Subjects -> LABOR UNIONS (Total: 27 journals)
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 Journals sorted by number of followers
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
ILR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Labour History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Citizenship Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Labor & Employment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
New Labor Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cuadernos de Relaciones Laborales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Labor and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv     Open Access  
Arbetsliv i omvandling     Open Access  
Arbeidsrett     Full-text available via subscription  
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Similar Journals
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International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations
Number of Followers: 31  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0952-617X
Published by Kluwer Law International Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Can We Trust the Courts in Labour Law' Stranded Between Frivolity and
           Despair

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      Abstract: Historically, the ruling theory of British labour law, collective laissez-faire, was rooted in distrust of courts. Over the last forty years, there have been profound and enduring constitutional changes. Successive governments have pursued deregulatory agendas through legislation, and workers and organized labour have turned increasingly to courts to vindicate their fundamental rights. In light of these changes, this article re-assesses the case against courts in British labour law. It identifies a vital yet subsidiary role for courts in labour law. This should lead scholars to reappraise the marginalization of doctrinal legal scholarship, lest the legal academy become stranded between frivolity and despair.
      Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Sat, 18 Jun 2022 00:01:12 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
  • Failing to Succeed' The Cambridge School and the Economic Case for the
           Minimum Wage

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      Abstract: The case of the British minimum wage illustrates the interplay of ideas and interests in the making of labour legislation. In the 1980s, the pragmatic and data-driven approach of the Cambridge School, associated with the Department of Applied Economics (DAE), advanced a case for the minimum wage which combined fairness and efficiency justifications. Through collaboration with trade unions and think tanks, the argument was mobilized into an activistled campaign which changed political perceptions of the minimum wage. During the 1990s the campaign looked to have failed, as a more conventional economics informed the passage of the National Minimum Wage Act 1998. In the long run, however, the case made by the Cambridge School has endured, to inform today’s global movement for a living wage.
      Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:01:14 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
  • Labour Movements and the Effectiveness of Legal Strategy: Three Tenets

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      Abstract: Social movements of every stripe have mobilized law in order to confront contemporary injustices and redetermine social experiences and expectations. The multiple disciplinary literatures that track and evaluate these strategies provide a rich picture of legal and political mobilization at different scales and relative successes. This article draws together the shared concern for strategic litigation of labour law and legal mobilization scholars in order to confront and rationalize the factors that determine its effectiveness for labour movements. This article sets out three core tenets of strategic litigation to provide a framework for analysing its potential effectiveness: Effective legal arguments; state law’s institutional capacity; and political objectives. Drawing on interdisciplinary insights, these tenets present a sober conception of the ways that law is mobilized by labour movements, to provide a critical conception of the opportunities and limitations of their strategic uses of law.
      Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:01:14 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
  • The Worker and the Law Revisited: Conceptualizing Legal Participation
           Mobilization and Consciousness at Work

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      Abstract: Situating legal mobilization within a wide-ranging conceptual framework of worker activity that goes beyond recent interest in ‘strategic litigation’ and related organizing in the gig economy, this contribution explores the fundamental relationship between ‘laypeople’, i.e., the non-professional subjects of law, and labour law. Notwithstanding a growing interest in empirical labour law research, there remains a lack of conceptual clarity and rigorous evidence pertaining to how workers, activists and employers think about law and how this has evolved over time. The idea, often implicit within policy discourses, that we have become increasingly ‘legally minded’, and the implications of this, remain particularly underexplored. This article develops understanding of what legal mobilization is, does, or potentially can do, mapping the range of ways in which ‘laypeople’ may invoke or engage with law at work, distinguishing between activities defined as (1) legal participation; (2) mobilization; and (3) consciousness. This schema goes beyond the more obvious ways in which laypeople engage formal legal institutions, ‘strategically’ or otherwise, towards everyday processes of constructing ‘legalities’. The concept of legalities, meaning taken-forgranted assumptions about what is ‘legal’, provides a lens through which to view the ideological processes involved in the constitution of society and economic institutions through law and vice versa. Revisiting the theme of the worker and the law, this schema focuses as much on how the worker understands and acts upon the conceptions of law as much as how the law characterizes and protects the worker, and how the interrelations between the two may have evolved over time.
      Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:01:14 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
  • Mobilizing for Recognition: Indie Unions, Migrant Workers, and Strategic
           Equality Act Litigation

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      Abstract: Drawing on a broad repertoire of action, including strategic litigation, several new activist unions have appeared that seek to represent the multiracial working class of contemporary Britain. Although the court cases that have drawn the most attention are those that challenge the misclassification of employees or ‘workers’ as ‘self-employed’, another dimension of these unions’ strategic litigation has been the utilization of the Equality Act 2010 (Equality Act) to allege racial discrimination. The contention advanced in this article is that it might be possible to read unions’ increasing use of the Equality Act as instances of them pursuing a politics of recognition. For those of us interested in analysing and assessing the strategies of unions in respect of their multiracial membership, the critical question is why and how race discrimination claims may act to boost indie unions’ efforts to organize diverse workplaces. Drawing on Nancy Fraser’s work that asserts a politics of recognition can contribute to a politics of redistribution, this article proposes that recognition claims may be advancing the broader goals of labour organizing by building a worker subjectivity poised for action, and a collective identity undergirded by respect, mutual understanding, and solidarity.
      Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:01:14 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
  • Reflections on the Role of the Trade Union Lawyer

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      Abstract: The role of the lawyer acting for trade unions is constrained, of course, by his or her function and status. The lawyer may be confined to servicing legal needs largely unrelated to the fact that her client is a trade union. Such matters as property conveyancing, fleet car purchase, insurance claims, disputes over payment for and services bought in, insurance and the like are common to many organizations. On the other hand, the lawyer may have the opportunity of using her legal skills to advance directly the principal functions of a trade union. In so doing, the lawyer is likely to operate in one or more of four spheres of activity: – The lawyer may be an advisor and litigator on behalf of members of the union in the field of workers’ rights vis-à-vis employers (and sometimes in relation to members’ interactions with the police or other State or third parties). – She may be an advisor and litigator on behalf of the union in the field of trade union rights. – She may have a function as an educator of members and officers in relation to the law. – Finally, she may have a role in changing the law. This paper explores some aspects of these activities. I will illustrate some points by reference to cases in which I have appeared. This is not as immodest as it sounds since so many ended in defeat! In mitigation, however, I would, of course, say that the legal battlefield is naturally unfavourable to trade unions and that that characteristic disadvantage is multiplied when pursuing ground-breaking litigation.Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:01:14 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
  • Labour, Strategy, and the Constitutional Protection of Work: On the
           Effectiveness of Legal Strategy

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      Abstract: Volume 38 Online ISSN 0952-617X
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:01:14 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 38 (2022)
       
 
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