Subjects -> LABOR UNIONS (Total: 27 journals)
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 Journals sorted by number of followers
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
ILR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Labour History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Citizenship Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Labor & Employment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
New Labor Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cuadernos de Relaciones Laborales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Labor and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv     Open Access  
Arbetsliv i omvandling     Open Access  
Arbeidsrett     Full-text available via subscription  
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.671
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1024-2589 - ISSN (Online) 1996-7284
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Book review: The Politics of Social Inclusion and Labor Representation:
           Immigrants and Trade Unions in the European Context

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      Authors: Duncan Adam
      Pages: 149 - 151
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 28, Issue 1, Page 149-151, February 2022.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T09:37:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221099980a
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Book review: Unwitting Architect – German Primacy and the Origins of
           Neoliberalism

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      Authors: David Hollanders
      Pages: 151 - 153
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 28, Issue 1, Page 151-153, February 2022.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T09:37:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221099980b
      Issue No: Vol. 28, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • European unemployment insurance. From undercurrent to paradigm shift

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      Authors: László Andor
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The need for the European Union to get involved in unemployment insurance has frequently been debated in the past decade, starting from exploratory discussions and eventually becoming a political commitment by the European Commission President. This article looks back at the origins of the idea of an EU-level unemployment benefit scheme and explains the political dynamics of the concept’s evolution. Following the 2009 Great Recession and the subsequent eurozone debt crisis, a new movement for a reinforced social dimension has been pushing the EU beyond its previous red lines. The case for counter-cyclical social stabilisation at EU level is now a touchstone for a materially meaningful EU social dimension. The COVID-19 crisis triggered a giant leap to a greater EU budgetary capacity, including financial support for job-saving schemes. This article argues that these new instruments will not suffice without also creating an EU safety net for those whose jobs cannot be saved in a period of economic downturn.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T10:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221099810
       
  • Industrial relations and unemployment benefit schemes in the Visegrad
           countries during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Katarína Lukáčová, Lucia Kováčová, Martin Kahanec
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing economic and technological adjustment increased the risk of unemployment, underemployment and skills mismatch across Europe. These increased risks highlighted the importance of national unemployment benefit schemes for income security. This article examines the role of industrial relations in shaping unemployment benefit regimes in the Visegrad countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. We adopted an actor-oriented approach based on desk research and 12 semi-structured interviews with the representatives of trade unions and employers in all the Visegrad countries. Our research showed that the capacities of the trade unions and employers' associations to shape the unemployment benefit regimes were rather limited. State control over social policy remained very strong and shaped the dynamics of industrial relations, without inclusive involvement of social partners. National governments sought to implement measures to protect employment (mainly wage subsidies), rather than to reform existing unemployment support regimes.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T10:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221099804
       
  • Readjusting unemployment protection in Europe: how crises reshape
           varieties of labour market regimes

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      Authors: Bernhard Ebbinghaus, J. Timo Weishaupt
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The labour movement has long fought for the social protection of unemployed workers as a major social right in capitalist economies across Europe. Employers, on the other hand, have often been reluctant to accept such intervention in the labour market. Hence, scholars explaining differences in the evolution of unemployment benefit systems need to consider the power distribution of labour relations, the context of the welfare state and the variety of capitalism in which they are embedded. This article makes three contributions. First, it offers a heuristic that systematically identifies the analytical affinities between unemployment protection and its institutional context. Second, it offers a succinct overview with a focus on major crises and subsequent adaptations in labour market regimes, ranging from the oil shocks in the 1970s to the Great Recession and the current COVID-19 pandemic. And third, it discusses whether European economies have adjusted their unemployment protection to recent crises and assesses the effects on labour market regimes.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T09:57:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221086172
       
  • Book Review: Minimum Wage Regimes. Statutory Regulation, Collective
           Bargaining and Adequate Levels

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      Authors: Felix Syrovatka
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T05:48:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221096670
       
  • Unemployment benefit governance, trade unions and outsider protection in
           conservative welfare states

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      Authors: Daniel Clegg, Elke Heins, Philip Rathgeb
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the relationship between trade union governance roles in unemployment benefit systems, their power resources and their capacity to counteract liberalising and dualising trends in the labour market in conservative welfare states with compulsory unemployment insurance. Against received wisdom, this article argues that in the 21st century trade unions in continental Europe have generally sought to combat the dualism to which their welfare states and labour markets are institutionally susceptible. In this context, a role in the operation of unemployment benefit systems and related forms of institutional power could help unions to attain the enhanced outsider protection they seek. But different modes of union involvement in public policy produce different levels of institutional power, and help to condition its impact on policy development over time. This article illustrates these points with a comparison of the recent development of labour market policy and regulation in Austria, France and Germany.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:43:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221094240
       
  • Invisible but not unlimited – migrant workers and their working and
           living conditions

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      Authors: Jan Cremers
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T10:42:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221089819
       
  • Job retention schemes in Europe during the COVID-19 pandemic – different
           shapes and sizes and the role of collective bargaining

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      Authors: Torsten Müller, Thorsten Schulten, Jan Drahokoupil
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      During the COVID-19 pandemic all the EU Member States established some kind of job retention scheme to cushion the employment effects of the economic crisis. While all job retention schemes share this general objective, they differ considerably as regards their institutional design and underlying functional logic. The aim of this article is to analyse the relevant institutional diversity across Europe, with a particular focus on the role of collective bargaining and employee representation structures in the design and implementation of job retention schemes. Based on an analysis of key institutional features of such schemes implemented during the pandemic, the second aim of the article is to identify a set of minimum standards for ‘good job retention schemes’ that ensure efficient and socially adequate use. These criteria include the following elements: ensuring inclusiveness; ensuring a minimum allowance to prevent workers from ending up below the subsistence level when on such a scheme; measures preventing misuse and deadweight losses; and making job retention schemes support conditional on the involvement of trade unions and employee representation structures.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T10:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221089808
       
  • The Ghent system in transition: unions’ evolving role in Sweden’s
           multi-pillar unemployment benefit system

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      Authors: Jayeon Lindellee, Tomas Berglund
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the multi-faceted and changing role played by trade unions in providing unemployment benefits in Sweden, a country using the so-called Ghent system. As an important institutional feature explaining the high rate of unionisation in the Nordics, the system has been much debated. This article provides a comprehensive account of the retrenchment of the state unemployment benefit system (UBS) and the development of occupational and private UBS pillars providing complementary protection. It also introduces an ongoing reform discussion where the social partners are proposed to govern the unemployment insurance system via collective agreements, while retaining the union-linked insurance funds. The core institutional feature of the Ghent system – voluntary membership of a union-linked insurance fund – is turning out to be highly resilient despite frequent attempts to weaken the union power stemming from it. However, the system’s role in providing unemployment protection has changed due to its development into a multi-pillar structure, meaning that its future prospects are uncertain.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T10:22:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221080885
       
  • Editorial

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      First page: 3
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:16:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221099990
       
  • COVID-19 and the opportunity to change the neoliberal agenda: evidence
           from socio-employment policy responses across Europe

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      Authors: David Natali
      First page: 15
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Much of the recent literature on the COVID-19 pandemic agrees on the uniqueness of this crisis. Assessments of the subsequent policy response in Europe diverge, however: while some see signs of policy change, others consider the empirical evidence to be inconclusive or, worse, consistent with a reinforcement of neoliberalism. The present article aims to contribute to that debate by providing a preliminary assessment of policy measures in the areas of health care, employment protection and pensions. Recent measures are viewed in terms of the neoliberal paradigm, which is used as a benchmark to identify any sign of innovation. While it is too early to talk about a true paradigmatic transformation, the evidence collected from international datasets and official documents confirms that ideas and policy measures show signs of change. The article also suggests that the study of ideas is a promising field of enquiry with which to improve our understanding of the pandemic and its effects.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T11:14:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221097231
       
  • Reflections on the COVID moment and life beyond neoliberalism

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      Authors: Colin Crouch
      First page: 31
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID pandemic has demonstrated the weakness of neoliberalism by showing the importance of public services, workers’ need for security, and a heightened awareness of collective interdependence. Economic theory recognises the deficiencies of depending on market forces by accepting certain grounds for public intervention, including public and collective goods and negative externalities. Acceptance of the human contribution to climate change has massively increased their importance. The pandemic has had similar effects. The very rich may be able to escape to safe places, but the great mass of us are dependent on the support of each other, often through a mobilisation of resources that only states can organise. While much of the community that was rediscovered during the pandemic was highly local, damage to the climate and the spread of disease cannot be contained within national boundaries; cooperation has to be cross-national. It is therefore incompatible with an obsession with national sovereignty. For Europeans the institutions of the EU are central.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T09:59:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221078125
       
  • Cui bono – business or labour' Job retention policies during the
           COVID-19 pandemic in Europe

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      Authors: Bernhard Ebbinghaus, Lukas Lehner
      First page: 47
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Europe has been faced with multiple challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the problem of how to secure jobs and earnings. In our comparative analysis, we explore to what degree European welfare states were capable of responding to this crisis by stabilising employment and workers’ incomes. While short-time work was a policy tool already partly used in the 2008/2009 Great Recession, job retention policies were further expanded or newly introduced across Europe in 2020 in the wake of the pandemic. However, cross-national variations persist in the way in which these schemes were designed and implemented across European welfare states, aiming more or less to hoard labour and thereby avoid mass dismissals throughout the employment crisis. We distinguish between business support and labour support logics in explaining the variation in job retention policies across Europe. Our finding is that Continental, Mediterranean and liberal welfare states did more to foster labour hoarding using short-time work than Nordic or Central and Eastern European countries.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T08:19:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221079151
       
  • Reconciliation policies in COVID times: what role for trade unions in
           Spain and Italy'

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      Authors: Emmanuele Pavolini, David Luque Balbona, Ana M. Guillén
      First page: 65
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to interpret trade unions’ role in reconciliation policies during the current pandemic in Italy and Spain. Questions to be answered include whether and to what degree unions have been present in the public debate, have participated in the policy-making process, have acted as policy reform protagonists or have consented to it, and to what extent they have been able to influence the direction of reform. The study proposes a three-level analytical framework of general applicability, signalling the variables that may affect the role played by unions at the micro-, meso- and macro-levels, together with the indicators that could be used. Research results for the Italian and Spanish cases indicate that the most relevant level to explain the role played by unions is the macro one. Unions tended to acquiesce to government policies in both countries, although that does not preclude action or involvement. The article also argues that a better and more nuanced categorisation of union roles should be developed.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T01:17:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221080872
       
  • Crisis corporatism 2.0' The role of social dialogue in the pandemic
           crisis in Europe

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      Authors: Guglielmo Meardi, Arianna Tassinari
      First page: 83
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The literature on corporatism sees exogenous threats as opportunities for establishing interclass alliances. This article asks if this has been the case with the COVID-19 pandemic, looking at whether social dialogue practices and functions have changed in the three largest EU countries compared with the ‘crisis corporatism’ and ‘austerity corporatism’ that accompanied the Great Financial Crisis of 2008–2009 and the eurozone crisis of 2010–2012. It concludes that continuity prevails in terms of the forms and limitations of concerted solutions, which remain country-specific. However, a crisis focused on health issues has entailed a shift in the agenda from labour costs to production issues, providing trade unions with discursive resources opening up opportunities to move from the concession bargaining of previous decades to more assertive roles.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T10:23:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221089785
       
  • A perfect storm: COVID-19 and the reorganisation of the German meat
           industry

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      Authors: Cornel Ban, Dorothee Bohle, Marek Naczyk
      First page: 101
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      An advocacy coalition of trade unions, churches and NGOs had been trying for a long time to mobilise domestic media and politicians in order to re-regulate the German meat industry. The meat industry’s low-cost business model, using employee posting and subcontracting on a massive scale, has led to extreme forms of unsafe working and poor living conditions for large numbers of Central and Eastern European workers. But it is only in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic that the German government decided to ban subcontracting, posting and temporary work in this industry. Why did COVID-19 make a difference' In an industry in which the livelihoods of local communities in Germany’s pig belt and in deprived rural parts of Romania have become structurally dependent on subcontracting, institutional change would not have happened without the pre-existing mobilisation of the above-mentioned advocacy coalition. But COVID-19 created a ‘perfect storm’ that empowered this coalition by helping reframe the meat industry issue away from a ‘narrow’ employment regulation problem into a ‘broader’ public health threat. Indeed, after becoming a virus hotspot, the meat industry was no longer just a threat to the livelihoods of its own workers, but to those of the wider local community.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:38:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221081943
       
  • From one crisis to another: changes in the governance of the Economic and
           Monetary Union (EMU)

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      Authors: Philippe Pochet
      First page: 119
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The article examines the evolution of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) in the aftermath of COVID-19 and compares the current crisis with the previous one (the financial crisis of 2008–2013). It does so by looking at the way interests, ideas and institutions have evolved over the last decade. It looks at the possible changes in European economic governance in the light of three different models of European integration. The goal is not only to describe the differences between the two periods of crisis but also to understand the amplitude of those changes. In the actor-centred ‘institutionalism’ approach of this article, particular attention is paid to conflicts and tensions including inside the EU institutions. This allow for the elements of continuity and rupture to be highlighted and for speculation on the possibility of a new paradigm emerging.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T03:41:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221084582
       
  • COVID-19: a prelude to a revaluation of the public sector'

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      Authors: Paul T. de Beer, Maarten Keune
      First page: 135
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T03:39:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221078710
       
  • The wages of reconstruction – the EU’s new budget and the public
           service staff shortage crisis on the EU’s eastern periphery

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      Authors: Imre G. Szabó
      First page: 141
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T03:43:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221094237
       
  • Book Review: Who Cares' Attracting and Retaining Care Workers for the
           Elderly

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      Authors: Stephen Bach
      First page: 147
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T05:34:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589221099980
       
 
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