Subjects -> LABOR UNIONS (Total: 27 journals)
Showing 1 - 4 of 4 Journals sorted alphabetically
ADR Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Alternatives to the High Cost of Litigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Arbeidsrett     Full-text available via subscription  
Arbeit. Zeitschrift für Arbeitsforschung, Arbeitsgestaltung und Arbeitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arbetsliv i omvandling     Open Access  
Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv     Open Access  
British Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Citizenship Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Relaciones Laborales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Gaceta Laboral     Open Access  
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Illawarra Unity - Journal of the Illawarra Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ILR Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Labor and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Labor & Employment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Labour History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
New Labor Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Relations industrielles / Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural and Political Protest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
South African Journal of Labour Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Transfer - European Review of Labour and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Labour History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.199
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0023-6942
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [385 journals]
  • Issue 119 - Knowledge activists on health and safety: Workmen-inspectors
           in Metalliferous Mining in Australia 1901-25
    • Abstract: Quinlan, Michael; Walters, David
      Worker campaigns for a more direct say in protecting their health and safety are a significant but under-researched subject in labour history. Largely overlooked are the attempts by coalminers in the UK, Australia and Canada to establish mechanisms for representation on health and safety in the 1870s. This push for a voice then spread to New Zealand, France, Belgium and other countries, with unions eventually securing legislative rights to inspect their workplaces a century before workers in other industries gained similar entitlements. In Australia metalliferous miners' unions followed coalminers in initiating a parallel campaign for the right to appoint their own mine-site and district inspectors (known as "check-inspectors") from the late nineteenth century. This article examines the struggle for and activities/ impact of workmen-inspectors in Australian metalliferous mines, including adoption of the competing UK-Australian and Continental-European models. It finds the development conforms to a resistance rather than mutual-cooperation perspective with check-inspectors performing the role of "knowledge activists." The article argues this finding is not only relevant to understanding more recent experience of worker involvement in occupational health and safety but also demonstrates the relevance of historical research to contemporary regulatory policy debates and union strategies.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Guardians of Workers' bodies': Trade Unions and the
           history of Occupational Health and Safety
    • Abstract: McIvor, Arthur
      Critically assessing the role and influence of trade unions on occupational health and safety (OHS), and tracing their contribution to OHS discourse, is here examined through the lens of history in Britain positioned relative to international experience. The idea of trade union neglect of OHS is challenged through study of the historic role of trade unions and the more recent experience (since the 1970s) of unions' growing interest in OHS whilst simultaneously experiencing a sharp decline in membership and the adverse impact of this disempowerment on OHS standards. Acknowledging the politics of gender shows British unions neglected occupational health and embodiment issues that impacted upon women as workers. Robust and compelling evidence from the mid-twentieth century - that unions were a powerful countervailing force to workplace dangers, as key sentinels shielding workers' bodies - is followed by evidence of increasing occupational illnesses in the period of union decline and precarious work from c. 1980. The article urges more critical reflection on trade unions as actors and as a voice in the OHS discourse.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Quinlan, Michael; Gregson, Sarah
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Research thesis notice board
    • PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Women of Steel
    • Abstract: Rittau, Yasmin
      Review(s) of: Women of Steel, directed and produced by Robynne Murphy, 56 mins, Batemans Bay, NSW: Jobs for Women Producers Group, 2020.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Without Bosses: Radical Australian Trade Unionism in the 1970s
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McGloin, Brendan
      Review(s) of: Without Bosses: Radical Australian Trade Unionism in the 1970s, by Sam Oldham, Melbourne: Interventions, 2020, pp. 198, AU $30 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Maurice Blackburn: Champion of the People [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Strangio, Paul
      Review(s) of: Maurice Blackburn: Champion of the People, by David Day, Melbourne: Scribe Publications, 2019, pp. 339, AU $49.99 cloth; The Blackburns: Private Lives, Public Ambition, by Carolyn Rasmussen, Melbourne: Melbourne University Press, 2019, pp. xiv + 400, AU $44.99 cloth.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Tasman George Parsons (1942-2020)
    • Abstract: Rechniewski, Elizabeth
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Disability as labour history
    • Abstract: Monk, Lee-Ann
      Disability and work are often considered to be mutually exclusive, so much so that in some definitions disability is defined as the inability to work. The present exclusion of disabled people from paid employment appears to confirm this idea. In Australia, 48 per cent of working-age people with disability are employed, compared with 79 per cent of non-disabled people. The same assumption is apparent historically, if not in the actual past then arguably in much that is written about the past, where disabled workers are often invisible. However, the two books reviewed here demonstrate that the idea that disability and work are incompatible is mistaken.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "If you thought about those things, your life would be a
           misery!" mental health and the safety of seafarers
    • Abstract: Kirkby, Diane
      Seafaring has long been recognised as a hazardous occupation, with the ever-present risk of disease, drowning or serious, often fatal, injuries from fires, accidents, shipwrecks or simply falling overboard. Health and safety concerns about physical dangers came to include illness from toxic substances but only recently has attention turned to the psychological hazards of shipboard living and working under conditions of isolation. A recent survey of seafarers working in the cargo shipping industry is the first sustained, methodical study to investigate the mental wellbeing of ships crews. It provides a wealth of statistical and other information from both crews and the companies employing them that, it is suggested here, is of value for further research, and an opportunity for labour historians.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Dangerous workplaces
    • Abstract:
      World War I drew many women into factory labour in the UK, particularly in munitions, and 400 women died from TNT poisoning or explosions. One 1917 incident killed 73 and flattened 900 homes. For many others, exposure to toxic sulphur yellowed their skin.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - In Apartheid's Shadow: Australian Race Politics and South
           Africa, 1945-1975 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Waters, Christopher
      Review(s) of: In Apartheid's Shadow: Australian Race Politics and South Africa, 1945-1975, by Roger Bell, Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2019, pp. xii + 352, AU $39.95 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Stranded Nation: White Australia in an Asian Region [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Tavan, Gwenda
      Review(s) of: Stranded Nation: White Australia in an Asian Region, by David Walker, Perth: UWA Publishing, 2019, pp. xi + 509, AU $39.99 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - 1919: The Year Things Fell Apart' [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Crotty, Martin
      Review(s) of: 1919: The Year Things Fell Apart', edited by John Lack, Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2019, pp. viii + 149, AU $32.95 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Labour Women in Power: Cabinet Ministers in the Twentieth
           Century [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Sawer, Marian
      Review(s) of: Labour Women in Power: Cabinet Ministers in the Twentieth Century, by Paula Bartley, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, pp. 324, 22.99 pounds, paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - OSH research should properly take into account gender
           differences
    • Abstract:
      Research on occupational safety and health (OSH) is of vital importance in stimulating and informing action to improve safety and health in the workplace. However, research tools and methods on OSH that were originally developed in relation to predominantly male-dominated sectors may not be relevant to analysing women's jobs to achieve this desired improvement.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "Railway Work, Life and Death": Exploring British and Irish
           railway worker accidents, c. 1890-1939
    • Abstract: Esbester, Mike
      The "Railway Work, Life and Death" project explores accidents and ill-health amongst British and Irish railway workers from the late nineteenth century to 1939. Drawing from state, railway company and trade union records, the project is making details of the working lives and accidents of railway employees more easily accessible. This note describes the collaborative impetus behind the project, and the crowd-sourcing methodology used, including the importance of working with volunteers. It shows that focusing on individual cases, at scale, is extremely revealing about the nature of work and the dangers of one of the largest employers of its time. It aims to encourage others to engage with crowd-sourcing and co-creation, as well as to make use of the resources being produced.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "We just thought we were superhuman": An oral history of noise
           and piecework in Paisley's Thread Mills
    • Abstract: Burns, William
      Paisley, in the West of Scotland, was once the world capital of industrial thread making. Existing scholarship on the thread works has focused on the "great men" of the mill-owning Coats and Clark families, neglecting the experience of female factory workers. This article explores the hidden history of the experience of work-induced illness and disability over the long term, from the perspective of women who worked in Paisley's thread mills. It draws upon extant oral history interviews and 13 new interviews with former millworkers. There is a particular focus on two work-health interactions: first, repeated exposure to the constant roar of machinery, which resulted in hearing loss; second, piecework - compelling women to work at speed and to engage in repetitive movements and awkward postures in order to increase their earnings - which had a debilitating effect on their joints and limbs in later life. This article examines oral testimony of the long-term health implications for Paisley's female thread workers and reveals that women engaged in risky work practices not only as victims of the industrial process but with agency in their desire to earn increased wages. This agency was framed within the inevitability of the absorption of risk, and curtailed by mechanical, social and financial factors.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Philanthropy and the "Management" of working-class women: The
           West Gate Bridge disaster
    • Abstract: Gregson, Sarah; Humphrys, Elizabeth
      The West Gate Bridge collapse in 1970 is one of the worst industrial disasters in Australian history. Closely examined for the engineering lessons it provides, scholarly interest in its historical, social, and industrial import is far less extensive. This article examines the role of union leaders, employers, and a private welfare organisation called the Citizens Welfare Service (CWS) in the management of funds raised to support the victims and families of the disaster. More broadly, it reveals philanthropic attitudes and practices adopted to manage working families' needs in the 1970s that were not altogether dissimilar from those of nineteenth-century philanthropists. Despite the families' raw grief in the immediate aftermath of the tragedy, "home visitors" from the CWS felt entitled to offer heavily gendered and class-based advice to widows about frugal budgeting, domestic order, and composed behaviour. The case management style employed by this welfare agency demonstrated a derivative commitment to capitalist mores that promoted hard work and thrift, while stigmatising welfare dependence.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "No place for tourists": Deaths on Western Australian
           construction sites
    • Abstract: Oliver, Bobbie
      The deaths of three young "backpackers" on Perth building sites is the starting point for this investigation of an industry that is ranked the third most dangerous in Western Australia. All were on a working holiday. They were unskilled, untrained and underpaid, revealing aspects of the construction industry since the beginning of the twenty-first century. The article suggests these fatalities are occurring, despite OHS reforms and mandatory training, because the decline of trade union rights and presence on work sites has led to inadequate policing and enforcement of safety measures. Deregulation and employers' over-emphasis on productivity have resulted in an unskilled, casual workforce and a culture of blaming individual employees rather than management, which has created a climate of fear where those who draw attention to safety breaches risk losing their jobs. The article considers arguments for introducing industrial manslaughter legislation, but the evidence suggests that the most effective solutions are to restore union rights. This would encourage a culture in which workers have a voice, and pointing out safety breaches on sites could be rewarded, rather than penalised.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "Fix the workplace, not the worker": Labour feminism and the
           shifting grounds of equality in the US workplace, 1960-91
    • Abstract: Faue, Elizabeth; Rector, Josiah; Walter, Amanda Lauren
      The US Supreme Court decision in 'UAW v. Johnson Controls', a landmark case that eliminated employer policies that excluded women from jobs with significant reproductive risks, has been the focus of considerable debate. While challenging policies that decided what risks were acceptable for women of childbearing age, critics charged that the ruling weakened labour law protections for women in the USA and lowered standards for all workers. Yet, the case emerged at a time when workplace protections under the Occupational Health and Safety Administration were already failing due to deregulation and unions were running into growing employer hostility. This article argues that labour feminists in the United Auto Workers (UAW) hoped to simultaneously force employers to end sex discrimination and toxic exposures in the workplace. They only shifted to the narrower legal strategy that prevailed in Johnson Controls in the late 1970s and 1980s for pragmatic reasons. Using equal opportunity provisions of the Civil Rights Act was one way for union plaintiffs to ensure that employers were not using foetal protection policies as an end-run around a safer workplace for all workers. Yet, while women workers and unions originally sought to "fix the workplace, not the worker," conservative opposition accepted women having fewer labour protections while endorsing a less protected and riskier workplace.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "Re-emergence" of Silicosis and Coal Workers Pneumoconiosis in
           Australia
    • Abstract: Penrose, Beris
      Some reporters, politicians, and doctors have described current cases as a "re-emergence" of these diseases, based on the notion that they had been eliminated. However, silicosis persisted in centuries-old industries like sandblasting and stonemasonry and coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP) continued in coal mining. Until recently, their presence was obscured by a combination of factors such as misdiagnosis, especially if there was a history of smoking; the failure to follow up workers thought to have silicosis or CWP; the long latency period between dust exposure and disease onset that can conceal the link between the two; and the lack of data collection that may have revealed their presence. As the recent Queensland government inquiry into CWP noted, current cases are more accurately a reidentification.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Against the Storm: How Japanese Printworkers Resisted the
           Military Regime, 1935-1945 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Palmer, David
      Review(s) of: Against the Storm: How Japanese Printworkers Resisted the Military Regime, 1935-1945, by Masao Sugiura, translated by Kaye Broadbent and Mana Sato, Melbourne: Interventions, 2019, pp. 164, AU $20.00 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction
           Remade the Constitution [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dabscheck, Braham
      Review(s) of: The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution, by Eric Foner, New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 2019, pp. xxxii + 224, US $26.95 cloth. Dabscheck, Braham

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - The Realities and Future of Work [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pocock, Barbara
      Review(s) of: The Realities and Future of Work, by David Peetz, Canberra: ANU Press, 2019, pp. xv + 406, AU $55, online open access.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Asbestos in Australia: From Boom to Dust [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ellem, Bradon
      Review(s) of: Asbestos in Australia: From Boom to Dust, edited by Lenore Layman and Gail Phillips, Melbourne: Monash University Publishing, 2019, pp. xiii + 346, AU $39.95 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Categories in Context: Gender and Work in France and Germany
           1900-Present [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Robertson, Emma
      Review(s) of: Categories in Context: Gender and Work in France and Germany 1900-Present, edited by Isabelle Berrebi-Hoffmann, Olivier Giraud, Lea Renard and Theresa Wobbe, New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2019, pp. 276, AU $135 cloth.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - "An Alien Ideology": Cold War Perceptions of the Irish
           Republican Left
    • Abstract: Madden, Gerard
      "An Alien Ideology": Cold War Perceptions of the Irish Republican Left, by John Mulqueen, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2019, pp. 296, 75.00 pounds cloth.

      PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 119 - Australian Society for the Study of Labour History: Directory
    • PubDate: Wed, 30 Dec 2020 15:42:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - "Violent and not quite modern'": Lascars and everyday
           resistance across the sail-steam divide
    • Abstract: Manjrekar, Naina
      By exploring forms of maritime resistance spanning the age of sail and steam, this article interrogates certain preponderant assumptions within the historiography of subaltern agency. Within this historiography, "modernity" has generally come to be signalled by trade union organisation and a concomitant regard for legality, while violent resistance is implicitly or explicitly taken to signify the Other of modernity: traditional, primitive, incomplete. Arguing that this tradition/modernity divide has mapped onto the sail/steam divide in the historiography of maritime resistance, this article complicates the association of violent mutiny with the age of sail and litigiousness with the age of steam. It does this by bringing both epochs into single focus, thereby finding important continuities in forms of everyday resistance on board ship across the sail-steam divide. Using existing scholarship to look at resistance in the age of sail and archival material like ships' logbooks, newspapers and "Lascari"-English dictionaries for the age of the steam, it argues that rather than trade unions fundamentally reshaping the forms of everyday resistance into legal channels, it was in fact these longer traditions of quotidian contestation that fed into the formation of unions at the end of World War I, and continued through the 1920s and 1930s.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - British steamship workers, c. 1875-1945: Precarious before
           precarity
    • Abstract: Hyslop, Jonathan
      Much current work on labour conditions is founded on the notion of precarity. This article contends that there is a lack of historical depth in the use of this concept. By looking at the case of British steamship workers, it argues that the Standard Employment Relationship (SER) which precarity theory has attributed to "advanced" economies in the twentieth century was not always the norm. The employment of British steamship workers was never characterised by a SER. They lacked labour freedom and were regularly imprisoned for work-related offences. They were never fully participant in the democratising processes that played out in liberal democratic societies. Seafarers were to an extraordinary extent subject to long-term debt relationships which generated structural poverty. They had life trajectories of a "catastrophic" character, involving difficulty in forming stable families, serious injury and early death. While British steamship workers were relatively privileged in relation to colonised workers, their case nevertheless places a question mark over the standard precarity theory narrative of the rise and fall of the SER.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kirkby, Diane
      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - "An unpopular cause": The Union of Australian Women's support
           for Aboriginal rights
    • Abstract: Milner, Lisa
      The Union of Australian Women (UAW) was a national organisation for left-wing women between World War II and the emergence of the women's liberation movement. Along with other left-wing activists, UAW members supported Aboriginal rights, through their policies, publications and actions. They also attracted a number of Aboriginal members including Pearl Gibbs, Gladys O'Shane, Dulcie Flower and Faith Bandler. Focusing on NSW activity in the assimilation period, this article argues that the strong support of UAW members for Aboriginal rights drew upon the group's establishment far-left politics, its relations with other women's groups and the activism of its Aboriginal members. Non-Aboriginal members of the UAW gave practical and resourceful assistance to their Aboriginal comrades in a number of campaigns through the assimilation era, forming productive and collaborative relationships. Many of their campaigns aligned with approaches of the Communist Party of Australia and left-wing trade unions. In assessing the relationship between the UAW and Aboriginal rights, this article addresses a gap in the scholarship of assimilation era activism.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - Australian transnational union solidarity through
           union-building in Timor-Leste
    • Abstract: Hannington-Pinto, Daniel
      Australian union support for the development of an organised labour movement in independent Timor-Leste has received scant attention. Looking to address this gap in the literature, this article focuses on the contributions of two individual activists between 2002 and 2003: Didge McDonald, from the Liquor, Hospitality and Miscellaneous Union; and the Maritime Union of Australia's Michael Killick. Their role in the development of Timorese unions was a crucial counterweight to the exploitation of domestic workers by foreign businesses - a phenomenon expedited by the macroeconomic implications of the broader United Nations state-building mission. Considered through the prism of nation-building at the civil society level, Australian union assistance to Timor-Leste is presented as a valuable example of how cross-border partnerships following the model of New Labour Internationalism can help workers challenge the growing reach of transnational capital.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - Forging an Australian working-class identity through myth,
           story-telling and maritime mateship: Becoming Harry Bridges
    • Abstract: Janiewski, Dolores E
      Applying a mix of autobiographical theory and research about the importance of the individual, families, and community to class formation, this article locates Harry Bridges, the future American labour leader, in Melbourne from 1901 to 1919. It examines the process by which he forged an Australian working-class identity through experience as a seaman, autobiographical story-telling, and selective narration about the achievements of the Australian labour movement and Labor governments. Creating a sense of assurance about workers' right to power enabled Bridges to assume a leadership position in the USA, avoid deportation, and evolve into a labour statesman.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - Queensland workers in the 1928 waterside strike
    • Abstract: Kelloway, Phoebe
      The 1928 strike of waterside workers against the Beeby Award was a national one, yet most of the histories of it concentrate on Melbourne. Queensland wharfies, like their Melbourne counterparts, had won improved working conditions that shipowners wanted to reverse. Watersiders in Brisbane and other Queensland ports, as well as Melbourne, stayed on strike for longer than anywhere else. This article examines Queensland wharfies' role in the strike, including their efforts to extend it, and how their activities showed the divisions in that state's labour movement. It situates the different positions that Waterside Workers' Federation branches took in 1928 in the context of the industrial politics of notable ports. This article takes account of conflict between the McCormack state Labor government and militant unions, including a development in Bowen which was as much an epilogue to the 1927 railway lockout as it was part of the waterside strike.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - "Communists they may have been": Australian maritime unionists
           and the national shipping line, c. 1950-90
    • Abstract: Ostapenko, Dmytro
      Australian maritime unions of the Cold War period are renowned for their militancy and rhetorical commitment to communist ideas. In contrast, concentrating on the policies and actions of the Seamen's Union of Australia (SUA) and the Waterside Workers' Federation (WWF) towards the Australian National Line (ANL), this article reveals their political and industrial pragmatism in advancing a national shipping agenda. It demonstrates that union support of the Line took two main forms. First, maritime unionists sought to protect the state-owned shipping company from unfair international competition by launching protest actions against substandard foreign carriers. Second, they willingly cooperated with Australian shipping industry stakeholders to boost seagoing labour productivity and thus the global competitiveness of the ANL. The article argues that it was the increasing integration of the Australian maritime enterprise into the highly competitive global shipping market that prompted the SUA and the WWF to take an active role in defending national shipping interests.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - "Never again": Fascism and anti-fascism in Melbourne in the
           1990s
    • Abstract: Fox, Vashti Jane
      An upsurge of fascist and anti-fascist activity in Australia in the early part of the twentieth century has received sustained historical attention. Yet scholarly historical coverage of the latter part of the century has been minimal. This article demonstrates the ongoing existence of both a far-right movement and a concomitant anti-fascist opposition by focusing on Melbourne in the 1990s. It draws from interviews with anti-fascist activists and from campaign paraphernalia and press reports. It introduces the group National Action (NA), identifies its political tactics and shows how it rebranded fascist traditions from Europe and the USA by drawing on iconic figures and symbols of the Australian labour movement, anti-immigrant racist tropes and on white Australian nationalism. Anti-fascist groups were loose collections of left activists and organisations animated by memories of the racist horrors of World War II. This article shows that, over time, loosely affiliated ant-fascist groups were influenced by various overseas currents of thought about political practice. These included notions of a United or Popular Front, direct and indirect action, "no platforming" and "squaddism" respectively. The analysis draws on contemporary trends in international anti-fascism studies.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - "People power": Social planners and conflicting memories of
           the Australian Assistance Plan
    • Abstract: Collins, Carolyn; Oppenheimer, Melanie
      The Australian Assistance Plan (AAP), Gough Whitlam's controversial programme of social welfare reform in the 1970s, was promoted as a national experiment in "people power." But the outpouring of often highly critical evaluations during and immediately after its brief existence failed to take into account the experiences of the programme's grassroots workers. This article focuses on the oral history component of a wider history of the AAP, and on those employed to realise Whitlam's vision - the social planners - comparing their backgrounds, roles, expectations, and frequently conflicting experiences as they shaped, and were shaped by, this "bold but crazy" experiment.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - The far left in Australia since 1945 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Rowse, Tim
      Review(s) of: The far left in Australia since 1945, by Jon Piccini, Evan Smith, and Matthew Worley, eds, (London: Routledge, 2019). pp. 285. 110.00 pounds cloth, 29.99 pounds paper, AU $49.99 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 116 - Frontiers of labor: Comparative histories of the United States
           and Australia [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Scalmer, Sean
      Review(s) of: Frontiers of labor: Comparative histories of the United States and Australia, by Greg Patmore, and Shelton Stromquist, eds, (Urbana, Chicago and Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2018). pp. 394. US $99.00 cloth, US $32.00 paper.

      PubDate: Wed, 5 Aug 2020 20:15:02 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - The novelist as labour force manager: Nevil Shute
    • Abstract: Abbott, Malcolm; Bamforth, Jill
      Nevil Shute was a best-selling novelist, aeronautical engineer and managing director of an important aircraft manufacturer in Britain in the 1930s. This paper looks at his role and the attitudes he had toward labour force management, while working as the managing director of Airspeed Limited. In this role his actions and attitudes to work relations were influenced greatly by the market, labour force composition, and technological aspects of the industry. These in turn influenced the nature of the way he presented work relations in his literature.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - The precarious working life of Muriel Heagney, labour activist
    • Abstract: Dickenson, Jackie; Francis, Rosemary
      Muriel Heagney's activism for equal pay for the sexes has been well documented. Heagney (1885-1974) is an important actor in the key works on the history of the struggle for equal pay and improved opportunities and conditions for women workers in Australia. But what about her own pay and conditions, during her more than 50 years as a labour activist' As an unmarried, working-class woman, how did she support herself and her activism' This article reconstructs Heagney's working life across the first half of the twentieth century, seeking to explain its significant opportunities and major constraints. It finds two influences on Heagney's unstable working life: her reluctance to compromise and resistance to factional allegiance, and the impact of the system she worked to overturn, in which as a woman she was paid less than a man for the same or similar work and struggled to secure long-term employment. Sustained by an authentic commitment to securing equal pay, Heagney weathered long periods of uncertain prospects and financial insecurity, experiences that resonate strongly with those of the so-called gigariat today.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Kirkby, Diane
      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Australian union transformation and the challenge for labour
           historians
    • Abstract: Bowden, Bradley
      The purpose of this article is two-fold. First, it confronts misconceptions that explain union decline in Australia; misconceptions that are entrenched in labour history and industrial relations scholarship. We are told that decline "commenced in the early 1980s," when in fact it began in 1948; that union decline primarily results from attacks by conservative governments "bent on their destruction," when the rate of decline has often been steepest under Labor governments; that unions invariably redress the plight of society's poorest, when union agreements negotiated in retail and hospitality routinely leave workers in a worse position than those employed under relevant awards. The article's second purpose is to trace the sociological consequence of union decline. While unions claim to speak for society's battlers, more than 40 per cent of unionists today are managers and professionals. In terms of wage cohorts, the propensity to join increases with wealth. Although unions retain representation rights for society's battlers, and publicly advocate their cause, the fact remains: society's poorest members are no longer found in much number in union ranks. In part, at least, the unwillingness of labour historians to confront harsh realities stems from an understandable desire to defend labour's cause, rather than serve primarily as dispassionate academic observers.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - How to solve a crisis': The 1977 metal unions seminar on
           the role of the Industries Assistance Commission
    • Abstract: Heino, Brett
      In June 1977, metal unions convened a seminar on the future of Australian manufacturing, bringing together over 1,200 delegates from unions, business and politics. The event is best conceived as an early episode of institutional searching, whereby the state, capital and labour engage in a contradictory and contested process of discovering ways through the crisis of the extant antipodean Fordist model of development. Whereas some prescriptions tended to reinforce the structure and logic of antipodean Fordism, others cut across its grain and evinced radically new modalities of regulating capitalism. Other contributions reflected confusion and an inability to formulate concrete proposals for reform. This article will demonstrate the utility of seeing the 1977 seminar in this way, by focusing on the session dedicated to exploring the role of the Industries Assistance Commission. The analysis will reveal that, whereas the union and employer advocates remained within the ambit of the antipodean Fordist system, the Commission representative delivered proposals fundamentally at odds with its dynamics.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Cultivating the "proletarian outlook": Towards a history of
           the left in central Australia, 1920-75
    • Abstract: Gibson, Jason
      This article presents a history of left-wing ideas and activities in central Australia from the 1920s through to the 1970s. Although the central Australian region, and the Alice Springs district in particular, is now often associated with various Aboriginal rights struggles and other protest movements, little is known about the presence of left-wing influences prior to the 1970s. Working from archival sources, this paper begins to build up a picture of how leftists and, in particularly, those associated with the Communist Party of Australia struggled to make their presence felt in a predominantly conservative socio-economic milieu. The intent of this article is to sketch out the various historical figures, events and ideological contests that came to influence the political identity of Australia's most isolated and scantily populated heartland over a number of decades. These vignettes also reveal how leftist politics did, and did not, have an effect on the Aboriginal rights campaigns that followed in the 1970s and onwards.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Tribune on Trove: A new digital resource
    • Abstract: McKnight, David
      The National Library of Australia (NLA) has recently added 'Tribune', the weekly newspaper of the Communist Party of Australia, to its collection of digitised and word-searchable historic newspapers. 'Tribune' has now been digitised to cover the period from 1954 until 1976. The NLA will soon digitise the remaining editions of 'Tribune' until it ceased publication in April 1991.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - An archivist's experience of processing the Bernie Taft
           collection at the University of Melbourne archives
    • Abstract: Beattie, Jane
      On the 80th anniversary of the start of the Spanish Civil War, I wrote about Lloyd Edmonds for the University of Melbourne Archives (UMA) blog. Lloyd's family donated his letters written home, mostly to his father, from the battlegrounds in Spain. Lloyd was studying in London when Francisco Franco invaded Spain, and believed so strongly in the Republican cause, and that Spain should not fall to fascism, that he joined the International brigade, along with 64 other Australians.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Assessing the accord and labour's role in neoliberalism
    • Abstract: Gregson, Sarah
      In 2018, the publication of Elizabeth Humphrys' book 'How Labour Built Neoliberalism' sparked considerable interest with its thought-provoking arguments about "vanguard neoliberalism," the 1983-96 Prices and Incomes Accord, and the significance of this "social contract" for the fortunes of the Australian union movement and working people. The Sydney launch of Humphrys' book, which I attended, attracted a large and diverse range of people, including young students interested in the period as "historical"; older people who had lived through it as workers, activists and academics; and Australian Labor Party (ALP) supporters interested in understanding this crucial element of their party's political path. Given this range of interest, and because the Accord period is so contentious, a single review of this book seemed insufficient and risked prioritising one perspective over the many others we could have solicited. Alternatively, a "roundtable" approach would air a diversity of views that capture the debate about this important period in Australia's history, particularly within the labour movement.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Research thesis notice board
    • PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Activism, struggle and labour history: The 16th Biennial
           Conference of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History, 3-5
           October 2019, Perth Trades Hall building
    • Abstract: Kelloway, Phoebe
      Some 100 participants, from across Australia and overseas, met in early October 2019 for the 16th Biennial Labour History conference, hosted by the Perth branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History (ASSLH). The Western Australia headquarters of the Construction, Forestry, Maritime, Mining and Energy Union (CFMMEU) was a very fitting venue, steeped in activist history, with new training rooms - paying tribute to May Holman, Vincent Lingiari and John Cummins - adjoining Perth's original Trades Hall building. In opening the conference, convenor Bobbie Oliver acknowledged the contribution of long-serving ASSLH Perth branch president Neil Byrne, who sadly passed away in July 2019. Noongar elder Vaughn McGuire gave us a warm welcome to country.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Progressive new world: How settler colonialism and
           transpacific exchange shaped American reform [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Muncy, Robyn
      Review(s) of: Progressive new world: How settler colonialism and transpacific exchange shaped American reform, by Marilyn Lake, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019). pp. 307. US $35 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - JB Chifley: An ardent internationalist [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Curran, James
      Review(s) of: JB Chifley: An Ardent Internationalist, by Julie Suares, (Carlton: Melbourne University Publishing, 2019). pp. 322. AU $49.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - General labour history of Africa: Workers, employers and
           governments, 20th-21st centuries [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Limb, Peter
      Review(s) of: General labour history of Africa: Workers, employers and governments, 20th-21st centuries, by Stefano Bellucci, and Andreas Eckert, eds, (Suffolk: James Currey, 2019). pp. 761. 30 pounds paper, 95 pounds cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Social-imperialism in Britain: The Lancashire working class
           and two World Wars [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Edmonds, Daniel
      Review(s) of: Social-imperialism in Britain: The Lancashire working class and two World Wars, by Neil Redfern, (Leiden: Brill, 2019). pp. 268. euro125 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Our Mary: The life of Mary Turner, 1938-2017 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Holton, Sandra Stanley
      Review(s) of: Our Mary: The life of Mary Turner, 1938-2017, by John Callow, (London: Lawrence and Wishart, 2019). pp. 232. 20.00 pounds cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Rehearsing revolutions: The labor drama experiment and radical
           activism in the early twentieth century [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Milner, Lisa
      Review(s) of: Rehearsing revolutions: The labor drama experiment and radical activism in the early twentieth century, by Mary McEvoy, (Iowa, IL: University of Iowa Press, 2019). pp. 260. US $90.00 paper or ebook.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Don Dunstan: The visionary politician who changed Australia
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Johnson, Carol
      Review(s) of: Don Dunstan: The visionary politician who changed Australia, by Angela Woollacott, (Sydney: Allen and Unwin, 2019). pp. 332. AU $32.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Winning for women: A personal story [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Smart, Judith
      Review(s) of: Winning for women: A personal story, by Iola Mathews, (Melbourne: Monash University Publishing, 2019). pp. 301. AU $29.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Shirley Smith: An examined life [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Taylor, Kerry
      Review(s) of: Shirley Smith: An examined life, by Sarah Gaitanos, (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 2019). pp. 464. NZ $40.00 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Dead letters: Censorship and subversion in New Zealand,
           1914-1920 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Littlewood, David
      Review(s) of: Dead letters: Censorship and subversion in New Zealand, 1914-1920, by Jared Davidson, (Dunedin: Otago University Press, 2019). pp. 306. NZ $35 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Secret: The making of Australia's security state [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Lee, David
      Review(s) of: Secret: The making of Australia's security state, by Brian Toohey, (Carlton, Vic.: Melbourne University Publishing, 2019). pp. 384. AU $49.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - McCarthyism vs. Clinton Jencks [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dabscheck, Braham
      Review(s) of: McCarthyism vs. Clinton Jencks, by Raymond Caballero, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2019). pp. xii + 306. US $29.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Hitler's collaborators: Choosing between bad and worse in
           Nazi-occupied Western Europe [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Moore, Andrew
      Review(s) of: Hitler's collaborators: Choosing between bad and worse in Nazi-occupied Western Europe, by Philip Morgan, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). pp. 336. AU $40.95 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Dead labor: Toward a political economy of premature death
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Sheil, Christopher
      Review(s) of: Dead labor: Toward a political economy of premature death, by James Tyner, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2019). pp. xvi + 180. AU $39.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - A natural battleground: The fight to establish a rail heritage
           centre at Western Australia's Midland Railway Workshops [Book Review]
    • Abstract: McConville, Chris
      Review(s) of: A natural battleground: The fight to establish a rail heritage centre at Western Australia's Midland Railway Workshops, by Bobbie Oliver, (Melbourne: Interventions, 2019). pp. vi + 132. AU $31.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Labor's mind: A history of working-class intellectual life
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Dabscheck, Braham
      Review(s) of: Labor's mind: A history of working-class intellectual life, by Tobias Higbie, (Urbana, Chicago and Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2019). pp. xii + 213. US $25.00 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Dissidents of the international left [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Cahill, Rowan
      Review(s) of: Dissidents of the international left, by Andy Heintz, ed., (Oxford: New Internationalist Publications, 2019). pp. 352. AU $29.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Inside the greens: The origins and future of the party, the
           people and the politics [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Murphy, James C
      Review(s) of: Inside the greens: The origins and future of the party, the people and the politics, by Paddy Manning, (Carlton, Vic.: Black Inc. Books, 2019). pp. 540. AU $34.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Being left-wing in Australia: Identity, culture and politics
           after socialism
    • Abstract: Bongiorno, Frank
      Being left-wing in Australia: Identity, culture and politics after socialism, by Geoff Robinson, (North Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2019). pp. 389. AU $44 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 118 - Notice board
    • PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Robertson, Emma; Strachan, Glenda
      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - From making do to making home: Gender and housewifery on the
           Victorian goldfields
    • Abstract: Dernelley, Katrina
      Feminist historians have been strong advocates for the recognition of women's domestic lives, yet housework remains an underexplored area of labour history. Scholars of material culture have explored individual aspects of domestic life on the goldfields, particularly needlework; however, the broader focus has remained on women's activities outside the home. Although typically interpreted through narratives of masculine adventure, hardship and goldseeking, the goldfields were also domesticated landscapes. Both men and women consciously made attempts to create home, even when the concept of home was transitory. Commonly, the task of transforming an industrial landscape into a domestic one fell to women, who had been assigned the "natural" responsibility of household labour for centuries. The expectation was that women would attend to the daily labour-intensive work of creating and maintaining home.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - "When women do the work of men": Representations of gendered
           occupational identities on British railways in world war I cartoons
    • Abstract: Robertson, Emma; Monk, Lee-Ann
      During World War I in Britain, women workers took on previously men-only jobs on the railways. In response to this wartime development, the National Union of Railwaymen published a series of cartoons in their journal, Railway Review. These images depicted women employed as porters and guards, occupying the engine footplate, and acting in the role of station-mistress. Through a close reading of the cartoons, and related images in the journal, this article examines how the humorous portrayal of female railway workers reinforced masculine occupational identities at the same time as revealing ambiguities in (and negotiating anxieties over) the gendered nature of railway employment. Despite wartime labour shortages, certain occupations, notably the driving and firing of steam trains, remained stolidly men's work and would do so until the late twentieth century. By scrutinising the construction of gendered occupational culture in union journals, we can better understand the tenacity of notions of "traditional" work for men and women on the railways.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Pioneer girls and flappers: Australia's early female
           ammunition workers
    • Abstract: Wood, Katie
      In 1890, in the midst of an extended public debate on the right of women to work and the conditions of those who did, a small arms ammunition factory was built on the banks of the Maribyrnong River in Victoria. The Colonial Ammunition Company employed women almost exclusively from its establishment until the end of World War I. During this time, the workforce became the largest group of women workers engaged in the metal industries across Australia. This article will draw out their working experience by focusing on several key questions. Why were women employed' How was their experience and how were their methods of organisation shaped by gender' How did World War I impact on this experience' Exploring the answers to these particular questions draws out some of the key ways in which gender shaped the working lives of these women.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Called to serve, shunned as citizens: How the Australian
           women's land army was recruited and abandoned by the labor government
    • Abstract: Gartshore, Heather
      The establishment and contribution of the Australian Women's Land Army (AWLA) during World War II was welcomed by farmers. At that time prime ministers and premiers, along with a range of politicians, labelled their work as a vital war service, applauding their efforts as enabling Australia's victory. However, in 1945, and following the war, key political leaders turned their back on this appreciation, denying the AWLA access to post-war benefits and services. This paper documents the reasons for the work of the AWLA from 1942 to 1945 and traces how the Labor Government in 1945 dismissed their contribution. It argues that to a large extent, this responsibility for denying the women the recognition and benefits that had been promised was a betrayal of the women they had called in to service.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - "Armed with glamour and collection tins": Femininity and
           voluntary work in wartime South Australia, 1939-45
    • Abstract: Harris, Rachel
      Between 1939 and 1945, more than 500 voluntary organisations operated across South Australia, the largest with a membership of more than 30,000 women. Focusing on the voluntary activities of these South Australian women - which ranged from providing material comforts for servicemen to fundraising as participants in beauty and pin-up competitions - this article reveals that female voluntarism was a highly visible and ubiquitous part of the home front experience in Australia during World War II. Oral histories, press reports and archival sources show that female voluntary work was considered crucial to the upkeep of male morale, and thus functioned to ease concerns regarding the war's impact on traditional gender relations. In practice, however, the close relationship between paid and unpaid work meant voluntarism did not necessarily limit the wartime gains of South Australian women. Instead the rhetoric used to describe women's voluntary work obscured the social and economic benefits it often provided.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - "These labourers in the field of public work": Librarians,
           discrimination and the meaning of equal pay
    • Abstract: Kirkby, Diane; Jordan, Caroline
      Librarianship has long been recognised as a numerically female-dominated occupation. Despite demonstrating a standard pattern of a sex-segregated labour force, it has suffered neglect in historical studies of women's work. This article positions Australia's librarians in the history of white-collar public service workers, and librarianship as illustrative of important themes of twentieth-century women's labour history. For smart, educated, ambitious women, librarianship offered professional standing, economic security and opportunity for advancement. Strategies of overt discrimination, however, deliberately kept women librarians out of senior administrative positions and confined them to the lower-paying jobs. Librarians in state and municipal libraries worked under public service regulations that established a dual labour market of wages and conditions for clerical and professional workers. Key decisions between 1918 and 1922 explicitly advantaged men in recruitment, wages and promotion, denying women similar opportunities. Studying the history of women librarians sheds new light on the meaning of professional workers' struggle for equal pay.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Eric Hobsbawm: A life in history [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Suny, Ronald Grigor
      Review(s) of: Eric Hobsbawm: A life in history, by Richard J. Evans, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2019). pp. xiii + 785. AU $70 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Gary Lewis (1943-2019)
    • Abstract: Cronan, Garry; Patmore, Greg
      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Archiving the records of the National Pay Equity Coalition
           (NPEC), 1988-2011
    • Abstract: Blackman, Danny; Burgmann, Meredith; Hall, Philippa; Hayes, Fran; Junor, Anne; Smith, Meg
      We decided to embark on our almost-completed project of archiving the records of the National Pay Equity Coalition (NPEC) for two reasons. First, women activists campaigning for pay equity seemed to be in danger of reinventing the wheel. So much of what we had researched and written about was still vitally relevant but was invisible because it had been produced before the digital era. We needed to get that information out there.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Changing the unions' agenda: Women's activism in Australian
           trade unions in the 1970s and 1980s
    • Abstract: Strachan, Glenda
      This paper takes a preliminary look at women's activities in trade unions in the 1970s and 1980s and the ways in which women's activism changed unions through the instigation of the Working Women's Charter, women's committees and training for women. Women's activism in trade unions created distinct spaces for women to support each other, to develop policies and to work together for their acceptance and adoption within unions. This resulted in major changes to policies that addressed women's specific needs within trade unions and in the wider society. The activism of the 1970s and 1980s formed the foundation for ongoing changes in policies and representation in trade unions. This article focuses on the experiences of women as they worked within unions to make changes and charts some of the major changes at the national level of the Australian Council of Trade Unions. It draws on a limited range of sources and the author's own experiences of the time.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Class, gender and cold war politics: The union of Australian
           women and the campaign for equal pay, 1950-66
    • Abstract: Keirs, Katherine
      The confluence of social and political forces during the Menzies era stalled the progress of wage justice for women workers until the end of the 1960s. Nevertheless, women's organisations and the progressive trade union movement advocated equal pay for the sexes throughout this period. This article examines the contribution of the Union of Australian Women (UAW), which represented the interests of workingclass women, to the campaign for equal pay from 1950 to 1966. It discusses the ways in which the mixture of women's culturally accepted domestic roles and widespread anti-communism muted enthusiasm for the UAW's message. The article argues, however, that the UAW made an effective contribution to keeping equal pay in the public consciousness, redressing the inattention to working-class women's role in their economic emancipation.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Academic ambassadors, pacific allies: Australia, America and
           the fulbright program [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Brown, Nicholas
      Review(s) of: Academic ambassadors, pacific allies: Australia, America and the fulbright program, by Alice Garner and Diane Kirkby, (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2019). pp. x + 233. 80.00 pounds cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Contesting Australian history: Essays in honour of Marilyn
           Lake [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Simic, Zora
      Review(s) of: Contesting Australian history: Essays in honour of Marilyn Lake, by Joy Damousi and Judith Smart, eds, (Melbourne: Monash University Press, 2019). pp. 264. AU $34.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - The seventies: The personal, the political and the making of
           modern Australia [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fox, Karen
      Review(s) of: The seventies: The personal, the political and the making of modern Australia, by Michelle Arrow, (Sydney: NewSouth Publishing, 2019). pp. 296. AU $34.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - What is work': Gender at the crossroads of home, family,
           and business from the early modern era to the present [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Baird, Marian
      Review(s) of: What is work': Gender at the crossroads of home, family, and business from the early modern era to the present, by Rafaella Sarti, Anna Bellavitis and Manuela Martini, eds, (New York, Oxford: Berghahn, 2018). pp. 398. US $130 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - John Curtin's war, colume 2, triumph and decline [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Horner, David
      Review(s) of: John Curtin's war, colume 2, triumph and decline, by John Edwards, (Melbourne: Viking, 2018). pp. 497. AU $49.99 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Empowerment and control in the Australian welfare state: A
           critical analysis of Australian social policy since 1972 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Murphy, John
      Review(s) of: Empowerment and control in the Australian welfare state: A critical analysis of Australian social policy since 1972, by Philip Mendes, (London: Routledge, 2019). pp. 244. AU $231 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - A new history of the Irish in Australia [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Evans, Tanya
      Review(s) of: A new history of the Irish in Australia, by Elizabeth Malcom and Dianne Hall, (Sydney: New South Publishing, 2018). pp. viii + 436. AU $34.99 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - A white hot flame: Mary Montgomerie Bennett: Author, educator,
           activist for indigenous justice [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bishop, Catherine
      Review(s) of: A white hot flame: Mary Montgomerie Bennett: Author, educator, activist for indigenous justice, by Sue Taffe, (Melbourne: Monash University Press, 2018). pp. 430. AU $34.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Australian society for the study of labour history
    • PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Trico: A victory to remember: The 1976 equal pay strike at
           Trico Folberth, Brentford [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ravenswood, Katherine
      Review(s) of: Trico: A victory to remember: The 1976 equal pay strike at Trico Folberth, Brentford, by Sally Groves and Vernon Merritt, (London: Lawrence and Wishart, 2018). pp. 268. 25 pounds cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - High voltage women: Breaking barriers at Seattle city light
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fieldes, Diane
      Review(s) of: High voltage women: Breaking barriers at Seattle city light, by Ellie Belew, (Seattle, WA: Red Letter Press, 2019). pp. 223. AU $25 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Organising union: Transport workers face the challenge of
           change, 1989-2013 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Forsyth, Anthony
      Review(s) of: Organising union: Transport workers face the challenge of change, 1989-2013, by Mark Hearn, (Melbourne: Melbourne University Publishing, 2017). pp. 245. AU $34.95 paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - American labour's cold war abroad: From deep freeze to
           detente, 1945-1970 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Palmer, David
      Review(s) of: American labour's cold war abroad: From deep freeze to detente, 1945-1970, by Anthony Carew, (Edmonton: Athabasca University Press, 2018). pp. xvii + 510. US $56.28 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - The postwar moment: Progressive forces in Britain, France, and
           the United States after world war II [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Huf, Ben
      Review(s) of: The postwar moment: Progressive forces in Britain, France, and the United States after world war II, by Isser Woloch, (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2019) pp. 560. US $40 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - A specter haunting Europe: The myth of Judeo- Bolshevism [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Mendes, Philip
      Review(s) of: A specter haunting Europe: The myth of Judeo- Bolshevism, by Paul Hanebrink, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018). pp. 353. US $29.95 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
  • Issue 117 - Un Ruso Blanco en la Division Azul: Memorias de Vladimir
           Kovalevski [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Keene, Judith
      Review(s) of: Un Ruso Blanco en la Division Azul: Memorias de Vladimir Kovalevski, by Xose M Nunez Seixas and Oleg Beyda, eds, (Barcelona: Galaxia Gutenberg SI, 2019). pp. 276. euro21.90 cloth.

      PubDate: Mon, 3 Aug 2020 01:12:24 GMT
       
 
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