 50th anniversary issue of Armed Forces & Society, I was one of the 10 fortunate authors (and their co-authors) whose work was chosen for a commentary about their original article. Mine was “The Military and the Family as Greedy Institutions.” In this new paper, I describe aspects of my career and the research opportunities that enabled me to develop my ideas. I include the importance of mentors and colleagues and I stress that my work built on that of others. I learned much from my students and I cherish their achievements and continuing contributions to advancing our knowledge in this field.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T09:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241247055
       
  • Turkish Military Sociology: Exploring the Evolution of an Early Starter
           but Latecomer

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      Authors: Barış Ateş
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the reasons for the late development of Turkish military sociology. Although the relationship between the Turkish military and society has some unique characteristics, it has received little attention from sociologists. The existing literature primarily focuses on the narrow field of civil-military relations conducted by political scientists and includes minimal sociological research on the military. Based on historical analysis using primary and secondary sources and interviews, this shortcoming is due to the politicization of sociology and even equating it with communism, the denial of research permits due to bureaucratic secrecy, the sacred position of the military in the eyes of society, and the partial apathy of Turkish sociologists. The institutionalization of Turkish military sociology after the 2016 coup attempt is promising, but restrictions on research permits remain challenging for its future. Building a solid military sociology literature without critically assessing the existing research would also be problematic.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T05:23:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241246276
       
  • Why Do People Attack Military Statues' A National Survey in New
           Zealand

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      Authors: Nick Wilson, John Horrocks, George Thomson
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military statues are being attacked and removed in multiple countries, but there is little analytic work on the associated reasons. Therefore, this research aimed to conduct a nationwide survey of outdoor military statues in a case study country (New Zealand) and identify reasons for attacks. Of the 118 statues identified, 11 (9%) of these had been physically attacked. A key risk factor for statue attack was it being linked to the colonial-era New Zealand Wars versus any other specific war (75% vs 8%, p = .003). This finding fitted with other evidence from attacks on statues of named New Zealanders (e.g. politicians) and on attacks of other types of monuments to these particular wars. It is also consistent with past and persisting injustices experienced by the Indigenous Māori population. In conclusion, some of the attacks on the military statues in this country appear to reflect social injustices and harm from colonialism.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T05:43:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241247811
       
  • Book Review: Army spouses: Military families during the global war on
           terror

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      Authors: Michelle A. Butler Samuels
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-18T12:03:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241248360
       
  • The Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society 70 Years Later:
           Alive and Kicking

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      Authors: David McCone, Wilbur Scott, Joseph Soeters
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article provides an account of the founding, growth, and success of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces & Society (IUS), a long-established professional organization for those studying the military and war. How IUS has thrived invites explanation. Two theoretical themes guide our effort: first, the life cycles of organizations literature, and two, a complementary focus on the professional-career life cycles of IUS’s participants. To put together our account, we review articles about IUS’s early days and present oral history interview material from past and present leaders and members. We conclude with suggestions concerning IUS’s future directions.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T12:24:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241244621
       
  • The Art of Military Innovation

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      Authors: Eyal Ben-Ari
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T11:39:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241244739
       
  • Book Review: Divided not conquered: How rebels fracture and splinters
           behave

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      Authors: Steve Medeiros
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-04-08T12:37:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241245358
       
  • A Playstation Mentality to Killing' Adverse Psychological Consequences in
           Drone Pilots and the Stigmatization thereof in the Military

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      Authors: Ayla Molenkamp, Maartje Weerdesteijn, Alette Smeulers
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Since the start of the 21st century, drones are increasingly used for military purposes. There have been concerns that the work of drone pilots resembles a video game and it has been argued that drone pilots are less likely to develop mental health problems than other service members. Such an assumption could increase stigmatization but empirical research is lacking. For this explorative study, 11 respondents were interviewed. They were purposefully sampled from the United States, the Netherlands, and Israel because of their insight into the working environment of drone pilots. These respondents included scholars, a therapist, and military personnel. They suggested that drone pilots do face mental health problems because of their work and that due to their distance to the battlefield, stigmatization of these problems is more likely. These findings, however, are nuanced by differences across countries and units.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T09:36:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241236221
       
  • Afghan Scholars’ Response to Perspectives on the Afghanistan War:
           Arrogant Conquest; Disgraceful Withdrawal

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      Authors: Nisar Ahmad Arghandwal, Mohammad Ehsan Omaid, Zmarai Fana
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In response to the special issue on the Afghanistan War published by Armed Forces & Society, this article offers alternative perspectives regarding America’s longest war from the point of view of scholars who experienced the war firsthand and continue to live in its aftermath. We argue that Afghanistan was invaded by Western militaries who came to experience political failures and moral regrets. The soil could be conquered, but the Afghan nation has always strictly rejected foreign rulers and dictations. As our research critically evaluated the special issue articles published in the Armed Forces and Society Journal, we believe these articles fall short of reasonable analysis by only considering and analyzing the military strategies, war tactics, and failed stabilization efforts in Afghanistan. Civilian casualties owing to military operations by U.S.-led forces, not establishing an inclusive central government, strong resistance of the Taliban, ignoring the Afghan nation’s core ambitions, Pakistan’s double game policy, and high level of corruption led the U.S. to defeat. Nevertheless, we conclude that the U.S. approach to getting revenge for 9/11 victims and restoring their dignity through banzai attacks, blind bombardments, and night raids in civilians’ homes in Afghan cities and villages and taking innocent lives must be recognized, remembered, and condemned.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-26T06:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241227919
       
  • Editor’s Note: Afghan Scholars’ Response to Perspectives on the
           Afghanistan War: Arrogant Conquest; Disgraceful Withdrawal

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      Authors: Donald S. Travis, Patricia M. Shields
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-26T06:41:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241239906
       
  • Effects of State-Level Individual Mandate on Veterans’ Access to Health
           Care in the United States

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      Authors: Dongjin Oh, Keon-Hyung Lee
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Following the repeal of the federal individual health insurance mandate, five states and D.C. adopted their own state-level individual mandates to counteract the potential negative consequences of the repeal. This study examines the actual changes in veterans’ enrollments in private and Veterans Affairs (VA) insurance following the 2019 repeal. By analyzing data from 65,297 non-elderly veterans aged 18 to 64 in the U.S. between 2019 and 2021, we found that state-level individual mandates have positive effects on veterans’ enrollments in private and VA insurance, but the effects vary depending on individual income levels. The state-level individual mandate successfully serves as a substitute for the federal mandate. The results imply that veterans in states without individual mandate policies are more likely to worry about health insurance premiums and medical bills, limiting access to health care and potentially worsening health outcomes. Thus, the Veterans Health Administration should endeavor to encourage more state governments to adopt individual mandate policies.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T12:42:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241237295
       
  • How Mandatory Military Service Can Divide Rather Than Unite: Conscription,
           Gender, and Military Trust in South Korea 2003–2021

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      Authors: Joonbum Bae, YuJung Julia Lee
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Can mandatory military service increase confidence in the state across the population when only men are required to serve' To answer this question, we leverage the case of South Korea to examine how male-only conscription influences trust toward a critical state institution, the military. Based on the foreign policy opinion literature on the gender gap, we hypothesize that women hold different views of the military and respond in distinct ways to conscription. Analysis of public opinion data from 2003 to 2021 shows that women generally exhibit less trust in the military than men. Male conscription also has diverging effects along gender lines for parents of sons who must serve, increasing distrust of the military for their mothers while not affecting fathers. The findings suggest that mandatory military service can (further) divide opinions of the military across society.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T11:34:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241234021
       
  • American Support of Public Programs for Veterans: Estimates From a
           National Survey Including a Discrete Choice Experiment

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      Authors: Jessie Coe, Daniel Schwam, Rajeev Ramchand, Carrie Farmer
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Do Americans see veterans as particularly deserving or simply as other members of their community' From a nationally representative survey fielded between June and September 2021 with over 2,000 respondents, we find that Americans state high levels of support for veterans and are willing to pay additional tax dollars to provide assistance programs. We find that most Americans support free health care, free college, and affordable housing for all Americans, and the support is notably stronger for programs for veterans. From a discrete choice experiment, we find that Americans are willing to pay hundreds of dollars in additional taxes to provide assistance programs to either veterans or to all community members, and Americans are willing to pay significantly more for certain programs for veterans. In addition, we look at differences in willingness to pay based on military and political affiliation and find significant differences in willingness to pay by political affiliation.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T07:08:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241235313
       
  • Sentiment Analysis of Russian-Language Social Media Posts Discussing the
           2022 Russian Invasion of Ukraine

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      Authors: Matthew C. Dean, Ben Porter
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The current study sought to identify the sentiment of Russian-language social media posts about the war in Ukraine and to contrast sentiment between two popular social media platforms in Russia: VK and Telegram. Overall, 1,393,245 posts were gathered from social media platforms from February 2022 to September 2022 using keywords associated with the conflict. Using the sentiment analysis program Valence Aware Dictionary for sEntiment Reasoning (VADER), we completed an analysis of 15,000 randomly selected, translated Russian-language posts related to the war. Overall, findings show that sentiment was initially positive in the early stages of the invasion before becoming more neutral by the end of the study period. On VK, sentiment followed a similar positive-to-negative trend over the study period. Alternatively, on Telegram, sentiment was neutral throughout the study period. Findings show an initial difference in sentiment toward the war that existed among Russian-language speakers on the two sites before lessening over time.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T07:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241235987
       
  • Declining Mental Health Without Diminished Military Service Motivation in
           Norwegian Adolescents From 2009 to 2022: A Research Note

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      Authors: Morten Nordmo, Lasse Bang, Anders Øvergaard, Ole Christian Lang-Ree
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      There is a growing concern that the mental health of adolescents is worsening and that this deterioration may influence adolescents’ willingness and ability to complete military service. The purpose of this study is to investigate yearly relationships between self-reported mental health indicators and motivation for military service. To accomplish this, nationwide yearly percentile records from repeated cross-sectional records of Norwegian cohorts (N = 891,600) collected from 2009 to 2022 were evaluated. The results show that the number of adolescents with self-reported mental health diagnoses increased every year for both males and females. Well-being and coping decreased over time for females (but not males), although absolute levels were high throughout the study period. Despite evidence of worsening mental health and well-being, self-described motivation and aptitude for military service were largely stable over time for both genders. The negative trends in mental health are not associated with functional consequences for adolescents’ motivation and aptitude to complete military service.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T06:41:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241236890
       
  • Differences in Cultural Dimensions Between South Korean Officers and
           Conscripts: A Topic Modeling Approach

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      Authors: Insoo Kim, Wonkwang Jo
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Excessive restrictions on individual rights, such as a ban on smartphone use and strict hair regulations, are a major concern among conscripts in South Korea. However, officers often adopt a lukewarm attitude toward their grievances. This study examines whether officers and conscripts have different standards of what is acceptable in the military. Theoretically and empirically, there are systemic differences in how officers and conscripts perform daily tasks; however, we do not have a detailed and systematic account of these differences. Therefore, we collected 23,987 responses to an open question regarding the disappointing aspects of military life and conducted a deductive descriptive study. A topic modeling analysis was used to identify 40 topics and categorize them into three clusters: respect for people, innovation, and sense of duty. The data analysis revealed that officers, non-commissioned officers (NCOs), and conscripts had different priorities regarding what the military must do. Officers and NCOs prioritized innovation over respect for people, but the opposite was true for conscripts. These findings have theoretical and methodological implications for exploring military subcultures.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-09T06:35:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241233564
       
  • Trump(ing) Tradition: Old Laws, New Norms, and the Danger to
           Civil–Military Relations

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      Authors: Ryan Burke, Jahara Matisek
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Before, during, and after his presidency, Donald J. Trump’s behavior and statements provoked segments of the U.S. military and civil society, with some decisions criticized and declared illegal by critics. Some current and former U.S. military personnel openly criticized and displayed contempt toward the president, thereby violating Article 88 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). Prior to the 2021 conviction of a Marine Corps officer, the last Article 88 conviction occurred in 1966 when an off-duty Army Lieutenant held a sign criticizing President Johnson at an anti-Vietnam War protest. Despite Trump engaging in norm-eroding behaviors that politicized the Armed Forces, these actions were well within his legal rights. However, open criticism against President Trump by many retired flag officers was illegal per UCMJ laws, yet not enforced. The paradox of a UCMJ law becoming dead letter law indicates a major disjuncture between normative civil–military relations and the laws regulating the behavior of active and retired U.S. military officers. We conclude that UCMJ laws must be enforced, rewritten, or abolished because non-enforcement degrades civil–military relations and military professionalism.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-03-08T09:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241234253
       
  • We (All) Want You' Perceived Military Leadership Potential and Actual
           Leadership Role Occupancy in Working Life: A Longitudinal Study of a
           Swedish Cohort

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      Authors: Therese Reitan, Sten-Åke Stenberg
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      One of the main tasks of the armed forces is to recruit and select future soldiers and to identify potential officers. However, these procedures may have a wider societal impact beyond the borders of the military organization itself. This study aims to examine how compatible assessments of military leadership potential are with those in the labor market. Using longitudinal data concerning a large cohort of Swedish males who underwent mustering during the early 1970s, we analyzed the association between officer suitability assessments and managerial role occupancy at age 50 to 55, while controlling for socio-demographic factors in childhood and adulthood. We found a high level of predictability, whereby those who were ranked highest were four times more likely to hold managerial positions than those with the lowest ranking. Results are discussed in relation to perceptions about leadership skills and possible institutional isomorphism between the armed forces and other societal organizations.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T12:23:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241228845
       
  • Exploring the Normative Structure of Finnish Soldiers’ Home Association:
           Understanding an Auxiliary Organization Through Volunteer Values

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      Authors: Jukka I. Mattila, Sanna K. Malinen
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on creating understanding of Finnish Soldiers’ Home Association (SODE) as an auxiliary organization. Drawing on the concept of organizations as normative structures, we explore how individual volunteer values contribute to shaping the functioning and actions within SODE. We took a novel approach that involved examining the values of SODE volunteers to understand the nature of the organization. We adopted an interpretivist lens and used an abductive logic of enquiry, drawing from existing research and new survey data from SODE volunteers. We show that SODE volunteers exhibit high pro-defense attitudes, patriotism, and security values. By understanding these values, we gain insights into the normative structure that guides the goals, means, and roles within SODE. This research contributes to literature on voluntary organizations in the field of military studies and highlights the significance of individual values in shaping and maintaining the unique nature of SODE as an auxiliary organization.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T11:05:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231224736
       
  • Professionalized Heroism' Comparing US, UK, and Norwegian War Decorations
           From the War in Afghanistan

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      Authors: Torunn Laugen Haaland
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article compares the awarding of the three highest war decorations in Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States for actions undertaken in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2018 to examine contemporary expressions of military heroism. The comparison shows Norway tends to award leadership, and gaining respect from prestigious allies, whereas the United States and the United Kingdom tend to award individual acts of courage, involving great risk to one’s own life. In the case of the United States, these acts were predominantly aimed toward rescuing fellow soldiers, whereas the U.K. cases were aimed toward defeating an enemy. The Norwegian war decoration regime, in which the highest decorations are detached from the traditional military value of sacrifice, illustrates that while professional forces may act heroically, heroism, contrary to war decoration regimes, cannot be professionalized.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T12:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231225449
       
  • The Impact of Military Policing on Armed Forces: The Case of Italy

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      Authors: Matteo Mazziotti di Celso
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, governments have progressively expanded the military’s role in internal security, often utilizing military policing to enhance their consensus. However, extending the armed forces’ participation in internal security gives rise to problems within the military. This article introduces a framework to analyze these problems and applies it to the explorative case study of “Strade Sicure,” an internal security operation of the Italian Army. The framework is used to develop the working hypothesis that Italian soldiers deployed in the operation are transformed into subordinates of the police: They are relegated to routine constabulary duties and work under the strict supervision of police officers. The article tests the hypothesis with qualitative data, including interviews with retired military personnel. The research contributes to the debate on military role expansion by offering a framework to study its effects on the military. Moreover, the article provides empirical evidence that holds practical policy implications.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T10:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231225771
       
  • Reserve Soldiers as Transmigrants—Two Decades On: A Research Note

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      Authors: Eyal Ben Ari, Edna Lomsky-Feder, Nir Gazit
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The choice of our article—Reserve Soldiers as Transmigrants—for the 50th anniversary of Armed Forces & Society special issue indicates heightened interest in reserve forces and recognition of their organizational and social uniqueness. At base of our previous publications was an implicit assumption that reservists belong to diverse and representative social and cultural groups. In other words, we did not explicitly address the issues of the social distribution of reservists. In this short piece, we turn that assumption into a variable so that the key questions that arise for further research are “Who serves in the reserves'” and “What are the implications of the social distribution of reservists'” While these questions have been addressed in regard to conscripts and regulars, there is a dearth of relevant studies on reserves. We suggest that this line of analysis further illuminates the complexity of contracts and dynamics between reservists, the military, and the state.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231223541
       
  • Commentary on the Standard Model of Military Group Cohesion

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      Authors: Guy L. Siebold
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In response to King’s article on cohesion, this author submitted a critique, “The Essence of Military Group Cohesion” (2007), based on 20 years of research. The critique noted that King had set up several strawmen and presented a narrow focus. Furthermore, the critique introduced the Standard Model of Military Group Cohesion as a more widely useful approach. The Model was further articulated in “Key Questions and Challenges to the Standard Model of Military Group Cohesion” (2011) and “The Misconceived Construct of Task Cohesion” (2015). This current article describes major conceptual and measurement efforts leading up to the development of the Model, critiques and expansions of the Model, and needed future research to refine the Model as well as combine cohesion with other key variables such as motivation, combatant capacity, and leadership to more fully explain variation in key military outcome variables such as unit performance and retention.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:48:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231225433
       
  • Cohesion, Combat Performance and Civil-Military Relations: Contextualizing
           “The Word of Command”

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      Authors: Anthony King
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In 2006, Armed Forces & Society published my article on small unit cohesion, “The Word of Command.” It has been the focus of considerable discussion since that time. This essay describes the origins and the purpose of that 2006 article, as an attempt to contribute to an emergent “practical” paradigm in the study of cohesion. Instead of focusing on interpersonal cohesion, my original article prioritized skill—task cohesion. This commentary argues that although the political implications of small unit cohesion was subordinate in 2006, that initial article—and my wider work on cohesion—speaks directly to a key theme in the journal: civil-military relations.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T11:21:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231181611
       
  • Workplace Stress in Military Women During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Brazil:
           A Research Note

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      Authors: Claudia Millani Gomes, Alessandra Soares Ayres Fraga, Romulo de Oliveira Fraga, Stephany Nass, Carina Rodrigues Boeck, Natielen Jacques Schuch
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated the prevalence of burnout syndrome symptoms and related factors in Brazilian military women during COVID-19 pandemic. The symptoms are a combination of physical tiredness, emotional exhaustion, and cognitive depletion, which are related to the job activity and result in mental disconnection with work and reduced professional achievement. It is a cross-sectional study on the frequency of burnout syndrome in military women in which individual questionnaires were delivered via e-mail and returned by the same form. The results revealed that 44.5% of the 164 military women were affected by burnout syndrome. The organizational environment, work overload, control over tasks, and some individual conditions can be highlighted among the factors for developing symptoms. The occurrence of stress symptoms among Brazilian military women was probably due to the constant exposure to stress in their job. The implications of women’s military service on their performance to work during the pandemic are discussed.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T07:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231221759
       
  • What Do Successful Military-to-Civilian Transitions Look Like' A Revised
           Framework and a New Conceptual Model for Assessing Veteran Well-Being

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      Authors: Jennifer K. Karre, Daniel F. Perkins, Nicole R. Morgan, Katie E. Davenport, Keith R. Aronson, Rosalinda Vasquez Maury, Deborah Bradbard, Nicholas J. Armstrong, Anne Wright, Randy Sargent, Megan Andros
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Developmental theory indicates that success during a major life change requires attention to multiple life domains (e.g., physical health, mental health, employment, financial, and social). This study presents a revised conceptual framework and offers a new empirical model to assess the well-being of post-9/11 veterans as they transition to civilian life. Data from a large sample of post-9/11 veterans surveyed over 2.5 years revealed that post-9/11 veteran transitions were mixed: veterans improved over time in some domains (e.g., employment), stagnated in some (e.g., social), and struggled more over time in others (e.g., physical health). Even in domains with improvement, a large percent of veterans still struggled (e.g., 34% struggled with mental health at Wave 6). Moreover, certain groups tended to struggle more (e.g., enlisted, women, people of color). The conceptual framework and empirical model are intended to stimulate discussion on how best to understand, evaluate, and support veterans’ military-to-civilian transition.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T11:25:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231216678
       
 
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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 285)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 251)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 243)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista do Exército     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access  
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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