Subjects -> ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (Total: 31 journals)
    - ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING (10 journals)
    - BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

BIBLIOGRAPHIES (21 journals)

Showing 1 - 14 of 14 Journals sorted by number of followers
The Library : The Transactions of the Bibliographical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 151)
American Archivist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 150)
Australian Academic & Research Libraries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 98)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Periodicals : A Journal of History, Criticism, and Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Studies in Bibliography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Bibliography of Military History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Genre & histoire     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studies in the Age of Chaucer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Script & Print     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
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American Periodicals : A Journal of History, Criticism, and Bibliography
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.145
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1054-7479 - ISSN (Online) 1548-4238
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Editors' Note

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      Abstract: The Spring 2022 issue of American Periodical refreshes our delight in the interdisciplinary range and historical sweep of periodical study. In contemporary literary and cultural studies—in the US and beyond—scholarly attention to periodicals has moved from an extractive understanding of them as "containers of discrete bits of information" toward a celebration of them as "autonomous objects of study" in ways so ubiquitous as to seem almost unremarkable.1 The diversity of essays in American Periodicals 32.1 invites us anew to appreciate the study of periodicals and the human labors behind them.Essays from Carl Ostrowski and Zaina Ujayli introduce new avenues for exchanges of literary and journalistic expectations. In ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Newspapers and Literary Authority in the 1830s: Laughton Osborn's The
           Vision of Rubeta

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      Abstract: In 1838 an anonymous author attempted to ignite a sensation in the pages of American periodicals with the publication of a remarkable mock epic poem. Modeled on Alexander Pope's Dunciad Variorum, The Vision of Rubeta: An Epic Story of the Island of Manhattan proffered a satire of the American literary scene that was by turns playful, indignant, and profane. Although the poem satirized numerous literary targets, including supposedly overrated authors such as Washington Irving and William Wordsworth, the author trained his sights primarily on the nation's periodicals. Within the poem, fictional identities were assigned to the editors of magazines and newspapers, whose literary pretensions were then skewered with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Perspective of Two Cities: Comparing Afifa Karam and Sumayeh Attiyeh

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      Abstract: "Would you allow me, daughter of my less developed country, to tell you something about the immigrant daughter of your country'" Afifa Karam (born 1883) asks this question in a column written for the Egyptian journal al-Mara'a al-Mis- riyya, titled "Hadith al Mahjar," from her home in Shreveport, Louisiana.1 Karam was one of the first Syrian women to publish in the Arab American printing sphere and later the first to publish an Arabic women's magazine outside the Arab world. While she was a prominent voice in the American diaspora, Karam also regularly wrote for Egyptian periodicals, addressing women in the Arab world from her immigrant position. "Socially, you see us immigrants facing two contradictory cities, one ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Enslaved Pressmen in the Southern Press

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      Abstract: From the turn into the nineteenth century up to the doorstep of the Civil War, enslaved Black pressmen1 worked the presses of a host of Southern printing offices. Articles from many of the newspapers they printed tell us so, primarily in three types of advertisements: wanted ads, "for sale" ads, and runaway notices. That is, individuals and printing houses sought to buy pressmen, advertised pressmen for sale, and offered rewards when these pressmen fled in acts of self-emancipation. The publicly available database of this paper comprises over thirty articles and advertisements of this description, identifying enslaved pressmen in seventeen towns and cities in seven states between 1796 and 1860.2This work builds on ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Print paper ought to be as free as the air and water": American
           

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      Abstract: On June 18, 1909, two months after the passage of the Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act, the Washington Post reported that the debate on specific tariff rates was underway in the United States Senate. The act had, among other things, established a mechanism for applying duties to Canadian newsprint and wood pulp—a finished product and a commodity in constant demand in the United States, required to print the 2,600 daily and weekly newspapers consumed across the country's forty-six states and four territories.1 In its coverage of the debate, the Washington Post reported that Senator Norris Brown (1863–1960), Republican of Nebraska, claimed that an American paper trust was engaged in price collusion and had created a cartel ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Sketch, the Tale, and the Beginnings of American Literature by Lydia
           G. Fash, and: The Intimacy of Paper in Early and Nineteenth-Century
           American Literature by Jonathan Senchyne (review)

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      Abstract: At first glance, Lydia Fash's and Jonathan Senchyne's books must appear to have little to do with one another. Fash's volume digs deeply into textuality, exploring the meaning of literary beginnings, specifically in the forms of the tale and the sketch, and the relevance of these two forms for a larger beginning: the peculiar formation of American literature. She complements close reading with attention to production contexts, but her focus clearly lies on textuality. Senchyne, by contrast, explicitly seeks to complement textuality with materiality, with thingness, with attention to the material text is printed on, linen rag paper. Fash's exploration of literary nationalism restricts her to a timeframe structured ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Twice-Divided Nation: National Memory, Transatlantic News, and American
           Literature in the Civil War Era by Samuel Graber (review)

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      Abstract: Samuel Graber's ambitious book explores the relationship between nationalism, memory, and transatlantic news reporting in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Focusing in particular on Horace Greeley's New York Tribune as well as the literary writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman, Graber traces what he reads as a growing struggle between a largely US-based "presentist" mode of memory and its British "traditionalist" counterpart. This "memory war" was largely fought in the pages of newspapers, publications that not only covered but indeed helped accelerate the struggle through innovations in the production and circulation of the news. Perhaps the most impressive element of Graber's excellent book is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Pleasure in the News: African American Readership and Sexuality in the
           Black Press by Kim Gallon (review)

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      Abstract: Over the course of several months in 1921 and 1922, the Half-Century Magazine, a Black middlebrow magazine based in Chicago, held a contest that sought to answer the question, "Who Is the Prettiest Colored Girl in the United States'" This contest was judged by Chicago luminaries, including Ida B. Wells-Barnett, the famed anti-lynching activist. The unlikeliness of Wells-Barnett's involvement with a beauty contest underscores the dichotomy between beauty and lynching, while the fact of her involvement unfurls the truth of lynch law's imbrication in all facets of Black life and the panoply of tools—including a beauty contest—needed to destroy it.In Pleasure in the News: African American Readership and Sexuality, Kim ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fighting Fascist Spain: Worker Protest from the Printing Press by Montse
           Feu (review)

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      Abstract: Montse Feu's Fighting Fascist Spain: Worker Protest from the Printing Press offers an illuminating consideration of the Brooklyn-based Spanish-language periodical España Libre (Free Spain), published from 1939–1977 as the voice of the Sociedades Hispanas Confederadas (SHC, Confederation of Hispanic Societies). SHC was a coalition of about 200 Spanish cultural and mutual aid societies formed in the United States in 1936 as the Nationalist coalition in Spain, of which Francisco Franco would emerge as the leader, attempted the coup that started the Spanish Civil War. España Libre, Feu argues, proves essential to recovering the understudied story of the international network of Spanish exiles—many of whom were workers ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Black Land: Imperial Ethiopianism and African America by Nadia Nurhessein
           (review)

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      Abstract: First things first. This is solid, professional, archive-based scholarship that weaves together close textual analysis and finely attenuated social history in order to take a deep dive into a plainly overlooked aspect of African American cultural production: the relationship between African American writers and the empire of Ethiopia from the 1860s through the 1930s, with a focus on the period of the New Negro. Its title is a bit misleading—the Ethiopia in question isn't so much that of the messianic, millennialist, and pseudomythic Biblical Ethiopianism familiar to students and believers of Black Christian eschatology, but rather the literal East African country of Ethiopia—but that's this book's hook. While ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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