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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 281)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 252)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 240)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Defence Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Terrorism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Naval de Odontologia On Line / Naval Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bioterrorism & Biodefense     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Problemy Mechatroniki. Uzbrojenie, lotnictwo, inżynieria bezpieczeństwa / Problems of Mechatronics. Armament, Aviation, Safety Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Studies & Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal on Baltic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fra Krig og Fred     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista do Exército     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Revista Agulhas Negras     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Wiedza Obronna     Open Access  
선진국방연구     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Revista Política y Estrategia     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Martial Arts Studies     Open Access  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Armed Forces & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0095-327X - ISSN (Online) 1556-0848
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • We (All) Want You' Perceived Military Leadership Potential and Actual
           Leadership Role Occupancy in Working Life: A Longitudinal Study of a
           Swedish Cohort

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Therese Reitan, Sten-Åke Stenberg
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      One of the main tasks of the armed forces is to recruit and select future soldiers and to identify potential officers. However, these procedures may have a wider societal impact beyond the borders of the military organization itself. This study aims to examine how compatible assessments of military leadership potential are with those in the labor market. Using longitudinal data concerning a large cohort of Swedish males who underwent mustering during the early 1970s, we analyzed the association between officer suitability assessments and managerial role occupancy at age 50 to 55, while controlling for socio-demographic factors in childhood and adulthood. We found a high level of predictability, whereby those who were ranked highest were four times more likely to hold managerial positions than those with the lowest ranking. Results are discussed in relation to perceptions about leadership skills and possible institutional isomorphism between the armed forces and other societal organizations.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T12:23:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X241228845
       
  • Exploring the Normative Structure of Finnish Soldiers’ Home Association:
           Understanding an Auxiliary Organization Through Volunteer Values

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jukka I. Mattila, Sanna K. Malinen
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on creating understanding of Finnish Soldiers’ Home Association (SODE) as an auxiliary organization. Drawing on the concept of organizations as normative structures, we explore how individual volunteer values contribute to shaping the functioning and actions within SODE. We took a novel approach that involved examining the values of SODE volunteers to understand the nature of the organization. We adopted an interpretivist lens and used an abductive logic of enquiry, drawing from existing research and new survey data from SODE volunteers. We show that SODE volunteers exhibit high pro-defense attitudes, patriotism, and security values. By understanding these values, we gain insights into the normative structure that guides the goals, means, and roles within SODE. This research contributes to literature on voluntary organizations in the field of military studies and highlights the significance of individual values in shaping and maintaining the unique nature of SODE as an auxiliary organization.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T11:05:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231224736
       
  • Professionalized Heroism' Comparing US, UK, and Norwegian War Decorations
           From the War in Afghanistan

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      Authors: Torunn Laugen Haaland
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article compares the awarding of the three highest war decorations in Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States for actions undertaken in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2018 to examine contemporary expressions of military heroism. The comparison shows Norway tends to award leadership, and gaining respect from prestigious allies, whereas the United States and the United Kingdom tend to award individual acts of courage, involving great risk to one’s own life. In the case of the United States, these acts were predominantly aimed toward rescuing fellow soldiers, whereas the U.K. cases were aimed toward defeating an enemy. The Norwegian war decoration regime, in which the highest decorations are detached from the traditional military value of sacrifice, illustrates that while professional forces may act heroically, heroism, contrary to war decoration regimes, cannot be professionalized.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T12:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231225449
       
  • The Impact of Military Policing on Armed Forces: The Case of Italy

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      Authors: Matteo Mazziotti di Celso
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, governments have progressively expanded the military’s role in internal security, often utilizing military policing to enhance their consensus. However, extending the armed forces’ participation in internal security gives rise to problems within the military. This article introduces a framework to analyze these problems and applies it to the explorative case study of “Strade Sicure,” an internal security operation of the Italian Army. The framework is used to develop the working hypothesis that Italian soldiers deployed in the operation are transformed into subordinates of the police: They are relegated to routine constabulary duties and work under the strict supervision of police officers. The article tests the hypothesis with qualitative data, including interviews with retired military personnel. The research contributes to the debate on military role expansion by offering a framework to study its effects on the military. Moreover, the article provides empirical evidence that holds practical policy implications.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T10:50:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231225771
       
  • Reserve Soldiers as Transmigrants—Two Decades On: A Research Note

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      Authors: Eyal Ben Ari, Edna Lomsky-Feder, Nir Gazit
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The choice of our article—Reserve Soldiers as Transmigrants—for the 50th anniversary of Armed Forces & Society special issue indicates heightened interest in reserve forces and recognition of their organizational and social uniqueness. At base of our previous publications was an implicit assumption that reservists belong to diverse and representative social and cultural groups. In other words, we did not explicitly address the issues of the social distribution of reservists. In this short piece, we turn that assumption into a variable so that the key questions that arise for further research are “Who serves in the reserves'” and “What are the implications of the social distribution of reservists'” While these questions have been addressed in regard to conscripts and regulars, there is a dearth of relevant studies on reserves. We suggest that this line of analysis further illuminates the complexity of contracts and dynamics between reservists, the military, and the state.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231223541
       
  • Commentary on the Standard Model of Military Group Cohesion

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      Authors: Guy L. Siebold
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In response to King’s article on cohesion, this author submitted a critique, “The Essence of Military Group Cohesion” (2007), based on 20 years of research. The critique noted that King had set up several strawmen and presented a narrow focus. Furthermore, the critique introduced the Standard Model of Military Group Cohesion as a more widely useful approach. The Model was further articulated in “Key Questions and Challenges to the Standard Model of Military Group Cohesion” (2011) and “The Misconceived Construct of Task Cohesion” (2015). This current article describes major conceptual and measurement efforts leading up to the development of the Model, critiques and expansions of the Model, and needed future research to refine the Model as well as combine cohesion with other key variables such as motivation, combatant capacity, and leadership to more fully explain variation in key military outcome variables such as unit performance and retention.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:48:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231225433
       
  • Cohesion, Combat Performance and Civil-Military Relations: Contextualizing
           “The Word of Command”

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      Authors: Anthony King
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In 2006, Armed Forces & Society published my article on small unit cohesion, “The Word of Command.” It has been the focus of considerable discussion since that time. This essay describes the origins and the purpose of that 2006 article, as an attempt to contribute to an emergent “practical” paradigm in the study of cohesion. Instead of focusing on interpersonal cohesion, my original article prioritized skill—task cohesion. This commentary argues that although the political implications of small unit cohesion was subordinate in 2006, that initial article—and my wider work on cohesion—speaks directly to a key theme in the journal: civil-military relations.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T11:21:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231181611
       
  • Workplace Stress in Military Women During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Brazil:
           A Research Note

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Claudia Millani Gomes, Alessandra Soares Ayres Fraga, Romulo de Oliveira Fraga, Stephany Nass, Carina Rodrigues Boeck, Natielen Jacques Schuch
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated the prevalence of burnout syndrome symptoms and related factors in Brazilian military women during COVID-19 pandemic. The symptoms are a combination of physical tiredness, emotional exhaustion, and cognitive depletion, which are related to the job activity and result in mental disconnection with work and reduced professional achievement. It is a cross-sectional study on the frequency of burnout syndrome in military women in which individual questionnaires were delivered via e-mail and returned by the same form. The results revealed that 44.5% of the 164 military women were affected by burnout syndrome. The organizational environment, work overload, control over tasks, and some individual conditions can be highlighted among the factors for developing symptoms. The occurrence of stress symptoms among Brazilian military women was probably due to the constant exposure to stress in their job. The implications of women’s military service on their performance to work during the pandemic are discussed.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T07:21:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231221759
       
  • What Do Successful Military-to-Civilian Transitions Look Like' A Revised
           Framework and a New Conceptual Model for Assessing Veteran Well-Being

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer K. Karre, Daniel F. Perkins, Nicole R. Morgan, Katie E. Davenport, Keith R. Aronson, Rosalinda Vasquez Maury, Deborah Bradbard, Nicholas J. Armstrong, Anne Wright, Randy Sargent, Megan Andros
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Developmental theory indicates that success during a major life change requires attention to multiple life domains (e.g., physical health, mental health, employment, financial, and social). This study presents a revised conceptual framework and offers a new empirical model to assess the well-being of post-9/11 veterans as they transition to civilian life. Data from a large sample of post-9/11 veterans surveyed over 2.5 years revealed that post-9/11 veteran transitions were mixed: veterans improved over time in some domains (e.g., employment), stagnated in some (e.g., social), and struggled more over time in others (e.g., physical health). Even in domains with improvement, a large percent of veterans still struggled (e.g., 34% struggled with mental health at Wave 6). Moreover, certain groups tended to struggle more (e.g., enlisted, women, people of color). The conceptual framework and empirical model are intended to stimulate discussion on how best to understand, evaluate, and support veterans’ military-to-civilian transition.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T11:25:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231216678
       
  • Mortality Among Individuals Released From U.S. Prisons: Does Military
           History Matter'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Susan McNeeley, Mark A. Morgan, Matthew W. Logan, Andrea R. Hazelwood, Valerie A. Clark
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The physiological effects of imprisonment are well-documented and include a heightened risk for various forms of mortality post-release. The incarceration-mortality nexus does not apply equally to all groups, however, and research shows that some demographics (i.e., vulnerable populations) experience a greater likelihood of death. In the current study, we analyze correctional data over a 10-year period (2010–2019; n = 36,716) from Minnesota to assess the extent to which formerly incarcerated military veterans differ from non-veterans in their relative risk of mortality, net of relevant control variables. We also examine whether specific risk factors for post-release mortality differ between these groups. Findings indicate that veteran status is not a significant predictor of all-cause, natural, or unnatural mortality among releasees, though several notable within-group differences were observed. Policy implications of the current study are discussed in relation to the provision of veteran-centric health care services and directions for future research are given.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-25T09:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231218893
       
  • Multidimensional Measures of Militarization (M3): A Global Dataset

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      Authors: Markus Bayer, Aurel Croissant, Roya Izadi, Nikitas Scheeder
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we present the novel M3-dataset. This global dataset brings together 30 existing and newly developed indicators and a total of 140,000 observations on three dimensions of material, political, and societal militarization from 1990 to 2020. We introduce a novel, multidimensional concept of militarization, explain the construction of the dataset, data-collection process, and the measures taken to ensure the validity and reliability of the data. We illustrate the usefulness of the dataset for researchers by analyzing for the first time the impact of military policing as one aspect of societal militarization on violence and human rights violations at the global level. We conclude by discussing the significance of the M3 dataset and outlining how scholars in different fields and with various research interests, including (de-)democratization, armed conflict, and human development, can benefit from incorporating this dataset into their studies.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T07:55:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231215295
       
  • Assessing the Link Between Bible Reading and Flourishing Among Military
           Families: Preliminary Findings

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matt Bradshaw, Sung Joon Jang, Byron R. Johnson
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines whether participating in a Bible reading program for military families (called “Hero Squad”) is positively related to overall human flourishing among children, family units, and parents/caregivers. Previous research shows salutary associations between multiple dimensions of religiosity (including reading sacred texts) and different aspects of flourishing (e.g., physical health, psychological well-being, character and virtue, social connections and support), so it was hypothesized that program participation would promote flourishing over time. Two waves of survey data were collected on a sample of 175 U.S. military families in 2021 and 2022, and differences between pretest and posttest surveys were analyzed. As hypothesized, improvements in indicators of flourishing were observed over time. These findings contribute to published work on religious participation by showing that Bible reading may promote overall mental, physical, and social well-being. Implications and limitations of these preliminary findings are discussed.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T11:22:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231211554
       
  • Book Review: Teaching and Learning the West Point Way

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      Authors: Clementine Fujimura
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-11-11T04:00:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231205535
       
  • Do the Best and Brightest West Point Officers Stay in or Leave the
           Army'

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      Authors: Everett S. P. Spain, Eric Lin, Andrew G. Farina
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Studying archival data from 16 West Point cohorts (classes of 1992–2007, N = 13,309), this article operationalizes the concept of “best and brightest” and then investigates whether the best and brightest West Point cadets depart the Army at a higher rate than their average-performing peers. A combination of multi-variable regression and survival analysis indicates that the best and brightest West Pointers are as likely to stay in the Army past year 6 (to serve as a company commander) and are more likely to stay in the Army past year 10 (to serve as a field grade officer) as compared with their average- and lower-performing peers. In addition, among the best and brightest West Pointers, both female and minority officers are as likely to stay in the Army past year 6 as their male and Caucasian officer peers, respectively, although minority officers are much less likely to stay past year 10 than their Caucasian male peers.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T08:12:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231194238
       
  • Book Review: Thanks for your service: The causes and consequences of
           public confidence in the U.S. military

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      Authors: Heidi A. Urben
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T12:06:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231204048
       
  • Book Review: Military Sociology: A Guided Introduction

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      Authors: Morten G. Ender
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-10-04T04:38:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231201972
       
  • Military-Connected Children With Special Health Care Needs and Their
           Families: A Literature Review

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      Authors: Antoinette “Toni” Hill, Martha Blue-Banning
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Since 2001, armed conflicts have required extraordinary sacrifices by U.S. military service members and their families. Literature on the impact of the military lifestyle between 2001 and 2021 suggests frequent relocation and deployment have consequences for children. Limited research on the subpopulation of children and youth with special health care needs contains evidence these military families face complex issues, amplifying stressors of military life. The results of this review identified challenges in continuity of care in education, health care, and family support resulting from frequent relocations, plus notable gaps in research. These findings are important because of their potential impact on military readiness, recruitment, and retention. This review appears to be the only peer-reviewed systematic literature review on military-connected children with special health care needs and their families.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T11:17:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231197992
       
  • Economic Sanctions and Civil–Military Relations in Target Countries

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      Authors: Ghashia Kiyani, Ryan Yu-Lin Liou, Amanda Murdie, Dursun Peksen
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      How do economic sanctions affect civil–military relations in targeted states' Though much research has focused on how external military threats affect civil–military relations, no study to date has offered a thorough assessment of the degree to which non-military threats, particularly sanctions, alter civil–military dynamics. We posit that sanctions alter civil–military bargaining in ways that increase the military’s role in political decision-making, ultimately lessening civilian control. However, we also posit that targeted regime leaders want to fulfill as many of the military’s demands as possible with their restricted pot of resources, ultimately leading to sanctions’ limited role in observed coup attempts. We substantiate our theoretical claims using time-series, cross-national data on economic sanctions, civilian control, and coup attempts.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-28T05:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231192359
       
  • The Rebel and the Politician: Developing a Typology of Insurgent
           Civil–Military Relations

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      Authors: Alec Worsnop
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have brought returned focus to civil–military relations in complex, fluid, and “asymmetric” environments. The close integration of politics and violence has led to renewed calls for more careful civilian control and involvement in strategy-making and operational design. While scholars and practitioners have struggled with this pressing task, so have the insurgent organizations that the United States and others have been fighting against. And, in some ways, rebels have been more successful in harmonizing military and political efforts. Yet, there is little research into the form and implications of their civil–military balance. This article constructs a typology of rebel civil–military relations that maps the overlap of an intensive form of civilian control, political integration, and the degree of military professionalization. The typology is developed by categorizing a range of prominent organizations operative in contemporary and past civil wars and considering how these patterns might influence insurgents’ pursuit of intricately intertwined political and military goals. This theory development exercise—intended for hypothesis generation to inform future avenues of research—has implications for how we understand insurgency and state-based civil–military relations in unstable environments.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-21T03:41:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231193152
       
  • Gender and Sexual Minorities in the Armed and Police Forces: Perceptions
           and Mental Health Implications of Portuguese Militaries—A Qualitative
           Study

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      Authors: Joana Azevedo, Henrique Pereira
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions toward gender and sexual identities in the Portuguese armed and police forces, emphasizing on mental health implications. A qualitative research methodology was followed, using an electronic inquiry answered by 64 participants who are members of the Portuguese armed or police forces. Data were examined using thematic analysis, and the recurrent themes identified were the following: general characteristics of the military/police environment and culture, sexist attitudes and behaviors, positive attitudes and behaviors related to sexuality, homophobic/heterosexist attitudes and behaviors, influence of military and police culture on the expression of sexuality and coping of sexual minorities, negative impact of military and police culture on the mental health of gender and sexual minorities, and personal opinion regarding how sexual and gender diversity should be addressed in the armed and police forces. Analysis of these themes provides insight into the perceptions and experiences of our participants and suggests that the impact of stigma and discrimination toward gender and sexual minorities in this context was relevant for the individuals within this sample.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T04:24:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231191676
       
  • Postpartum Women’s Perceptions of Risk of Musculoskeletal Injuries in
           the Canadian Armed Forces: A Qualitative Research Study

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      Authors: Francine Darroch, Candace Roberts, Lilly Jean-Pierre, Gabriela Gonzalez Montaner, Kristi B. Adamo
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Musculoskeletal injuries (MSKi) are a major concern within military forces, significantly reducing productivity and military readiness. Within the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), MSKi are the most common cause of delayed deployment of members. There is a lack of research specifically focused on the experiences of postpartum CAF members and their perceived risk of MSKi. Drawing on Giles et al.’s equity-centered 4 E’s injury prevention framework (education, engineering, enforcement, and equity), we highlight that individuals who experience pregnancy may perceive themselves to be at heightened risk of injury due to sex and gender-based inequities in their workplace. This qualitative research draws on data from focus groups with 32 individuals who experienced pregnancy while serving in the CAF. Using reflexive thematic analysis, we identified the following findings related to perceived increased risk of MSKi: (a) nature of relevant physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy, (b) unreasonable pressures to return to work at peak physical readiness, and (c) perceived challenges associated with accessing resources and services to support physical recovery. There are opportunities to improve access to injury prevention resources and support for pregnant and postpartum CAF members to reduce rates of MSKi. Findings from this study may be additionally relevant to armed forces more broadly or other professions that require return to physical readiness.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T04:21:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231188457
       
  • Book Review: US National Security: Policymakers, processes, and politics

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      Authors: Donald S. Travis
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-08-10T04:43:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231186348
       
  • Between “Victims” and Their “Saviors”: Process-Based Leadership
           and Trust Building in Civil–Military Relations in Northern Nigeria

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      Authors: Folahanmi Aina
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Northern Nigeria has been plagued by the nefarious activities of terrorist groups, including Boko Haram, its affiliates, and armed bandits. Beyond its kinetic operations, the military has since deployed several strategies toward trust building across the region. This article contributes to the literature, by adopting process-based leadership as a social psychology conceptual and analytical lens. As a departure from traditional conceptualizations of civil–military relations, process-based leadership identifies where influence exists and how it is being exchanged toward the attainment of mutually linked security goals and objectives, between the military and society, in conflict settings. A central argument of the article is that improving civil–military relations in conflict settings is largely dependent on trust building, and achieving this is a function of the exchange of influence and the establishment of mutuality between the military and society.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-24T04:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231187581
       
  • Who Supports the Troops' Social Support Domains and Sources in Active
           Duty Army Networks

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      Authors: Nicholas Barr, Laura Petry, Anthony Fulginiti, Anil Arora, Julie Cederbaum, Carl Castro, Eric Rice
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Social support is a critical determinant of military service members’ mental and behavioral health outcomes, but few studies have investigated social support types and sources in the mixed family and military social networks in which service members are embedded. We applied multilevel logistic regression modeling to investigate links between active-duty Army Soldiers’ individual demographic and military characteristics, relational characteristics, and social support outcomes, in sample of 241 active-duty U.S. Army personnel. Results showed that participants who rated unit cohesion higher were more likely to report receiving informational, emotional, and mental health help-seeking support. Participants were more likely to receive informational, emotional, and help-seeking support from a romantic partner or deployment buddy than a relative and less likely to receive help-seeking support from males than females. Findings highlight the critical importance of both unit level and external relationships in meeting Soldiers’ social support needs.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T07:18:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231182907
       
  • Book Review: “German Warriors: From the Empire to the Berlin
           Republic—A Military History.”

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      Authors: Nicolas Stojek
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T05:00:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231181612
       
  • “A Hidden Community”: The Experiences of Help-Seeking and Receiving
           Mental Health Treatment in U.K. Women Veterans. A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Gavin M. Campbell, Victoria Williamson, Dominic Murphy
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Women veterans are often underserved in both the research into and provision of mental health treatment. This study explored women veterans’ experiences of mental health difficulties, help-seeking, and treatment provision. Semistructured telephone interviews with 19 U.K. women veterans who met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder were conducted and Reflexive Thematic Analysis was used in analysis. Three superordinate themes encompassing participants’ experiences were developed: (a) attitudes toward mental health and help-seeking; (b) the need to acknowledge the uniqueness of women veterans; and (c) the structural elements of care provision. The findings indicate that women veterans have additional gender-specific challenges and needs concerning tailored pathways into help and support, as well as the environment and modality of treatment delivery, as distinct from veteran men.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T04:58:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231182140
       
  • Mitigating the Risks of Imported Soldiery: Britain, Dhofaris, and the
           Early Military of the Emirates

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      Authors: Athol Yates, Ash Rossiter
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Various polities have imported soldiers to compensate for a lack of manpower, to reduce costs, or to avoid the risk of arming potentially disloyal citizenry. However, importing soldiery is not without dangers. Foreign soldiers may carry with them subversive ideas, continue homegrown conflicts in their employer’s territory, be unreliable, or, worse, revolt. How importers of foreign soldiers might mitigate these risks is little studied. This case study reveals the repertoire of measures Britain used to mitigate the risks posed by one group of imported soldiers—the Dhofaris from Oman’s restive southern province who served from the late 1950s to 1973 in the British protected Trucial States, which became the United Arab Emirates in 1971. It concludes that intelligence collection measures were hampered by an inability to penetrate the Dhofaris’s linguistic and sociocultural world, and that threat analysis failed to accurately consider the impact of the conflict in their homeland.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T04:55:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231182719
       
  • Masculine Conformity and Social Dominance’s Relation With
           Organizational Culture Change

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      Authors: Michelle E. Deng, Adelheid A. M. Nicol, Cindy Suurd Ralph
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      While the workforce is becoming increasingly more modernized and diverse, masculine norms are prevalent among certain organizations that remain male-dominated. Namely, the military is an institution that promotes masculine stereotypes and a culture where such stereotypes form a normative system of hierarchy. This study, surveying 145 military cadets at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), found that social dominance orientation, or preference for in-group superiority and out-group inequality, was associated with higher conformity to masculine norms. Moreover, higher levels of social dominance explained the relationship between masculine conformity and less acceptance toward cultural reforms in the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). These findings suggest that achieving true organizational culture change in the military involves challenging not only masculine norms but, more importantly, the dominant and nonegalitarian attitudes of social dominance.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T05:28:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231178522
       
  • Prisoner’s Dilemma: Hedging Loyalties in (Un)Governed Space of the
           Lake Chad Basin

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      Authors: Oyewole Simon Oginni
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the dynamics of interactions between civilians, armed groups, and the state in frontline states. Drawing on a 6-year ethnographic study of armed conflicts in the Lake Chad Basin region, the article argues that civilian loyalty becomes multiple and overlapping when the roles of the state and armed groups become indistinguishable in insecure spaces. A range of actions and outcomes can be observed from civilians’ navigating strategies: individual and collective bargaining, false compliance and co-optation with Boko Haram, Islamic State of West Africa Province (ISWAP) and other militias to mitigate the risks of multiple competing authorities. The coupling of emerging individual and collective actions exemplifies self-organization that shapes the state response, armed groups’ behaviors, and their legitimacy at the local scale. Thus, civilians result in hedging loyalty between the state and armed groups to reduce the potential harm that the non-zero-sum control of conflict-torn spaces would otherwise cause.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-06-07T04:52:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231177896
       
  • Does Withdrawal of Troops After Military Intervention Reduce Rebel
           Groups'

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      Authors: Wakako Maekawa
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      How does the withdrawal of troops after a military intervention supporting the government affect the number of rebel groups in the long term' This study argues that the withdrawal of foreign support for the government affects the number of rebels by directly provoking a nationalist backlash in the short term and threatening government legitimacy in the long term. Whether or not nationalism is provoked and whether legitimacy is enhanced or eroded depend on whether or not it was a humanitarian intervention. If rebels win, the intervention withdrawals also indirectly affect the number of rebel groups in the long term through the militias’ presence. Using interrupted time-series estimates between 1961 and 2005, this study found that humanitarian intervention withdrawals decrease the number of rebel groups in the long term, whereas nonhumanitarian intervention withdrawals promote the growth of militias and increase the number of rebel groups.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T05:34:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231177717
       
  • Two World Views' How Regular and Reserve Royal Marines Perceive Each
           Other

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      Authors: Edith Wilkinson, Elmar Kutsch, Emma Parry, Neil Turner
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Effective integration of the Regular and Reserve Armed Forces is essential to operational effectiveness, but evidence suggests that this remains problematic. Past research has focused on the professional values of Regulars and the perceptions that this group holds about Reservists. In this study, we argue that it is necessary to consider the perceptions of both Regulars and Reservists to truly understand the barriers to integration between these elements of Defence. This study investigates what Regular and Reserve Royal Marines see as the important constructs related to each group, through the use of repertory grid technique with 18 Regulars and 16 Reservists. Not only did the Regulars and Reservists in this study see different constructs as important, they also ascribed different constructs to each group. These differences are potentially problematic when aiming to integrate the Regular and Reserve Armed Forces.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T10:17:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231176064
       
  • Welcome to the U.S. Army: A Qualitative Examination of the Army’s
           Reception of New Soldiers

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      Authors: Sara Kintzle, Leslie P. Schnyder, Eva Alday, Lindsey Alas Gonzalez, Michàlle Mor Barak, Carl A. Castro
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Joining the Army, a new installation or a new unit are times of significant stress for Soldiers. Support provided during these transitions can affect unit cohesion, Soldier well-being, retention, and mission readiness. This research aimed to explore how Soldiers experience the Army onboarding process as well as perceptions of the welcome experience. Nineteen focus groups were conducted with 120 Soldiers using a semistructured interview protocol. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts revealed two major themes, varied welcome experience and an inconsistent Total Army Sponsorship Program. Soldiers reported varied transition experiences ranging from positive, neutral, nonexistent, to negative. Results indicate that Soldiers welcome experience was dependent on the specific installation, leaders, and unit. Findings demonstrate that at the installation and unit level, the Army currently lacks standardized processes for onboarding new service members. We note the research limitations and offer several recommendations that can be drawn from the present findings.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T06:09:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231170837
       
  • “Mom Calling the Commanding Officer”: The Changing Relationship
           Between Mothers and Their Sons Serving in Israel Defense Forces

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      Authors: Orit Bershtling
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Anchored in feminist theory, this article examines the relationship between mothers and their sons serving in Israel Defense Forces. A review of the feminist literature reveals that the military is one of the main sources of gender inequality and reproduction of traditional gender roles. The military plays a pivotal role in male socialization and encourages soldiers to distance themselves both physically and psychologically from their mothers and deny any feminine traits that may be attributed to them. Yet this qualitative study, which is based on 28 interviews with mothers and sons, reveals a more complex picture. Although the military does serve as a gatekeeper that distances mothers and reinforces hypermasculinized culture, the participants depict the mothers’ active involvement in the daily life of their soldier sons without any sense of inferiority in confronting the military apparatus. The mothers assume the role of psychologists, save the sons from entanglement with their direct commanders, and even organize their sons’ service route. The extension of maternal practices into the military realm blurs the binary conceptualization of “men in arms and women at home” and sheds more light on contemporary changes that have taken place in military–family relations in Israel.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-05-12T11:02:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231172778
       
  • If You’ll Be My Bodyguard: Presidential Guard Units and Leader Capture
           During Coups d’état

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      Authors: Austin S. Matthews
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Coup “handbooks” emphasize the capture the incumbent leader as a key objective for plotters to enact successful regime change. However, the literature has yet to empirically assess this relationship. We also lack a robust understanding of how leaders prevent their own capture during coups d’état. Using novel data on leader statuses during coups from 1950 to 2017, I find evidence that incumbent leader capture has a positive and significant relationship with the likelihood of coup success. The findings also suggest that leader capture will be less likely if the regime pre-emptively creates a counterweight presidential guard unit, responsible for providing proximate security for the core leadership. These data and findings provide new insights into the dynamics of in-progress coups, focusing on the operational strategies employed by both sides. It also demonstrates the diversity of independent effects that specific types of counterweight forces have on specific coup outcomes, encouraging further study in this area.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-05-10T09:29:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231169480
       
  • The Relationship Between Military Service and Legislative Behavior for
           U.S. Representatives in Recent Congresses

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      Authors: David J. Tier
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military veterans serving in the U.S. House of Representatives during the 113th–115th Congresses (2013–2019) exhibited distinct legislative behavior on selected defense-related topics compared with their nonveteran colleagues. Examining 208 House roll call votes on issues salient to military veterans in which more than 90,000 individual Representative votes were cast as well as by categorizing more than 19,000 bills sponsored, this study finds that there was a small but distinct veteran voting trend that opposed Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) troop reductions. In addition, younger members exhibited a trend that suggests future Congresses may be more willing to approve use of military force than in previous decades. Finally, this study empirically demonstrates the tension in conservative fiscal policy preferences between increasing defense spending versus restraining total government expenditure.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-05-09T05:15:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231168321
       
  • The Rise of the Militarized State' African Developmental Militarism,
           Public Works Projects, and Praetorian Politics in Kenya

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      Authors: O.A. K’Akumu
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the civil–military relations in Kenya in the context of civilian-activated politicization that is taking place the same way it happens in Latin America and the United States under the former Trump administration. In Kenya, this involves the use of the military in noncombat internal missions such as infrastructure development and management of public institutions especially where such institutions are perceived to be inefficient due to corruption both in public and private sectors. Judging from the outcomes of public works undertaken by the military, corruption and inefficiencies cannot be ruled out. This is demonstrated by the Kenya–Somalia Border Securitization Project where 34 million dollars was used to erect a 10-km fence in the war against terrorism. The outcomes of this study negate the logic of the proponents of developmental militarism in Africa who have been vocal in advocating the deployment of the soldiers to solve noncombat social challenges in the continent. Based on three case studies examined, deploying the military to engage in public works projects brings the military into a political minefield, is not productive, and proves to be an unreliable way to combat internal political corruption.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-29T01:22:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231169013
       
  • Stabilization of Anti-U.S. Military Bases Sentiment: Japan’s Evolving
           Compensation Policies and Base Politics in Okinawa

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      Authors: Ryota Hiyane, Long Piao
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The comparative literature on base politics often suggests that stable base politics in Okinawa were achieved, thanks to Japanese compensation politics. These claims mostly focus on the central government’s strategic use of compensation politics toward Okinawa from Tokyo’s perspective, ignoring the influence of local decision makers. Through a case study of the Futenma relocation process and in-depth interviews with the decision makers at the Henoko relocation site, this study highlighted the role of the local district government (Henoko) under the framework of Tokyo’s strategic use of compensation politics for multilevel local governments (Okinawa Prefectural Government, Nago City Government, and Henoko). The study not only adds to the importance of local Henoko decision makers in strengthening compensation politics but also provides more nuanced views of base politics in Okinawa, which is essential to understanding how Japan managed to stabilize Okinawa’s base politics in the context of anti-U.S. military bases.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-26T11:34:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231167772
       
  • How (Not) to Win a Medal: Military Professionalism, Gallantry Awards, and
           the Problem of Fraud

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      Authors: Anthony King, Patrick Bury
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Gallantry medals are invested with deep significance not only by the armed forces but also by civilian society. In the last decade, there has been a debate in sociology about whether the medallic regime has become post-heroic or whether it has professionalized. This article contributes to these debates by focusing on the topic of fraudulent medals. Fake medals are very rare; there has been one proven case in the United Kingdom in the last 20 years. However, precisely because fake medals are the exception, their pathologies illustrate the processes by which medals are actually awarded with particular clarity. This analysis of the fake medal shows that gallantry awards have professionalized; in the UK medals have become more meritocratic, recognizing skill not status. The awarding process is also more objective. Yet, its very professionalism is ironically vulnerable to a specific type of fraud by skilful but cynical citation writers.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T04:50:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231160104
       
  • Building Resilience Against Hostile Information Influence Activities: How
           a New Media Literacy Learning Platform Was Developed for the Estonian
           Defense Forces

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      Authors: Andreas Ventsel, Sten Hansson, Merit Rickberg, Mari-Liis Madisson
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Modern societies are characterized by unprecedently broad and fast diffusion of various forms of false and harmful information. Military personnel’s motivation to defend their country may be harmed by their exposure to disinformation. Therefore, specific education and training programs should be devised for the military to systematically improve (social) media literacy and build resilience against information influence activities. In this article, we put forward a useful methodological approach to designing such programs based on a case study: the process of developing a media literacy learning platform tailored to the needs of the Estonian defense forces in 2021. The approach is grounded in data on (a) the current needs and skills of the learners, (b) the kinds of influence activities that the learners may encounter, and (c) the learning design principles that would enhance their learning experience, such as learning through play and dialogue through feedback.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-19T06:18:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231163265
       
  • Moral Coping or Simply Uncomplicated Soldiering' How Soldiers Avoid Moral
           Injury Through Simplification, Justification, Rationalization, and
           Compartmentalization

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      Authors: Tine Molendijk
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      A substantial number of soldiers develop moral injuries, yet just as many do not. Therefore, it is important to explore the question: How do military service members generally interpret and cope with moral challenges related to their profession' This article analyzes the accounts of 80 (former) soldiers, examining how they perceived their profession and the coping strategies they tend to use in the face of moral challenges. The findings show that they generally did not experience as much moral tension as one might expect. Yet, when they did, they used coping strategies of simplification, justification, and rationalization, including doing good, rules and instructions, reciprocity, numbing, and compartmentalization. This leads to a middle position between the view that military personnel never experience moral challenges and the position that they find violence actually highly problematic, with important implications for research on moral injury, trauma, and soldiers’ experience.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T10:05:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231165910
       
  • The Reactivation and Reimagination of Military Conscription in Sweden

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      Authors: Sanna Strand
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The post-Cold War tendency of abandoning conscripted for volunteer forces appears to be reversing, and many countries have recently expanded or reintroduced mandatory military service. This article offers insights into the contemporary “return” of draft models by exploring how the reactivation of (this time gender-neutral) military conscription was justified and made possible in Sweden. The study, based on a discourse analysis of political and policy documents and interviews with defense officials, shows how Sweden’s new conscription was envisioned as “modernized” in its reimplementation phase; a system distinguished from the familiar republican citizen-soldier model. Instead, the article shows how conscription was reimagined when linked to characteristics of (neo)liberal government and citizenship: voluntarism, individualism, and gender equality. The study’s unique contribution to knowledge is thus an improved understanding of how conscription is ascribed meaning, legitimacy, and appeal and consequently how its return and retainment is enabled, across national contexts.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T09:59:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231164740
       
  • Militarism and the Politics of Covid-19 Response in Uganda

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      Authors: Moses Khisa, Sabastiano Rwengabo
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Within the broader context of securitized responses to Covid-19 globally, Uganda experienced an oversized military role, ranging from law-and-order and lockdown enforcement, to managing food-relief supplies, medical operations, and partisan political repression. What explains this excessive militarization' To address this poser, the article draws on secondary sources and key-informant interviews to test the hypothesis that military involvement in pandemic responses depends on pre-pandemic militarism. The findings reveal direct links between pre-crisis militarism and Covid-19 responses, contrary to the view that exceptionality and novelty of Covid-19 informed overly militarized responses. Through pandemic framing and institutional morphing, pre-pandemic militarism foregrounded military roles because Covid-19 provided Uganda’s ruling elites with a public health pretext to heighten militaristic rule, clutch the political arena in the context of elections, and deepen military presence in civilian public health realms. This excessive militarization of public health seriously impacts civil–military relations, specifically command and control, reporting and accountability, and resources management.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-17T12:26:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231162848
       
  • Exploring Why Police and Military Commanders Do What They Do: An Empirical
           Analysis of Decision-Making in Hybrid Warfare

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      Authors: Jostein Mattingsdal, Roar Espevik, Bjørn Helge Johnsen, Sigurd Hystad
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, a total of 102 high-ranking commanders from a military and police background were included in a simulation involving hybrid attacks on Norway. The aim was to explore the commanders’ decision-making in the context of hybrid warfare and changing threats. Data were collected in a simulated national headquarters and analyzed by a multinominal logistic regression method using a scenario that transformed from peacetime into war and returned to peace. The results demonstrated significant differences in the commanders’ preferences for unilateral or interagency forces depending on whether decisions were made in peacetime, war or the post-conflict phase. The results also showed how the commanders’ level of operational experience was associated with an increased preference for interagency forces. The current findings are new empirical insights into a thus far neglected aspect of decision-making research and have implications for improving police-military interoperability in major security crises.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-15T12:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231160711
       
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences in Military, Veteran, and Civilian Families

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      Authors: Melanie Sberna Hinojosa, Ramon Hinojosa, Josalie Condon, Sarah DaSilva
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse childhood experiences are traumatic early life experiences that can lead to poorer mental, physical, and social outcomes. Children in military and veteran families can face unique challenges compared with civilian families. This study utilizes data from 2017–2019 National Survey of Children’s Health to examine 56,655 children living in military, veteran, and civilian families to predict the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences. Findings indicate that children living in veteran families (compared with civilian families) have higher odds of witnessing parents use violence and witnessing parents with alcohol or substance use problems. Children in military families had higher odds of divorce and lower odds of experiencing parental death. It is also noted that children living in military, veteran, and civilian families are similar across other ACEs including the incarceration of a parent, child as victim of violence, living with family with mental illness, unfair treatment because of race, and difficulty covering basics like food and housing.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-07T06:20:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231161365
       
  • Risks and Fallacies of Expanding New Roles to the Military: The Case of
           the Spanish Emergency Military Unit; A Research Note

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      Authors: Alberto Bueno, Rafael Martínez
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article responds to the analysis about the Spanish Emergency Military Unit in the research note by Pérez et al. in Armed Forces & Society, which emphasizes the efficiency of the Spanish Emergency Military Unit and how it has enhanced the image of the Spanish Armed Forces. We believe that a more critical understanding of the development of this military unit is necessary, as its deployment pitfalls and the literature on civil–military relations were neglected. Consequently, four policy traps are identified: response to civilian emergencies has become a central task of the armed forces rather than an auxiliary role; behind the pragmatism of its employment, there is potential for a worsening of civil–military relations, as highlighted by the scholarly literature; there are serious inefficiencies in its organizational design, related to human and financial resources; and image improvement is an illusion, strongly conditioned by political cleavages, with potential long-term counterproductive results.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-06T06:33:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231164594
       
  • The Empirical Determinants of Violent Nonstate Actor Drone Adoption

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      Authors: Kerry Chávez, Ori Swed
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Commercial drone advancements have enabled terrorists with crude airpower, challenging states’ aerial dominance. Today, many groups skillfully use drones for propaganda generation, surveillance and reconnaissance, command and control, and attacks. Despite their obvious value, there is wide variation in adoption begging questions about who is using drones and why. Prominent in practitioner and security provider circles, academics are just skimming the surface of this important phenomenon. The small existing literature suggests that violent nonstate actor drone use is little more than Iran-sponsored jihadist terrorists with territory in the Middle East. Using an original data set on characteristics across 998 armed nonstate groups from 1995 to 2019, we explore the empirical determinants of drone adoption. Although Iran-sponsorship is a significant factor, we find that network affiliations are the strongest predictors of adopting a drone program. We also demonstrate that groups with more intensive attack profiles and narco groups are more likely to pursue unmanned aerial systems. Our study provides the first quantitative probe of the drivers of armed nonstate drone use, putting academic assertions and policy prescriptions on firmer empirical ground.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-04-05T04:58:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231164570
       
  • The Moral Career of Soldiers’ Identity: A Norwegian Case

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      Authors: Iselin Silja Kaspersen
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military service can require soldiers to act beyond their moral beliefs, something that can impair soldiers’ mental health. However, little is known about the shaping of soldiers’ moral identity within their institutional context. This article explores how the moral identity of 20 experienced Norwegian soldiers is (re-)shaped in the Army. Findings from unstructured interviews suggest that they accept compromising their moral beliefs and give priority to an institutional obligation to follow orders. They present three mediating arguments justifying such a compromise and one effort to reduce the potential burden of carrying out illegal or immoral orders. I argue that these compromises are made possible through a shared belief they are socialized into through interactions in their military context. The study complements our knowledge of socialization processes in the military and identifies two theoretical concepts useful to gain knowledge about the (re-)shaping of soldiers’ moral identity.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-03-28T12:34:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231162019
       
  • Military Duty during Mission Deployment: Exploring Local Relations and
           Dynamics of Cohesion—The Case of Swedish Troops

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      Authors: Lisa Ekman
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores contemporary understandings of military duty and dynamics of cohesion during deployment with a focus on host–citizen relations. Duty is treated as a perception-based dynamic construct shaped, in part, by operational experiences. Traditionally, Western military duty is defined by conventional obligations of loyalty to the military unit and mission in the context of combat operations, in these ways linked to military cohesion. However, in response to increasingly “population-oriented” military operations, I argue the need to broaden the study of military duty and cohesion beyond interpersonal bonds of the military organization to include the role of host–citizen relations. In-depth interviews with Swedish service members reaffirm the centrality of conventional duty to the mission and military unit, yet also indicate varying levels and forms of obligations to local actors. Overall, understandings of duty matter to cohesion both as a unifying force and source of tension within the mission.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-03-28T12:33:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231160424
       
  • Sexual Misconduct, Civil–Military Relations, and the Canadian Armed
           Forces

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      Authors: Rachael Johnstone, Victoria Tait-Signal
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), like most gender-integrated militaries, has a serious issue with sexual misconduct. However, despite the ubiquity of this form of violence, civil–military relations (CMR), arguably the dominant theory for addressing the politics of the civilian control of the armed forces, has paid little attention to gendered power relations. In this article, we utilize Canada as a case study to question the utility of CMR to address sexual misconduct. We find that major changes to the approach are necessary if CMR is to remain relevant to the study of emerging and increasingly complex challenges faced by militaries, like sexual misconduct. To this end, we suggest three strategies to develop the theoretical and analytical foundations of the CMR approach.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T06:35:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221148498
       
  • Perceptions of Espoused Versus Enacted Culture Around Sexual Misconduct
           and Other Offenses Among U.S. Military Service Members

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      Authors: Jeffrey W. Lucas, Paul J. Hanges, Kelly Beavan, Jordan Epistola, Emily Forgo, Debra L. Shapiro
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Interviews and focus groups with active-duty U.S. military service members and students at military service academies investigated relationships between espoused and enacted culture in perceptions of sexual assault and harassment versus other types of offenses. Results show that participants widely understood and accepted an espoused culture that is intolerant of sexual misconduct. The enacted culture included tolerance of some forms of sexual misconduct, differences in conduct in private versus public settings, and widespread resentment of frequent trainings. Results also showed cynicism about service treatments for all types of offenses, but especially for sexual misconduct. Of note is that participants tended to perceive inconsistencies in consequences for sexual misconduct in terms of who faced punishment, whereas for other offenses, they tended to see inconsistencies in what types of consequences were administered. Results demonstrate the value of efforts to align trainings with cultures that consistently discourage behaviors trainings are designed to eliminate.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-03-10T11:22:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231153434
       
  • The Varieties of Civilian Praetorianism: Evidence From Sudan’s Coup
           Politics

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      Authors: Salah Ben Hammou
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the varieties of civilian praetorianism or the different ways in which civilians enable and support military coups. It specifically argues that by shaping their access to different sets of resources, civilians’ proximity to the political establishment and their level of social capital influence their method of support. Civilians linked to the political establishment wield resources better suited for enabling praetorianism through tactics like initiating or plotting coup conspiracies with military officers. Conversely, civilians with high levels of social capital hold resources valuable for consolidating praetorianism through tactics like providing post-coup support and neutralizing anti-coup opposition. Qualitative evidence from three coup episodes in Sudan demonstrates the argument’s plausibility. By explaining the important variation in civilian capabilities and resources, this study advances research on civilian coup involvement, which—although understudied—is critical to understanding coup politics.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-28T12:56:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231155667
       
  • Emergent Veteran Identity: Toward a New Theory of Veteran Identity in
           Israeli Society

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      Authors: Uzi Ben-Shalom, Itamar Rickover, Abira Reizer, Vincent Connelly
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Israeli society has seen a gradual decrease in the proportion of compulsory and reserve soldiers amid growing criticism of the military from those who have previously served. This criticism is connected to a willingness on their part to organize collective action for postservice benefits and influence other postservice-related issues. We argue that a new theoretical concept of an “emergent veteran identity” could explain this new social phenomenon for both the Israeli military and others. In this study, 248 Israeli veterans completed questionnaires designed to investigate emergent veteran identity. The results reveal that emergent veteran identity was explained by the perception of the role of the military in society, by the organizational dimensions of veterans’ transition into society, and, to a lesser extent, by combat experiences. Female veterans had a higher emergent veteran identity and exhibited higher transformation limbo. The article also discusses the utility of this new concept for the study of veterans in general and the results’ implications for threats to and the loss of military identity.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-24T06:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231153043
       
  • Food Insecurity Among U.K. Veterans

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      Authors: Paul B. Stretesky, Margaret Anne Defeyter
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This research compares food insecurity for U.K. veterans and nonveterans using the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 10-item Adult Food Security Survey Module (AFSSM) for a sample of 1,492 participants. We find 1 in 10 veterans are living in a food-insecure household but that veteran status is not related to food insecurity. In addition, income and housing benefits are correlated with food insecurity for veterans and for nonveterans, but disability benefits are correlated with food insecurity among veterans only. Specifically, veterans with disability benefits averaged 1.12 (95% confidence interval, [0.42, 1.82]) more points (indicating more food insecurity) on the AFFSM than veterans without those benefits. These findings raise concerns that low-income disabled veterans with housing needs are a unique population at risk of living in food insecurity. Given the absence of research on food insecurity among U.K. veterans, it is necessity to study this population in greater detail and implement screening protocols where possible.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T09:22:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221151078
       
  • The State of Knowledge on Female Veterans Experiencing Homelessness: A
           Scoping Review of the Literature

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      Authors: Heba Hassan, Jonathan Serrato, Cheryl Forchuk
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The primary goal of this scoping review was to assess and summarize existing research on homelessness among female Veterans to understand their unique experiences. A total of 52 relevant studies were found and included. All identified studies had been conducted in the United States, with one in the United States and Puerto Rico. The findings provided important insight on services access/utilization, indicating that homeless female Veterans with substance abuse, physical health conditions, and mental health issues have high rates of accessing services; however, there is a lack of housing services available for female Veterans with children. Although the findings revealed many studies conducted in the United States, research investigating the issue needs to be conducted across the international community. In doing so, alternative methods and policies for supporting female Veterans experiencing homelessness can be identified and transferred. In particular, exploratory qualitative studies are needed to further understand the experience of homelessness for female Veterans.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T06:57:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221150819
       
  • Stolen Valor: The Legal Story Behind Impersonating Military Personnel

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      Authors: E. R. Weisz
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military impersonation, or stolen valor, is an understudied topic. Military impersonation can be committed by civilians and service members alike. Military service misrepresentation is adjudicated under civilian federal law (for civilians and veterans) or the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ; for service members). In the legal field, the main literature concerns the constitutionality of the Stolen Valor Act (SVA) of 2005. However, since the SVA of 2005, many developments have occurred. The same applies to the UCMJ, which underwent a large revision that went into effect in 2019. The scarcity of research has led to this legal study covering the federal statutes and state statutes that apply to military impersonation. Not only are financial motives found, mitigation of sentences in court cases is also a motive. Both demonstrate a need for military history verification.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-07T06:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231152622
       
  • Predicting Loyalty: Examining the Role of Social Identity and Leadership
           in an Extreme Operational Environment—A Swedish Case

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      Authors: Torbjörn Engelkes, Magnus Sverke, Torun Lindholm
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military organizations often emphasize the importance of loyalty. It has been suggested that loyalty enhances motivation to take great risks and strive to accomplish a mission. However, research into what influences loyalty among military personnel is scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine how leadership and social identity fusion relate to loyalty, using data from a sample consisting of a Swedish military unit on a United Nation mission (N = 152) in Mali. Hierarchical multiple regression results generally showed that social identity fusion and leadership were positively related to a willingness to show loyalty to the closest workgroup, one’s own unit, and the mission. The findings indicate that leadership and high levels of social identity fusion may influence the willingness to be loyal to organizational goals. The practical implication of this study is increased knowledge about the importance of leadership and social identity in developing relevant loyalties.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-03T09:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221150948
       
  • Rural Military Veterans of Color and STEM Occupational Outcomes

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      Authors: Justin T. McDaniel, Harvey Henson, Bruce DeRuntz, Daniel Brown, Yvonne Hunter-Johnson, David L. Albright
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Although the literature on veteran differences in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) occupational outcomes by gender is established and veteran/nonveteran differences in STEM outcomes are well studied, we fill a gap in the literature by examining the following two research questions in this study: (1) are rural veterans less likely than urban veterans to be employed in a STEM occupation and how does race/ethnicity modify this relationship; (2) among veterans in a STEM occupation, does total income vary by rural/urban location and race/ethnicity' We retrieved data on employed military veterans (n = 845,467) aged 18 to 65 years from the 2008–2020 American Community Survey. Results showed that rural-dwelling Black and Hispanic veterans were less likely than Whites to be employed in a STEM field. Among veterans employed in a STEM field, rural-dwelling Hispanics had lower annual incomes than Whites. As such, future STEM education programs should target rural-dwelling veterans of color.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T12:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X231152265
       
  • Military Service and Health Outcomes of the Elderly in China

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      Authors: Chunkai Zhao, Jianhao Guo, Jinchen Yan
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigated the effects and mechanisms of military service on health outcomes of Chinese elderly men aged 60 and older. While numerous studies explored the effect of military service on health in developed countries, we still knew little about the relationship between military service and later health outcomes in developing countries such as China. Using the data of China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, we found that military service is positively associated with better health outcomes of the elderly, in terms of physical health, cognitive abilities, and self-rated health. In addition, results of mechanism analysis show that, compared with nonveterans, elderly veterans had healthier habits, better education, higher individual and household income, and more favorable social medical security.Moreover, heterogeneity analysis indicates that this effect is more pronounced for older, rural, and spouseless elderly people. This article provided insights into elderly veterans’ health security measures in developing countries.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T07:05:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221149423
       
  • A Comparative Study of Military Communication on Instagram: A Research
           Note

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      Authors: Guillermo López-Rodríguez, Francisco Castillo-Eslava
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Military organizations have adapted to the logic and dynamics of social media to transmit their institutional narratives. Instagram is the most popular social network, but one of the most understudied in relation to the Armed Forces. This research note presents a comparative study of the content of the official accounts of the Spanish, French, the United States, Israeli, and Australian armies throughout 2021 (n = 1,922). The specific objectives are to describe and analyze the hashtags, the accounts mentioned, and the main topics of the post. Results show that armies can convey multiple messages in a single post, and reveal that armies make similar use of Instagram, notwithstanding the various differences between Israel and the other armies due to organizational and contextual elements.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T10:10:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221149419
       
  • A Tale of Two Clocks: A Framework for Assessing Time Pressure and
           Advantage in the Russo-Ukrainian War

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      Authors: David V. Gioe, Tony Manganello
      Abstract: Armed Forces & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article assesses the role and understanding of war’s most inflexible factor—time—and its associated pressures and advantages in the Russo-Ukrainian War. While there seems to be no consensus on who might prevail (and of course the elements of what constitutes victory itself can vary), the passage of time—frequently understood in military terms as endurance and exhaustion—is a useful framework to assess the direction of the war, relative advantage at various stages, who may ultimately prevail, and under what conditions that may be possible. Although timetables and schedules have played an enormous role in military history, there appears to be no systematic assessment of the role of time in relation to strategy and victory in the Russo-Ukrainian war. This article sets out the fill that gap through a systematic comparison of time’s passing and time pressures facing the combatants.
      Citation: Armed Forces & Society
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T01:37:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0095327X221145690
       
 
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  Subjects -> MILITARY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 24 of 24 Journals sorted by number of followers
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 281)
Small Wars & Insurgencies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
Perspectives on Terrorism     Open Access   (Followers: 252)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 240)
Security Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal for Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Defence Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Armed Forces & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
War in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
First World War Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Conflict and Security Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The RUSI Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Terrorism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Media, War & Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Small Wars Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
A Fragata     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Arms & Armour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Military Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Military Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Military Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Military Balance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Military Behavioral Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Strategic Comments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Nonproliferation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of National Security Law & Policy     Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Naval de Odontologia On Line / Naval Dental Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Military Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Chinese Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Military and Strategic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Informativo Marítimo     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
O Periscópio     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Medicine, Conflict and Survival     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Intelligent Defence Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation : Applications, Methodology, Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Bioterrorism & Biodefense     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whitehall Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Defence Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Archives in Military Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Problemy Mechatroniki. Uzbrojenie, lotnictwo, inżynieria bezpieczeństwa / Problems of Mechatronics. Armament, Aviation, Safety Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia y Poder Aéreo     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Special Operations Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of power institutions in post-soviet societies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Modern Information Technologies in the Sphere of Security and Defence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eesti Sõjaajaloo Aastaraamat / Estonian Yearbook of Military History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Digital War     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Acanto     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Âncoras e Fuzis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Caderno de Ciências Navais     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Espírito de Corpo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Post-Soviet Armies Newsletter     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sabretache     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Studies & Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
University of Miami National Security & Armed Conflict Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal on Baltic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Vojnotehnički Glasnik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CRMA Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fra Krig og Fred     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction     Open Access  
Revista Militar de Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Revista do Exército     Open Access  
Revista Científica Fundação Osório     Open Access  
Revista Babilônia     Open Access  
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
O Adjunto : Revista Pedagógica da Escola de Aperfeiçoamento de Sargentos das Armas     Open Access  
Revista Agulhas Negras     Open Access  
Doutrina Militar Terrestre em Revista     Open Access  
Coleção Meira Mattos : Revista das Ciências Militares     Open Access  
Wiedza Obronna     Open Access  
선진국방연구     Open Access  
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Scientific Journal of Polish Naval Academy     Open Access  
Revista Política y Estrategia     Open Access  
Medical Journal Armed Forces India     Full-text available via subscription  
Martial Arts Studies     Open Access  
Revista Científica General José María Córdova     Open Access  
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Sanidad Militar     Open Access  
Naval Research Logistics: an International Journal     Hybrid Journal  

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