Subjects -> LABOR UNIONS (Total: 27 journals)
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 Journals sorted alphabetically
ADR Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arbeidsrett     Full-text available via subscription  
Arbeit. Zeitschrift für Arbeitsforschung, Arbeitsgestaltung und Arbeitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arbetsliv i omvandling     Open Access  
Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv     Open Access  
British Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Citizenship Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Relaciones Laborales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Illawarra Unity - Journal of the Illawarra Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ILR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Labor and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Labor & Employment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Labour History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
New Labor Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
South African Journal of Labour Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.671
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1024-2589 - ISSN (Online) 1996-7284
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1141 journals]
  • When two (or more) do not equal one: an analysis of the changing nature of
           multiple and single jobholding in Europe
    • Authors: Wieteke Conen, Paul de Beer
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The scope and structure of multiple jobholding and its consequences for multiple jobholders are changing in many Western economies. Only limited quantitative empirical knowledge is currently available on the changing features of multiple jobholding and whether the economic vulnerability of multiple jobholders has been changing over time. In this article we focus on the position and trends of multiple jobholders compared with single jobholders in Europe. We study this in terms of working hours, workers’ desire to work more hours, and in-work poverty. To that end, we analyse data since the early 2000s from the EU Labour Force Survey and from the EU Statistics on Income and Living Conditions. Our findings show that multiple jobholding is a significant and increasing labour market phenomenon in many advanced economies, with changing characteristics, for example in terms of gender distribution and combinations of contracts. In-work poverty is relatively high among non-standard workers, but the findings do not indicate a deteriorating trend effect. In-work poverty seems to be on the rise among people who are single, for both single jobholders and multiple jobholders.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T08:29:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10242589211002630
       
  • Negotiating wage (in)equality: changing union strategies in high-wage and
           low-wage sectors in Czechia and Slovakia
    • Authors: Monika Martišková, Marta Kahancová, Jakub Kostolný
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Reducing wage inequality requires an understanding of the importance of labour market institutions, in particular statutory minimum wages and sectoral collective bargaining. This article argues that the impact of labour market institutions on wage inequality is enhanced by specific strategies of unions and employers. Empirical evidence is provided from the high-wage automotive sector and the low-wage retail sector in Czechia and Slovakia. Against the backdrop of the erosion of collective wage bargaining, trade unions have prioritised increases in the national statutory minimum wage as a mechanism for reducing wage inequalities. Trade unions’ leverage on minimum wages can compensate for their declining influence on wage distribution via collective bargaining.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-03-15T09:57:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258921995363
       
  • Internal devaluation and economic inequality in Portugal: challenges to
           industrial relations in times of crisis and recovery
    • Authors: Maria da Paz Campos Lima, Diogo Martins, Ana Cristina Costa, António Velez
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Internal devaluation policies imposed in southern European countries since 2010 have weakened labour market institutions and intensified wage inequality and the falling wage share. The debate in the wake of the financial and economic crisis raised concerns about slow wage growth and persistent economic inequality. This article attempts to shed light on this debate, scrutinising the case of Portugal in the period 2010–2017. Mapping the broad developments at the national level, the article examines four sectors, looking in particular at the impact of minimum wages and collective bargaining on wage trends vis-à-vis wage inequality and wage share trajectories. We conclude that both minimum wage increases and the slight recovery of collective bargaining had a positive effect on wage outcomes and were important in reducing wage inequality. The extent of this reduction was limited, however, by uneven sectoral recovery dynamics and the persistent effects of precarious work, combined with critical liberalisation reforms.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T10:09:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258921995006
       
  • Adapting social protection to the needs of multiple jobholders in Denmark,
           the United Kingdom and Germany
    • Authors: Lukas Jerg, Jacqueline O’Reilly, Karin Schulze Buschoff
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Working in two or more jobs at the same time creates special needs in terms of social security that differ from those of standard dependent employees or the self-employed. To investigate how well social security systems adapt to multiple jobholders we examine three case studies of countries with different levels and trends in multiple jobholding: Denmark, the United Kingdom and Germany. We review recent trends and policies to address social protection gaps for multiple jobholders in these countries prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the extent to which the emergence of the ‘platform economy’ can exacerbate multiple jobholding. We conclude that attempts to resolve the gaps in social security protection reflect distinctive characteristics of each employment system.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T10:07:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258921991039
       
  • Multiple jobholding in the digital platform economy: signs of segmentation
    • Authors: Anna Ilsøe, Trine P. Larsen, Emma S. Bach
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Although recent studies indicate that multiple jobholding is widespread in the digital platform economy, the interaction between people’s engagement with digital platforms and the conventional labour market is rarely explored. This article brings new insights into this interaction, exploring the income of individuals combining paid work in the conventional labour market with income from distinct digital platforms. Based on two large-scale representative surveys of a random sample of 18,000 people in 2017 and 2019 in combination with administrative register data, we demonstrate how labour and capital platforms attract different income groups. We also find that online income in combination with non-platform income sources such as traditional jobs exacerbate the segmentation tendencies found in the conventional labour market. An increasing share of rich and poor seem to use different platforms, indicating a potential hierarchy of labour market segments in both the online and the conventional labour markets.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-12T09:58:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258921992629
       
  • A panel study of the consequences of multiple jobholding: enrichment and
           depletion effects
    • Authors: Wieteke Conen, Jonas Stein
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to research on the embeddedness of multiple work arrangements in the employment biography. We investigate transition and duration effects of multiple jobholding on financial and non-financial job outcomes, and the role of flexible work arrangements and household contexts. To that end, we examine panel data from Germany, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands for the period between 2002 and 2017. The findings underscore the importance of economic factors in the decision to work multiple jobs and reveal that labour market contexts play a significant role in outcomes. Findings furthermore indicate negative well-being effects for those who have both multiple jobs and children. For a substantial share of workers, holding multiple jobs occurs in relatively short-term episodes, posing the question of whether episodes of multiple jobholding necessarily come with either clear enrichment or depletion effects, or are merely a phase in the overall employment biography.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-02-05T09:57:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920985417
       
  • Who receives occupational welfare' The importance of skills across
           Europe’s diverse industrial relations regimes
    • Authors: Egidio Riva, Roberto Rizza
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the association between eligibility for occupational welfare and employees’ skill levels. In particular, building on Visser’s classification, we explore (i) the extent to which this relationship is moderated by industrial relations regimes and (ii) whether the moderating effect of industrial relations regimes has changed over time. Analyses draw on the latest three waves (2005, 2010, 2015) of the European Working Conditions Survey, and consider a nationally representative sample (N = 64,122) of employees in 30 European countries (the then 28 EU Member States plus Norway and Turkey). Findings indicate a significant, persistent, skill-biased disparity in access to occupational welfare in any industrial relations regime, with the only exception of the organised corporatism regime (that is, the Nordic countries).
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T10:32:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920980635
       
  • Understanding the dynamics of inequity in collective bargaining: evidence
           from Australia, Canada, Denmark and France
    • Authors: Ruth Barton, Élodie Béthoux, Camille Dupuy, Anna Ilsøe, Patrice Jalette, Mélanie Laroche, Steen Erik Navrbjerg, Trine Pernille Larsen
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Unions and collective bargaining are generally considered to be the main vehicles for ensuring equity at work. This article questions this assertion by examining distinct forms of inequity between workers in unionised workplaces and, more specifically, the role of collective bargaining in creating, maintaining, reducing or avoiding them. Based on a study conducted in Australia, Canada (Québec), Denmark and France, the situations of inequity examined are related to employment and working conditions, and favour one group of workers over another group of workers performing the same tasks in the same workplace. To better apprehend these dynamics and distinguish between different situations, we develop an analytical framework to capture them. Then, we focus on one example observable in each country: two examples of inequity based on date of hiring (Canada and Australia) and two based on employment status (France and Denmark), showing how the four ideal-type processes interact in each national context. Based on an analysis of these examples, we demonstrate the segmentation between core and non-core employees, along the lines of segmentation theory, but also within groups of insiders or core employees and the key factors that explain how the collective bargaining process can lead to inequity: time, balance of power, and workplace institutions.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2021-01-08T10:30:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920981827
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Jean-Yves Boulin
      Pages: 367 - 371
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 26, Issue 4, Page 367-371, November 2020.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11T11:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920969480
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Jean-Yves Boulin
      Pages: 372 - 376
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 26, Issue 4, Page 372-376, November 2020.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11T11:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920969480a
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Jean-Yves Boulin
      Pages: 377 - 382
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 26, Issue 4, Page 377-382, November 2020.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11T11:01:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920969480b
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Book Review: Trajectories of Neoliberal Transformation: European
           Industrial Relations Since the 1970s
    • Authors: Roberto Pedersini
      Pages: 481 - 483
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 26, Issue 4, Page 481-483, November 2020.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11T11:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920960290
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Book Review: Transnationale soziale Dialoge und ihr Beitrag für den
           europäischen sozialen Fortschritt
    • Authors: Hans-Wolfgang Platzer
      Pages: 484 - 485
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 26, Issue 4, Page 484-485, November 2020.

      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-11T11:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920960290a
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Multiple jobholding in Europe: features and effects of primary job quality
    • Authors: Agnieszka Piasna, Marcello Pedaci, Jan Czarzasty
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the relationship between job quality features of the primary job and the propensity to engage in multiple paid activities. The analysis covers workers from 28 European countries using data from the EWCS (European Working Conditions Survey) 2010-2015. The results show that workers experiencing economic and job insecurity in their primary job are more likely to engage in additional paid employment. Multiple jobholders (MJHs) report higher work pressure and more unsocial hours in their main jobs, but also more control over and flexibility in working hours, more autonomy and a wider scope for exercising skills, the latter largely explained by compositional factors. Moreover, the evidence shows that experiences of work diverge among multiple jobholders, and they can be classified into six clusters based on the quality of their primary job. This points to a variety of motivations and factors that encourage multiple jobholding. Finally, we find a considerable cross-country variation in job quality among multiple jobholders, with worse outcomes in more segmented labour markets with a higher proportion of non-standard employment.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-09-16T10:54:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920958836
       
  • Northern European collective wage bargaining in the face of major
           political-economic challenges: common and differing trajectories
    • Authors: Paul Marginson, Jon Erik Dølvik
      First page: 383
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      We address developments in collective wage bargaining arrangements in northern Europe in the light of two major political-economic challenges: EU eastern enlargement and the financial and economic crisis which broke in 2008. Through the lens of debates on convergence and divergence, we examine three dimensions of collective wage bargaining: coordination across sectors; articulation between different levels; and regulation of wage floors. We draw on findings from five countries and four sectors. Our analysis undermines the proposition that developments exhibit a common liberalising trajectory. It points to the differential impact of the two major political-economic challenges as between sectors, highlights similar and different policy responses by actors within a sector across countries, reveals differing consequences for governance of collective wage bargaining across sectors and countries, and finds no uniform trend in wage inequality outcomes.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-07-24T07:57:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920937961
       
  • The extension of collective agreements in France, Portugal and Spain
    • Authors: Miguel Ángel García Calavia, Michael Rigby
      First page: 399
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the role of extension provisions for collective agreements in France, Portugal and Spain, three countries that have faced pressure to introduce more flexibility in their employment regimes during recent economic crises. The article establishes the continuing importance of extension provisions for maintaining high bargaining coverage in all three countries and traces the origin of national differences in their evolution to the strategies of the various actors, governments, employers and trade unions, and the context in which they are operating. It also looks at the characteristics of the extension regulations themselves.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-11-02T10:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920970131
       
  • Trade union responses to precarious employment: the role of power
           resources in defending precarious flight attendants at Ryanair
    • Authors: Pedro Mendonça
      First page: 431
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on a case study on the civil airline industry in Portugal, this article addresses the impact of precarious employment on trade union action and examines the conditions under which trade unions defend precarious workers’ interests. Using a power-resource theoretical framework, findings in this article highlight that cost-cutting employment practices are used strategically by employers to curb collectivisation and trade unionism. In addition, this article shows that when trade unions engage in an inclusive strategy to defend precarious workers’ interests, the compounded and inter-linked effect of trade union power resources, network embeddedness and international solidarity may be key to achieving success.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-08-03T11:32:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920944294
       
  • ‘Grey zones’ within dependent employment: formal and informal forms of
           on-call work in Germany
    • Authors: Karen Jaehrling, Thorsten Kalina
      First page: 447
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to take stock of the various manifestations of on-call work in Germany. It is shown that formal on-call work is, by international standards, relatively strictly regulated in Germany, not least as the result of a 2019 reform of the law. Similar to other countries, however, other informal variants are used that lie outside the scope of the re-regulation or ‘normalisation’ of formal on-call work. Differentiated analyses based on survey data show that both formal and informal variants of on-call work are associated with disproportionately high levels of short part-time work, low pay and consequently with considerable risks of poverty. As a consequence, the ongoing debate on the erosion of the status of employee should not be too narrowly restricted to self-employed workers in the gig economy (Deliveroo, Uber) but should be extended to include the ‘grey zones’ in the area of dependent employment.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-07-24T07:57:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920937960
       
  • Beyond European unemployment insurance. Less moral hazard, more moral
           assurance'
    • Authors: Günther Schmid
      First page: 465
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Ahead of Print.
      The compromise that emerged from the lengthy debate on European unemployment insurance (EUI) involved the establishment of a ‘European Unemployment Reinsurance Scheme’. However, it was not until the shock waves of the COVID-19 pandemic were felt that any specific measures were actually taken to establish such a scheme. The reasons for such prevarication were, first, doubts as to whether moral hazard can be kept under control and, second, the huge diversity of EU Member States’ coverage and level of social protection. This article offers a third reason for this protracted stalemate: the neglect of moral assurance as a countervailing force of moral hazard. It argues that the concept of unemployment insurance itself needs to be fundamentally revised. Modern labour market policy must cover not only income risks related to unemployment, but also other serious income risks related to critical transitions over the life course. Finally, this article proposes the extension of the European Social Fund to create a European Employment and Social Fund with elements of work-life insurance and a reinsurance mechanism for shock absorption.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2020-09-16T11:00:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258920952666
       
  • Post-socialist labour and the dual logic of collective action: workers’
           unrest and trade union strategy in Fiat Automobiles Serbia
    • Authors: Francesco Bagnardi, Valentina Petrović
      Pages: 415 - 430
      Abstract: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research, Volume 26, Issue 4, Page 415-430, November 2020.
      In this article we examine the episode of labour discontent that occurred at the Fiat-Chrysler assembly plant in Kragujevac, Serbia, in the summer of 2017. The article traces the process through which the two main trade unions organised and channelled labour unrest at the plant level. Drawing on Offe and Wiesenthal’s conceptualisation of workers’ collective action dilemma, the case highlights the trade-off between on the one hand the need for institutional legitimation and on the other hand responsiveness to workers’ demands. We attempt to show that unions still have space in which to represent workers’ interests effectively when disputes emerge, regardless of unfavourable structural constraints and legacies. The article shows that not even traditionally non-conflictual and legacy unions can be fully sheltered from democratic pressures from workers and competitor organisations. Therefore, the ability to mediate between democratic and bureaucratic logics of action and legitimation remains crucial for any union and determines unions’ ability to represent effectively the interests of labour.Dans cet article, les auteurs examinent l’épisode de mécontentement des travailleurs qui s’est produit à l’usine d’assemblage Fiat-Chrysler à Kragujevac, en Serbie, à l’été 2017. L’article retrace le processus par lequel les deux principaux syndicats ont organisé et canalisé les conflits de travail au niveau de l’usine. En se fondant sur la conceptualisation développée par Offe et Wiesenthal du choix de l’action collective des travailleurs, ce cas met en évidence le compromis entre, d’une part, le besoin de légitimation institutionnelle et, d’autre part, la capacité à répondre aux demandes des travailleurs. Les auteurs tentent de montrer que les syndicats disposent encore de l’espace nécessaire pour représenter efficacement les intérêts des travailleurs lorsque des conflits surgissent, indépendamment des contraintes structurelles et de l’héritage défavorables qui leur ont été laissés. Cet article montre que même les syndicats traditionnellement non conflictuels et ceux issus du passé ne peuvent pas être totalement à l’abri des pressions démocratiques des travailleurs et des organisations concurrentes. Par conséquent, la capacité de médiation entre les logiques démocratiques et bureaucratiques de l’action et de la légitimation demeure primordiale pour tout syndicat et détermine la capacité des syndicats à représenter efficacement les intérêts des travailleurs.Im vorliegenden Artikel untersuchen wir die Auseinandersetzungen zwischen der Belegschaft und der Unternehmensleitung im Fiat-Chrysler-Montagewerk in Kragujevac, Serbien im Sommer 2017. Der Artikel zeichnet nach, wie die beiden großen betrieblich vertretenen Gewerkschaften die Unzufriedenheit der Arbeitnehmer auf der Werksebene kanalisiert und organisiert haben. Unter Bezugnahme auf Offes und Wiesenthals Konzeptualisierung des Dilemmas des kollektiven Handelns von Arbeitnehmern ist dieser Fall symptomatisch für den Zielkonflikt zwischen der Notwendigkeit institutioneller Legitimation einerseits und dem Reaktionsvermögen auf Forderungen von Arbeitnehmern andererseits. Wir versuchen nachzuweisen, dass Gewerkschaften nach wie vor Handlungsspielräume haben, um in Konfliktfällen Arbeitnehmerinteressen ungeachtet struktureller Einschränkungen und Altlasten effektiv zu vertreten. Der Artikel zeigt, dass nicht einmal traditionell konsensorientierte Gewerkschaften und Rechtsnachfolger der früheren sozialistischen Gewerkschaften umfassend vor demokratisch legitimiertem Druck von Arbeitnehmern und Mitbewerberorganisationen geschützt werden können. Die Fähigkeit, zwischen demokratischer und bürokratischer Handlungslogik und Legitimation vermitteln zu können, ist deshalb für alle Gewerkschaften von entscheidender Bedeutung und bestimmt ihre Fähigkeit, die Interessen von Arbeitnehmern wirksam zu vertreten.
      Citation: Transfer: European Review of Labour and Research
      PubDate: 2019-12-03T01:53:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1024258919879803
      Issue No: Vol. 26, No. 4 (2019)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.237.48.165
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-