Subjects -> LABOR UNIONS (Total: 27 journals)
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 Journals sorted by number of followers
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
ILR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Labour History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Citizenship Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Labor & Employment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
New Labor Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cuadernos de Relaciones Laborales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Labor and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv     Open Access  
Arbetsliv i omvandling     Open Access  
Arbeidsrett     Full-text available via subscription  
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Similar Journals
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ILR Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.455
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 46  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0019-7939 - ISSN (Online) 2162-271X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Employer Wage Subsidy Caps and Part-Time Work

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      Authors: Joel A. Elvery, C. Lockwood Reynolds, Shawn M. Rohlin
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      Using tract-level US Census data and triple-difference estimators, the authors test whether firms increase their use of part-time workers when faced with capped wage subsidies. By limiting the maximum subsidy per worker, such subsidies create incentives for firms to increase the share of their payroll that is eligible for the subsidy by increasing use of part-time or low-wage workers. Results suggest that firms located in federal Empowerment Zones in the United States responded to the program’s capped wage subsidies by expanding their use of part-time workers, particularly in locations where the subsidy cap is likely to bind. Results also show a shift toward hiring lower-skill workers.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T07:30:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221102865
       
  • Decomposing the Decline of Unions: Revisiting Sectoral and Regional Shifts

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      Authors: Zachary Schaller
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study uses newly disaggregated National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) election data to revisit the theory that sectoral and regional shifts in economic activity contributed substantially to private-sector union decline in the United States. Unlike most studies, which focus on differential employment growth among union and non-union establishments, this article focuses on how such shifts may have affected organizational rates themselves. Improved data permit a shift-share decomposition that indicates that approximately 40% of the decline in union elections is in response to sectoral shifts, the majority attributable to changes within each sector. Moreover, in an update to Dickens and Leonard’s 1985 study, the author shows that declining organization rates since 1980 are responsible for a decline in union density of 5.4 percentage points.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T08:39:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221101555
       
  • A Forum on Emerging Technologies

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      Authors: Adam Seth Litwin, Jessie HF Hammerling, Françoise Carré, Chris Tilly, Chris Benner, Sarah Mason, Steve Viscelli, Beth Gutelius, Nik Theodore
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      As part of ILR Review’s new special series “Novel Technologies at Work,” this article introduces a forum composed of five industry studies that examine the drivers and impact of recent and impending technological change. Each of the studies, condensed from longer reports published over the past two years, relies on interviews with sectoral actors and other primary data to determine the relevant technologies confronting workers and managers and the sorts of strategies and policies that will mediate their effects.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T07:04:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221095527
       
  • Book Review: Closing the Enforcement Gap: Improving Employment Standards
           Protections for People in Precarious Jobs, by Leah F. Vosko

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      Authors: Sean O’Brady
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:58:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221099222
       
  • Schooling and Parental Labor Supply: Evidence from COVID-19 School
           Closures in the United States

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      Authors: Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, Miriam Marcén, Marina Morales, Almudena Sevilla
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines changes in parental labor supply in response to the unanticipated closure of schools following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. The authors collect detailed daily information on school closures at the school-district level, which they merge to individual-level data on labor supply and sociodemographic characteristics from the monthly Current Population Survey spanning from January 2019 through May 2020. Using a difference-in-differences estimation approach, the authors find evidence of non-negligible labor supply reductions. Having a partner at home helped offset the negative effect of school closures, particularly for maternal employment, although respondents’ job traits played a more significant role in shaping labor supply responses to school closures. Overall, the labor supply impacts of school closures prove robust to identification checks and to controlling for other coexistent social distancing measures. In addition, these early school closures seem to have had a long-lasting negative impact on parental labor supply.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T11:06:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221099184
       
  • Brokered Careers: The Role of Search Firms in Managerial Career Mobility

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      Authors: Matthew Bidwell, Kira Choi, Isabel Fernandez-Mateo
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      The authors explore how career paths are shaped by the involvement of search firms in hiring. Drawing on theories of market intermediation, they argue that search firms constrain horizontal moves across functions and industries by favoring workers from within the same function and industry as the role being filled. Using survey data on 1,342 job moves undertaken by 816 MBA alumni, the authors find that individuals who move jobs through a search firm experience lower horizontal mobility than those who move through other means. Findings also suggest that these results are not driven by firms’ decisions to use a search firm to fill the job. Supplementary analyses show no evidence that the job matches that are formed using search firms result in a better fit between workers and employers. Overall, the findings point to the significant institutional role search firms play in managerial careers.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T04:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221096112
       
  • Book Review Symposium

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      Authors: Gay Seidman, Manjusha Nair, Chris Tilly, Elísio Estanque
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T05:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221094554
       
  • Firm Pay Policies and the Gender Earnings Gap: The Mediating Role of
           Marital and Family Status

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      Authors: Jiang Li, Benoit Dostie, Gaëlle Simard-Duplain
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from the Canadian Employer-Employee Dynamics Database between 2001 and 2015, the authors examine the impact of firms’ hiring and pay-setting policies on the gender earnings gap in Canada. Consistent with the existing literature and following Card, Cardoso, and Kline (2016), findings show that firm-specific premiums explain nearly one-quarter of the 26.8% average earnings gap between female and male workers. On average, firms’ hiring practices, due to differences in the relative proportion of women hired at high-wage firms (known as sorting), and pay-setting policies, due to differences in pay by gender within similar firms, each explain approximately one-half of this firm effect. The compositional difference between the two channels varies substantially over a worker’s life cycle, by parental and marital status, and across provinces.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T03:51:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221093562
       
  • Gender Inequality, Bargaining, and Pay in Care Services in the United
           States

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      Authors: Nancy Folbre, Leila Gautham, Kristin Smith
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      The authors argue that paid providers of care services in the United States (in health, education, and social service industries) are less able than providers of business services to capture value-added or to extract rents because limited consumer sovereignty, incomplete information regarding quality, and large positive externalities reduce their relative market power. In addition, many care jobs enforce normative responsibility for others and require specific skills that limit cross-industry mobility. Analysis of Current Population Survey data for 2014 to 2019 reveals significant pay penalties in care services relative to business services, controlling for factors such as gender, education, occupation, and public or private employment. Women’s concentration in care services explains a significant proportion of the gender wage gap and raises the possibility of significant potential benefits from industry-level bargaining strategies.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T10:00:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221091157
       
  • Book Review: Global Production, National Institutions, and Skill
           Formation: The Political Economy of Training and Employment in Auto Parts
           Suppliers from Mexico and Turkey, by Merve Sancak

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      Authors: Stephen J. Frenkel
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T10:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221091461
       
  • Headstrong Girls and Dependent Boys: Gender Differences in the Labor
           Market Returns to Child Behavior

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      Authors: Robert Kaestner, Ofer Malamud
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      The authors use data from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (C-NLSY79) to examine gender differences in the associations between child behavioral problems and early adult earnings. They find large and significant earnings penalties for women who exhibited more headstrong behavior and for men who exhibited more dependent behavior as children. By contrast, the authors observe no penalties for men who were headstrong or for women who were dependent. Although other child behavioral problems are also associated with labor market earnings, their associations did not differ significantly by gender. The gender differences in headstrong and dependent behavior are not explained by education, marriage, depression, self-esteem, health, or adult personality traits. One potential explanation is that these gender differences are a consequence of deviations from gender norms and stereotypes in the workplace.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T10:15:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221086929
       
  • Book Review: Automation Anxiety: Why and How to Save Work, by Cynthia
           Estlund

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      Authors: Trevor Brown
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T05:42:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221080695
       
  • Heterogeneous Labor Market Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Guido Matias Cortes, Eliza Forsythe
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      The authors study the distributional consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on employment, both during the onset of the pandemic and over subsequent months. Using cross-sectional and matched longitudinal data from the Current Population Survey, they show that the pandemic has exacerbated pre-existing inequalities. Although employment losses have been widespread, they have been substantially larger—and more persistent—in lower-paying occupations and industries. Hispanics and non-White workers suffered larger increases in job losses, not only because of their over-representation in lower-paying jobs but also because of a disproportionate increase in their job displacement probability relative to non-Hispanic White workers with the same job background. Gaps in year-on-year job displacement probabilities between Black and White workers have widened over the course of the pandemic recession, both overall and conditional on pre-displacement occupation and industry. These gaps are not explained by state-level differences in the severity of the pandemic nor by the associated response in terms of mitigation policies. In addition, evidence suggests that older workers have been retiring at faster rates.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T09:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221076856
       
  • Remote Work and Post-Bureaucracy: Unintended Consequences of Work Design
           for Gender Inequality

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      Authors: Kim de Laat
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      In-depth interviews with IT employees (N = 84) working under two types of work design—a post-bureaucratic work design labeled “agile,” and a bureaucratic work design labeled “waterfall”—are used to examine gendered patterns in the adoption of remote work. Interviews reveal an unintended consequence of the agile model: It promotes a physical orientation that induces on-site work. Agile is gender-inegalitarian, with more women than men working remotely despite its perceived unacceptability, and low numbers of employees working remotely overall. By contrast, workers within a waterfall work design express a digital orientation to work and feel empowered to work remotely. The waterfall model is associated with gender egalitarianism; most employees opt to work remotely, and men and women do so in even numbers. Findings suggest that when compared to the post-bureaucratic work design, the bureaucratic work design provides more flexibility. This article refines our understanding of barriers to remote work and provides a lens on the gender dynamics underlying work design.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T09:09:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221076134
       
  • New Evidence on Teacher Pay

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      Authors: Krishna Regmi
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has shown that teachers receive lower pay compared to people with the same educational level who work in other occupations. This article challenges that literature and shows that by applying novel statistical approaches, the pay differentials are reduced, and even become pay premiums. In particular, these approaches provide unifying estimates that turn an earnings penalty between female teachers and non-teachers of approximately 10%—based on a standard approach in the literature—into an earnings premium of 5 to 10%. Likewise, estimates based on these approaches erase up to two-thirds of the earnings gap between male teachers and non-teachers. Moreover, going beyond the traditional focus on the mean, the author decomposes the pay gap across the entire earnings distribution. Estimates show that although teachers have a substantial earnings premium at the bottom of the distribution, they have a large earnings penalty at the top.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T09:16:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939211072538
       
  • Emerging Technologies at Work: Policy Ideas to Address Negative
           Consequences for Work, Workers, and Society

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      Authors: Diane E. Bailey
      First page: 527
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging technologies such as sensors, drones, robots, digital platforms, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality increasingly operate as interlinked components in large technological suites that carry out novel functions. In this article, the author outlines potential negative consequences for work, workers, and society that use of these emerging technologies pose and offers policy ideas for a proactive, strategic response. Resonating across these policy ideas is a call for government to hold corporations accountable. In addition, workers and others who tend to our social fabric, built environment, and governing institutions must participate in the process of technology development, selection, design, implementation, and use. Given the potential for the use of emerging technologies to transform work and society radically and quickly, it falls upon all of us, not just a powerful few, to make choices that support positive outcomes.
      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T12:23:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221076747
       
  • Reply to “Racial Differences in Time at Work Not Working” by William
           A. Darity Jr. et al.

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      Authors: Daniel S. Hamermesh, Katie R. Genadek, Michael C. Burda
      First page: 573
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T05:39:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221077262
       
  • Book Review: Crunch Time: How Married Couples Confront Unemployment, by
           Aliya Hamid Rao

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      Authors: Jaclyn S. Wong
      First page: 794
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T11:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221076779
       
  • Book Review: You’re Paid What You’re Worth: And Other Myths of the
           Modern Economy, by Jake Rosenfeld

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      Authors: Patrick McGovern
      First page: 795
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T12:25:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221076757
       
  • Book Review: Re-Union: How Bold Labor Reforms Can Repair, Revitalize, and
           Reunite the United States, by David Madland

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      Authors: Jeonghun Kim
      First page: 797
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T12:27:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221079277
       
  • Book Review: Work and Labour Relations in Global Platform Capitalism, by
           Julieta Haidar and Maarten Keune

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      Authors: Valeria Pulignano
      First page: 798
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T12:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221078219
       
  • Book Review: Revaluing Work(ers): Toward a Democratic and Sustainable
           Future, by Tobias Schulze-Cleven and Todd E. Vachon

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      Authors: Inez v. Weitershausen
      First page: 800
      Abstract: ILR Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: ILR Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T12:28:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00197939221079735
       
 
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